• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Durham University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Pennsylvania Featured Masters Courses
"bone"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Bone)

We have 79 Masters Degrees (Bone)

  • "bone" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 79
Order by 
You can choose specific modules that interest you, so you can be sure that you'll learn exactly what you're passionate about. Our teaching staff are healthcare professionals who have worked in a range of roles within the management of fracture risk. Read more

Why choose this course:

• You can choose specific modules that interest you, so you can be sure that you'll learn exactly what you're passionate about.

• Our teaching staff are healthcare professionals who have worked in a range of roles within the management of fracture risk. They will share their professional knowledge with you as well as their theoretical knowledge, including the latest developments in bone densitometry reporting.

• Our staff have also contributed to national guidance on standards for DXA reporting. This will inform your studies and provide you with confidence in the standard of teaching you'll receive.

• You'll develop and improve your practice throughout the course as you'll become involved in higher level decision making and problem solving, building your professional development.

About the course:

This course is awarded as part of our MSc in Advanced Practice course. This means you may either complete your studies at the Postgraduate Certificate level in Bone Densitometry Reporting or continue your studies to Masters level and gain either the Postgraduate Diploma or MSc in Advanced Practice.

You'll have the chance to study with people from different professions, which will improve your understanding of osteoporosis and bone densitometry reporting across a wide spectrum within healthcare. You'll also develop the skills you need to work at an advanced practice level, recognising areas for change and improvement that will enhance your practice.

It's important that you have the support of an appropriate mentor in your workplace before you start this course, as your mentor and our tutors will support you to produce diagnostic reports that will inform the management and care of your patients.

You'll attend a minimum of four study days at the University where you'll hear from keynote speakers, get involved in case study discussions and take part in scan viewing sessions.

Throughout this course you'll develop a portfolio of 100 reports, which have been independently reported on and include comments on technical aspects of the image as well as treatment recommendations. You'll also include an audit of your reports compared with those of a trained practitioner.

Your final optional module can reflect an area of particular interest to you personally and professionally, so it might be directly related to bone densitometry reporting or it could be a more generic module from the MSc in Advanced Practice course.

Read less
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science. Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Read more
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science

Why choose this course?

Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Uniquely, however, it is the only course in the UK to combine this discipline with the molecular analysis of human remains. Nowhere else can you immerse yourself in the study of stable isotopes, lipid residue analysis, palaeoproteomics and ancient DNA – and play an active role in the development of new techniques in this constantly evolving branch of archaeology. In 2014, seven of the top 100 discoveries in science were in archaeology, and BioArCh staff were involved in three of these.
-Advanced training in human osteoarchaeology, delivered by the UK’s leading practitioners
-Study ancient biomolecules in world-class facilities at the BioArch centre and Department of Biology
-Unique opportunity to combine bioarchaeology with complementary subjects and tailor a course to suit your interests
-Access an incredible range of in-house analytical equipment
-Take part in cutting-edge science and build essential practical skills
-Work alongside leading researchers and academics in a diverse range of specialisms
-Work on diverse material that is often ‘fresh out of the ground’ and make valuable contributions to live projects Receive career and research guidance from staff with significant experience in the sector and a track record of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and dissertation research, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of bioarchaeology theory, investigation and practice.

Uniquely, you can combine bioarchaeology with a range of subjects and tailor your degree to your own interests. You could adopt a ‘period’ focus, for example, to specialise in the bioarchaeology of the Medieval, Viking, Mesolithic or early prehistoric periods. You could combine human bioarchaeology with zooarchaeology and orientate your course towards more advanced studies of bone function and anatomy. Or you could focus on skills such as GIS modelling and field archaeology.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students with a passionate interest in the future of archaeology, who want to work at the frontiers of archaeological science. The degree is primarily aimed at those whose previous experience is in archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, but we do accept students from diverse backgrounds. The common factor among our student intake is a keen interest in science and in human remains at a biomolecular or bone level.

What can it lead to?

Molecular analysis is used increasingly widely in archaeology, but the range of osteological and molecular skills offered by the course provide valuable training and expertise for a wide range of careers and further study.

Many students go on to take PhDs at York and other institutions around the world. Others pursue a wide range of professional careers, from osteoarchaeology and environmental archaeology to the medical humanities and laboratory technician work.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Bioarchaeology course you will be able to:
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Understand advanced methods for analysing bone tissues, including biomolecular methods
-Apply chemical and biomolecular methods to skeletal material
-Understand the processes of decay and diagenesis of bone tissue
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Work effectively within a laboratory environment
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many our MSc Bioarchaeology postgraduates go on to further research in bioarchaeological and environmental fields. The BioArch department has a successful track record of placing students on PhD courses in York and institutions worldwide.

Here’s a selection of the career and research destinations of some of our recent students: US graduate school programmes
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

Read less
The incidence of bone disease has been increasing worldwide as the world population gets older. Read more
The incidence of bone disease has been increasing worldwide as the world population gets older. This course aims to inform and equip the practitioner with the necessary skills to function in a modern biomedical/clinical environment specialising in caring for the patient with bone disease, and will be relevant to researchers, day-to-day NHS hospital practice and general practice.

Why Study Orthopaedics with us?

You will receive training in the skills required in the reading and interpretation of the literature and translating that into evidence-based practice. We will develop your research and writing skills so that you will be in a position to contribute to the scientific literature in an effective manner.

