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Masters Degrees (Body Language)

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Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world. Read more
Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world.

If you wish to focus specifically on the linguistics of the English language then our MA English Language and Linguistics should interest you. “Grammar” is the body of knowledge that enables a speaker to produce and understand the language(s) they speak. We study that knowledge, taking a practical approach to our research through analysis of English corpora, recordings and texts.

Our course allows you to cover a wide range of topics related to English, including:
-Dialectal and social variation
-Conversation analysis
-Language change
-Language rights
-Pragmatics

You also have the choice of optional topics including American languages, language and gender, multilingualism and language disorders.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology
-English Syntax 1
-Varieties of English
-English Syntax 2
-Variation in English II
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Summary. We offer a comprehensive range of programmes in Irish in both part-time and full-time mode at a number of centres which serve a diverse body of students. Read more

Summary

We offer a comprehensive range of programmes in Irish in both part-time and full-time mode at a number of centres which serve a diverse body of students. Irish language provision and practice amongst staff and students reflects the University’s strong commitment to cultural and linguistic diversity within Northern Ireland.

Our Irish programmes play a vital role in preserving, sustaining and celebrating Ireland’s Gaelic literary and linguistic heritage as well as serving the demands of the Irish language sector within the local and international job market.

At a personal level our programmes fulfil the needs of individuals who wish to acquire the necessary competence to fully participate in the Irish language community as confident and independent users of the language.

About

This course is ideal for those who have already attained a high level of proficiency in spoken and written Irish and who wish to pursue a full-time or part-time career in Translation/ Interpretation, although this course would also be suitable for anyone working in the Irish Language sector who wishes to improve their language skills.

Career options

It is estimated that 700 new jobs will be created within the EU in Irish translation/interpretation over the next 5-6 years. This exciting new MA programme is in response to the need for translators, editors and lexicographers to work in both domestic and European institutions, and will equip students with advanced language skills currently in demand in the Irish Language sector and in the European Union.

Irish, graduates from this programme will have career prospects in translation/interpretation for business and communications, in the legal sector, as well as in translation for the public sector and in tourism, and in the ever growing fields of both lexicography and language planning, in particular with 'Foclóir Gaeilge/Béarla an Fhorais.'



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Further entry requirements: .   International applicants should be aware that full registration with the RCSLT entails completion of a probationary period of clinical practice in the UK after the successful completion of the degree. Read more

Further entry requirements:   International applicants should be aware that full registration with the RCSLT entails completion of a probationary period of clinical practice in the UK after the successful completion of the degree. It may be necessary to confirm with the professional body in your home country that this qualification is recognised and that full registration in the UK will entitle you to practice in your home country.

This course is for people with a relevant degree seeking to refocus their studies into the area of speech and language therapy. It will enable you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) to practise as a speech and language therapist in the UK.

As a speech and language therapist, you will assess, diagnose and treat children and adults with a wide range of communication difficulties. This will include developmental disorders and speech and language problems resulting from injury, stroke and disease. You will also develop strong practical skills as well as a sound understanding of the theory of speech and language therapy.

There is a major clinical studies (ie placement) element to this course and clinical work is underpinned by modules in linguistics, psychology and biological and medical sciences. Although every effort is made to arrange summer block placements to suit students’ circumstances, this is not always possible and students must be prepared to be flexible about placement location and timing. Students are responsible for any travel and/or accommodation costs incurred during placements.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Teaching will include a mix of lectures, tutorials, student-led seminars, clinical placement experience, case study analysis and individual project work. Emphasis will be placed on integrating clinical and university based learning opportunities and on independent study. Your performance will be assessed by a combination of course work including essays, reports, presentations, vivas and examinations, as well as clinical practical assessments.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your attendance at placement is compulsory and your attendance at QMU-based modules is expected. Classes will be spread over the whole week, except for placement days when you will be off campus. This is a full-time course, with the expectation that classes, independent study and placement together require 35 - 40 hours of dedicated time each week.

Links with industry/professional bodies

The course provides graduates, including those who complete the PgDip, with eligibility to register with the Royal College of Speech and  Language Therapists and the Health and Care Professions Council to practice in the UK.

