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Masters Degrees (Bovine)

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This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. Read more
This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. The qualification is recognised by both the RCVS and European College of Animal Reproduction (ECAR). It provides postgraduate education in an important aspect of the bovine health. The overall aims of the programme are to enable veterinary surgeons in regular contact with cattle to:

achieve a widely-based and deep understanding of bovine reproduction, which will enable them to provide sound scientific advice to the cattle industry;
develop appropriate skills; and
maintain a critical approach to their own work.

The programme is modular in structure, with eight residential weeks spaced over two years. Learning methods include lectures, demonstrations, videos, practical work, discussions, field visits and directed reading. Participants will be expected to satisfy essay and work based continual assessments for each module during the course; to pass written, practical and oral examinations of the final module at the end of the programme; and to present a dissertation, not exceeding 10,000 words, before the award of the Diploma.

Guidance is given by staff of the University of Liverpool and by invited contributors, each a recognised authority in a specialised field. Teaching takes place mainly at Leahurst, the University of Liverpool’s rural campus.

Although mainly restricted to the study of reproduction in cattle, the programme includes reference to other species to establish biological principles or to illustrate concepts for which information is not available in cattle and also covers key areas impinging on fertility such as nutrition and infectious disease.

Module Code Module Title Credits

Module DBRM611 Normal Non-Pregnant Female 15

Module DBRM612 Nutrition and Fertility 15

Module DBRM613 Fertility in Post-Partum Period 15

Module DBRM614 The Male 15

Module DBRM615 Genetics 15

Module DBRM616 Early Pregnancy 15

Module DBRM617 Late Pregnancy and Parturition 5

Module DBRM618 Synopsis and the Future 15

Module DBRM621 Dissertation 60

Key Facts

RAE 2008
In the latest Research Assessment Exercise, 45% of the School’s research activity was deemed world-leading or internationally excellent and a further 45% internationally recognised.

Facilities
The School has two bases: the University’s main campus in Liverpool and the Leahurst campus in Wirral. Leahurst has highly equipped research laboratories, which are shared with the research institutes of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, as well as being home to the Philip Leverhulme Equine Hospital, the Farm Animal Practice and the Small Animal Teaching Hospital.

Our clinics provide numerous cases for clinical investigation, as do our co-operating veterinary surgeons in private practice. The School also has excellent relationships with farming enterprises and Chester Zoo.

Individual topics within the DBR are also offered as CPD for those who do not wish to attend the whole programme.
Why School of Veterinary Science?

Excellent reputation

The DBR has been successfully completed by over 100 vets whilst working in full time clinical practice. It has an academic and support structure proven to achieve a high completion rate whilst maintaining academic rigour validated by RCVS and ECAR external observers.

Many leading cattle clinicians have obtained the qualification and feedback from past students is excellent.

Consistently strong League Table and National Student Survey performance

Veterinary Science at Liverpool is consistently highly rated in The Times Good University Guide (rated 2nd in the UK in 2011), the Complete University Guide (rated 1st in the UK 2011), and in the National Student Survey (rated first or second for several years).

Collaboration across academic disciplines

Our staff work closely with colleagues from medicine, life sciences, and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, not only on animal disease and welfare, but on human health too – taking a ‘one health’ approach from long before the phrase was invented. We also collaborate with colleagues from social sciences to exploit fully the comparative nature of veterinary science. This greatly extends the postgraduate study and research opportunities at Liverpool.

Wide coverage across the postgraduate programmes

The School of Veterinary Science at the University of Liverpool provides excellent postgraduate scientific and clinical training, from population to whole animal studies to the molecular level.

Recognised by the European College of Animal Reproduction

Successful reproduction is the cornerstone of the dairy industry. The DBR has been rin for nearly 30 years and has been completed by some of the leading farm animal vets practicing in the U.K. They have also contributed back into the course to maintain its relevance to modern Cattle Practice.

The DBR is recognised as a Diploma level qualification by RCVS and a recognised training course by the European College of Animal Reproduction.

Career prospects

Course participants are in employment as veterinary surgeons and most become employed in specialist private practice. Some have moved to academia internationally.

