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Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques. Read more
Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques.

-Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
-Masters course developed and delivered by leading researchers in the field
-Excavation and bioarchaeological analysis of real human remains
-Gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory techniques using specialised bioarchaeological labs and facilities
-Substantial bone selection for research and for experience as teaching toolstools


Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing science that combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences. Study focuses on the key topics pertaining to human remains from archaeological sites.

Bioarchaeology includes areas of scientific investigation including palaeodemography, past behaviour, biological affinity, subsistence strategy, and health and well-being in the past.

The MSc in Bioarchaeology will help you to develop a broad understanding of these issues, through the excavation and analysis of human and animal remains. Analytical techniques will cover dental and osteological analyses, archaeological field methods, and ancient genetics.

The programme aims to develop your advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department’s well-equipped specialist laboratories and reference collections.

A particular strength of our provision and Faculty expertise is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of many world areas and time periods. When you complete the course, you will have all the skills necessary to continue into an academic career or gain employment in research, museums, education or commercial organisations.

During the year you will be given a personal tutor that will support you throughout your time at LJMU and be following both your academic and professional development.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Semester 1 (three core modules)

Advanced Osteology and Skeletal Pathology
Provides students with an advanced knowledge of the human skeleton and the ability to identify animal bones, methods of curation of skeletal collections and understanding of pathological modifications.
Research Design and Quantitative Methods
Provides extensive training in generic research knowledge and statistical techniques for the Natural Sciences. Students design a research project and are assessed via the preparation of a full grant application for the project.
Dental Anthropology
Provides students with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience required by bioarchaeologists to identify and examine human teeth.
Semester 2 (two core modules and one option)

Bioarchaeology: Bones, Teeth and Genes
Focuses on the different methods used to study human remains in archaeological and anthropological contexts. Delivery is through a combination of lectures, practicals, workshops and seminar sessions by experts in different fields, followed by reading and in-class discussion of recent literature.
Excavation
Covers field survey, site management, excavation and related data analysis. In addition to practicals and lectures, the course includes a non-residential field experience.
Dissertation
Comprises an independent, in-depth scientific research study on a chosen relevant topic. The following options are typically offered:
Ballistics and Arson Investigation
Teaches the fundamental principles of fire science, fire dynamics and material science, enabling students to demonstrate their application of fire investigation.
Taphonomy Trauma Analysis
Provides students with an extensive understanding of the biomechanics of human bones and the reaction of bones to the environment for a taphonomic history of the remains. Students gain a broad appreciation of different types of weapons to reconstruct a traumatic event using skeletal evidence.
Human Identification and Forensic DNA
Analyses the issues related to the identification of an unknown subject from both skeletal and genetic features. The module also introduces students to the use of a DNA typing approach for the identification of human remains.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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This programme explores experimental archaeology's potential as a powerful research method, an effective educational tool and an excellent medium for public outreach. Read more
This programme explores experimental archaeology's potential as a powerful research method, an effective educational tool and an excellent medium for public outreach.

You will receive a sound practical and theoretical grounding in scientific use of experiments in archaeological research. The programme will give you practical experience of experiments related to archaeological and taphonomic processes and the production of a range of material culture types including ceramics, stone tools, metals and a range of organic materials.

The role of experiments and ‘reconstructions’ in education and public outreach is investigated through classes, practical activities, and field visits. Links with professionals, such as museums and independent establishments, provide opportunities for practical work based on a sound appreciation of theory.

The University has established an outdoor centre on its Streatham Campus to provide a location for both short- and long-term experimental archaeology research. The programmes involve practical work and field trips.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Experimental Archaeology; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology and Funerary Osteoarchaeology.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

Learning and teaching

This programme involves a high degree of learning through practice and experiments. Most of the formal classes that you attend will be based on a mixture of lectures, seminars, and workshops. The precise mix will vary between modules.

All members of staff are actively engaged in research, both in Britain and abroad, and regularly attend conferences, symposia and workshops. It is through this active engagement in the discipline that we are able to supply top quality teaching by experts in their field and as a result we have a 24/24 grading for our teaching from the Quality Assurance Agency.

