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Masters Degrees (Book Arts)

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Introduction. MA Visual Arts. Book Arts at Camberwell College of Arts focuses on debates concerning the cultural, creative and individual functions of the book. Read more

Introduction

MA Visual Arts: Book Arts at Camberwell College of Arts focuses on debates concerning the cultural, creative and individual functions of the book. The course engages with aspects of the book such as sequence, poetry, structure and materials; encompassing printed multiples and sculptural one-offs.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- To develop a project from proposal to final exhibition

- To research content, materials and technical skills, then produce written and practical work exploring a subject in relationship to contemporary practice

- To receive support and supervision throughout the course from specialist academic staff in workshops, individual tutorials, seminars and lectures

- To take part in staff and student-led seminars to help promote debate, and work-in-progress sessions that allow for supportive critique

- To develop research skills, professional practice and an understanding of the wider context of book arts as an area of fine art and design practice

- To take part in a shared lecture programme across the Visual Arts courses that draw upon the richness of research across Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Colleges

- To get involved in artists book fairs and visiting special collections in London such as the Tate, John Latham’s Flat Time House and the National Art Library at the V&A Museum

- To explore the expanded book in a display or installation by showing work in public exhibitions

Structure

Unit One – Research, Development and Practice

Students will explore, experiment and research to further develop their Project Proposals. This unit introduces students to pathway specific issues and topics, research methodologies and techniques. It aims to orientate students and their practice within the course, and develop their contextual, critical and research skills at the onset of their MA learning.

Unit Two – Reflection and Presentation

Resolution and presentation of students' work according to their Project Proposal. A symposium will provide the opportunity to present their research and provide further peer feedback. Students' practice at this stage should synthesise their practical, conceptual and professional abilities and they will be expected to consider their future practice, audience and context of their work in contemporary practice.

The intention and context of students' work will inform their decisions they will take regarding a final exhibition. Students' will also be expected to work collaboratively with their peers to actively plan, organise and install an exhibition as part of their continued Personal and Professional Development.



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Design and carry out your own visual projects, exploring the relationships between word and image, as you prepare for a career as a visual artist in a growing creative industry. Read more
Design and carry out your own visual projects, exploring the relationships between word and image, as you prepare for a career as a visual artist in a growing creative industry.

Overview

Whatever your artistic background, our Master's course will develop your visual practice in areas that are important for illustrators and book artists, such as visual sequencing and visual text. It will challenge you to cross the divide between fine art and applied art found on many undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, making it a unique course for the UK.

Studying in our purpose-built studios at Cambridge School of Art, much of your work will be practice-based. You’ll propose and undertake self-directed projects, attending group critiques and tutorials that will help you develop your creative skills.

You'll also attend a series of integrated lectures and seminars. These serve two purposes. You’ll explore aspects of illustration and book art, such as the relationships between word and image, narratology and visual language. And you'll receive guidance on research methods and critical writing - which you'll put to immediate use on the course, as well as in your future career.

Throughout the course, you’ll collaborate and discuss your work with staff, visiting professionals and fellow students, giving you an invaluable opportunity to see how others respond to it. All of our teaching team are practising artists, so you’ll hear about the latest news and issues in the industry, and have access to sound careers advice.

Teaching times: 9am-5pm Tuesdays and Wednesdays (full-time); 9am-5pm Wednesdays in Year 1, Tuesdays in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career as a freelance illustrator or freelance book artist. In recent years these roles have been increasingly in demand thanks to the growth of interest in artists' books, graphic novels, self-publishing, e-books and an awareness of small, batch publishing. You’ll also gain skills that will be useful in many other fields, such as bookbinding or teaching. You might even find a way to combine it with your current career, as did Dr Katy Shorttle, whose artwork on health issues was recently featured by The Guardian (http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/gallery/2015/sep/25/ebola-mumps-old-age-inspire-doctors-artwork-in-pictures).

Modules

Process and Practice as Research
Visual Text
Sequence and Series
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through your self-directed visual projects, which will include written project proposals, developmental and final visual work, and a reflective commentary. On the Master's Dissertation module, you’ll submit a 6,000-word essay. Finally, the Master's Project will allow you to build on all previous modules to design a visual project which shows mastery of your subject.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in purpose-built art and design studios, with open access to our printmaking, bookbinding, letterpress and laser cutting facilities, and training from dedicated technicians. We also have many digital imaging resources that you’ll be able to use, including Macs, scanners, and A3/large-format printers, as well as photography darkrooms, animation and moving image studios and 3D workshops. Our University’s Media Services Unit stocks photographic and recording equipment that you can borrow.

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The Rutgers University-Newark MFA Program is a nationally ranked, 36 credit hour, studio/research program, which means that our writers study literature as they endeavor to write it. Read more

The Rutgers University-Newark MFA Program is a nationally ranked, 36 credit hour, studio/research program, which means that our writers study literature as they endeavor to write it. The program focuses strongly on 12 credit hours of Writing Workshop in a declared genre (one workshop, with permission of the department, may be cross-genre), and requires 6 thesis hours in which students work one-on-one with their mentor professors. We also require 18 credit hours of graduate courses in literature. Students may take up to two undergraduate courses for graduate credit with additional requirements assigned by professor and with permission by the department. Applicants who have completed graduate level English Literature courses may transfer up to 12 credit hours (grades of B or above) with permission of the department. While some MFA grads go on to law or business school or into publishing, many seek teaching jobs. The MFA is the terminal degree in creative writing, which allows graduates to teach at the university level, and the Rutgers-Newark MFA offers our students the essential advantage of substantial coursework in literature.

At Rutgers University-Newark, students may choose six courses (18 credit hours) from a long and exciting list of graduate literature courses taught by important scholars. Study Shakespeare with Professor Ameer Sohrawardy. Read Samuel Johnson with Professor Jack Lynch, nationally renowned Johnson scholar. Study the proletarian novel with Marxist theorist Professor Barbara Foley, or “Women in Literature” with feminist scholar Professor Fran Bartkowski. Explore the still unresolved Vietnam era with Professor H. Bruce Franklin. Discover Victorian literature with Professor Janet Larson, discuss Latino literature and culture with Professor Laura Lomas.

