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Masters Degrees (Book History)

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Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. Read more

Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. This programme brings together theory and practice in new and innovative ways. We study the production, circulation and reception of books from manuscript to e-books, paying attention to the histories of reading and authorship.

The programme integrates traditional bibliography, advanced theoretical approaches, training in special collections, and hands-on experience. You will be taught by leading experts at the University’s renowned Centre for the History of the Book. Field trips and work placements will allow you to take advantage of the exceptional collections in Edinburgh.

The programme attracts outstanding students from a variety of academic and professional backgrounds. The degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Programme structure

You will complete two core and two option courses, along with training in research methods. You will then complete a supervised, independently-researched dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Compulsory courses:

  • Cultures of the Book
  • Working with Collections

Option courses may include:

  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
  • Shakespeare's Sister: Archival Research and the Politics of the Canon
  • Sex and God in Victorian Poetry
  • Exploring the Novel
  • Censorship

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

  • the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
  • the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
  • advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with the detailed knowledge and research skills you need to progress to a research degree and continue a career in academia; or you may pursue a career in publishing, libraries, and the cultural heritage sector. You will graduate with a number of highly transferable skills in communication, project management and analysis that will give you an advantage, whatever your chosen career.



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The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. Read more
The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. The University’s location in the centre of London, with its unrivalled resources for all aspects of book history within easy reach, together with the expertise that exists in its many colleges and institutes, makes it an ideal place in which to carry out research of an interdisciplinary nature. The history of the book has developed rapidly over the last 40 years as its power to clarify problems in many other disciplines has become evident. Scholars have come to see the study of the book as an aid to understanding literary and other texts and, more recently, as a way of understanding broader social, cultural, and intellectual processes in history.

The programme aims to:

Give students a broad understanding of book history from c. 3000 BCE to 2000 CE

Introduce students to the range of disciplines that make up the subject, including historical bibliography, palaeography, codicology, history of printing, bibliometrics, history of publishing, history of reading, and library history

Provide frequent opportunities to handle archaeological and historical objects relating to the subject

Give students the ability and confidence to deal with primary sources for book history (both manuscript and printed)

In addition, the MRes will:

Provide selected students with a foundation of three appropriately specialised taught courses (60 points in all), which will equip them to undertake a more extensive programme of master’s level research than that offered by the MA

Provide the opportunity for able students to write an extended dissertation (30,000 words) on a subject that requires treatment at a much greater length and depth than the usual MA topic

Offer students a degree programme that satisfies the needs of those who wish to undertake more extensive research or go on to do an MPhil or PhD

Structure

The MA consists of a series of six taught courses (including two core courses) plus a dissertation of 15,000 words.

The MRes consists of a series of three taught courses and a 30,000 word dissertation.

Students may also choose courses from the London Rare Books School programme under the guidance of the Course Director and Course Tutor.

London Book Trade Internship

Students have the option to substitute one of the modules with an internship at a London bookselling firm. The internships offer a key opportunity for students to experience life in a bookselling firm, to undertake projects for the company (everything from stocktaking to cataloguing to running a book stall at a fair), and to make connections in the book trade. In the past, students have been placed in Maggs Bros., Jarndyce Booksellers, Robert Frew Ltd., and Ash Rare Books.

Teaching and Supervision

Teachers are recognised experts drawn from the Institute, the British Library, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Lambeth Palace Library, and other institutions, at which some of the teaching takes place.

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The MLitt in Book History is a taught postgraduate programme run by the School of History. Highlights. Students will acquire the technical skills required for rare book curatorship (teaching involves the. Read more

The MLitt in Book History is a taught postgraduate programme run by the School of History.

Highlights

  • Students will acquire the technical skills required for rare book curatorship (teaching involves the Special Collections department).
  • The programme provides a deep understanding of key issues and methods in book history and familiarises students with the invention, development, spread and transformation of printing.
  • Students can undertake skills training in palaeography and either Latin or a modern foreign language.

Teaching format

The MLitt course comprises two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation (15,000 words) completed during the summer on a subject of the student’s own design.

The optional components of the course are carefully designed to meet each student’s intentions: structured preparations for undertaking a PhD, professional development, or personal scholarly interests.