The course culminates in the Research Dissertation, which will be assessed through your production of two publishable scientific articles.

If biomedical or clinical research is your interest, successful completion of the MSc will allow you to directly register onto PhD study and join our team of researchers at the Institute of Medicine.

What will I learn?

Our course investigates in detail the different types of bone disease and various complications. You will review current guidelines and their evidence base in the therapeutic management of bone disease, and explore potential new therapies. You will evaluate new developments in research into bone disease, and carry out a research project.

Seminars and tutorials will be held with various healthcare professionals and clinical researchers. You will also attend cancer clinics in one of our partner hospital trusts.

How will I be taught?

Our course consists of taught modules and a Research Dissertation.

We deliver taught modules as three-day intensive courses to facilitate attendance from students in employment. Weekly support sessions and journal club supplement learning – all held in our modern facilities in Bache Hall.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed via clinical reviews, laboratory reports, posters, oral presentations, or data manipulation exercises.

Read less
Summary. Read more

Summary

This course provides a grounding in the analytical approaches to human and faunal bone identification, and to the wider social, cultural and economic issues raised through the interpretation of archaeological bone assemblages; students receive training in bone identification, palaeopathology and analysis, and explore the associated intrinsic problems and potential.

Modules

Core module: Osteoarchaeology and Palaeopathology in Context

Compulsory modules: Human Skeletal Studies; Zooarchaeology; Dissertation Preparation

Typical optional modules: Palaeolithic modules; social archaeology modules; other archaeology or University modules

Visit our website for further information...



Read less
Study animals from the past with the techniques of the future. The MSc in Zooarchaeology at York is the UK's only dedicated programme in the archaeological study of animals. Read more
Study animals from the past with the techniques of the future

Why choose this course?

The MSc in Zooarchaeology at York is the UK's only dedicated programme in the archaeological study of animals. Any consideration of the human past is incomplete without examining the essential roles that animals have played in our economies and societies, and on this course you will study archaeological animal remains on a macro and micro scale to investigate what they tell us about how humans and other species have co-existed over the millennia.

Housed within BioArCh, York's world-leading centre for research into ancient biomolecules, the MSc in Zooarchaeology also draws heavily on the expertise of functional and comparative anatomists from the Centre for Anatomical and Human Sciences, part of the Hull York Medical School. We use the full range of available techniques, including advanced biomolecular methods and sophisticated morphometrics, to investigate and interpret animal bone data in a variety of cultural contexts.

The scope of the course is global, equipping you with the knowledge and techniques to study the roles of animals in human societies from the Palaeolithic to the present, around the world. You will learn from leading academics in both traditional and biomolecular zooarchaeology, and from dedicated specialists in evolutionary anatomy, enabling you both to master the latest analytical techniques and to examine skeletal anatomy at a level of detail not possible elsewhere.
-Study past relations between people and other animals, through the archaeological record
-Examine zooarchaeology across the entire span of human prehistory and history, right around the world
-Develop advanced skills in bone taphonomy and understand its importance to osteoarchaeological studies
-Explore biomolecular techniques, including DNA analysis, proteomics and stable isotope analysis
-Investigate skeletal anatomy in intricate detail
-Work alongside leading academics in zooarchaeological research
-Receive career and research guidance from Department of Archaeology staff with significant experience of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?
This course covers the practical skills, analytical techniques, and interpretative frameworks necessary to study the roles of animals in past societies from the bones and other remains that we find on archaeological sites. Core modules and laboratory classes will provide you with a solid grounding in the essential tools of the zooarchaeologist's trade, while the option modules and dissertation allow you to explore and potentially specialise in a unique range of biomolecular and anatomical approaches.

Who is it for?
This course is aimed primarily at graduates in archaeology who want to specialise in the analysis and interpretation of animal remains, either as a basis for future research or as a practical specialism to further a career in archaeology. We are also happy to accept graduates of disciplines such as biology, zoology, ecology, and palaeontology who wish to focus on the study of animals in a human context.

What can it lead to?
The advanced skills and specialist knowledge gained on this course can provide the springboard for many varied careers or further study at PhD level. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to careers in museum services, universities, conservation organisations and commercial archaeology units around the world.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Zooarchaeology course you will have:
-Gained a thorough grounding in all aspects of vertebrate zooarchaeology, including general aspects that are applicable to invertebrate zooarchaeology
-Experienced the processes of data collection, analysis and interpretation, both in principle and in practice
-Developed a range of analytical abilities by studying and undertaking quantitative analysis of zooarchaeological data
-Gained essential critical skills through reviewing and assessing published work from throughout the world, including hunter-gatherer and agrarian sites, and socially complex societies
-Studied the vertebrate skeleton, its evolutionary origins and its adaptations
-Identified and recorded archaeological bone assemblages
-Reviewed the field of taphonomy and the practical recognition of the taphonomic ‘imprint’
-Developed independent research skills by completing a dissertation project

Many our MSc Zooarchaeology postgraduates go on to conduct further research at PhD level. Others progress into careers with archaeological units, museum services, conservation bodies and a range of other organisations.