Deepen and specify still more: MFA students will fulfill 6 of the required 18 elective hours by choosing one of three unique Electives Concentrations. Virtually no other program in the country gives students the opportunity to work in such a wide range of genres for elective credits. Those who choose Literature/Book Arts will work with photographer Nick Kline to design and publish a chapbook of their own work. Performance/Media Studies allows students to study writing for television or the stage with playwright Michele Rittenhouse, urban and narrative journalism with Professor Rob Snyder, or jazz influences with Lewis Porter Cultural/Political/Ethnic Studies allows students to choose courses in History, Liberal Studies, American Studies, Urban Education, Political Science, Global Affairs, African-American Studies, or Women’s and Gender Studies. RU-N’s Electives Concentration is designed to support our MFA students in their completion of courses that specifically contribute to the fiction, poetry or nonfiction works they will turn in as Theses.

Rutgers University-Newark MFA students may also make use of resources provided by theInstitute for Jazz Studies, the Institute for Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience, the Paul Robeson Gallery, Dana Library and its Book Arts program, and the Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies. The RU-N MFA Program also enjoys affiliations with The Newark Museum, the New Jersey Historical Society, the Newark Public Library, and Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art, all a short walk from campus.

Rutgers University-Newark is developing a respected and exciting MFA Program that will attract national and international applicants, yet we feel strongly about maintaining and deepening the University’s commitment to the diversity and flavor of the Rutgers University-Newark community. Our MFA Program is influenced and inspired by Newark, a community of long and remarkable history now enjoying a political and cultural Renaissance. We describe our program as Rutgers University-Newark Real Lives, Real Stories cause we’re interested in the real world experience of our applicants as well as in their creative work and intellectual rigor.

The Rutgers University-Newark MFA can be completed in a two or three year time frame. Most of our classes, workshops and readings will begin at 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, allowing students to commit to rigorous daily writing schedules, work day jobs, or raise families. Though we live in the real world more affordably than in Manhattan, Rutgers-Newark MFA faculty and students also comprise an arts community. Workshops are encouraged to adjourn at 8:30 for drinks and refreshments at chic local eatery 27 Mix, Art Kitchen, or at one of many inexpensive Portuguese restaurants in the Ironbound. Newark is changing and thriving, and Rutgers University-Newark is changing with it. The residence dorm at University Square is just one of the University’s commitments to a burgeoning campus whose expansion will eventually reach the shores of the Passaic River.

Courses & MFA Concentrations

Students entering the Master of Fine Arts Program at Rutgers University-Newark will complete a 36 credit hour program in four to six semesters, as follows: 18 hours of writing credits, including 12 hours of Workshop in a specific genre (one workshop per semester for 4 semesters); 6 thesis hours in a specific genre (including 3 hours of mentored "Thesis in Conference"); 18 hours of Elective courses (6 courses, 3 credit hours each). Two of the Elective courses, or 6 hours, comprise an Electives Concentration: Literature/Book Arts, Cultural, Political, Ethnic Studies, or Performance/Media Studies. Electives may include graduate lit courses, graduate courses in other disciplines, or MFA elective courses such as Craft of Fiction, Craft of Poetry, Editing and Publishing, a Nonfiction workshop offered each Spring, or Writers At Newark: Contemporary American Lit. The [email protected] Reading Series comprises part of our core curriculum; MFA students study the works of writers visiting each semester as textbooks on craft.



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The Master in Arts Management offers a unique learning experience preparing students to embark on a management career in the arts and creative industry. Read more

The Master in Arts Management offers a unique learning experience preparing students to embark on a management career in the arts and creative industry. The one-year program aims at developing skills and providing tools to deal with the new challenges of the domains of both the visual and performing arts, with an international perspective.

Learning objectives

The main goals of the program are:

● Build and strengthen basic knowledge and understanding of History of Art (visual and performing arts), with particular attention to the contemporary world and the international scene

● Build and strengthen competence in economics and management and as it applies to the cultural industry

● Build and strengthen competence in legislative transmit and reinforce the legislative competences and their application to the cultural field, in an international perspective

● To contribute to the advancement of cultural institutions and companies in Italy and abroad, by fostering interests for Art and its proliferation

Career opportunities & professional recognition

The Master’s qualification in Arts Management will open up professional opportunities in the fields of Organization, Marketing and Communications, Accounting, Legal Affairs, Projects and Events Management in cultural institutions and companies. Other professional opportunities are to be found in consulting and service companies in the fields of promotion, communication and management of cultural events, products and services.

Curriculum

Core Courses

  • History of visual Arts: The course is meant to provide students with the necessary knowledge and understanding of modern and contemporary art.
  • Performing Arts history: Music: the course will give students a foundation for understanding some of the basic relationships between Music History and Society. Theatre: the course will briefly explore the history of European theater from the Early Modern age to nowadays, focusing on political, social and economic aspects.
  • Visual Arts System: This course will give students a large and differentiated overview of contemporary effective practices for managing visual arts.
  • Performing Art System: The course aims at providing students with a wide view of the performing arts system, through the elaboration of a critical interpretation of its multiple features, from traditional roots to technological perspectives; but also from the production of cultural value to the entertainment trap, from public institutional and financial protection to market orientation. 

Advanced Courses

The goals of the advanced courses are to build up competencies in specific fields of arts management in order to provide participants with advanced knowledge about how to solve problems and cope with the challenges of the arts field

  • Cultural Policy: cultural policy will be discussed from historical and international perspectives in order to focus on the main policy challenges when managing arts organizations
  • Marketing for the Arts: marketing policies and practices for cultural organizations will be covered, ranging from for-profit to non-profit cultural organizations
  • HR and Leadership in the creative Industries: organization forms for cultural industries, project management tools and the most advanced people management topics will be discussed during the course
  • Fundraising in the Arts Industry: accounting principles and contemporary fundraising tools for non-profit and cultural organizations will be discussed and applied
  • Law and the Arts: relevant and most up-to-date criminological knowledge about the empirical dimension of offences against both movable and immovable cultural property, at both national and international level will be covered
  • Media in the Arts: the role of technology, especially new media, in changing the business and organizational model of cultural institutions will be analyzed
  • Finance and Art Market:This course will give students a foundation for understanding the structure and various segments of today’s ever-evolving international art market.
  • Strategy in the Arts:This course will give students a foundation for understanding principles and practices of strategy and accounting in Arts and Culture Organizations (ACOs). 