Teaching methods include fortnightly seminars and practical classes. Class sizes range from individual supervision up to 12 students. The modules are assessed by coursework only; there is no final exam.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

Each module typically comprises:

  • fortnightly seminars or weekly two-hour seminars
  • 100% coursework assessment

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017-2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. Read more
Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such as oral history or historical databases.

Why study History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), in wide areas of the history of Britain, Scotland, Europe, Russia and North America. Themes range across political, cultural, military, religious, economic and social history, taught within a department of research specialists. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as palaeography, historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Students can choose either a generic MLitt in History, or named pathways in:
Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

The MLitt in History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. Due to this a variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

All our History MLitt degrees have a common core module (40 credits):

History Skills and Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
If you are enrolled on the general History degree, you then choose two further modules, either specialist modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History of the Book (semester 2)
or one or two of our flexible modules, where you choose the topic:

Taught History MLitt module, (semester 1)
Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)
All students then complete a History dissertation (summer).

If you are enrolled on a specialist degree, then you replace the semester 1 flexible module with the relevant specialist module. Visit the course webpage for full details:

Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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The MA in English Literature. Early Modern Studies, 1300-1700 pathway offers you the opportunity to explore the culture of the English Middle Ages and Renaissance within its European framework. Read more

The MA in English Literature: Early Modern Studies, 1300-1700 pathway offers you the opportunity to explore the culture of the English Middle Ages and Renaissance within its European framework.

Register your interest

Apply now

The Early Modern Studies pathway invites you to study the vibrant culture of Europe between 1300 and 1700. Our approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on aspects of history, religion, and visual culture from the period as well as on its literature. In order to develop your understanding of pre-modern documentary and material culture, our teaching involves close study of original manuscripts and early printed texts and of early objects.

Working alongside distinguished scholars in English Literature you will be asked to think about what we mean by the terms ‘Medieval’ and ‘Early Modern’, and to formulate conclusions using a profoundly interdisciplinary approach: you will examine the literature, history, religion, visual culture, social relations, and politics of the period. Imaginative and ambitious themed modules enable you to study some of the most influential writers working between the 14th and 17th centuries within their cultural and historical context: Chaucer, Erasmus, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Donne, and Milton amongst others. You’ll construct a historical understanding of the key movements, debates, and ideas that shaped the period in preparation for researching and writing your dissertation.

Queen Mary’s strong early-modern cluster is widely recognised for its vibrant teaching and research strengths. The early-modern MA programme offers core study in medieval and early-modern historiography, and archival, bibliographical, and research skills. The optional modules draw on the interests of our leading researchers and vary from year to year. We have particular concentrations in globalisation, trade, the exotic, and cartography (Jerry Brotton, Alfred Hiatt); book history, the material text, and editing (David Colclough, Joad Raymond, Claire Preston, Julia Boffey, Tamara Atkin, Jaclyn Rasjic); epistolarity, early newspapers, news networks, the circulation of books and manuscripts (Ruth Ahnert, Joad Raymond, Warren Boutcher); and women’s writing (Andrea Brady).

Other research specialisms include prison writing, network theory, the history of reading, late-medieval London literary production, forgery, early-modern political thought, literary-scientific relations, medieval chronicles, prison writing, pre-Shakespearean drama, John Donne, John Milton, Thomas Browne.

You will be trained to a very high level in research skills and you’ll get hands-on experience of working with a variety of early modern items, with access to otherwise uncatalogued and unexplored materials. You’ll work with rare books and manuscripts during this training. Throughout, you’ll be considering the impact of developments in manuscript culture and the new technologies in printing and publishing in the period.

The optional modules draw on the interests of our leading researchers and vary from year to year. We have particular concentrations in globalisation, trade, the exotic, and cartography (Jerry Brotton, Alfred Hiatt); book history, the material text, and editing (David Colclough, Joad Raymond, Claire Preston, Julia Boffey, Tamara Atkin, Jaclyn Rasjic); epistolarity, early newspapers, news networks, the circulation of books and manuscripts (Ruth Ahnert, Joad Raymond, Warren Boutcher); and women’s writing (Andrea Brady).

 

Compulsory modules

  • Writing in the Pre-Modern World
  • The Material Text, 1300-1700
  • Dissertation

Option modules:

You choose two modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London.



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The MLitt in Early Modern History is a one-year taught postgraduate programme run by the School of History. Highlights. Read more

The MLitt in Early Modern History is a one-year taught postgraduate programme run by the School of History.