Here’s a selection of possible destinations and careers for students of this course:
-Academia
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Museum outreach programmes and the heritage sector
-University/research technicians
-Commercial laboratory technicians
-US graduate school programmes

Read less
This programme offers a fascinating range of subjects, including molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, microbiology, immunology, tissue engineering, clinical medicine, laboratory management and statistics. Read more
This programme offers a fascinating range of subjects, including molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, microbiology, immunology, tissue engineering, clinical medicine, laboratory management and statistics.

It is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science and is based at one of the largest transfusion centres in the world, enabling visits to manufacturing, testing and tissue typing sections. You will learn from specialist lecturers based at the University, NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), and NHS hospitals, and have an opportunity to become fully embedded in an NHS environment while you develop your knowledge.

The programme will give you extensive practical experience of transfusion and transplantation, allowing you to gain skills that directly relate to your future career. As well as being academically interesting, this continually developing area of healthcare science has a major impact on patients' quality of life.

The programme:
-Is one of just two specialist full-time courses in transfusion and transplantation, and is a recommended course at level seven in the Career Framework for Health.
-Gives you the opportunity to carry out your MSc project with NHSBT research staff within the transfusion centre.
-Has high contact hours, with teaching each day and practical classes.
-Includes a large skills component (eg writing in different formats, conference and publication skills, assignments with specific study aims).
-Includes laboratory management, a key skill required at level seven.
-Attracts a diverse range of students (about 50 per cent overseas students), including new graduates, those working in blood centres or blood transfusion/haematology in hospitals, or training to lecture in transfusion.

Programme structure

The programme comprises eight taught units that run from September to March and a research project that begins in May and runs until August. Example project topics have included:
-A study on red cell antibody formation in trauma patients
-Optimisation of platelet antigen detection using recombinant proteins
-Expression of red cell membrane proteins during large-scale red cell culture
-A comparison of stem cell mobilisation drugs for stem cell transplantation

Taught units
-Transfusion and Transplantation Science:
-Pathology of Transfusion and Transplantation Science
-Provision of Blood, Cells, Tissues and Organs
-Clinical Transfusion and Transplantation
-Transfusion and Transplantation in Practice (two units)
-Biostatistics
-Research and Laboratory Management

Assessments are designed to teach skills such as comprehension, scientific writing in different formats and conference skills, and to further knowledge in subject areas not covered in the lectures. Students must pass the taught component to be able to progress to the project.

Part-time students complete the Postgraduate Certificate components in their first year and the Postgraduate Diploma in the second. The project is usually taken during year three to complete the MSc.

Careers

Some of the career paths that graduates have followed include: blood transfusion and fetal medicine research, working for a bone marrow donor laboratory or bone marrow registry, biostatistics, graduate entry to medical school, NHS Clinical Scientist Training programme, and progression to PhD study in several areas including cancer biology and stem cell regeneration.

Read less
The Biomedical Materials research degrees cover an exciting area of research in the School focusing both on fundamental understanding of interactions between man-made materials and biological tissues and the development of useful applications. Read more
The Biomedical Materials research degrees cover an exciting area of research in the School focusing both on fundamental understanding of interactions between man-made materials and biological tissues and the development of useful applications. We have close links with the world's leading pharmaceutical and medical device companies and the clinical applications of our research impact many areas of medicine.

The subject

The subject of biomedical materials covers those materials that are used in the context of biology and medicine, usually to evaluate, treat, augment or replace any tissue, organ or function of the body. In surgery, a biomaterial may be a synthetic material used to replace part of a living system or to function in intimate contact with living tissue.

A new area in biomaterials involves the exploration of nanotechnology for drug delivery, biological sensing or tissue regeneration. Examples of these bionanomaterials are small particles that may be used for the delivery of drug molecules to target sites within the body or to detect diseased areas.

Biomaterials are produced using chemical, physical, mechanical processes and they often employ or mimic biological phenomena in order for them to interact with their biological surroundings in defined ways.

Application of research

The clinical applications of our research impact many areas of medicine, including drug delivery, cancer, wound healing, stem cell technology, repair and regeneration of nerve, tendon, cartilage, bone, intevertebral disc, skin, ligament and cornea.

Industry collaboration

We have strong ties with industry, including ongoing collaboration with Smith & Nephew, Johnson & Johnson, and Versamatrix A/S (Denmark), developing novel biomaterial based strategies for wound healing, bone repair, control of inflammation and drug delivery.

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

Read less
The Biomedical Materials research degrees cover an exciting area of research in the School focusing both on fundamental understanding of interactions between man-made materials and biological tissues and the development of useful applications. Read more
The Biomedical Materials research degrees cover an exciting area of research in the School focusing both on fundamental understanding of interactions between man-made materials and biological tissues and the development of useful applications. We have close links with the world's leading pharmaceutical and medical device companies and the clinical applications of our research impact many areas of medicine.

The subject

The subject of biomedical materials covers those materials that are used in the context of biology and medicine, usually to evaluate, treat, augment or replace any tissue, organ or function of the body. In surgery, a biomaterial may be a synthetic material used to replace part of a living system or to function in intimate contact with living tissue.

A new area in biomaterials involves the exploration of nanotechnology for drug delivery, biological sensing or tissue regeneration. Examples of these bionanomaterials are small particles that may be used for the delivery of drug molecules to target sites within the body or to detect diseased areas.

