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Masters Degrees (Book Design)

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About the course. -Practical design for printed books and ebooks, delivered by practising designers through projects and assignments. Read more
About the course:
-Practical design for printed books and ebooks, delivered by practising designers through projects and assignments
-Theory and history, taught through a variety of lectures, seminars and workshops
-Access to the University’s special collections, ensuring a truly hands-on experience
-Close to resources, including historic libraries in Oxford and the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Book design: practice (design projects)
-Book design: core (seminars and essays)
-Dissertation

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

EMPLOYABILITY

Our graduates have an excellent employment record. Many take up positions in type design studios, with publishers and general design studios, and wayfinding and information design studios. Others develop their own businesses, or take up managerial roles in creative firms. Employers include Apple, Monotype, Microsoft Typography, Victoria & Albert Museum, Oxford University Press, Financial Times and Nokia.

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Taught at our Kingsway Campus, this course is intended for practitioners from a range of design disciplines wanting to advance their professional and personal design practice and develop their skills and theoretical knowledge of design processes. Read more
Taught at our Kingsway Campus, this course is intended for practitioners from a range of design disciplines wanting to advance their professional and personal design practice and develop their skills and theoretical knowledge of design processes. In a creative and challenging interdisciplinary environment, design theories are questioned and established and individual creative solutions are explored.

Why Study Design with us?

Our course looks across traditional boundaries within visual design practices, encouraging you to develop design possibilities for your individual practice while examining theoretical and professional contexts.

We will encourage you to engage with design discourses and new directions, thereby contextualising your individual practice.

Our course will initially facilitate the contextualisation of your practice, through research methods, current contexts and exploratory practice. Next, you will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of project management, effective collaboration and the communication of design practice to professional audiences. Lastly, the final major project provides a chance to undertake a significant self-initiated design project.

What will I learn?

The course is based on the relationship between design theory and design practice. This will inform your design process, allowing you to understand critical ideas, to subject your work to robust scrutiny, and to devise contexts that will lead to new insights and challenges by exploring:
- design methodologies and processes
- current and historical design practice
- visual communication skills
- ongoing design discourses
- social and cultural contexts for design practice
- research methods
- project management
- creative processes and facilitation.

How will I be taught?

In Kingsway Campus, students have access to the Department's specialist facilities and equipment together with its technical support.
Formal contact of circa four hours per week may include face-to-face and online seminars, student presentations, and presentations by visiting practitioners. The notional learning time for full-time students is circa 40 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is through a combination of practical and written work. This may include:
- design artefacts
- academic papers
- reports
- sketchbooks
- presentations.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Graduate Diploma in Interior Design at Chelsea College of Arts is a full time, one year programme. This course provides students with the skills and experience required for a career in the field of interior design, or further study at MA level. Read more
Graduate Diploma in Interior Design at Chelsea College of Arts is a full time, one year programme. This course provides students with the skills and experience required for a career in the field of interior design, or further study at MA level.

Content

What students can expect:

- To develop a flexible, open-minded approach to thinking about interior design or critically engaging with contemporary design approaches

- To connect with interior design in a variety of ways such as designing, writing, visual communication and research

- To explore the possibility of making narratives from interior design

- To develop an open way of thinking about interior design, and give students the opportunity to critically engage with contemporary design approaches

- To design small-scale interiors and explore new opportunities within existing architectural spaces

- To be assigned a personal tutor who supports your development

Structure

The course runs over a total of 30 weeks and offers a combination of taught study, self-directed negotiated study, personal research and written assignments. There are also two major practical projects undertaken during the year and each is the subject of a book.

The course is studio based and delivered in three units of study:

Unit 1 - Commodity and Design

This is a design programme that explores a small-scale domestic interior. This project focuses on how the client / user can be given a new opportunity to perform within a space and the various methods students have to envisage and communicate this opportunity.

Unit 2 - Negotiated Design Programme

In this unit students are expected to initiate a design project. They will choose a location, make an analysis of an interior and establish a design brief for a new programme of habitation. Students are asked to find a context in the public realm rather than the domestic one, and are expected to reflect upon and discuss how habitation is improved by their contribution.

Unit 3 - Professional Context

This unit is concerned with critical reflection upon professional practice and creative processes. Students will learn about professional communication within the practice of interior design, and specifically the writing requirements of an interior designer when they are reflecting upon and communicating their design proposals. This will prepare students for professional practice and support the critical position of their design proposals.