Many practices are using the fact they have DBR holders and support such study when advertising for new staff and to gain farmer clients. Candidates use the qualification as a springboard to specialisation.

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This programme is the only one of its kind in the UK. It is designed for high-calibre, veterinary graduates from clinical backgrounds who want to explore and benefit from veterinary research, perhaps with a view to pursuing a PhD or a career in research. Read more

Research profile

This programme is the only one of its kind in the UK. It is designed for high-calibre, veterinary graduates from clinical backgrounds who want to explore and benefit from veterinary research, perhaps with a view to pursuing a PhD or a career in research.

The programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a research project in a laboratory or department relevant to your speciality. The choice of research projects carried out is wide, and ranges from bench research to clinical research.

Admission to this programme is subject to identifying a suitable research project and appropriate supervisor before starting the degree. Examples of projects completed in session 2015-2016 were:

1. Interactions of natural killer cells and dendritic cells in bovine tuberculosis immunity.
2. Defining correlates of protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis.

Subjects include:

epidemiology
gene delivery
genetics
immunology
microbiology
neuroscience
parasitology
pathology
welfare and zoo animals.

The programme begins with a month of teaching to give you an overview of the whole range of techniques used in medical research. The first two weeks comprise lectures on subjects from stem cell biology to ethics and clinical trials and statistics training. This will follow with two weeks of practical workshops in cell biology and molecular medicine and learning practical techniques, including basic tissue culture, how to do PCRs and run Western Blots. After the first month of teaching you will move to a laboratory most relevant to your own speciality.

Career opportunities

Most MVetSci graduates go on to study for a PhD. Those who choose to return to clinical practice go back with a broader experience of research than is afforded by the undergraduate clinical veterinary curriculum.

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at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. A fully funded studentship is available for 1-year research training in Veterinary Genetics and Disease Control aimed at studying the susceptibility of British deer to chronic wasting disease, a member of the prion disease family. Read more

Masters by Research in Veterinary Genetics and Disease Control

at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies

A fully funded studentship is available for 1-year research training in Veterinary Genetics and Disease Control aimed at studying the susceptibility of British deer to chronic wasting disease, a member of the prion disease family. The successful candidate will register for a masters by research degree. This research training position is funded by The British Deer Society.

The Roslin Institute at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, is a centre of expertise for prion diseases creating an ideal environment for postgraduate training.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease of cervid species, similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or "mad cow disease") in cattle. Until recently, CWD was found only in captive and free-ranging cervids in North America, but since the beginning of 2016, cases of CWD have been identified in reindeer and moose in Norway. This raises concerns that the disease has established in Europe and may become widespread, as it has in the US and Canada, with serious implications for wildlife and the environment, agriculture/trade and public health. The main purpose of the proposed project is to estimate the susceptibility of the British deer population to CWD, which will inform mathematical modelling approaches aiming to predict the spread of disease in the UK (collaboration with Professor Rowland Kao, University of Glasgow). The methodologies will include genetic analysis by DNA sequencing, protein biochemistry, tissue culture and the candidate is encouraged to participate in the modelling. The expected outputs will be a survey of PRNP gene (the gene which predominantly influences genetic susceptibility to prion diseases) variants in some of the major UK deer species, and a prediction of the association of the most frequent variants with susceptibility to CWD. Results will be analysed in the context of deer population size / density, distribution, movements and behaviour to model the spread and potential impact of CWD in the British deer population.

The ideal candidate will have an enthusiasm for genetics and animal health, strong work ethic, and the ability to work as part of a team. Funding is for UK and EU applicants only.

Enquiries

Informal enquiries are encouraged and should be directed to Fiona Houston () or Wilfred Goldmann ().

How to apply

Applications including a full CV with names and addresses (including email addresses) of two academic referees, should be emailed to Postgraduate Research Student Administration at . When applying for the studentship please state that your application is for the 1 year MScR in Deer CWD Genetics with Dr Houston.

The scholarship is available from May 2017. Closing date for applications: 25th April 2017.

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