Biomaterials are produced using chemical, physical, mechanical processes and they often employ or mimic biological phenomena in order for them to interact with their biological surroundings in defined ways.

Application of research

The clinical applications of our research impact many areas of medicine, including drug delivery, cancer, wound healing, stem cell technology, repair and regeneration of nerve, tendon, cartilage, bone, intevertebral disc, skin, ligament and cornea.

Industry collaboration

We have strong ties with industry, including ongoing collaboration with Smith & Nephew, Johnson & Johnson, and Versamatrix A/S (Denmark), developing novel biomaterial based strategies for wound healing, bone repair, control of inflammation and drug delivery.

Read less
Medical engineering combines the design and problem-solving skills of engineering with medical and biological sciences to contribute to medical device solutions and interventions for a range of diseases and trauma. Read more

Medical engineering combines the design and problem-solving skills of engineering with medical and biological sciences to contribute to medical device solutions and interventions for a range of diseases and trauma.

This exciting and challenging programme will give you a broad knowledge base in this rapidly expanding field, as well as allowing you to specialise through your choice of optional modules.

We emphasise the multidisciplinary nature of medical engineering and the current shift towards the interface between engineering and the life sciences. You could focus on tissue engineering, biomaterials or joint replacement technology among a host of other topics.

Whether you’re an engineer or surgeon, or you work in sales, marketing or regulation, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills to launch or develop your career in this demanding sector.

Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering

You’ll learn in an exciting research environment where breakthroughs are being made in your discipline. This programme is closely linked to our Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (IMBE), which focuses on research and education in the fields of medical devices and regenerative medicine. It focuses on innovating and translating new therapies into practical clinical applications.

Our world-class facilities in materials screening analysis, joint simulation, surface analysis, heart valve simulation and tensile and fatigue testing allow us to push the boundaries in medical engineering.

Find out more about IMBE

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Course content

One core module in Semester 1 will give you a background in experimental design and analysis within medical engineering. You’ll look at computational and biological methodologies alongside statistical data analysis and different data visualisation techniques to lay the foundations of your studies.

Optional modules in each semester will allow you to build on this knowledge and focus on specialist topics that suit your own interests and career intentions. You could focus on biomechatronics and medical robotics, spinal biomechanics, surface engineering or computational fluid dynamics analysis and a range of other topics. Depending on your academic or professional background, you may decide to take introductory modules such as Basic Orthopaedic Engineering or Structure and Function of the Body to fill the gaps in your knowledge.

Throughout the programme you’ll complete your Professional Project – an independent piece of research on a topic within mechanical engineering that allows you to demonstrate your knowledge and skills. In the two taught semesters you’ll review the literature around your topic and plan the project, before completing the design, analysis, computation, experimentation and writing up in the summer months.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll extend your studies over a longer period so you can take fewer modules in each year.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Medical Engineering module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Medical Engineering Experimental Design and Analysis 15 credits
  • Professional Project 75 credits

Optional modules

  • Biomaterials and Applications 15 credits
  • Managing for Innovation 15 credits
  • Structure and Function of the Body 15 credits
  • Spinal Biomechanics and Instrumentation (Distance Learning) 15 credits
  • Basic Orthopaedic Engineering 15 credits
  • Surface Engineering 15 credits
  • Biomaterials (Short Course) 15 credits
  • Functional Joint Replacement Technology (Short Course) 15 credits
  • Biomechatronics and Medical Robotics 15 credits
  • Biotribology 15 credits
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis 15 credits
  • Tissue Engineering 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medical Engineering MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medical Engineering MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular interactions with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings. Some modules make use of online learning methods or a short course format.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Medical Engineering students have included:

  • Investigating aspects of wear in total disc replacements
  • Finite element analysis of tissue engineered structures
  • Determining properties of bone and cement augmentation in vertebroplasty
  • Cartilage tribology
  • Investigating 3D printing of a bone substitute

Career opportunities

Career destinations are diverse and include medical engineering within industrial or public sector organisations, regulatory affairs and sales and marketing.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in a range of roles for employers such as the clinical research centres, continued in a career in clinical orthopaedics, progressed to a PhD programme.

You’ll also be well prepared to continue with engineering research, whether in industry or at PhD level.

Careers support

You’ll have access to the wide range of engineering and computing careers resources held by our Employability team in our dedicated Employability Suite. You’ll have the chance to attend industry presentations book appointments with qualified careers consultants and take part in employability workshops. Our annual Engineering and Computing Careers Fairs provide further opportunities to explore your career options with some of the UK's leading employers.

The University's Careers Centre also provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



Read less
The MCh Orth Course in Dundee (accredited by the Royal College of Surgeons of England) is a clinically-based Masters degree that encompasses taught, clinical attachment and research elements, which provide orthopaedic surgeons with in-depth knowledge of the latest advances in surgical and biomechanical techniques. Read more
The MCh Orth Course in Dundee (accredited by the Royal College of Surgeons of England) is a clinically-based Masters degree that encompasses taught, clinical attachment and research elements, which provide orthopaedic surgeons with in-depth knowledge of the latest advances in surgical and biomechanical techniques.