We have excellent facilities for experimental archaeology including:
• experimental archaeology lab - this flexible laboratory space is the epicentre of our students' experimental activity and is a hard- wearing practical space in which we can carry out the unusual projects that only experimental archaeologists can dream up!
• material stocks - including sinew, feathers, hides, bones, antlers, wood, different stone types and plant materials
• pottery and kiln room, where students can work with clay, equipped with a potter's wheel and a large programmable electric kiln that can reach 1300 degrees Celsius
• workshop equipped with all the tools necessary to prepare materials for experiments
• knapping area - an outdoor space reserved for flintknapping and other activities best done in the fresh air
• experimental land - a substantial area of land on campus for long-term outdoor experiments.

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Sheffield’s MSc in Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology has offered advanced training in the study of archaeological human bones for 25 years. Read more

About the course

Sheffield’s MSc in Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology has offered advanced training in the study of archaeological human bones for 25 years. This programme will provide you with both the technical skills and knowledge required to undertake analysis of archaeological human remains, and the cultural understanding of funerary practices needed to situate your findings within a broader archaeological and historical context, providing you with the tools to write human history from human remains.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Funerary Archaeology; Quantitative Methods in Anthropology and Archaeology; Research Design: planning, execution and presentation; Biological Anthropology I; Biological Anthropology II; Human Anatomy; Human Osteology; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

A 15 credit module can be selected from a range across the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

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The MSc Real Estate is a conversion programme for graduates from other academic disciplines and is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Read more
The MSc Real Estate is a conversion programme for graduates from other academic disciplines and is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). It is one degree programme with three distinct pathways: Commercial Real Estate; Residential Real Estate and International Real Estate. All three pathways are viewed as a single cohort.

The programme will provide you with all the necessary skills and knowledge to excel in the real estate profession and will prepare you for the challenge of completing the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) to become a chartered surveyor.

The MSc Real Estate is available for full-time study only. Given the intensity of the programme, you are advised to live in or near Oxford. Please note this course has a September start only.

Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/real-estate-international-commercial-or-residential/

Why choose this course?

- The majority of the teaching staff are professionally qualified as chartered surveyors, planners, lawyers or accountants, each of them is dedicated to providing excellent teaching.

- Learning is enhanced by external speakers, field trips and management support from the industry, provided by seven of the major international real estate consultancies who sponsor the programmes: CBRE, Cluttons, DTZ, GVA, Jones Lang LaSalle, Knight Frank and Savills.

- The programme has always enjoyed a very successful level of graduate employment. Our students find employment in both the major international real estate consultancies and local firms.

- The programme is well respected in all areas of the industry and we also have alumni in real estate management companies, banks, financial institutions, government bodies and corporates.

- The small cohort (about 40 students each year) means more individual attention, excellent group dynamics in lectures/discussions, good opportunities for socialising, sharing experiences, supporting each other and creating lasting friendships.

Teaching and learning

The philosophy of the MSc programme is to provide you with a theoretical framework in the early modules and to build on this in the latter stages with practical, real life examples and case studies.

Learning methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials, project work and independent study. Teaching is organised around the component modules, involving a total of around 20 hours of teaching time per week over each 12-week teaching semester.

The semester system requires examinations to be taken at the end of each teaching period. It is a very intensive course and you undertake a substantial amount of private study and project work.

The Integrative Professional Practice module draws together the different subjects taught on the course and enables you to develop strong interpersonal communication via a series of face-to-face role-plays.

In addition to the taught modules (see below), there is also an umbrella module, Real Estate Markets, which incorporates a number of field trips in the UK and Europe.

Approach to assessment

Each module is assessed individually, through coursework such as submission of reports and presentations, and/or formal written examination.

Specialist facilities

Students taking the MSc Real Estate benefit from the allocation of a dedicated base-room in the newly redeveloped Abercrombie Building. The majority of teaching takes place in the base-room which also houses a suite of PCs.

Field trips

One of the most important elements of the MSc Real Estate programme is the field trip schedule, which helps you to build on your learning by giving you the opportunity to see how things are done in practice. These start in the induction week with trips around Oxford and London.

In the autumn, there are further day trips to London and a three-day residential field trip to another major city in the UK. In the spring we have further day trips, and in the summer we have a five-day residential trip to a major European city.

In each case, the intent of the field trips is to 'add flesh to the bones'. In the classroom, we can talk about how things should be done. It is only when on these trips that a student can appreciate how things are done in practice.

The cost of field trips is included in the programme fees.

How this course helps you develop

The MSc Real Estate, although grounded in academic excellence, is a practice-based programme for students wishing to become chartered surveyors. It has established itself as a premier postgraduate programme for students wishing to enter the property profession and it meets the strong demand from the real estate profession for high-calibre postgraduate students both in the UK and overseas.