Highlights

  • Students receive a high level of specialised supervision and advanced training in the history of the early modern European and Atlantic worlds with a high level of specialised supervision in most fields.
  • Modules offer a wide-ranging survey of the major historical and historiographical controversies that define the early modern period, as well as more specialised study.
  • The course provides research training for students wishing to pursue further study. It also provides a solid foundation and advanced transferable skills for those pursuing other careers in heritage, tourism or education.

Teaching format

The MLitt course lasts for one calendar year; taught modules run from September to April, followed by dissertation research and writing over the late spring and summer.

Teaching methods typically include fortnightly seminars, practical classes and tutorials. Class sizes range from individual supervision up to 12 students. The modules are assessed by coursework only; there is no final exam.

The early modern cohort is typically close-knit and friendly, but comprises a diverse, international group with a range of intellectual interests. Students work closely with each other, with early modern research staff, and also with students in parallel MLitt degrees such as Reformation Studies, Intellectual History, and Book History.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice. Read more
The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of research-active historians – internationally renowned scholars who publish in their areas of expertise.

- The History field at Oxford Brookes is recognised as a centre of academic excellence in both teaching and research.

- We include all aspects of our research interests in the History MA course, teaching modules and supervising dissertations that reflect our specialist subjects.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to go on to PhD research and will also be of interest to graduates wishing to pursue advanced study in History.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Ms Poppy Hoole ().

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, discussion groups, workshops and individual tutorials as well as historiographical and bibliographical presentations.

Classes are held in the evenings (except where indicated), and the sessions run from 6.30pm to 9.00pm.

Part-time students attend the University one evening per week and should be able to devote an additional 12-15 hours per week to private study.

Full-time students attend classes on two evenings per week and spend 30 hours per week in private study. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Shorter courses in History are also available: the postgraduate diploma and the postgraduate certificate. It is possible to transfer between these and the MA course.

Specialist facilities

Students have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

The city is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to an even wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in History have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government; the civil service and at GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from the 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research.

Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study. You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods.

Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of medicine
- History of fascism
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards.

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities including organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The programme is designed for students with a keen interest in studying the remote as well as the more recent past of the countries, peoples, and cultures of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Read more
The programme is designed for students with a keen interest in studying the remote as well as the more recent past of the countries, peoples, and cultures of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. It is also ideal for students who seek to understand the historical conditions of the contemporary world from a global perspective.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS have the opportunity to participate in the Regional History Seminars, as well as in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences, which regularly take place in different departments and centres across the School and at other colleges of the University of London.

Key benefits

• You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

• The proximity to the School of many archive depositories and records offices, including its own archival collection as well as the British Library, greatly enhances the potential for dissertation work.

Course detail

While the course is open to students with backgrounds in a diverse range of disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History or a relevant area studies programme, some knowledge of foreign, in particular Asian or African languages, and preferably relevant background in the region of specialism.

You will develop a sound training in the historical sciences, gain specialised historical knowledge and regional expertise, and will acquire valuable critical thinking, research, and writing skills that will enable you to make a difference in your choice of career.

Those who wish to further develop their linguistic skills may choose from a range of African and Asian language courses.

Experts at where the world is changing

Studying history at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective of the historical conditions of the contemporary world. You will benefit from working closely with world-renowned historians whose research is building a new way of looking at the world as a whole.

The broader MA History is ideal if you want to study a variety of regions. Alternatively, there is an opportunity to specialise in a single region by selecting one of these pathways:

• MA History: Africa
• MA History: Near and Middle East
• MA History: South Asia
• MA History: South East Asia
• MA History: East Asia

Expert at where the world is changing

Our historians are world-leading specialists with unparalleled expertise on the dynamic histories of Africa, Asia and the Middle East – from the era of the Crusades to the more recent past, nineteenth- and twentieth-century China and Japan, the formation of state and society in Africa, to Islam from West Africa to Southeast Asia.

History at SOAS

We lead the world in research and teaching about the histories of Asia and Africa, being the only history department that examines history from the perspective of these continents, rather than through a western-centric framework.

Format and assessment

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of taught courses and a 10,000 word dissertation worth one unit.

One of the taught courses will be recognised as the student’s Major course and normally the dissertation will be on a topic linked to that course.