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, to reflect the multi-disciplinary aspect of the research carried out at IMAR, where the majority of the MCh Orth projects are conducted, the respective staff were returned into Unit of Assessment 25 (General Engineering - Biomedical Engineering) and Unit of Assessment 8 (Primary Care and Other Community Based Clinical Subjects) where 90% and 85% of our quality profile was deemed of international class. This is an excellent outcome taking into consideration that IMAR was only established in 2003 in support of the MCh Orth course.

Why study Orthopaedic Surgery at Dundee?

There are six key reasons:
- Course accredited by the Royal College of Surgeons of England
- Best lecturing faculty drawn from specialists across the entire UK
- Best research experience in clinical and biomechanics in association with the Institute of Motion Analysis and Research, one of the leading facilities in biomechanics and motion analysis worldwide
- Associated clinical attachment with a consultant orthopaedic surgeon with no need for GMC registration
- Our MCh Orth philosophy is to recruit ambitious orthopaedic surgeons with career aspirations that encompass leadership, academic excellence and the highest levels of skill and expertise
- Our successful MCh Orth graduates value education and recognise the need for professional reflection and lifelong learning to deepen their understanding, and to enhance their ability and develop a sound professional judgement

We have been successfully educating orthopaedic surgeons for 20 years and to date we have over 350 graduates. We continue to offer the highest standard of visiting external lecturer and orthopaedic lecture topics to be found anywhere and on any other similarly titled course; arthritis, foot and ankle, gait and motion analysis, hand and wrist, biomechanics, hip and knee, paediatrics, imaging techniques, shoulder and elbow, trauma, wheelchairs and seating systems, spine, research, statistical analysis and many other associated specialities.

What's so good about studying Orthopaedic Surgery at Dundee?

This programme is delivered by the Department of Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery and the Institute of Motion Analysis & Research within the School of Medicine.

"It was a great learning experience. Coming here, my overall personality has changed. I have learnt the right way to write thesis and also got to know the recent advancements in field of Orthopaedic surgery."
International Student Barometer, 2009

How you will be taught

You will be taught via lectures, tutorials, multi-media demonstrations, dry bone workshops, anatomy demonstrations, clinical and operating theatre attachments, and hands-on latest surgical techniques using Thiel embalming cadavers, which is unique to Dundee in the whole of the UK.

What you will study

Bioengineering material will provide you with basic science and permitting you, as clinicians, to associate with clinical engineering materials to compliment your clinical knowledge. A formal programme of lectures, tutorials, multi-media demonstrations, dry bone workshops, anatomy demonstrations, clinical and operating theatre attachments, and hands on latest surgical techniques (using

Thiel Embalming cadavers, which is unique to Dundee in the whole of the UK) are provided and these include:
Foot and Ankle
Hand and Wrist
Hip and Pelvis
Knee
Paediatric Orthopaedics
Shoulder and Elbow
Spine
Trauma
Tumour
Infection
Pathology
Disability Medicine
Biomechanics
Implants
Introduction to Mechanics
Orthopaedic Technology
Statistics in Medical Research
Mechanics of Materials
Orthotics
Prosthetics
Seating and Wheelchairs
Foot Pressure Analysis
Gait Analysis
Motion Analysis
Sports Injury

How you will be assessed

The programme assessment is made up of three elements: two written MCQs (one per semester) using the latest e-assessment technology and iPads, OSCE and a thesis. Candidates will be examined orally on the subject of thesis by a committee consisting of a convenor, an external and internal examiners. Students are required to pass each element to qualify for the award of the degree. There is no resit facility.

Careers

Many of our MCh Orth graduates have gone on to highly successful careers once returned to their own countries with many taking up new challenges and opportunities within the UK up to Consultant position. Several have published widely in journals and at conferences and have even gone onto Fellowships throughout Europe and employment in the UK.

This unique MCh Orth course offers a truly wide ranging curriculum that will help you to achieve your career goals no matter what your speciality. Our distinguished visiting lecturers are specialists at the forefront of innovative orthopaedics and continue to return each year to teach as they understand the value and benefit of this course to working surgeons. They care deeply about the course and what it has achieved over the last twenty years and without their support we would not have been able to be so successful.

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Every day we are hearing of ground breaking advances in the field of tissue engineering which offer tremendous potential for the future of regenerative medicine and health care. Staff at Swansea University are active in many aspects of tissue engineering.

Key Features of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

We are actively researching many aspects of tissue engineering including the following areas:

- Characterisation and control of the stem cell niche

- Mechanical characterisation of stem cells and tissues

- Production of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering

- Electrospinning of scaffold materials

- Cartilage repair and replacement

- Bone repair and replacement

- The application of nanotechnology to regenerative medicine

- Wound healing engineering

- Reproductive Immunobiology

- Bioreactor design

As an MSc By Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine student, you will join one of the teams at Swansea University working in tissue engineering and use state of the art research equipment within the Centre for NanoHealth, a collaborative initiative between the College of Engineering and Swansea University Medical School.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Aim of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine programme

The aim of this MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide you with a solid grounding within the field of tissue engineering and its application within regenerative medicine.

This will be achieved through a year of research in a relevant area of tissue engineering identified after discussion with Swansea academic staff. Working with two academic supervisors you will undertake a comprehensive literature survey which will enable the formulation of an experimental research programme.

As a student on the MSc by Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine course, you will be given the relevant laboratory training to undertake the research program. The research will be written up as a thesis that is examined. You will also be encouraged to present your work in the form of scientific communications such as journals and conference poster presentation.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine will equip you with a wealth of research experience and knowledge that will benefit your future career in academia or the health care industries.