Modules

Foundations for Speech and Language Therapy/ Linguistics 1: Introduction to Linguistics/ Neurology for SLT and Audiology/ Adult Acquired Language and Cognitive Communication Disorders/ Linguistics 2: Clinical Linguistics/ Disorders of Speech and Fluency/ Manual Handling/ Dysphagia (Developmental and Acquired)/ Within-Semester Clinical Placement 1/ Professional Practice for SLT 1/ Biological and behavioural Science for SLT: Typical Processes/ Developmental Disorders of Language and Communication/ Intellectual Disability, Physical and Sensory Impairment/ Linguistics 3: Linguistic Processing and Variation/ Within-Semester Clinical Placement 2/ Motor Speech Disorder, Voice Disorder, Cleft Lip and Palate/ Clinical Contexts/ Within-Semester Clinical Placement 3/ Professional Practice 2/ Research Methods

If studying for the MSc, you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Most graduates work within the NHS in community clinics, schools and hospitals. Some graduates have gained research posts and some have gone on to achieve higher degrees. Some graduate Speech and language therapists may wish to seek employment outside the UK. For further information about how and where this qualification can be used outside of the UK please contact the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Quick Facts

  • The diploma course is the only postgraduate pre-registration course of its kind in Scotland. 
  • This course is the only one in the UK whereby speech and language therapists and audiologists are in the same department. 
  • Both these awards qualify you to register to work as a speech and language therapist in the UK.


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A flexible, professionally orientated programme for speech and language therapists and other graduates seeking new knowledge and expertise about communication disorders and swallowing. Read more
A flexible, professionally orientated programme for speech and language therapists and other graduates seeking new knowledge and expertise about communication disorders and swallowing.

Who is it for?

The course is for qualified speech and language therapists seeking to gain specialist knowledge and high level research skills in their field. It is also suitable for other graduates with a background and special interest in children and adults with speech, language, communication and associated difficulties, including Deafness.

Objectives

The MSc programme is designed to:
-Stimulate you to think in new ways about disorders of language, communication and swallowing.
-Introduce you to new theoretical ideas and new approaches to clinical practice.
-Strengthen your knowledge of the evidence base for clinical work.
-Enhance your skills in critically appraising research evidence.
-Provide you with the skills and knowledge that you need to begin independent research.
-Students are taught in a dynamic and supportive atmosphere, which encourages participation and the exchange of ideas. The knowledge and skills that you will develop can be applied across different language and cultural contexts, making the programme highly suitable for home, EU or overseas students.

Academic facilities

Students on the MSc course have access to specialist labs, e.g. providing speech and hearing instrumentation, computing resources and the excellent Institution library facilities, including our subject specific librarian. The School of Health hosts a speech and language therapy clinic (The Roberta Williams Centre) which provides project opportunities for MSc students.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching and learning takes place in small groups, combining direct input from experts with student-led discussion and workshop activities. Large-group teaching in research methods is combined with small-group laboratory sessions. Our virtual learning environment, Moodle, provides a platform for sharing module information and interactive learning. These methods support and are supported by self-directed study.

Assignments include essays, portfolios, literature reviews, poster presentations, oral presentations, and data analyses. Some focus entirely on critical evaluation of research; others require you to apply a selected body of research to a given case, client group, or clinical setting.

Modules

To gain the MSc or a PG Dip you will study two core modules, three discipline-specific modules (or related to communication or swallowing), and two elective modules which may be discipline-specific or generic.

Most modules run in the Autumn and Spring terms. A typical 15 credit module involves between 25 and 30 hours of teaching, supplemented by extensive private study (at least 8 hours a week).

The research dissertation involves up to one year of independent data collection and study, supported by a supervisor.

To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Speech Language and Communication you will be required to complete 3 or 4 modules totalling 60 credits. These must include at least two discipline specific modules in the area of Speech Language and Communication.

Core modules
-Introduction to research methods and applied data analysis (30 credits)
-Critical issues in advanced practice (15 credits)

Discipline Specific and Elective modules
-Acquired language impairments (15 credits)
-Case-based clinical management (15 credits)
-Cognitive communication impairments (15 credits)
-Developmental language impairment (15 credits)
-Dysphagia and disorders of eating and drinking (15 credits)
-Habilitative audiology (15 credits)
-Identity, Inclusion and Living with Disability
-Language learning and development (15 credits)
-Instrumental Techniques in Speech Sciences
-Developing Complex Interventions (15 credits)

Students can also choose modules from the School of Health Sciences' broader Continuing Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) portfolio.

Following successful completion of the taught component, students have up to one year to complete the dissertation.

Career prospects

Successful completion of the MSc fulfils the requirements for many higher-grade senior speech and language therapy posts, and for many EU and overseas clinical posts that require a masters level qualification. Students will also be eligible to apply for a research degree (MPhil/PhD) and for some research posts.

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This course is for teachers, speech and language therapists, and other professionals working with children with special educational needs. Read more

About the course

This course is for teachers, speech and language therapists, and other professionals working with children with special educational needs. You’ll develop your understanding of speech, language and communication and build on your existing skills. The course is delivered online, by distance learning, so you can gain a specialist qualification without having to leave your current job.