Team Building Activities

The goals of team building activities is to help participants know each other and create a collaborative atmosphere in class. Moreover, these activities will introduce participants to Milano and its cultural assets. Team building will include:

● Dinner with the class and the Master Faculty

● Team building experiences to know your class

● Guest speeches from established professionals in the field


Internship

To complete the Master in Arts Management, participants are required to carry out a three-months internship in a cultural institutions or company in one of the above mentioned fields. They will have the chance to be included in the Master Curricu- lum Vitae book, that will be transmitted to the major institutions and organizations in Italy and abroad.

An international learning experience

Located in the unique city of Milan which contributes to a valuable international perspective. This glowing city allows students to merge the learning experience with the cultural atmosphere of the city. Students will have the opportunity to practice their knowledge through field projects and internships even beyond the classroom.

Trained faculty

A national and international academic and professional faculty using teaching methods that foster an interactive and hands-on approach to issues of cultural heritage management.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarship value: €2500



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The Photography Arts MA offers a dynamic mix of photography practice and research to support your development as an artist. In an open-minded educational environment you will expand the boundaries of your photography, advancing your own distinct visual and conceptual approach. Read more

The Photography Arts MA offers a dynamic mix of photography practice and research to support your development as an artist. In an open-minded educational environment you will expand the boundaries of your photography, advancing your own distinct visual and conceptual approach. Students are fully supported by our internationally renowned photography staff and inspired by an exciting range of prominent visiting photographic artists and thinkers. 

Situated in Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design, you will have access to extensive photographic facilities and a wealth of inter-disciplinary expertise. You will be part of a world-famous centre for photography research. 

The Photography Arts MA is a recently revalidated course, which builds on the former Photographic Studies MA (1996-2016). The course champions a long, proud tradition of cutting-edge photography pioneered at the University.

The course has an open definition of photography, encompassing a wide range of approaches and forms. We encourage free experimentation in the development of ideas. You will advance your practical work choosing new or traditional techniques, digital or analogue forms, in work that may extend beyond the traditional boundaries of wall, page or screen into other modes including moving image, installation and performance.

The research components of the course are tailored for the needs of the contemporary artist photographer, and allow you to focus on the lines of inquiry that will be most productive for your own development. Your progress through the course will be supported with one-to-one tutorials with a personal tutor.

This is the right course if you are highly motivated and excited to develop your independent practice alongside critical research within a rapidly changing field. Working with our experienced staff and a group of peers drawn from all over the world, you can discover your own future working with the most contemporary approaches to photography.  

The course is structured to develop your practice, informed by research. Throughout the course, students make work with great attention to how it will be presented in a range of modes including exhibition, book and/or screen. The practice modules provide a framework for developing and testing new approaches and establish a foundation for your future independent work. Students write three short research essays during the course, each aimed at broadening knowledge of photography, contemporary art and related histories, theories and criticism. Content for these assignments is led by the student’s own research interests. The course is unusually flexible in that a dissertation is not required, but can form an optional part of the final master’s project.

The course enables students to become independent practitioners, generating up-to-date, informed work. You will be empowered with visual, critical and practical skills that culminate in the Masters Project, exhibited in a central London degree show at the end of the course. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Option modules

Option modules from Documentary Photography and Photojournalism MA

Career path

An MA in Photography Arts is an unusually versatile qualification that prepares you to be an artist/photographer working at the highest level of ambitious contemporary art, and also gives you a range of transferable skills vital to twenty-first century creative industries.

Graduates of the course work as independent artist/photographers and also as writers, educators, critics, publishers, curators, gallerists, picture editors and researchers. A number of graduates go on to pursue their research at doctoral level.

Alumni from the course (under the former title Photographic Studies MA) now work all over the world in a range of careers requiring creativity, research skills and critical analysis of visual images



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IN BRIEF. Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices. Access to your own studio space and workshop support. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices
  • Access to your own studio space and workshop support.
  • You'll be offered placements, residencies and exhibition opportunities with key arts organisations.
  • Part-time study option
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This programme is open for September 2018 entry only.

This course is designed for students to refine their subject specific practice through creative industry experience, studio based experimentation, contextual research and critical dialogue to enable them to graduate as professional artists within the wider context of contemporary arts networks.  

During your time with us, you will be encouraged to undertake independent contextual and theoretical research that will improve your capacity for independent enquiry, creativity and professional practice. 

There are plenty of opportunities to get involved in group exhibitions, residencies and live projects as we work closely with key cultural organisations within the North West. These include; The Center for Chinese Contemporary Art, Hotbed Press, Islington Mill, Castlefield Gallery, International 3, Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Artworks, Mark Devereux Projects and HOME.

COURSE DETAILS

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

  • Provide the skills needed to professionalise careers through embedded creative placements and live projects with industry and community organisations.
  • Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies appropriate to Masters level degree study, which is informed by current industry practice.
  • Develop advanced understanding of research methods in the context of contemporary art & design practice and to understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.
  • Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional, contextual and collaborative frameworks appropriate to their experiences and objectives by establishing intellectual debate to enable the articulation and dissemination of their propositions.
  • Assist you at an advanced level in developing, extending and applying complex strategies and approaches to the development of a professional studio practice, embedding the knowledge and skills required to establish you as an arts practitioners within the wider context of contemporary arts networks.

Contemporary Arts Practice is for committed artists who wish to develop their personal creative practice towards a higher, professional level. It actively encourages the pursuit of individual agendas for study and for personal choice of media/disciplines selected from the range of practices within the field.  