As a student on the MSc Real Estate, you will benefit from the many contacts that the Department of Real Estate and Construction has established within the property industry and from the networking/career events organised during the year specifically for our students.

The Department also has an active alumni group on LinkedIn for students/graduates in Real Estate and students are encouraged to join when they start the MSc.

Careers

The MSc Real Estate programme at Brookes is highly respected in the profession.

In the case of UK students, it is normal for our students to secure employment before the programme ends. Most students work for the big international real estate companies in London, but our students have also been successful in securing employment in smaller niche practices in London or in other areas of the country.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

David Shiers, co-author of The Green Guide to Specification, is based in the department.

Research areas and clusters

The Real Estate and Land Policy Group examines the impact of land and housing markets/policy on broader development processes - particularly for enhancing urban sustainability. We also address broader market-based fundamentals such as valuation, and emerging areas of research include behavioural finance.

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Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing field which combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences to study key topics such as past health and well-being, diet, ecology, subsistence strategies and environmental impacts. Read more
Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing field which combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences to study key topics such as past health and well-being, diet, ecology, subsistence strategies and environmental impacts.

The MSc in Bioarchaeology aims to develop a broad understanding of these issues through the study of human remains. Students on this programme will also have the opportunity to study animal remains, as well as floral and faunal evidence.

The programme develops advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department’s well-provisioned specialist laboratories and reference collections. A particular strength of our provision is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of both the New and Old Worlds. Those completing the Course acquire the skills necessary to continue into academic research or employment, as an osteologist in field units, museums or Cultural Resources Managament companies.

The programme allows you to specialise in one of two named pathways: Human Osteoarchaeology (physical anthropology and funerary archaeology) or Zooarchaeology (animal bones and other faunal remains).

Learning and teaching

Most of the formal classes that you attend will be based on a mixture of lectures, seminars, and workshops. The precise mix will vary between modules. These aim to outline the principal issues of the module, to explore some detailed issues, and, where relevant, to give you experience of working with a particular technique or data set.
All members of staff are actively engaged in research, both in Britain and abroad, and regularly attend conferences, symposia and workshops. It is through this active engagement in the discipline that we are able to supply top quality teaching by experts in their field and as a result we have a 24/24 grading for our teaching from the Quality Assurance Agency.
In addition to our established palaeobotany, experimental archaeology, and microscopy laboratories, we have a new bioarchaeology lab dedicated to the study of anatomical variation, palaeopathological conditions, and the funerary context of human and animal remains. The laboratory, accompanied by a designated store for the Department's collection of human remains, provides facilities for use by researchers and students for examining skeletal remains recovered from archaeological sites. Equipment includes anatomical casts and demographic reference standards used to determine the sex, age-at-death, stature and body proportions from human remains.

Research areas

Bioarchaeological research at Exeter combines the study of archaeology with branches of the natural and physical sciences to address questions of health and well-being, diet, ecology, subsistence strategies and natural and human-induced environmental impacts in the past.

Our approach is holistic and inter-disciplinary, drawing its inspiration from both definitions of ‘bioarchaeology’: as a study applied to human remains (human osteoarchaeology) and, as originally defined by Grahame Clark, as related to the integration of environmental archaeology, floral and faunal evidence – archaeobotany and zooarchaeology – in archaeological research.
Active field research programmes in North and South America and Eurasia link with extensive laboratory research to address questions of social structure and social organisation, the process of animal and plant domestication, the development of social inequality and power relations, violence and warfare, the rise of élites and craft specialists, and division of labour.

Programme Structure

This programme includes 135 credits of compulsory modules and 45 credits of optional modules.

Pathways

The two available pathways are; Human Osteology (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/archaeology/bioarch/humanosteology/) and Zooarchaeology
(http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/archaeology/bioarch/zooarchaeology/)

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules for each of the pathways can include the following; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Musculo-skeletal Anatomy; Advanced Zooarchaeology; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology (Masters level); Bioarchaeology Dissertation and Bioarchaeology Dissertation Zooarchaeology.