Your career

Your masters will give you the skills and knowledge to make a difference. Our MMedSci course provides the necessary training to meet the requirements of the UK Health and Care Professions Council which is the accreditation body for UK speech and language therapy. Our other courses provide professional development training. They can also lead to careers in university teaching and research.

How we teach

We have a reputation for high quality research in the field of human communication and its disorders. That research informs our teaching. We offer professional training for students who are considering speech and language therapy as a career. If you’re interested in a research career, we can prepare you for a PhD.

We also run professional development courses for students already working in the field, so you can study alongside your current job. We have links with the NHS, special schools and specialist charities to ensure that what we teach you is in line with current developments in the field.

We work with other departments across the University including the School of Education, the Department of Psychology, the Department of Computer Science and the School of English Language and Linguistics.

Core modules

PGCert, PGDip and MSc

Children’s Learning; Language and Communication; Spoken and Written Language; Developing an Evidence Base for Practice.

PGDip and MSc

Research Methods A; Research Methods B (optional for PGDip).

Examples of optional modules for PGDip and MSc levels only:

Case Study; Speech Difficulties 1: nature and investigation; Speech Difficulties 2: intervention and management; Research Methods B; Literacy 1: assessments and constructs; Literacy 2: difficulties and intervention; Developmental Disorders.

For Developmental Disorders, you can choose up to two specialist topics for further study, such as: Autism Spectrum Disorders; Specific Language Impairment; Language and Behaviour; Language and Environment; Learning Difficulties; Hearing Impairment; Auditory Processing Difficulties; Alternative and Augmentative Communication; Dysfluency; Dyslexia; Multilingual Contexts; Early Years; Adolescence.

MSc students also complete a dissertation.

Teaching

We provide material online for weekly study across the full calendar year. There are two or three (optional) study weekends per year in Sheffield. Essential reading material is available electronically. Online activities support your study and build links with tutors and other students.

Assessment

Modules are normally assessed by written assignments. MSc students are also assessed on their research dissertation.

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This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research. Read more

This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research.

You will study among one of the world’s largest and most vibrant postgraduate communities in philosophy, alongside internationally recognised leaders in the study of mind, of language, and of situated and embodied cognition. By choosing this programme, you will be entering an increasingly popular field in which many large unsolved problems remain.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words written at the end of the second semester. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor with whom you meet to plan your reading and discuss your work.

Compulsory courses:

  • Introduction to Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Advanced Topics in Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Introduction to Philosophical Method (for students without a strong philosophy background)

A wide range of optional courses is offered in the philosophy, psychology, language sciences, informatics and music subject areas. Options may include:

  • Advanced Philosophical Methods
  • Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Critical Social Psychology
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • Eye Movements and Visual Cognition
  • Foundations of Evolution
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Intelligent Autonomous Robots
  • Irrational Animals
  • Metaphysics of Mind
  • Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy
  • Music, Mind and Body: Psychology and Sociology
  • Music, Mind and Body: Physiology and Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology of Perception and Action
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Philosophy of Psychology
  • The Philosophy of Wittgenstein
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Self, Agency and Will
  • Social Cognition
  • Theories of Mind Philosophy
  • Topics in Cognitive Modelling

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the training necessary to undertake research in philosophy of cognitive science, and ultimately to pursue a career in academic philosophy. You will also acquire an understanding of the central debates in the sciences of the mind today.

If you do not intend to follow an academic route, the study of philosophy helps to develop general intellectual abilities and enhance analytical, critical, interpretive and problem-solving abilities.



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The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere. Read more
The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere.

Course Overview

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David's long-established expertise within this field as part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The degree offers modules which encompass a range of aspects on bilingualism and language planning in Wales and internationally. Different pathways are offered to meet the professional demands of a variety of careers in the field of bilingualism. It consists of five modules in Part One and a dissertation of 15,000 words in Part Two.

In Part One students may choose from a range of modules according to their personal professional or vocational needs, including:
-Introduction to Bilingualism
-Societal Bilingualism (political aspects of language vitality)
-Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-Models of Bilingual Teaching
-Language Planning Essentials
-Research Methodology

Students will choose their own research subjects for the dissertation in Part Two based on aspects of the modules studied previously in Part One and agreed in advance with the Programme Director. It is intended that students will be given the opportunity to conduct in-depth research in a field of study which will promote their professional development.

Although the modular structure of the postgraduate degree allows students to study a single module, on the successful completion of three modules students will be eligible to exit the course with a Postgraduate Certificate in Bilingualism and Multilingualism, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Bilingualism and Multilingualism on the completion of five modules. Students wishing to progress to the MA in Bilingualism and Multilingualism would undertake an additional dissertation.