Work experience and opportunities

During the year students are involved in live projects. One of these, the making of a Christmas-themed installation for a highly regarded hotel in Westminster, has become an annual event.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/design/graduate-visual-communication-design. The changing landscape of people’s everyday interactions has blurred the lines between respected design fields giving designers new responsibilities to shape experiences. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/design/graduate-visual-communication-design

The changing landscape of people’s everyday interactions has blurred the lines between respected design fields giving designers new responsibilities to shape experiences. Designers must increase their knowledge in all areas of design, including print media, human-computer interaction design, motion graphics, and 3D digital graphics.

Plan of study

The MFA in visual communication design provides a learning environment for advancement in innovative research, user-centered design, and professional practice focusing on the creative potentials of visual communication through a full spectrum of media. Students may advance their design knowledge and technical skills by choosing one of three options: communication design, interaction design, or motion and 3D digital design.

The cross-disciplinary nature of the program offers a greater potential to foster innovation and creativity in visual communication design. The program reflects the current views and changes occurring in the professional design field. The skill sets required of graphic, interactive, and digital design have now crossed over and are interrelated.

Admission requirements

- Portfolio

A portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides a visual statement of the applicant’s performance to date of a candidate's design skills, aesthetic development, and maturity.

The portfolio must demonstrate a strong understanding of design principles and visual computer skills using Adobe products, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. A portfolio of 10-15 examples representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work should be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website.

Examples must demonstrate a good sense of design, typography, and digital illustration in addition to the applicant's interests in and aptitudes for advanced study and, specifically, potential for success at RIT. Applicants are encouraged to submit only their best original work. Applicants should not submit work copies from film, television, photographs, magazine/book illustrations, or other sources.

- Application deadline

The application deadline is February 15th. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications submitted. Acceptance after February 15th is based upon available space and accepted applicants may be placed on a waiting list.

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The MA Toy Design programme occupies a potentially unique position within the portfolio of postgraduate courses in the Northern School of Design. Read more
The MA Toy Design programme occupies a potentially unique position within the portfolio of postgraduate courses in the Northern School of Design. Whilst sitting most closely to the MA Consumer Product Design, it is envisaged that students will also make use of the subject knowledge in MA Games Design, Ma Graphic Design, and the MA in Children’s Book Illustration, covering as they do, many of the areas associated with the definition, manifestation, and presentation of a toy or play product. Additionally students might also call on expertise from outside the Northern School of Design, such as the work being undertaken by the Child Computer Interaction group (ChiCi) in the Faculty of Science and Technology.

A student defined placement in the second practice module allows the student to further explore areas of relevance to their studies, either through arranged placement, collaborative activity or research visit.

The student is supported by staff input through a series of design activities during Design Practice 1 that are designed to identify an area of interest that can then be fully explored through the following practice modules. Central to the programme is the learning agreement which is drawn up during the beginning of your studies – this forms the backbone of the postgraduate activity and provides a term of reference for assessable outcomes. Another important element of this course is that of ‘Reflective Practice’ where academic and theoretical issues arise out of Practice itself and students are expected to reflect on their design work through a written reflective journal. Complementary to the Design practice modules are two research modules that provide theoretical underpinning, one studied in semester 1 and the other in semester 2 (for both full time and part time mode).

Advanced Practice 2 provides the opportunity to explore issues through a student led dynamic research experience. Through a series of self arranged visits, the student will undertake further exploration within the commercial production context of toy design and manufacture.

The final semester of studies provides the student with the opportunity to bring together all that has been developed and researched through the preceding two semesters of study. A final major design activity and dissertation are undertaken and presented at the final public exhibition.

Modules:

Toy Design Practice 1
Research for Creative Design Practice 1
Advanced Practice 2
Research for Creative Design Practice 2
Toy Design Practice 3
Postgraduate Project/Dissertation

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The production designer plays a vital role in creating real or imagined worlds on the screen. This MA course in Production Design develops individual creativity and teaches technical skills essential for a career in film and television. Read more
The production designer plays a vital role in creating real or imagined worlds on the screen. This MA course in Production Design develops individual creativity and teaches technical skills essential for a career in film and television

Quick Facts

- 2 Year Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec each year
- Next intake: January 2017
- NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

- Study in a collaborative filmmaking environment
- Design for live action shoots
- Use traditional and digital design techniques
- Work in fully-equipped design studios
- Work on both fiction and animation films
- Have opportunities and facilities for set builds
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/production-design

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 07 JUL 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

Uniquely in the UK, our MA Production Design students study alongside students of other filmmaking disciplines, engaging in a series of productions where working methods replicate professional practice.