You will contextualise your work via rigorous analysis of relevant cultural discourses and reflective studio-based practice. Running alongside this, is the notion of embedding this practice within the creative industries through public exhibition as well as responses to opportunities provided by our industry partners. Studio production is emphasised as a key driver for practice development and there is a challenging seminar programme and a comprehensive schedule of visiting or visits to artists/art professionals and venues.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme structure consists of five modules, four of which are delivered within a collaborative framework allowing all students across the Masters in Art & Design programmes (Contemporary Fine Art, Socially Engaged Arts Practice and Design for Communication) opportunities to engage with your peers whilst working through individual assignments focused around each programme. The remaining one module is tailored to the specific programme learning outcomes.

For the full-time study option:Semester 1 - September to February

Semester 2 - February to June

Semester 3 - June to September

You will take five core modules and will study one day a week. Full-time students will have concentrated module delivery in both the morning and afternoon.

TEACHING

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

  • formal lectures
  • seminar presentations
  • workshops
  • critical analysis and independent learning

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods used on the course include:

  • Practical projects (60%)
  • Reflective writing and essays (30%)
  • Group presentations/ exhibitions (10%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

  • Body of work and contextual research: e.g studio/portfolio/exhibition/publication/etc.
  • Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/critical writing/seminar or other presentation*  

All submissions are comprised of a body of arts practice: ‘studio’ plus a contextual and critical research portfolio, and reflective logs/journals. As the ‘thesis’ is embedded in the practice there is no requirement for a separate, written dissertation - although you may elect to do so, if appropriate, by negotiation with final award Course Team. 

*You can negotiate the format of your submissions, in response to the needs and priorities within your practice, and in line with contemporary professional practice habits.

EMPLOYABILITY

Our graduates have exhibited successfully in a range of venues and biennales. Many graduates establish themselves within the local creative economy and develop a studio presence in the region and beyond.  

We encourage students to pursue an international profile and presence as soon as possible in support of their professional reputation. Opportunities via MediaCityUK will facilitate internationalisation of practice on individual terms.

Many of our students succeed through related professions in: education, community development, healthcare environments or enterprise. Some graduates prefer to apply their creative practice to commissioning, consultancy or other professional outcomes.

FACILITIES

This programme is based at New Adelphi on the main campus. The facilities include:

  • 2D & 3D Printing Facilities
  • 3D workshop
  • Fibre Workshop
  • Photography studio which includes a lighting set-up
  • Computer suites
  • Gallery Spaces

You will be inducted into the workshops, which covers how to use all the machinery, by trained workshop technicians.



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The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms. Read more

The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms.

These forms have included written and illustrated books for children and adults, interactive design, film, graphic novels, stage and exhibition design, animation, book arts, narrative textiles, experimental writing, product design and even community projects that encourage social development through storytelling.

In its 25-year history, this course has built on the gathered knowledge and experience of its staff and students to cover topics that are relevant to all MA students interested in storytelling, visual narrative and delivering complex sequential messages.

Recent graduate work – ranging from a biography of Edith Sitwell to a series of calendars made from human hair – demonstrates the diversity of individual research. Other students have examined the legacy of recipes, the secret language of headscarves, the parallels between quantum physics and Taoism as demonstrated through a detective novel, and the role of plumage in communication.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis.

  • Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.
  • Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.

Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Making sure that what you learn with us is relevant, up to date and what employers are looking for is our priority, so courses are reviewed and enhanced on an ongoing basis. When you have applied to us, you’ll be told about any new developments through our applicant portal.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects, with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Arts and Design by Independent Project MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1

  • Sequential Project(s)
  • Visual Narrative
  • Research and Investigation

Stage 2

  • Major Sequential Project(s)
  • Project Report

Visiting lecturers

We arrange a programme of weekly lectures by a range of practitioners and academics to broaden your experience and understanding of professional issues and activity. Lecturers describe their practice and professional experience, sharing insights about their research methods and discoveries.

The programme is organised to relate to specific stages of the course and varies on a two-year cycle, so part-time students have access to a different set of events in each of their two years of study.

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

Recent graduates include:

  • an art and display technician at the Littlehampton Academy
  • an associate teaching fellow at the University of Southampton
  • a book designer at Flukso Design
  • a designer and associate lecturer at the Open University
  • an exhibition and graphic designer at Hello Museum
  • an illustrator at Helen Murphy Freelance Illustration
  • a lecturer at Norwich University of the Arts
  • a mobile game designer at TieSense Information Company.


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Follow in the footsteps of acclaimed children’s artists. Show your work to publishers at book fairs and exhibitions and get dedicated support from a team of internationally-recognised artists, who’ll help you to develop your own personal visual vocabulary and make connections with the children’s publishing industry. Read more
Follow in the footsteps of acclaimed children’s artists. Show your work to publishers at book fairs and exhibitions and get dedicated support from a team of internationally-recognised artists, who’ll help you to develop your own personal visual vocabulary and make connections with the children’s publishing industry.

Overview

This taught studio course, the first of its kind in the UK, will give you the dedicated support and knowledge you need to develop your practice in the art of children’s book illustration.

Within the broad guidelines of each module, you’ll propose and develop a project, with guidance from internationally recognised illustrators, writers and publishers of children's books. You’ll share and discuss your work with other students in group critiques, and attend lectures and seminars that will inform your studio practice.

Illustration at Anglia Ruskin is built on a tradition that goes back to the founding of the Cambridge School of Art in 1858. Our MA students work in dedicated illustration studios right next door to the Ruskin Gallery, with access to a fully equipped printmaking studio.

By studying with us, you’ll follow in the footsteps of alumni such as designer and war artist Edward Bawden, acclaimed graphic satirist Ronald Searle, and Roger Law and Peter Fluck, founders of the TV phenomenon Spitting Image.

Teaching times: currently either Mondays and Thursdays (9am-3pm) or Tuesdays and Fridays (9am-3pm). There are also lectures and presentations on Wednesdays from 3-5pm (full-time); Wednesdays 9am-5pm in semesters 1 and 2 (part-time)

Careers

Our partnership with Walker Books and its American counterpart Candlewick Press will give you the chance to go on a work experience visit to their London offices. They also sponsor our annual Sebastian Walker Award for Most Promising Student.