Optional modules

The following is a list of the possible optional modules; Advanced Project; Experimental Archaeology in Practice; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Material Culture; Advanced Human Osteology; ;Zooarchaeology (Masters level); Palaeobotany (Masters level); Funerary Osteoarchaeology (Masters level); Musculo-skeletal Anatomy and Researching the Historic Environment Online.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

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Osteoarchaeology is concerned with the study of human and animal remains from archaeological sites. Read more
Osteoarchaeology is concerned with the study of human and animal remains from archaeological sites. This course provides practical skills in the identification and analysis of both human and animal bones, while providing a theoretical archaeological underpinning focused on the interpretation of human and animal remains in the context of the diet, health, natural environment, economy, social and ritual activities of past human societies.

The opportunity to study both animals and human remains as part of the same course is of great benefit as the two sets of analytical skills complement and strengthen each other.

There are option units within this Osteoarchaeology course that will enable you to tailor your learning. It also provides the opportunity if you have a particular preference or aptitude for either animal or human remains the chance to specialise your studies in either area. The course is delivered by an experienced and enthusiastic team who are leading experts in their fields.

Core units:
Humans, Animals & Diet
Principles & Methods in Human Osteology
Principles & Methods in Zooarchaeology
Advanced Zooarchaeology
Research Project

Optional units (choose 1):
Human Functional Anatomy
Techniques of Archaeological Recovery & Recording

And 1 of the following:
Archaeology of Human Remains
Bodies of Evidence- Skeletal Changes Before & After Death

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This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. Read more
This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. The Institute of Archaeology has a long research and training tradition in environmental archaeology, and has well-established laboratory facilities and reference collections as a result.

Degree information

Students gain practical experience in laboratory analysis of at least one of either: identification of animal bones, identification of plant macro-remains, sedimentological analyses. They develop an understanding of stratigraphic formation processes and their implications for developing sampling strategies, and are trained to collect and analyse data and report scientific results.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Environmental Archaeology in Practice
-Resources and Subsistence

Optional modules
-Archaeology of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene Hunter Gatherers
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Funerary Archaeology
-Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age in the Near East: City-States and Empires
-The Aegean from First Farmers to Minoan States
-The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, normally based on practical laboratory-based research, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, laboratory sessions, practicals, and site and museum visits. Assessment is through the dissertation, and a combination of essays, coursework, presentations, practical examination and laboratory reports, depending on the options selected.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies but others will be well-placed to pursue a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology, including employment as environmental specialists for contract archaeology units.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Archeology in South Asia, University of Barcelona.
-Archaeological Technician, Southeast Archeological Center.
-PhD Archaeology, University of Exeter.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The institute boasts a wide range of laboratory facilities relevant to this degree including dedicated laboratories for zooarchaeology (with a comparative collection of Near Eastern and European faunal remains), archaeobotany (with extensive comparative collections for seeds, wood, tubers, phytoliths and pollen); phytolith processing, sedimentology and scanning electron microscopy.

UCL is located in central London, close to the resources of the British Museum, the British Library and the Natural History Museum.

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With human bones representing a major portion of archaeological finds, it’s not surprising that we rely on their analysis to further our understanding of ancient societies. Read more

Programme description

With human bones representing a major portion of archaeological finds, it’s not surprising that we rely on their analysis to further our understanding of ancient societies.

This programme gives you the skills to work with these archaeological treasures to discover evidence of population structure, biological affinities, cultural behaviour, and patterns of disease in prehistoric and historic civilisations.

You’ll be part of a steadily growing community, as interest in osteoarchaeology expands globally and the discipline takes its place as a vital means of understanding our past.

Combining theoretical learning with hands-on practice, the course provides a grounding in osteoarchaeological method and theory, which will be essential to your handling of specimens recovered from archaeological sites.

Programme structure

Throughout the programme you’ll take part in lectures, seminars and practical work with archaeological skeletal assemblages and reference collections.

You’ll complete six courses:

Analytical Methods in Human Osteology
Bioarchaeological Interpretation
Human Musculoskeletal Anatomy
Practical Osteology
Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology
Skeletal Pathology

In addition to essays, reports, and practical assessments, you’ll submit a dissertation on a research topic of your choosing.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to:

identify and interpret human bone remains from archaeological sites
develop hypothesis testing skills
carry out relevant scientific analyses, often in cooperation with experts in other disciplines
engage in theoretical and methodological discussions relevant to osteoarchaeology
design research strategies based on transferable skills providing a basis for advanced studies (PhD and beyond)

Career opportunities

The programme provides a foundation for further study or your career. Following successful completion of the programme, a large proportion of students continue their studies to PhD level and beyond, and the programme provides the necessary osteological knowledge for PhD study involving human remains.