Apart from the History courses, approved courses from other departments, language courses, and in some cases intercollegiate courses are available as additional options

Teaching is generally by informal lectures and seminar discussions. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

Careers

A postgraduate degree from the History department at SOAS provides its students with an understanding of the world, giving them specialised historical knowledge and understanding of cultural sensibilities of a region. Postgraduate students are equipped with the expertise to continue in research as well as the skills needed to enable them to find professional careers in the private and public sectors.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including familiarity with methods of research; the competence to manage large quantities of information; the ability to select and organise information and analytical skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Local History offers students interested in the history, cultural and development of their local area the opportunity for advanced study and research within a collaborative and academic environment. Read more
The MA in Local History offers students interested in the history, cultural and development of their local area the opportunity for advanced study and research within a collaborative and academic environment.

Course Overview

In recent years, local history groups have flourished in our communities. This course offers the guidance and support of professional historians for such interests. Although it focuses upon the specific local history of South West Wales, it will also draw upon a general awareness of historical trends and a detailed working knowledge of Welsh history.

The practical research element will familiarise students with research strategies and resources and will encourage them to undertake their own individual original research based upon their personal interests. Successful presentations could be considered for publication in relevant local history journals or as monographs.

The course offers focused support in practical research skills and techniques and detailed analysis of primary material, much of it untapped, which exists in both Welsh and English. Students will be able to make use of the excellent facilities available in local county libraries and record offices.

The course will explore a range of questions that include : How do we define 'local history'? How does local history relate to the wider Welsh and British contexts? What factors forged the lives of the ordinary people of South West Wales in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? What sources are available for in depth local history research? And what skills will be fostered by an MA in Local History?

Modules

-Agricultural Experiences
-Educational Experiences
-Industrial Experiences
-Popular Culture 1860 - 1960
-Social Experiences.
-Research Methods

Key Features

-Established in 1995 - this course is unique in Wales
-Experienced and dedicated staff
-An opportunity to pursue an individual, personal and original research project in local and regional history
-Attractive to anyone interested in the history of South West Wales, in the methodology of practical historical research and of course in historical debate and inquiry
-Ample library and archival resources in the locality
-An opportunity to submit work in Welsh and, if there is sufficient demand, to take certain modules through the medium of Welsh
-High success rate

Assessment

Assessment is usually based on written work in the form of long and short essays, reports, book reviews and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

This course is aimed at those with an interest in local and regional history and how it relates to the national and international perspective. It is ideal for the continuing professional develop of those working in the fields of teaching, research, librarianship, the Museum Service as well as the heritage and tourism industry.

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The MPhil in Early Modern History provides intensive training in the history of early modern Britain, Europe and the wider world to enable its students to produce a substantial piece of historical research and historical writing. Read more
The MPhil in Early Modern History provides intensive training in the history of early modern Britain, Europe and the wider world to enable its students to produce a substantial piece of historical research and historical writing. This stimulating course is designed for those who have completed degrees in which History is the main or at least a substantial component and who want to consolidate their knowledge of the period between 1500 and 1800. It aims to deepen students’ understanding of how early modern history has been studied and to explore how traditional and innovative methods can be used to interpret it.

This course is designed both for those who are considering undertaking historical research at a doctoral level and for those who seek simply to explore history and the craft of the historian at an advanced level. In the first term, students are offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Each student will take two compulsory training modules and select three from a list of options, including languages, palaeography, the history of the book, visual and material culture, and a variety of thematic courses. Those who satisfactorily complete this programme of study will move on to an individual research project, which will lead to the submission of a 20,000-25,000 word dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpemh

Course detail

By the end of the course, students should have acquired:

- a deeper understanding of their chosen area of early modern history and the critical debates within it
- a conceptual and technical understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies
- the technical skills necessary to pursue primary research in their chosen area
- the ability to situate their own research within current and past methodological and interpretative developments in the field.

Format

Part I: in the Michaelmas term, students on the course take two compulsory training modules and select three from a list of five options, including languages, palaeography, the history of the book, visual and material culture, and a variety of thematic courses. Students are also expected to attend a weekly relevant graduate research seminar. Those who satisfactorily complete this programme of study move on to Part II: a research dissertation, supervised by one of Cambridge's early modern scholars, which is undertaken during the Lent and Easter terms.