Recent MSc by Research theses supervised in the area of Tissue Engineering at Swansea University include:

- Quality assurance of human stem cell/primary cell bank

- The development of electrospinning techniques for the production of novel tissue engineering scaffolds.

- The incorporation of pulsed electromagnetic fields into wound dressings.

- The application of pulsed electromagnetic fields for improved wound healing.

- The use of nanoparticles in the control of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds.

- The control of bacterial adhesion at surfaces relevant to regenerative medicine.

- The production of micro-porous particles for bone repair

Facilities

The £22 million Centre for Nanohealth is a unique facility linking engineering and medicine, and will house a unique micro-nanofabrication clean room embedded within a biological research laboratory and with immediate access to clinical research facilities run by local NHS clinicians.

Links with industry

The academic staff of the Medical Engineering discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London also offers the opportunity for collaborative research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK

Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK

Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK



Read less
1. Big Challenges being addressed by this programme – motivation. Human health and quality of life is one of the most critical challenges facing humanity. Read more

About the Course

1. Big Challenges being addressed by this programme – motivation

• Human health and quality of life is one of the most critical challenges facing humanity.
• The challenge is all the greater due to a rapidly increasing and rapidly aging global population that now exceeds 7 billion.
• Biomedical Engineering addresses these issues directly, with engineers innovating, analysing, designing and manufacturing new medical implants, devices and therapies for the treatment of disease, injuries and conditions of the human body, to restore health and improve quality of life.
• CNN lists Biomedical Engineering as No. 1 in the “Best Jobs in America” 2013.

2. Programme objectives & purpose

The objective of the programme is to generate graduates with a sound grounding in engineering fundamentals (analysis, design and problem solving), but who also have the multi-disciplinary breadth that includes knowledge of human biology and clinical needs and applications, to be able to make an immediate impact in the field on graduation, in either the academic research or medical technology industry domains. Ultimately the programme aims to generate the future leaders of the national and international medical technology industry, and of academic research and teaching in biomedical engineering.

3. What’s special about CoEI/NUIG in this area:

• NUI Galway pioneered the development of educational programmes in Biomedical Engineering in Ireland, introducing the country’s first bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in 1998, that was the first to achieve professional accreditation from Engineers Ireland in 2004, and at the graduate level with the Structured PhD programme in Biomedical Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (BMERM) in 2011.
• NUI Galway has been at the forefront of world-class research in biomedical engineering for over 20 years and has pioneered multi-disciplinary research in biomedical engineering and science, with the establishment of the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science (NCBES) in 1999, and up to the present day with the announcement of NUI Galway as the lead institution in a new Science Foundation Ireland funded Centre for Research in Medical Devices (CÚRAM).
• NUI Galway has a very close and deep relationship with the medical device industry locally, nationally and internationally, at many levels, from industry visits, guest lectures and student placements, up to major research collaborations.
• Many of our engineering graduates now occupy senior management and technical positions in the medical device industry nationally and internationally.

4. Programme Structure – ECTS weights and split over semester; core/elective, etc.:

• 90ECTS programme
• one full year in duration, beginning September and finishing August
• comprises:
- Foundational taught modules (20 ECTS)
- Advanced taught modules (40 ECTS)
- Research/Industry Project (30 ECTS).

5. Programme Content – module names

Sample Modules:

Advanced Finite Element Methods
Advanced Computational Biomechanics
Advanced Biomaterials
Mechanobiology
Bioinstrumentation Design
Medical and Surgical Practice
Stem Cells and Gene Therapy
Translational Medicine
Polymer Engineering
Advanced Engineering Statistics
Systems Reliability
Lean Systems
Research Methods for Engineers
Financial Management
Regulatory Affairs and Case Studies
Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

6. Any special funding arrangements – e.g. Irish Aid

Comment (PMcH): CoEI scholarships a great idea.

7. Opportunity for number of Industrial & Research internships.

Students enrolled on this programme will have an opportunity to apply for a one-year post-graduation internship in either a related industry or research group in Ireland.

8. Testimonials.

“The Biomedical Engineering programme at NUI Galway has given me the fundamental engineering skills and multi-disciplinary background in biology and clinical application that I needed to be able to make an immediate impact in industry and to be able to design and develop new medical implants and devices. My graduate education through my PhD in bone biomechanics was also very important in this because I directly combined engineering and biological analysis techniques to better understand how stem cells generate new bone, showing me how biomedical engineers can play a critically important role in generating new knowledge on how the body works, and how new treatments can be developed for diseases and injuries, such as osteoporosis.” Evelyn Birmingham, BE Biomedical Engineering (2009), PhD Biomedical Engineering (2014), R&D Engineer, Medtronic Vascular, Galway.

For further details

visit http://nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/

How to Apply:

Applications are made online via the Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC): https://www.pac.ie
Please use the following PAC application code for your programme:

M.Sc. Biomedical Engineering - PAC code GYE24

Scholarships :

Please visit our website for more information on scholarships: http://www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/feesandscholarships/

Read less
The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. Read more
The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. The programme also develops critical, analytical and transferable skills that prepare you for professional, academic and research careers in the exciting and rapidly advancing area of archaeological science or in non-cognate fields.