The advent of digital technology has brought in new design tools and ways of working and this course promotes a lively interface between old and new methods. 3D and 2D computer techniques and Concept Art are taught alongside traditional skills such as set sketching, orthographic draughting, design geometry and model-making. The course offers the opportunity to specialise in Concept Art, particularly in the second year. Design students apply their skills to live action and animation films, television programmes and commercials, in the studio and on location, using built sets and green screen. Relevant business and management skills are also taught, equipping students to manage a small art department, its budget, personnel and logistical schedules, studio procedures and set decorating. Studio visits and placements familiarise students with a working art department and inspire them with actual film sets.

All staff, permanent and visiting, are Industry practitioners and students develop close links with the film and television industry while they train.

CURRICULUM

Central to the philosophy of the course is the recognition of the production designer’s role as a key player in film & television production while embracing the Creative impact of computer generated imagery and digital design

YEAR ONE:
The fundamental strategy in the first year is to provide all students on the course with an intensive foundation in language and grammar for the moving image, including computer skills. The intention is also to include some practical film and video projects and workshops to be realised on screen. The notion of independent learning and research is established, as is that of collaboration and commitment.

- Take One Painting: set build and green screen workshop with Cinematography and Digital Post Production students
- Visualisation and model-making
- Character of Place – pixillation workshop with Animation and Cinematography students
- Sci-fi and Fantasy - paper design project
- Construction budgeting
- First Year Film - design, possible set build, set dressing and location work
- CAD, Photoshop, MAYA Foundation
- Measured drawing

YEAR TWO:
In the second year the 'scaffolding' or 'water wings' are removed and students, now equipped with the necessary skills, are able to undertake work of originality and individuality. The work has to be seen to be showing a progression with an increase in quality and ambition. Students must be able to generate their own briefs and identify the design challenges they pose. Since film is a ‘‘deadline’’ business, time management becomes an essential part of the learning.

- Film Architecture - paper project with a foreign setting and in a particular period
- Design for animaiton
- Final Year Film - design, possible set build, set dressing and location work
- Personal projects - negotiated subject matter and scope
- CAD workshop
- MA Dissertation

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

The head of the production design department is Caroline Amies (In The Name Of The Father, Ladies in Lavender, Miss Julie). Other key tutors include Moira Tait (a design background with the BBC, working with Stephen Frears, Alan Bennett and Brian Tufano), John Fenner (Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Shining, Return of the Jedi), and Jamie Leonard (Mona Lisa, Lorenzo's Oil, Tom & Viv).

ALUMNI

Production Designers Tom Conroy (Legend, Vikings, West is West, Breakfast on Pluto), Paul Kirby (Untitled Bourne Sequel, Bastille Day, Kingsman: The Secret Service, Captain Phillips), and Art Director Steven Lawrence (Jungle Book, Avengers: Age Of Ultron, Paddington, The Dark Knight) studied at the NFTS.

APPLY WITH

- A comprehensive portfolio of work which demonstrates an aptitude for spatial and 3D design, awareness of architecture, design for the moving image and a personal visual language. Please submit a hard copy portfolio, which can be A4, A3, A2, A1. If you have any questions regarding the content, format or amount of work to submit, please contact the Production Design department at the NFTS or Registry.

- CAD work – printouts (optional extra submission)

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR PRODUCTION DESIGN COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. Read more
The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. It draws on theories of print culture and book history to identify the ideological challenges to the culture of publishing and the ways in which contemporary practice has been shaped by social, economic and technological developments. The course is taught by specialists in the field and is closely linked to our renowned MA in Publishing. The core programme focuses on the theory and practice of authorship, textual production, dissemination and reception in the period 1870 to the present day.

In addition,you have the opportunity to take elective MA modules in Publishing, English and History, enabling the study of the interrelations between these disciplines.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/book-history-and-publishing-culture/

Why choose this course?

- The MA in Book History and Publishing Studies provides you with the academic skills and knowledge to extend your studies in this burgeoning and interdisciplinary field.

- This programme provides you with access to a specific selection of the vocationally oriented modules on the master's publishing programmes.

- The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Arts) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing studies and print culture in Europe. We offer full-time and part-time courses with a variety of exit awards to suit your needs and career aspirations.