Many of our past students now enjoy careers as freelance authors and illustrators for children. Among our published graduates are Paula Metcalf, Marta Altés, Nadia Shireen, Birgitta Sif, Rebecca Patterson and Jo Empson.

You may decide to take your work to a deeper level with a research degree, like our PhD Children’s Book Illustration.

Modules

Core modules:
Observation and Experiment
The Sequential Image
The Diploma Project
The Diploma Review
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

In your first three studio modules, you’ll show your progress through project work, worth 80% of your module grade, and an essay relating to the contextual study lectures, which is worth 20%.

Your Diploma Review thesis will be assessed 100% on your 6,000-8,000 word essay, while the Master’s Stage Project will be assessed 90% on your project work and 10% on your written report.

What you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Field trips

At our annual London graduation exhibition you’ll show your work to leading publishing companies and literary agencies. We also organise a stand at Bologna Children's Book Fair each year, where you’ll have more opportunities to secure a publishing deal with industry reps. As a direct result, our past students have signed contracts with publishers including Macmillan, Random House, Nosy Crow, Sarbacane (Fr), Donizelli (It), Child's Play, Walker Books, HarperCollins (NY), Doubleday (NY), Penguin (NY), Faber & Faber and Hodder. Advances against royalties have ranged from €2,000 with an independent publisher, to $50,000 for a three-book deal.

Work experience

Our partnership with Walker Books and its American counterpart Candlewick Press will give you the chance to go on a work experience visit to their London offices. They also sponsor our annual Sebastian Walker Award for Most Promising Student.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in dedicated illustration studios right next door to our Ruskin Gallery, with access to a fully-equipped printmaking studio.

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IN BRIEF. Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices. You will develop your arts practice within a socially engaged and collaborative context. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices
  • You will develop your arts practice within a socially engaged and collaborative context
  • Undertake placements, residencies and live project opportunities with communities, arts and public sector organisations.
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This programme is open for September 2018 entry only.

Socially Engaged Arts Practice focuses on building relationships between artists, members of communities and organisations by working alongside those communities in ways that inform the artist’s practice. Through such practice, communities and individuals can be supported to articulate their own concerns and priorities. Students on the programme may work with a community in a specific area or identify a community of users from public places such as schools, hospitals, museums/galleries or sites of commercial interest to collaborate with.

COURSE DETAILS

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

  • Provide the skills needed to professionalise careers through embedded creative placements and live projects with industry and community organisations.
  • Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies appropriate to Masters level degree study, which is informed by current industry practice.
  • Develop advanced understanding of research methods in the context of contemporary art & design practice and to understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research
  • Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional, contextual and collaborative frameworks appropriate to their experiences and objectives by establishing intellectual debate to enable the articulation and dissemination of their propositions.
  • Assist students at an advanced level in developing, extending and applying complex strategies and process based activities within collaborative, community based, and informal educational contexts, enabling detailed discourse and the creation of a contextual framework from which to practice.

Socially Engaged Arts Practice focuses on building relationships between artists, members of communities and organisations working alongside those communities in ways that inform the artist’s practice. Through such practice, communities and individuals can be supported to articulate their own concerns and priorities. Students on the programme may identify with a specific community in a specific area or identify a community of users from public places such as a school, hospital, museum/ gallery or sites of commercial interest.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme structure consists of 5 modules, 4 of which are delivered within a collaborative framework allowing all students across the Masters in Art & Design programs (Contemporary Fine Art, Socially Engaged Arts Practice and Design for Communication) opportunities to engage with your peers whilst working through individual assignments focused around each programme. The remaining 1 module is tailored to the specific programme learning outcomes.

For the full-time study option:Semester 1 - October to February

Semester 2 - February to June

Semester 3 - June to September

You will take five core modules and will study one day a week. Full-time students will have concentrated module delivery in both the morning and afternoon.

TEACHING

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

  • formal lectures  
  • seminar presentations  
  • workshops  
  • critical analysis and independent learning.  

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods used on the course include:

  • Practical projects (60%)
  • Reflective writing and essays (30%)
  • Group presentations/ exhibitions (10%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

  • Body of work and contextual research: e.g action research/publication/exhibition etc.
  • Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/critical writing/seminar or other presentation*

All submissions are comprised of a body of practice plus a contextual and critical research portfolio, and reflective logs/journals and case studies. As the ‘thesis’ is embedded in the action research there is no requirement for a separate, written dissertation - although you may elect to do so, if appropriate, by negotiation with final award Course Team.  

*You can negotiate the format of your submissions, in response to the needs and priorities within your practice, and in line with contemporary professional practice habits.

EMPLOYABILITY

Some teachers on leaving the course step out of formal education and become freelance practitioners working in galleries, prisons, youth centres, hospitals and schools.  They are supported in establishing business practices and marketing their activities.  

Artists leave the course as professional freelancers working in a variety of formal and non-formal workshop or residency settings.  The mix of freelancers and employed teaching staff enrolled on the course brings a wide range of peer employment opportunities. Current students are working in primary and secondary schools, prison education, hospitals, galleries, further and higher education, youth clubs and residential and care homes.

The School co-ordinates a range of enterprise projects and initiatives that can benefit graduating students, in order to assist their career opportunities or routes into self-employment.

FACILITIES

This programme is based at Peel on the main campus. Students working on site have access to their own studio space. They have access to facilities in New Adelphi Building. 

These include:

  • 2D & 3D Printing Facilities
  • 3D workshop
  • Fibre Workshop
  • Photography studio which includes a lighting set-up
  • Computer suites
  • Gallery Spaces

You will be inducted into the workshops, which covers how to use all the machinery, by trained workshop technicians.



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Postgraduate study in illustration reflects the diversity of the subject and the opportunities that exist in areas such as publishing, advertising, graphic and web design, theatre, television, art galleries and museums. Read more

Postgraduate study in illustration reflects the diversity of the subject and the opportunities that exist in areas such as publishing, advertising, graphic and web design, theatre, television, art galleries and museums. We welcome applicants with a variety of approaches to Illustration, from both academic and professional perspectives.

You will be encouraged to explore a range of methods with support from highly accomplished and respected staff, all of whom have understanding and expertise in the art of illustration.