The programme places the study of the human past at the centre of archaeological science enquiry. This is achieved through a combination of science and self-selected thematic or period-based modules allowing you to situate your scientific training within the archaeological context(s) of your choice. The programme provides a detailed understanding of the foundations of analytical techniques, delivers practical experience in their application and data processing, and the ability to design and communicate research that employs scientific analyses to address archaeological questions. Upon graduation you will have experience of collecting, analysing and reporting on data to publication standard and ideally equipped to launch your career as a practising archaeological scientist.

Distinctive features

The MSc Archaeological Science at Cardiff University gives you access to:

• A flexible and responsive programme that combines training in scientific enquiry, expertise and vocational skills with thematic and period-focused archaeology.

• Materials, equipment, library resources and funding to undertake meaningful research in partnership with a wide range of key heritage organisations across an international stage.

• A programme with core strengths in key fields of archaeological science, tailored to launch your career in the discipline or to progress to doctoral research.

• A department where the science, theory and practice of archaeology and conservation converge to create a unique environment for exploring the human past.

• Staff with extensive professional experience in researching, promoting, publishing, and integrating archaeological science across academic and commercial archaeology and the wider heritage sector.

• An energetic team responsible for insights into iconic sites (e.g. Stonehenge, Çatalhöyük), tackling key issues in human history (e.g. hunting, farming, food, and feasts) through the development and application of innovative science (e.g. isotopes, residue analysis, DNA, proteomics)

• A unique training in science communication at every level - from preparing conference presentations and journal articles, to project reports, press releases and public engagement, our training ensures you can transmit the excitement of scientific enquiry to diverse audiences.

• Support for your future career ambitions. From further study to science advisors to specialists – our graduates work across the entire spectrum of archaeological science as well as moving into other successful careers.

Structure

There are two stages to this course: stage 1 and stage 2.

Stage 1 is made up of:

• 40 credits of Core Skills and Discipline-Specific Research Training modules for Archaeology and Conservation Master's students
• A minimum of 40 credits of Archaeological Science modules
• An additional 40 credits of Archaeological Science or Archaeology modules offered to MA and MSc students across the Archaeology and Conservation department

Stage 2 comprises:

• 60 credit Archaeological Science Dissertation (16-20,000 words, topic or theme chosen in consultation with academic staff)

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Archaeological Science Dissertation

Teaching

Teaching is delivered via lectures, laboratory sessions, interactive workshops and tutorials, in addition to visits to relevant local resources such as the National Museum Wales and local heritage organisations.

Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, an introduction to key concepts and relevant up-to-date information. The Archaeological Science Master's provides students with bespoke training in scientific techniques during laboratory sessions. This includes developing practical skills in the identification, recording and analysis of archaeological materials during hands on laboratory sessions. These range from macroscopic e.g. bone identification, to microscopic e.g. material identification or status with light based or scanning electron microscopy, to sample selection, preparation and analysis e.g. isotopic or aDNA and include health and safety and laboratory management skills. Students will be able to develop specialist practical skills in at least one area of study. In workshops and seminars, you will have the opportunity to discuss themes or topics, to receive and consolidate feedback on your individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation.

This programme is based within the School of History, Archaeology and Religion and taught by academic staff from across Cardiff University and by external speakers. All taught modules within the Programme are compulsory and you are expected to attend all lectures, laboratory sessions and other timetabled sessions. Students will receive supervision to help them complete the dissertation, but are also expected to engage in considerable independent study.

Assessment

The 120 credits of taught Modules within Stage 1 of the Programme are assessed through in-course assessments, including:

Extended essays
Oral presentations
Poster presentations
Statistical assignments
Critical appraisals
Practical skills tests
Data reports
Research designs

You must successfully complete the taught component of the programme before progressing to Stage 2 where assessment is:

Dissertation (16-20,000 words)

Career prospects

After successfully completing this MSc, you should have a broad spectrum of knowledge and a variety of skills, making you highly attractive both to potential employers and research establishments. You will be able to pursue a wide range of professional careers, within commercial and academic archaeology and the wider heritage sector. Career paths will generally be specialist and will depend on the choice of modules. Graduates will be well placed to pursue careers as a specialist in isotope analysis, zooarchaeological analysis or human osteoarchaeology. They will also be in a position to apply for general laboratory based work and archaeological fieldwork. Working within science communication and management are other options. Potential employers include archaeological units, museums, universities, heritage institutions, Historic England and Cadw. Freelance or self-employment career routes are also common for animal and human bone analysts with postgraduate qualifications.

The archaeology department has strong links and collaborations across the heritage sector and beyond. British organisations that staff currently work with include Cadw, Historic England, English Heritage, Historic Scotland, National Museum Wales, the British Museum, the Welsh archaeological trusts and a range of other archaeology units (e.g. Wessex Archaeology, Oxford Archaeology, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, Archaeology Wales). In addition, staff are involved with archaeological research across the world. You will be encouraged to become involved in these collaborations via research projects and placements to maximise networking opportunities and increasing your employability.

Read less
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is the specialty concerned with the diagnosis and management of diseases, injuries and defects affecting the mouth, jaws, face and neck. Read more
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is the specialty concerned with the diagnosis and management of diseases, injuries and defects affecting the mouth, jaws, face and neck.