- Studying any of the publishing programmes at Oxford Brookes gives you excellent employment prospects, opportunities for extensive industry links and networking in the global publishing centre of Oxford, unrivalled access to work experience and international internships, and specialist careers advice including our Working in Publishing Day.

- You will be part of large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise which will provide you with comprehensive coverage of publishing, from mass market books to magazines; print and digital dissemination.

- You will have access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes, and access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Book Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library.

- You will have the opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt, London and Bologna, and to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

- There is an industry advisory board attached to the publishing courses with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House. Additionally, we have links with publishing organisations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes.

Teaching and learning

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods across the course. Most modules use more than one learning and teaching method. This ensures that you are exposed to a range of different learning opportunities, which helps maintain your motivation and interest.

Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures designed to provide students with the foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable them to achieve the learning outcomes for the module

- seminars and workshops designed to encourage students to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test their understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop their transferable skills and to encourage deeper learning

- field trips to book fairs, libraries and publishing archives to enable students to undertake research in print culture and publishing history

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for dissertations or major projects

- resource-based learning materials in several of our modules and virtual learning environment to support student learning through Computer Assisted Assessment and Computer Assisted Learning.

Approach to assessment

Assessment for the programme is by written course work. The assignments include researched essays, project work and the opportunity to contribute to an online journal.

Specialist facilities

Students on the course have access to the Bodleian Library and archives of local publishers, including the Oxford University Press, for research. The library at Oxford Brookes has an extensive collection of texts and journals about publishing, as well as a special collection on publishing in Africa. It also houses the Booker Archive and the André Deutsch Archive.

Field trips

A place on the tutor-led field trip to Frankfurt Book Fair which is held in October is available for applicants who have accepted their place by mid-July. The Bologna Book Fair, which occurs in the spring is also tutor-led with arranged interviews with publishers, but students organise their own flights and accommodation. The London Book Fair, also held in the spring, offers students volunteer opportunities in addition to meetings with publishers and access to many of the seminars that are held during the fair.
Attendance pattern
Attendance at lectures and seminars varies with your chosen modules. In most cases, you will have at least two days in the week without formal tutor contact hours. These times are emphasised here because you can use this time for work experience with local publishers and with fellow students in group work as preparation for presentations and reports.

How this course helps you develop

Academic writing and research skills are honed to a high level during this programme. In the second semester, assessment for the compulsory module involves contribution of a research article for an online journal. Students are also involved in the academic editing and design of the journal which is available to the public. This practice enables student to demonstrate excellence in archival and secondary research activities.

Careers

The course provides excellent prospects for students interested in further academic study in the interdisciplinary fields of media, publishing studies, cultural production and book history. In addition, students go on to work in academic publishing and are equipped to succeed in editorial positions in publishing.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girls' magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

OICPS carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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Your smartphone is probably the most well-known example of an advanced embedded system; a handheld low-power device that carries out signal processing at the same time as it is able to entertain its user with computer games, internet sessions, and streaming audio/video. Read more
Your smartphone is probably the most well-known example of an advanced embedded system; a handheld low-power device that carries out signal processing at the same time as it is able to entertain its user with computer games, internet sessions, and streaming audio/video. What makes a system embedded is that system functionality must be implemented in hardware and software within very challenging constraints, such as performance, power consumption, real-time demands, reliability, and size.

The aim of this programme is to educate engineers that can design, implement and verify advanced embedded electronic systems based on hardware and software. The programme graduates will gain knowledge and skills in a variety of areas, such as integrated circuit technology, computer design, industrial design methodologies and industrial design software suites. Programme graduates will be qualified to work as productive engineers in industrial teams designing state-of-the-art embedded products or intellectual property, or to undertake graduate studies leading to a doctorate in the field of electronic system design.

Who should apply

As far as study background, most of our students have a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering or in Computer Science and Engineering. In particular, you need skills in electronic and computer fundamentals, including digital system design using VHDL/Verilog and basic programming.

Why apply

This programme is designed to address the entire design challenge of embedded systems. During the first fall semester three compulsory courses will give you a solid design platform in preparation for the spring design project, when all students will participate in a programme-wide embedded system design project; here, the knowledge and skills acquired during the fall are put to use in the design of a prototype embedded system. By adding elective courses from one of the three main profiles - System Design, Computer Systems and Electronics Production - each student can combine breadth with a certain depth.