Facilities include excellent individual working spaces with access to a drawing studio and extensive printmaking resources. There are life drawing classes, workshops and field trips. You will also have the chance to study bookbinding, book arts, digital technologies and web publishing.

The programme also includes working with writers, designers and publishers in collaboration and in live briefs. Many of our postgraduates have seen their work published and there are a small number of set projects, which evolve from year to year to reflect contemporary developments in Illustration. For example, students have made work for the Royal Botanical Gardens, Edinburgh Filmhouse and the ECA Bookmarks symposium.

You will be encouraged to take part in national and international competitions, with the aim of joining the ranks of those who have exhibited and won prizes in prestigious events, such as the V&A Student Illustration Awards, Folio Society, Penguin Book Awards, 3x3 and Image Nation.

Programme structure

This programme offers an excellent opportunity for independent, focused study. MA students produce a body of practical and written work on an agreed topic. MFA students produce an extended range of work, appropriate to the length of the course. Self-directed projects are connected to a number of set projects, workshops and collaborations throughout the academic year.

Your studies will combine practical studio work with theoretical and written studies, including professional practice elements in preparation for employment in the industry. There is a lecture/seminar series that will examine the wider context of your studies, presented by contemporary illustrators, designers and artists.

Career opportunities

Graduates explore an exciting and diverse range of careers, including working as picture book illustrators, designers, freelance illustrators, artists and craftsmen, or in leading agencies.



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The Master of Fine Art in Fine Art (MFA) provides postgraduate studio-based arts practice, critical theory in fine arts and access to the professional skills and knowledge to succeed in a career in the fine arts. Read more

The Master of Fine Art in Fine Art (MFA) provides postgraduate studio-based arts practice, critical theory in fine arts and access to the professional skills and knowledge to succeed in a career in the fine arts. The programme will appeal to independent artists wanting to extend their practice within a critical research framework supported by practicing tutors. Artists looking to extend their career path into curatorial practice in the contemporary arts, collaborative projects with arts organisations, arts in socially engaged practices and/or further research will find support for this trajectory in this broad-based programme. Teaching involves lectures, seminars, and group and individual tutorials from active artists with research profiles. The programme will equip you with creative, interpretive, critical and analytical skills to develop an advanced understanding of contemporary art and its social, cultural and historical contexts.

The image above shows a close up of the work Nova by Saad Querishi, a former student of Fine Art at Oxford Brookes. Saad has been commissioned to produce a piece of work for the new areas of the campus and will be acting as a resource for the students on the programme.

Why choose this course?

Your artistic practice – An independent studio environment enables you to further your work within a supported critical framework. Through group and individual tutorials, staff/peer critique and presentations, an incremental approach is applied whereby you will confidently develop your work towards public exhibition/dissemination. There are two formal exhibitions during the MFA programme.

Flexible studio options – Students may select to locate their studio either at Oxford Brookes or elsewhere. Students working from their own studios will be eligible for a reduced tuition fee. 

Technical resources – The School of Arts’ workshops offer supported working environments in a range of specialist areas including: sculpture, photography, video, sound, printmaking and book-works. All our workshops are staffed by highly skilled and creative Technical Specialists.

Extra-curricular activities – You will gain exposure to a range of contemporary artistic practice through the thriving creative student community in the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes. You will participate in the lectures and film screenings set up by the Fine Art Research (FAR) Group. These include visiting contemporary artists, critics, curators and notable alumni. Free life drawing classes extend your drawing skills and optional local, regional and international field trips provide further stimulus.

Theoretical framework – Your ability to articulate your own creative position is enabled through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship informed by diverse practices by nationally and internationally recognised artists, collectives and movements. An early theoretical module explores contemporary art discourse through seminars informed by selected readings and in a later module you develop a more intense involvement with theory related to your individual research interests.

Professional development – The programme enables you to identify a professional focus which is likely to inform your subsequent career trajectory. This might involve research preparation, a placement, a collaborative project or exhibition management/curatorial practice. With the guided experience in this module our graduates are better prepared for a successful career as a professional artist.

Careers and professional development

How this course helps you develop

In addition to the support, teaching and development opportunities afforded by the curriculum, as a student you will be immersed in the active arts environment of the School. During your studies with us you will have access to the visiting speakers arranged for this and for other arts programmes, for the seminars and conferences in diverse fields, including publishing, film, music and digital production in the School. The field trips, visiting artists, PhD students and opportunities in the programme’s Professional Experience module offer a rich network of individuals and organisations that enable you to make useful contacts for your future career. 

Careers

Graduates from this programme will be well equipped to pursue their practice as independent artists who have a well-developed understanding of the theoretical and professional contexts of the current and contemporary landscape of the arts and creative industries. 

This programme is delivered within the School of Arts, which offers a vibrant environment for the creative industries including film, photography, music and publishing. Through the modules, which address practice, theory and professional experience, students are provided with links to engage with employment and further study opportunities, either as independent practitioners, facilitators or participants within a range of group and collaborative practices and contexts. 

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:

  • studying at a Brookes partner college
  • studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.


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This innovative, industry-facing programme allows you to work in a cross-disciplinary way or in a specialist area of study. Students on this course come from a diverse range of disciplines to apply ideas and findings from research towards problem-solving, social design and environmental issues. Read more

This innovative, industry-facing programme allows you to work in a cross-disciplinary way or in a specialist area of study. Students on this course come from a diverse range of disciplines to apply ideas and findings from research towards problem-solving, social design and environmental issues. Approaches to future design range from the artistic design, such as illustration, printmaking, book arts and decorative arts, to more functional and problem-solving pursuits.

Course details

Creative, forward-thinking individuals and groups are key contributors to the new economic and social agenda. We welcome applications from disciplines outside of art and design if there is evidence of ability and desire to develop better systems, services, products and experiences. 