You may wish to work in mainstream archaeology, or develop a career in museums or archaeological units.

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This programme combines the study of human and animal bones from archaeological sites, generally known as ‘human osteology’ and ‘zooarchaeology’ or ‘archaeozoology’. Read more

About the course

This programme combines the study of human and animal bones from archaeological sites, generally known as ‘human osteology’ and ‘zooarchaeology’ or ‘archaeozoology’. Teaching is centred on the explanation of methods and approaches that can be used to address many different types of archaeological questions, regardless of the period or geographic area. Students play an active part in the shaping of their own programme of study and have the opportunity to develop their own original research.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Advanced Zooarchaeology; The History of the Human Animal Relationship; Zooarchaeological Assemblage Analysis; Archaeozoology; Biological Anthropology I; Biological Anthropology II; Human Osteology; Dissertation in either Human Osteoarchaeology or Zooarchaeology.

Indicative optional modules

A 15 credit module can be selected from a range across the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

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The MRes in Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) has been established by leading international researchers and clinicians within the Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield and Newcastle as part of our MRC/Arthritis Research UK funded Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) initiative (www.cimauk.org). Read more
The MRes in Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) has been established by leading international researchers and clinicians within the Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield and Newcastle as part of our MRC/Arthritis Research UK funded Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) initiative (http://www.cimauk.org). CIMA researchers investigate why our bones, joints, ligaments and muscles function less well as we age, and how age related decline of the musculoskeletal tissues and age related clinical disorders (such as osteoporosis and arthritis) can be ameliorated or prevented.

Why is the CIMA MRes unique?

The programme provides you with access to state-of-the-art resources and facilities from across the three CIMA partner sites (Liverpool, Sheffield and Newcastle), with teaching and supervision delivered by leading researchers and clinical practitioners. As a CIMA student, you will be allied with the wider cohort of CIMA researchers, and participate in regular CIMA scientific meetings and events.

The CIMA MRes Programme

The first semester (60 credits) comprises taught modules which will ground you in current approaches and techniques to study the integrated musculoskeletal system as a whole and the effects ageing has on this system. These modules are delivered by e-learning, including live interactions with tutors and peers, online lectures and presentations and discussion forums. You will supplement the online component via self-directed learning. During the second semester, you will undertake a research module which will provide you with the opportunity to apply your knowledge to a project under the expertise of supervisors based across the CIMA consortium. You will receive multidisciplinary skills training specific to your individual training needs, and have the opportunity to undertake an exchange visit at another CIMA site (e.g. to learn a particular research technique in another laboratory).

Modules

Muscle in the Integrated Musculoskeletal System (20 credits)
Biology of Ageing (20 credits)
Biology and Assessment of Skeletal Health (10 credits)
Principles of Nutrition: Relevance to Ageing(10 credits)
Research Project and Skills Training (120 credits)

Why study the CIMA MRes in Musculoskeletal Ageing?

The CIMA MRes will provide you with the ability to:

• Show evidence of a systematic and comprehensive understanding of, and ability to critically appraise, core principles, current literature, techniques and paradigms within integrated musculoskeletal ageing research.
• Collect, analyse and critically evaluate qualitative and quantitative research data.
• Plan, manage and carry out a research project in a rigorous scientific manner within a prescribed time-frame.
• Show evidence of a range of skills, including scientific writing, oral presentation, time management, study/ experimental design, and professional development.

Whether you have a background in basic science, are a medical student or clinician, as a CIMA MRes graduate you will be highly equipped to embark on further research in musculoskeletal ageing at doctoral level, and be well placed to choose from a wide range of career options within clinical practice, academia, or within the commercial/ industrial sector.

Bursary competition for September 2015 entry

CIMA is currently offering a number of competitive bursaries for outstanding applicants (individual awards of up to £3000) towards the MRes in Musculoskeletal Ageing. Successful candidates should be able to demonstrate the following:

Essential
A minimum grade (or expected grade) of 2.1 in a degree in a related subject.
Enthusiasm and motivation to contribute to research in the area of Musculoskeletal Ageing

Desirable
Practical laboratory experience (especially if related to the area of Musculoskeletal Ageing).
Presentation or conference attendance experience (especially if in the area of Musculoskeletal Ageing)


To apply, you must submit an application to the University to apply for the MRes programme, and fill in an additional bursary application form available under the fees tab https://www.liv.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/musculoskeletal-ageing-mres/fees/

The closing date for bursary applications is Monday 31st August 2015, until all bursaries have been awarded.