An overarching idea of the programme is to facilitate progression of key knowledge and skills throughout the courses that lead up to the big spring project. The programme makes use of progressive educational methods such as small projects, hands-on design exercises, flipped classroom teaching and scientific writing. Also, examination is adapted to the learning outcomes which means that the traditional written exam is complemented by, for example, report and log book writing, project demonstrations and oral examinations.

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On this course, you will tackle issues central to contemporary design practice – such as design authorship and social engagement – through a process of analysis, experimentation and the implementation of creative ideas. Read more
On this course, you will tackle issues central to contemporary design practice – such as design authorship and social engagement – through a process of analysis, experimentation and the implementation of creative ideas. During your time with us, you will be encouraged to engage creatively with contemporary visual communication issues.

The course places an emphasis on problem setting rather than problem solving, through the development of self-initiated projects and briefs.

Key benefits:

• Open to applicants from a range of backgrounds, including education and industry
• Enhance your skills through creative thinking, research, visualisation, interactivity, social and multi-media
• Future-proof your skill set for developments in the discipline.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/art-and-design-communication-design

Suitable for

Graduates or professionals from a wide range of creative disciplines wishing to pursue a particular individual line of enquiry via in-depth research, personal practice and business acumen.

Programme details

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

• Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies informed by contemporary professional practice.
• Develop an advanced understanding of research methods in general and those of importance to creative practice and industry in particular.
• Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional and collaborative frameworks
• Provide the opportunity to develop industry experience and understanding through contact by placement, project and/or contact with professional practitioners.

Format

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (such as ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows you to progressively take ownership and direction of your learning so that you may develop as independent, life-long learners. This is achieved by including self-directed projects where you will have the opportunity to negotiate your learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

• Formal lectures
• Seminar presentations
• Workshops
• Critical analysis and independent learning.

Award specific learning activities include exercises, team based learning, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates. You will have the opportunity to engage in a range of coursework activities in order to foster active learning through contribution to participatory exercises and through formal and informal presentations of your work.

Semester 1

• Research Methods and Practice
• Specialist Practice

Semester 2

• Creative Contexts
• Practice in Context

Semester 3

• Negotiated Thesis/Major Project

Assessment

Assessment methods used on the course include:

• Practical, oral and written assignments (80%)
• Group presentations (20%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on your:

• Body of work and contextual research: e.g. studio/portfolio/workshop outcomes/ exhibitions
• Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/seminar or other presentation

Career potential

This course will suit you if you want to either progress in an industry you already have experience in, re-skill for a different career path or continue the studies you took as an undergraduate.

Graduates from this course have progressed onto a number of careers within the industry such as design lecturer, freelance designer, graphic designer, researcher and brand manager.

Graduates have gone on to work for companies including: Zyad University Abu Dhabi, University of Salford and Welsh design agency BWA.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The School of Media, Art and Design is delighted to offer a new MA by Research with a range of exciting specialisms. Read more
The School of Media, Art and Design is delighted to offer a new MA by Research with a range of exciting specialisms. As a postgraduate MA student enrolled on this programme you will join a department with over thirty years of experience delivering excellent teaching and learning, research and knowledge exchange, and award-winning professional practice. You will join a vibrant community of researchers and practitioners and play a role in contributing to the culture of research and practice-based research that exists within the department.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/media-art-and-design-by-research.aspx

Course detail

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design provides the opportunity to undertake a supervised programme of independent study and practice in a structured and supportive environment. The programme may be undertaken either full time over one year, or part time over two years.

Suitability

This MA by Research is open to anyone who can satisfy the entry requirements. Individuals who would like to develop their research skills to a higher standard, whether they are using traditional research methods or practice-based research approaches, are particularly encouraged to apply. The MA by Research is offered both full-time and part-time, and given the emphasis placed on independent research, the course is well suited to graduates looking to continue their educational journey in a flexible fashion. The MA by Research is also a proven, and important developmental stepping-stone towards doctoral study.

Content

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design is not a taught MA, and therefore there are no modules offered. Instead, the individual defines their own set of research questions in conversation with their supervisory team. The range of subjects available for students to research is necessarily constrained by the range of specialisms offered by the supervisors within the School. Areas of specialism include:

• Animation
• Applied Art
• Cultural Studies
• Digital Media
• Film
• Fine Art
• Graphic Design
• Journalism
• Media and Communications
• Media Studies
• Photography
• Radio
• Television
• Web Design

Format

Students are supported principally through regular tutorials from a specialist supervisor. All supervisors are members of staff within the School of Media, Art and Design who have significant research experience and have been granted supervisor status by the Graduate School. A supervisor will help the student adopting the traditional research mode to frame the research topic and provide ongoing guidance about carrying out secondary and primary research and writing up the findings.