Students are provided with written feedback on the formative essays they submit at the end of the Michaelmas Term. They receive regular oral feedback from their dissertation supervisors, who also write termly reports. Oral feedback is also provided at the Dissertation presentations workshop. They will receive formal written feedback from two examiners after the submission and examination of their dissertations.

Assessment

This MPhil is assessed solely through a 20,000-25,000 word dissertation. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Students submit short essays (2,000 words) for each of their 5 modules. These pieces of work do not contribute to the mark for the degree. Students must, however, pass these essays (Part I of the course) to proceed to Part II (dissertation).

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MRes degree is a research programme with some provision for taught modules. Read more

The MRes degree is a research programme with some provision for taught modules.

It is aimed at those who wish to move beyond taught work and are prepared to engage in research in depth for a substantial postgraduate thesis, but who also wish to take modules that help develop research and related skills, and to study broader historical subjects with other postgraduates.

Times Higher Education ranked the Department of History first in the country for its performance in the latest Research Excellence Framework exercise.

Course details

After consultation with your academic supervisor, you can pursue a research thesis in any aspect of British or European history, including European discovery of the wider world, political, military or diplomatic history, or the history of early modern religion, culture, society or ideas.

You willl study three taught modules:

  • Historical Methods
  • Writing Early Modern History: Sources and Approaches 
  • Research Preparation 

You will then complete a 20,000-word thesis on an agreed topic which relates to early modern history and which can be appropriately supervised by a member of academic staff.

Assessment

Modules are assessed in various ways – by examination, coursework, presentation, transcription and attendance. 

Learning and teaching

Past and current MRes topics for the 20,000 word thesis have included:

  • Hunting for hidden meaning: an analysis of the history, interpretation and presentation of seventeenth-century plasterwork at St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall
  • Colonial failure in the New World: A French and German comparison
  • Dutch and English competition for the Muscovy Trade in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
  • Harnessing Nature: Gardens and Science in John Evelyn’s England
  • Susan Countess of Denbigh and Women at the Caroline Court
  • "Lioness”: Ladies-in-Waiting and their careers at the Tudor Court, 1509-1547
  • The “Black Book” and the politics of Elizabeth Warwick
  • Commercial theatre management in the age of Shakespeare
  • Religious Persecution in Henrician England

You will also become part of, and contribute to, the lively international community of the College of Arts and Law Graduate School, which offers dedicated research resources and a supportive working environment. Our team of academic and operational staff are on hand to offer support and advice to all postgraduate students within the College.

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: History

Birmingham’s History graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills that are highly valued by a range of employers. These skills include: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Some of our History postgraduates go on to use their studies directly, for example in heritage, museums or the armed forces; others use their transferable skills in a range of occupations from finance, to publishing, to fundraising. Employers that graduates have gone on to work for include: Royal Air Force; Ministry of Defence; University of Birmingham; Big Lottery Fund; Royal Air Force Museum; and University of Oxford.



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The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Read more
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Our expert tutors will introduce you to the very latest academic debates, along with longstanding critical issues such as race, class and sexuality.

Why study English Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt English Studies is a taught one year full-time, or two years part-time, postgraduate degree, which can be tailored to your needs, allowing you to pursue any literary interest you can imagine, whether it’s Arthurian literature or American crime fiction, animal rights or post colonialism.

This degree will:
Provide training in literary and cultural research as a firm basis for proceeding to doctoral work
Provide a taught postgraduate programme to suit individual student research interests and research needs
Enable completion of a dissertation of 18,000 words: an independent piece of work based on primary texts and sources, on your own topic, under the direction of an expert in the field.

Unique to Dundee is the “Special Author” option module, which allows you to explore in depth the full range of your chosen author’s works, whether it might be the Harry Potter series, Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, or the poems of Geoffrey Hill. Other examples include: Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, or Angela Carter.

What's so good about English Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
English Studies is part of the School of Humanities at Dundee, is a centre of research excellence, we have recognized strengths in book history, authorship studies and visual culture, and we lead the way in interdisciplinary scholarship. Our research culture thrives on probing the creative relationships between literature and film, poetry and theatre, word and image.

In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

We are also home to an annual Literary Festival which regularly attracts high profile writers to Dundee.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

What you will study

There is one core module: Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture which runs over two semesters, and you choose two optional modules, from the list available each year, plus the English Studies Dissertation.