You learn through initiatives and activities that stimulate and develop creative practice, problem solving, manufacture and distribution. Thinking, making and observation are applied to practical and social contexts. Playful and fictional approaches are encouraged through workshops and connections with international events and research projects. Future design challenges us to enquire into what happens next – in our careers, ambitions and responsibility to society. Knowledge and awareness in futurology are increasingly desirable attributes in business, employment, innovation and enterprise. Creative individuals prepare for professional practice, developing new business ideas, products, systems and services. Working in a stimulating environment you explore emerging and future aspects of design practice, through individual and collaborative action. Project-based learning activities enable knowledge, skills and experience to be acquired according to negotiated plans and professional directions. This two-year programme enhances your qualification by spending one semester completing a vocational internship, research internship or by studying abroad. Although we can’t guarantee an internship, we can provide you with practical support and advice on how to find and secure your own internship position. A vocational internship is a great way to gain work experience and give your CV a competitive edge. Alternatively, a research internship develops your research and academic skills as you work as part of a research team in an academic setting – ideal if you are interested in a career in research or academia. A third option is to study abroad in an academic exchange with one of our partner universities. This option does incur additional costs such as travel and accommodation. You must also take responsibility for ensuring you have the appropriate visa to study outside the UK, where relevant.

What you study

The programme begins with group research projects, sharing information and references from diverse sources. Collecting and analysing information from a theme of common interest helps to develop your awareness of the subject from multiple perspectives. Stage one involves developing your professional skills, ideas, research, project work and provides the opportunity for co-working, partnerships and collaborations. Your interests are evaluated for their enterprise potential and innovative outputs are proposed. 

Stage two culminates in a feasibility study for a negotiated research project. Stage three enhances your learning through practice with the potential to spend one semester working full-time in industry, on a major research project, or studying or working abroad. 

Stage four enables you to direct and display your major project work, supported by regular tutorial contact and studio interaction. You show future ambitions and plans for the project including how it may be distributed or realised beyond the University. 

Course structure

Core modules

  • Creative Interaction
  • Design Direction
  • Design Innovation
  • Research and Development

Advanced Practice options

  • Research Internship
  • Study Abroad
  • Vocational Internship

 Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

At MA level it is vital that you take an active role in structuring your own learning, and engage with the relevant methods and underpinning theories of your discipline. 

Tutorials, seminars and workshops enable you to apply key learning principles to your day-to-day interactions. Individual support, provided by a personal tutor, is an integral feature of the learning and teaching strategy. 

Research is also an intrinsic part of your study. You need to find and make sense of a wide variety of information from books, newspapers, journals, magazines, websites, archives and many other sources, then analyse and discuss your findings to inform the creative process. Lectures and briefings introduce topics and impart key aspects of disciplinary knowledge, usually to larger groups. 

You develop your practical and professional skills with hands-on experience, informed by subject knowledge and critical understanding. Practical workshops introduce specific skills, followed by independent learning, project work, tutorials and critiques.

Critical reflection is key to all successful problem solving and is essential to the design process. You are expected to test and assess your solutions against design criteria which you develop in the light of your research.

How you are assessed

Your assessments are primarily in-course assessments – you submit work during the module rather than sit timed exams at the end.

Design modules are generally project based and primarily assessed through appraising your portfolio of work, often accompanied by a verbal presentation. Design work is largely developmental and you are assessed on your problem-solving process as well as the result, so it is essential you provide clear evidence of your development work.

Employability

Work placement

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. 

Career opportunities

Graduates have the opportunity to go on to a range of design-related employment, develop new enterprise propositions or receive project funding to take their ideas to market.

You can work across a range of professions within design and the creative industries such as freelance designers, creative entrepreneurs, designer makers and creative directors. Further study at doctoral level is also an option.



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Live the writer's life in New York City. The New School's. Creative Writing MFA. program allows you to join a community of diverse voices, plug into New York's publishing world, and build a network that will support you through graduation and beyond. Read more

Live the writer's life in New York City. The New School's Creative Writing MFA program allows you to join a community of diverse voices, plug into New York's publishing world, and build a network that will support you through graduation and beyond.

Creative Writing MFA students develop their craft in workshops and literature seminars led by an internationally recognized faculty with close ties to New York publishing and the city's literary scene. Courses and events are held in the evening, enabling students to work during the day while in the program.

This two-year, full-time creative writing program offers concentrations in:

  • Fiction
  • Nonfiction
  • Poetry
  • Writing for Children and Young Adults

If you're thinking about pursuing your master's in creative writing, find your place in a center of learning where creativity, support, and experimentation come together at The New School.

Program Highlights

  • Take part in workshops and seminars led by an internationally recognized faculty with close ties to NYC’s literary scene
  • Immerse yourself in the publishing world, learning crucial skills and techniques to get published
  • Enter the creative process from the inside out, learning to read like a writer, and take courses in publishing and multimedia storytelling

One third of the curriculum consists of Writing Workshops. Guided by an experienced writer-teacher, students work intensively on their manuscripts, with a focus on the creative acts of self-editing and revision. Workshops meet for two hours; structure and content are adapted to the student's area of concentration

Access to New York City Publishing

Evenings with agents and editors, exclusively for MFA students, provide informal opportunities to meet publishing professionals. Courses and internships provide students with hands-on experience in publishing. In The Writing and Publishing Lab, students use new and traditional technologies to produce works that combine text and images, while also taking part in project-based internships. In Freeman's Journal Seminar, students help produce a professional journal distributed by Grove Press. Students also serve as editorial staff members and work with alumni on The New School's nationally distributed literary journal, LIT.

Recent student internships include

  • PEN
  • Guernica
  • The Academy of American Poets
  • Scholastic
  • The Center for Book Arts
  • Interview magazine
  • Tin House magazine

The publishing and literary worlds are changing quickly. Graduates, faculty, and partners of the program are at the forefront of the reinvention of literature. Novels and poems aren't going away, but it is increasingly important for writers to be able to tell stories with images as well as words. Courses in the MFA program give students the tools to become leaders in a transformed industry.



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This MA allows you to develop your work as a creative writer, going beyond the merely personal and writing with an engaged sense of society and an understanding of the location of your work in relation to contemporary practices. You will take one of three distinct pathways. Read more

This MA allows you to develop your work as a creative writer, going beyond the merely personal and writing with an engaged sense of society and an understanding of the location of your work in relation to contemporary practices. You will take one of three distinct pathways: Fiction Writing, Poetry Writing, and Poetic Practice. In addition, all students take modules in Supplementary Discourses and Reading as a Writer, and all students undertake a Practical Project and a Dissertation.