A supervisor will help the student adopting the practice ­based mode to devise and produce their project and to set it within a critical framework. Face­to­face supervisions will take place on a regular basis during term time, and supplemented by telephone, email and Skype guidance as needed. The schedule of supervisions will be agreed by negotiation between the supervisor and the student. Tutorials can be scheduled around a student’s other commitments and meaningful distance learning can be facilitated. Work­in­progress is reviewed by a panel of supervisors half way through the registration period. Following advice from this review students complete their theses or projects.

One of the few fixed commitments is the integral research seminar programme, which MA by Research students are required to attend, typically one afternoon each fortnight through October - June. The seminar programme is built around the department’s own research seminar series and is designed to integrate the student body by addressing issues of common interest, such as aesthetics, genre, form etc. Some seminar presentations will be tutor-led, others student-led. Every Masters student will be expected to deliver a research paper during the seminar programme. Students choosing the practice ­based mode will be expected to present work-in-progress for group critique.

Students choosing the practice­based mode will have access to the department’s extensive range of specialist equipment, which they will be able to book, and to its specialist facilities at times that they are not in use for taught classes.

Assessment

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design is offered via two modes:

A traditional research mode that consists of supervised academic study culminating in the submission of a thesis of 25,000­-30,000 words.

A practice­based mode that consists of supervised work on a body of creative practice that culminates in the submission of a project or portfolio equivalent to 20,000-25,000 words, together with a reflective analysis of no less than 5,000 words and no more than 10,000. The combined word count equivalent for a practice-based submission should not exceed 25,000-30,000 words.

The MA by Research is assessed using the Graduate School’s validated doctoral framework, which means that MA by Research students produce a single thesis (whether written or comprising both practice-based and written elements) that will be submitted at the end of their study. The thesis will then be examined both internally and externally and four possible outcomes will be achieved: Pass, Pass with Minor Corrections, Pass with Major Corrections, and Fail.

What can I do next?

The programme leads to a significant qualification in its own right but could also fast­track successful applicants to MPhil and ultimately to PhD qualifications.

The skills and specialist period knowledge developed during the programme provide additional grounding for careers in media, art and design.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Humber’s Creative Book Publishing graduate certificate program combines creativity and entrepreneurship with the only opportunities in Canada to specialize in literary agenting/rights management and publishing technology. Read more
Humber’s Creative Book Publishing graduate certificate program combines creativity and entrepreneurship with the only opportunities in Canada to specialize in literary agenting/rights management and publishing technology. Taught by working professionals, and visited by industry experts and published authors, students of this program regularly make valuable contacts.

After two months of foundational publishing courses including business models, acquisitions, contracts, copyright, technology, creativity, operations and content management, you will choose three of four specializations: editorial, marketing, literary agenting/rights management or advanced technology. In the final month, students are organized into groups representing publishing enterprises. They collaborate to create model publishing companies from the ground up including business plans, publishing lists, jackets and covers, websites, and marketing campaigns. This intense capstone assignment provides an unprecedented knowledge base which prepares graduates for a successful career in publishing.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:
• Create a freelance business in any of the following areas – Editorial, Publicity/Public Relations, Design/Packaging.
• Represent authors as literary agents to publishing houses in Canada and internationally.
• Publish their own creative works independent of publishing houses.
• Critically analyze proposals and literary works for legal implications including copyright issues, libel, trademark, moral rights and intellectual property rights.
• Prepare business documents related to publishing such as business plans, annual reports, and business proposals in conformity with industry and market standards.
• Evaluate national and international markets.
• Prepare sales and promotion strategies and materials, and negotiate agreements for the selling of rights of authors’ works.
• Produce publishing content for media outlets as arts commentators, book reviewers, and TV/radio producers.
• Analyze manuscripts for quality and profitability.
• Analyze and predict publishing operations in the areas of distribution, credit, supply chain, information technology, warehousing and inventory control, and customer service.
• Analyze public policy and granting structures available to publishing as a Canadian cultural industry.
• Prepare marketing strategies and create marketing documents and materials for book proposals, book jackets, and sales presentations.
• Complete structural edits and copy edits, perform proofreading, and production editing as part of the editorial process.