Below is a typical list of modules, which varies from year to year, and is subject to demand and availability. You can also choose your optional modules from any grouping.

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
Exploring Old English Texts
Special Author: directed reading
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
The Scottish Novel
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
British and Irish Poetry, 1680-1830
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
Literature & Society, 1750-1900
The Irish Novel
Special Author: directed reading
Modern and Contemporary Literature

The Scottish Novel
Constructing Identities: Self, Subject and Persona in Contemporary Poetry
Virginia Woolf
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
The Irish Novel
The Literature of Hollywood
Writing, Texts and Books
Joyce and the Cinema
Postwar American Fiction and Transatlantic Exchange
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
Gender, Ethnicity, Text: Contemporary Readings
Special Author: directed reading
For the current list, visit the Humanities website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Humanities degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, recent graduate

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An MA in International History will equip you with knowledge and a skill set which will improve your ability to function within an increasingly interconnected… Read more

An MA in International History will equip you with knowledge and a skill set which will improve your ability to function within an increasingly interconnected world, and as such it is likely to improve your employability, particularly with respect to foreign-service, non-governmental organisation, and inter-governmental organisation careers, in a way that traditional history postgraduate qualifications will not. You will be taught by staff with a broad range of expertise and research interests in international history, in accordance with a philosophy that emphasises the development of students as practising historians. The programme includes access to a visiting speaker series given by notable historians on campus, and opportunities for you to contribute your own work to various forums, including an integrated MA International History seminar series.

Full Time is for a duration of 12 months; Part Time is for a duration of 24 months.

Contact hours: Full-time: 6 hours per week during terms 1 and 2; Part-time: 3 hours per week during terms 1 and 2; no weekend teaching.

Course structure

You will study for the MA in International History through a combination of taught modules, independent study, writing and research. Throughout the programme you will have the opportunity to emphasise your particular interests in international history through your choice of seminar and coursework assignments, and through the selection and development of an extended piece of independent research and critical writing on a topic of your choice. This will enable you to demonstrate the full range of attributes required of the professional historian short of the PhD. While the writing-up of this project will take place at the end of your programme, you will begin the process of topic selection and preparation much earlier, and your research for the dissertation will take place in train with your other modules. Taken as a whole, the programme will enable you to better understand this seminal period in international history, offer you a window on the contemporary world, and foster the development of high-order generic transferable skills.

How will I study?

You will experience an integrated mix of contact teaching, supported open learning and independent study. In the classroom you will take part in small seminar discussion groups and one-to-one tutorials with your lecturers. You will prepare for these sessions by examining specified bodies of relevant material, much of which will be made available via a Virtual Learning Environment; this will provide you with a shared launching point for discussion in the seminars.

You can take our MA in International History as either a full-time or a part-time programme, whichever suits you best. The programme is designed to provide you with a continuity of learning and teaching whichever route you choose to take. If you choose the full-time programme, you take two modules per term, alongside the dissertation, over one academic year. If you prefer to study part-time then you will take one module per term, alongside the dissertation, over two academic years.

Teaching and learning

On all of the taught modules on the MA International History students will be taught in small three-hour student-led workshops. Students will be required to read a number of essential readings as well as primary documents in preparation for each workshop. Moreover, selected students will be assigned tasks to prepare in advance of the workshops and then they will lead discussions on the topic under scrutiny. Time in each workshop will also be devoted to discussing student coursework and one-to-one tutorials will be offered to students. For the Research Dissertation students are assigned an expert supervisor with whom they will meet regularly during Terms 2 and 3.

Assessment and feedback

Main Currents in International History

Historiographical Essay (2500 words): 50% of assessment

  • Oral Presentation: 25% of assessment
  • Written Proposal (2000 words): 25% of assessment

Imperial Crisis; Decolonisation and the Post-colonial World; Peril and Progress : Security in the Post-1945 World

  • Research Essay (5000 words): 100% of assessment

Research Dissertation

  • Research Dissertation (15000 words): 100% assessment

For all modules written feedback is provided on Moodle three weeks after the submission deadline. You are also invited to book tutorials with the Module Director.

Programme specification

Further information on this course is available in the programme specification. Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course.

Learning support

York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students. We offer a range of learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.



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