All units are based on the speciality of oral surgery but within the wider context of maxillofacial surgery. The three year course provides specialist oral surgery clinical training. You will undertake minor oral surgery under supervision, carried out under local anaesthesia, conscious sedation and general anaesthesia. You will also attend theatre to assist and observe major surgery and attend consultation clinics, trauma clinics, ward rounds and carry out ward duties.

The clinical component of the course consists of the following units:
-Surgical Basic Sciences (Basic surgical science, preoperative and postoperative care) and Patient Care (Assessing patients, medical aspects of patient care and control of pain and anxiety)
-Reflective Oral Surgery Practices
-Dental Tissues (Infections and inflammation of the teeth and jaws, removal of teeth and surgical implantology)
-Bone: Disease and Injury (Diseases of bone and the maxillary sinus, oral and maxillofacial injuries)
-Soft Tissues (Cysts, mucosal disease, premalignancy and malignancy)
-Salivary Tissue, Pain and TMJ (Salivary gland disease, facial pain and disorders of the temporomandibular joint)

You will attend weekly interactive seminars led by senior staff and some invited guest speakers. Some of these have actor patients present to allow you to rehearse your clinical skills. If you study the full three year MSc you will also attend external teaching events such as residential blocks for basic science applied to surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

Aims

The course aims to:
-Provide dental practitioners with the knowledge and skills to undertake oral surgery in the context of wider knowledge of oral and maxillofacial surgery
-Provide you with the appropriate knowledge, understanding, intellectual skills, practical skills and attitude to practice oral surgery in selected cases
-Enable you to carry out critical evaluation, problem solving and use sound judgement for clinical problems
-Give you the knowledge to criticalyl understand the issues involved in the scientific basis of oral and maxillofacial surgery
-Ensure you are competent in the design and interpretation of original clinical research at the forefront of current dental research (including data collection and statistical analysis using appropriate computer software)
-Provide you with the knowledge and experience to plan, implement and complete a research project showing initiative and personal responsibility

Career opportunities

MSc courses are designed for dental practitioners who wish to further their knowledge of surgery and are a useful foundation for specialist training in this field.

The three year course provides specialist oral surgery clinical training.

Read less
The University of Dundee has a long history of mathematical biology, going back to Professor Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Chair of Natural History, 1884-1917. Read more

Mathematical Biology at Dundee

The University of Dundee has a long history of mathematical biology, going back to Professor Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Chair of Natural History, 1884-1917. In his famous book On Growth and Form (where he applied geometric principles to morphological problems) Thompson declares:

"Cell and tissue, shell and bone, leaf and flower, are so many portions of matter, and it is in obedience to the laws of physics that their particles have been moved, molded and conformed. They are no exceptions to the rule that God always geometrizes. Their problems of form are in the first instance mathematical problems, their problems of growth are essentially physical problems, and the morphologist is, ipso facto, a student of physical science."

Current mathematical biology research in Dundee continues in the spirit of D'Arcy Thompson with the application of modern applied mathematics and computational modelling to a range of biological processes involving many different but inter-connected phenomena that occur at different spatial and temporal scales. Specific areas of application are to cancer growth and treatment, ecological models, fungal growth and biofilms. The overall common theme of all the mathematical biology research may be termed"multi-scale mathematical modelling" or, from a biological perspective, "quantitative systems biology" or"quantitative integrative biology".

The Mathematical Biology Research Group currently consists of Professor Mark Chaplain, Dr. Fordyce Davidson and Dr. Paul Macklin along with post-doctoral research assistants and PhD students. Professor Ping Lin provides expertise in the area of computational numerical analysis. The group will shortly be augmented by the arrival of a new Chair in Mathematical Biology (a joint Mathematics/Life Sciences appointment).

As a result, the students will benefit directly not only from the scientific expertise of the above internationally recognized researchers, but also through a wide-range of research activities such as journal clubs and research seminars.

Aims of the programme

1. To provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of mathematical biology.
2. To enhance analytical and critical abilities and competence in the application of mathematical modeling techniques to problems in biomedicine.

Prramme Content

This one year course involves taking four taught modules in semester 1 (September-December), followed by a further 4 taught modules in semester 2 (January-May), and undertaking a project over the Summer (May-August).

A typical selection of taught modules would be:

Dynamical Systems
Computational Modelling
Statistics & Stochastic Models
Inverse Problems
Mathematical Oncology
Mathematical Ecology & Epidemiology
Mathematical Physiology
Personal Transferable Skills

Finally, all students will undertake a Personal Research Project under the supervision of a member of staff in the Mathematical Biology Research Group.

Methods of Teaching

The programme will involve a variety of teaching formats including lectures, tutorials, seminars, journal clubs, case studies, coursework, and an individual research project.

Taught sessions will be supported by individual reading and study.

Students will be guided to prepare their research project plan and to develop skills and competence in research including project management, critical thinking and problem solving, project reporting and presentation.

Career Prospects

The Biomedical Sciences are now recognizing the need for quantitative, predictive approaches to their traditional qualitative subject areas. Healthcare and Biotechnology are still fast-growing industries in UK, Europe and Worldwide. New start-up companies and large-scale government investment are also opening up employment prospects in emerging economies such as Singapore, China and India.

Students graduating from this programme would be very well placed to take advantage of these global opportunities.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X