Modules

• CBPP 5000: Acquisitions
• CBPP 5002: Contracts, Legal Issues and Publishing Ethics
• CBPP 5003: Book Production and Manufacturing
• CBPP 5004: Sales and Retail
• CBPP 5005: Marketing Overview
• CBPP 5008: Editorial Overview
• CBPP 5012: International Publishing
• CBPP 5015: Publishing Finance
• CBPP 5018: Technology
• CBPP 5021: Enterprise Group
• CBPP 5022: Enterprise Individual

Your Career

Book publishing is an innovative cultural industry that adapts to rapid and constant change in the marketplace and to evolving technological requirements while continuing to nurture creativity and growth. Find opportunities in editorial, marketing, technology, contracts, subsidiary rights, sales, management/operations and production/ design. Or work in closely related fields as a content manager, publicist, literary agent, book reviewer, arts journalist, bookseller, educator, or entertainment/copyright/intellectualproperty expert in government agencies and industry associations. Humber also encourages entrepreneurship and the development of new enterprises including self-publishing and freelance options. Professional development is emphasized throughout the program.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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The MA Children’s Book Illustration course is aimed at both professional practitioners wishing to pursue a sustained period of time developing new ideas or recent graduates wishing to focus their studies and refine ideas at an advanced level. Read more
The MA Children’s Book Illustration course is aimed at both professional practitioners wishing to pursue a sustained period of time developing new ideas or recent graduates wishing to focus their studies and refine ideas at an advanced level. The course will also consider students from non-traditional illustration backgrounds, such as fine artists, graphic and Internet designers and animators, providing they can offer clearly articulated and informed reasons for wishing to study Children's Book Illustration at an advanced level.

The emphasis of the course is on the practice of illustration for children’s picture books and story books. At postgraduate level you will be encouraged to pursue a unique and personal line of enquiry within their chosen area of children’s book illustration and design.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Through the collective community, students have access to a wide range of staff expertise and extensive workshops and studio resources.

The course is supported by extensive computer, studio and workshop facilities located within the department and the University as a whole. There is also a programme of guest lecturers, company and consultancy visits as well as exhibitions and extra workshops.

Both the practical and theoretical elements will be assessed both during and at the end of each module. The final form of the assessment strategy and criteria is the result of collaboration between student and staff.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Children’s Book Illustration is aimed at practicing professional illustrators, artists and designers wishing to develop new ideas and techniques aimed at the children’s market, and at recent graduates who wish to focus and refine their ideas at a more advanced level

Understandably, Children’s Book Illustration is primarily a visual course; however authorial control over content is also hugely important in the children’s book field so the ability to write creatively and to fuse written and visual content is an important component in the practice of children’s book illustration. You will have the opportunity to collaborate with postgraduate students on the MA Writing for Children course.

At the end of the course you will have a body of work produced to a professional and publishable standard. This will culminate in a final project and public exhibition, and hopefully, although not exclusively, in professional publication.

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This course develops the principles and techniques necessary for creating innovative design solutions to a range of problems. Read more
This course develops the principles and techniques necessary for creating innovative design solutions to a range of problems.
It will challenge you across a wide range of projects from built structures, commercial projects, industry research or smaller design projects, all with an embedded relationship to interior space or practice.

This course:

• focuses on interior spatial interventions in the context of existing or new buildings
• develops advanced design, management and technical skills
• enables you to focus on areas of interest to you
• benefits from strong links with industry
• offers extensive opportunities to work on live design projects
• is available full-time and part-time

The course develops skilled professionals qualified to solve and manage complex problems related to interior architecture from advanced cultural, environmental and design perspectives. For example, these may be related to sustainable urban contexts and materials, technology, component design, architectural conservation, exhibition / museum design in the digital age or learning environments for the future.

Postgraduate scholarships
The School will be offering a number of scholarships for students commencing their studies on one of our postgraduate courses. Find out more about the scholarships at http://www.ntu.ac.uk/adbe-pgscholarships

Open evening
Our postgraduate open events are a great opportunity to meet our postgraduate teaching staff and students, visit the University, find out about the courses we offer, bursaries and funding opportunities.

Find out more and book your place at http://www.ntu.ac.uk/adbeopenevenings

Find out about the course at http://www.ntu.ac.uk/interior

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