Fiction:

This course encourages you to develop and reflect on your work as a creative writer. While you learn to stretch your imagination, you'll be motivated to develop your technical and analytic skills, and in the process, sharpen your self-criticism.

Poetry:

If you choose the poetry strand, you'll benefit from the strong focus on individual creative pactice fostered in weeklly workshops, critical classes and tutorials. As with all the Creative Writing pathways, poetry is taught by writers practising at the highest level and the emphasis is on your own needs as a developing poetry student.

Poetic practice:

Poetic Practice is a unique, practice-based pathway that draws upon the Department of English's expertise in contemporary experimental poetry and writing within an expanded field of creative practice.

All three courses are designed to help you develop your work as a creative writer, against the backdrop of literature through history. Choosing the Fiction or the Poetry strand, you'll make the most of your existing experience, stretch your imagination, develop analytic skills, and in the process sharpen how you think about your own work. The Poetic practice pathway draws upon our expertise in contemporary experimental poetry across a wide range of ideas and practices. You will learn how to develop your practice and how to situate your practice in relation to recent and contemporary trends in experimental poetry, including visual poetics, sound and conceptual writing.

Course structure

Core modules

Supplementary Discourses

This is a weekly one-and-a-half hour seminar involving critical and theoretical reading designed to supply you with appropriate critical and theoretical discourse for discussing your own work with others.

Reading as a Writer

The principle aim of the course is to enable you to read as a writer in order to inform your literary composition. You will read a selection of contemporary fiction and poetry from the persepctice of the writer.

Creative Writing Project

You will undertake a major extended fiction, non-fiction, poetry or poetic practice project under supervision.

Dissertation

The principle aim of the Dissertation on Practice is to enable you to demonstrate your ability to reflect critically and theoretically on your own practice and to locate your practice in relation to contemporary writing practices.

Pathways

Fiction Workshop

This module is designed to develop your understanding of, and ability in, fiction writing beyond first-degree level. You will attend a weekly three-hour workshop, in which work you produce will be discussed.

Poetry Workshop

You will develop your understanding of, and ability in, contemporary poetry beyond first-degree level. You will be expected to embark on an advanced programme of writing and critical thinking through creative exploration and dialogue with the tutor and other members of the group.

Poetic Practice

You will develop, and reflect on, your own practice in the context of an understanding of contemporary experimental practice in poetry from the UK and North America, and consider how contemporary poetry and poetics intersect with such fields as conceptual art writing, sound art, live art, digital poetics, book arts, installed texts and writing in relation to site.

Teaching & Assessment

At the beginning of the Spring term fiction writers will submit a 5,000-word piece of work and poets on both the Poetry and the Poetic Practice pathways a portfolio of 12 pages. In addition, they will submit a 3,000-4,000 word essay arising from their work in Supplementary Discourses. They will be given feedback and then, at the beginning of the Summer term, resubmit improved versions together with a second piece of creative work of the same length, and a second essay in relation to Reading as a Writer. Part-time students hand in their work for Supplementary Discourses and Reading as a Writer at the end of the Spring and Summer terms respectively; they will submit their portfolios for the pathway at the start of September.

At the end of the course fiction students will submit a 15,000 word piece of work and poets a portfolio of 24 pages. In addition, students will write a dissertation of 10-12,000 words, relating to their creative work and to their wider literary interests, to be submitted with the portfolio. Part-time students will make these final submissions at the end of their second year.

Your future career

A significant number of our Creative Writing students have become published authors or found work in publishing and allied professions. Along with this, we have has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs; recently they've secured positions at the Universities of Edinburgh, Leeds, Sussex and UEA, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland.

This course can also give you an distinctive, creative edge in careers such as publishing, teaching, writing and journalism, administration and marketing. Recent graduates have taken up jobs at the BBC and in art therapy.



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The Publishing - Book, Magazine and Electronic program is one of the most prestigious programs of its kind in Canada. Through hands-on education, it prepares you for employment in a wide variety of areas in the publishing industry. Read more
The Publishing - Book, Magazine and Electronic program is one of the most prestigious programs of its kind in Canada. Through hands-on education, it prepares you for employment in a wide variety of areas in the publishing industry.

Established in 1974, this unique and award-winning Publishing program has earned several accolades for academic excellence and for the career success of its graduates.

In this School of Communications, Media, Arts and Design program, you learn to:
-Be an integral part of the team that helps to shape the evolution of Canada's cultural and literary landscape
-Publish e-books
-Help build the careers of the next generation of writers in the publishing industry
-Take part in publishing the bi-yearly On the Danforth magazine

Your experience in the Publishing program is rounded out by an industry field placement at a book or magazine publisher in Toronto. During this time, you acquire critical working experience, industry knowledge and professional relationships as you initiate your new career.

A career in book, magazine or online publishing promises a world of innovation, stories and culture that integrates your creative, marketing and business skills.

Career Opportunities

Companies that have hired program graduates include: Penguin, Random House Canada, Pearson Education, Toronto Life, Nelson Educational Publishing, Chatelaine, Canadian Living, Style at Home, Hockey News, Cycle magazine, Harper-Collins Canada, ECW, House of Anansi, Firefly Books, Outpost Magazine, Cottage Life, McClelland & Stewart, McGraw-Hill Ryerson and Profit.

Program Highlights
-The two-semester accelerated format covers all facets of the publishing process, including e-books and online magazines.
-You complete a six-week field placement in the industry.
-The graduate certificate that is earned reflects a high standard of learning.

Career Outlook
-Editorial assistant
-Marketing coordinator
-Social media assistant
-Web editor
-Web developer
-Sales coordinator
-Publicist
-Copy editor
-Design and layout artist
-Fact checker
-Digital marketer
-Advertising sales representative

Areas of Employment
-Trade and educational book publishing
-Consumer and business-to-business magazines
-Online publications

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