Interviews will be held.

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This Masters course at Liverpool John Moores University provides the skills and knowledge to forge a career in forensic anthropology. Read more
This Masters course at Liverpool John Moores University provides the skills and knowledge to forge a career in forensic anthropology. You will also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the field and carry out novel research.

•Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
•Stratigraphic excavation techniques to solve missing person cases
•Specialised forensic science labs and facilities
•Study a course developed and delivered by leading researchers
•Gain hands-on experience in the field
•Employment opportunities in forensic anthropology and related fields
•Optional module in skeletal anatomy – a complete introduction to working with bones


Forensic Anthropology is the combination of physical anthropological knowledge, and the application of forensic methods and techniques. The discipline is used by the justice system to solve cases where a missing person or an unknown murder victim is involved.

The MSc in Forensic Anthropology will provide you with the skills and knowledge required to pursue a career in the search for missing people, recovery of evidence and human remains from clandestine graves and identification of unknown corpses by osteological analysis.

The programme will develop a broad understanding of these issues, including excavation, laboratory analysis and the courtroom skills necessary to present findings in a trial. You will also have the opportunity to learn analytical techniques, taphonomic analysis, field methods and genetic applications.

The programme develops a high profile curriculum, which is supported by a structured lecture programme, workshops and seminars in the department’s well-equipped specialist laboratories.

The MSc in Forensic Anthropology is also supported by a skeletal reference collection and staff members are currently involved around the world as practitioners in forensic cases. When you complete the course you will have the skills to continue into academic research or employment as a forensic anthropologist.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Level 7

Advanced research methods
Project management and employability skills
Academic and non-academic dissemination
Human identification from skeletal remains
Human identification from genetic evidence
Dental anthropology
Biomechanics and trauma analysis
Taphonomy
Excavation techniques
Paleopathology
Laws and courtroom skills
Crime scene investigation
Forensic sciences, chemistry and biosciences

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Informational Energy Osteopathy is the therapeutic approach to the movement of the manual treatment approach proposed by Raimund Maurice Poyet, who noted in his clinical practice, the importance of incorporating therapeutic intent in the act to the detriment of the applied force, being the pressure required to trigger the movement that a butterfly would land on a leaf. Read more
Informational Energy Osteopathy is the therapeutic approach to the movement of the manual treatment approach proposed by Raimund Maurice Poyet, who noted in his clinical practice, the importance of incorporating therapeutic intent in the act to the detriment of the applied force, being the pressure required to trigger the movement that a butterfly would land on a leaf. From this premise and a detailed observation of the body, behavior and distribution and operation of certain reflex zones, developed a personal working method that spread throughout his life: the Method Poyet.

This method is based on the primary respiratory motion (MRP), taking as origin the synchondrosis spheno (SEB), spread to every structure and tissue through the fascial or connective system. For any MRP dysfunction is altered, so the first step in balancing tissue from the perspective of Poyet, is to approximate it.

An identifying feature of the method Poyet is the use of cranial somatotopías to diagnose and verify the post-treatment. That is, the existence of reflex points located on the bones of the skull and face, where are represented all regions of the body.

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This course provides postgraduate education in the discipline of Forensic Anthropology. This course provides intensive training in human osteology and the techniques used by Forensic Anthropologists to build osteological profiles of unknown skeletonised human remains. Read more
This course provides postgraduate education in the discipline of Forensic Anthropology. This course provides intensive training in human osteology and the techniques used by Forensic Anthropologists to build osteological profiles of unknown skeletonised human remains. The first half of the taught phase provides you with a solid foundation in the core skills of forensic science, such as crime scene examination and interpretation and presentation of evidence, using our crime scene facilities and real crime scene expertise and casework. The second half of the taught phase includes specialised modules on human osteology, and techniques of estimation of sex, age, stature and ethnic ancestry in skeletal remains, as well as distinguishing between animal and human bones. It also includes topics such as skeletal development, trauma and pathology; forensic taphonomy (decomposition and decay); and post-mortem interval estimation. The course is very practically and vocationally-focused, and provides hands-on experience of dealing with skeletonised and decomposed human (and animal) remains.

In the last third of the course, you are given the opportunity to pursue an original research project, on a topic provided by supervisors or of a relevant topic of your choice. This requires 50 days of laboratory work, and takes place in the summer term.

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This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology. Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 x (C) Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits) (C)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

Read less
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology.

It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology.

Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

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