Modules

A summary of the aims of individual modules:
-CYAD-7015: Introduction to Bilingualism
-CYAD-7002: Societal Bilingualism
-CYAD-7007: Research Methodology
-CYAD-7008: Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-CYAD-7009: Development of Bilingual Education in Wales
-CYAD-7010: Models of Bilingual Teaching
-CYAD-7012: Language Planning Essentials

Key Features

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s long-established expertise within this field. The University is part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The programme aims to:
-Provide students with various aspects of bilingualism and multilingualism, both in Wales and in international contexts
-Develop students’ ability to critically analyse the various factors involved in the study of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to relate those factors to national and international contexts
-Equip students for various vocations involved with bilingualism/ multilingualism and enable them to apply basic principles, together with knowledge, understanding and subject-based skills, to their daily vocational needs
-Introduce students to the most relevant research and thinking in the field which forms the basis for the most recent theories and learning
-Develop students’ transferable skills and enable them to research, interpret and critically evaluate
-Develop students’ cognitive skills including their ability to reason, to critically analyse, as well as to think creatively in appraising any current policies in the field of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to propose improvements

The programme will focus on various aspects of bilingualism and language planning relevant to a range of professional and vocational posts in order to extend and deepen knowledge, understanding and skills in specific fields. The professional / vocational skills related to this programme will enable students to:
-Rise to the challenge which faces individuals in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning
-Undertake projects concerned with various aspects in the field
-Undertake individual and team research to promote linguistic plans and strategies
-Analyse and interpret data concerned with various developments
-Exhibit proficiency in the use of ICT in presentations and in communication

Students are given an opportunity to undertake field studies occasionally (eg in Scotland and Ireland) in order to study language revitalization projects and, when geographically convenient, to attend national and international conferences on bilingualism and language planning.

The advantage of the MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism to students is the flexibility which allows them to gain the necessary knowledge and skills through distance learning, by studying part-time or full-time and with the assistance of technology and the reading materials provided.

One can study as few as two modules per year and spread the cost over the period of study. By now, the course is studied by students in Wales and in various parts of the world including, for example, Italy, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia, Cyprus, Greece and Mongolia.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are adopted in order to enable students to illustrate their knowledge and skills in relation to learning outcomes, including:
-Written assignments
-Presentations (adapted for distance learning purposes)
-Extended essays

Assessment methods are adopted on the basis of their appropriateness for ensuring that students can show that they have achieved the learning outcomes which are explicit in every module and on which the assessment criteria are based.

At the start of every module students are provided with:
-The assignment(s) for the assessment of the module and the weighting for each assignment
-A list of the criteria used to mark an assignment or presentation
-Further guidance in relation to the requirements of the set tasks and dates for presentation

Following the completion of an assignment, each student will receive:
-A formal report containing an assessment of the individual criteria on which the final mark was based, and feedback containing comments on how to improve as part of a formative process
-An opportunity to discuss the assignment with a tutor if necessary

Every assignment is assessed internally by a second-marker and by an external examiner.

Career Opportunities

The University has excellent resources, thus enabling us to offer a range of modules available to suit professional developmental needs and personal interests. The degree has a broad focus which is suitable for a range of professional fields and aims to equip students with the information and skills to work confidently in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning. The course offers a range of experiences and would appeal to anyone involved in the development of the use of language in modern society, including:
-Language Officers
-Policy Makers & Government Officers
-Language Planners
-Teachers & Trainers
-Translators
-Youth/ Community Workers
-Those currently working in adult education in various countries
-Those developing learning opportunities in both youth and adult contexts

The MA degree offers opportunities to progress to undertake subsequent research for a PhD.

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Top up your existing postgraduate qualification in body psychotherapy to a full MA. Receive a high level of academic and research input as you work on a clinically-focused arts therapies project, in our purpose-built therapy centre in Cambridge. Read more
Top up your existing postgraduate qualification in body psychotherapy to a full MA. Receive a high level of academic and research input as you work on a clinically-focused arts therapies project, in our purpose-built therapy centre in Cambridge.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/body-psychotherapy

Overview

If you’re already qualified as a body psychotherapist, our part-time course will give you the chance to work on a substantive piece of academic research, with access to our resources and internationally renowned therapies staff.

You’ll be assigned an academic supervisor to support your work, and will be able to attend our research methodologies training. You can also attend lectures and seminars from our MA Dramatherapy and MA Music Therapy courses, which will give you further insight into arts therapies theory and practice.

Our teaching team includes internationally recognised researchers as well as practising arts therapists. You’ll work alongside other students from our Music Therapy, Dramatherapy and Psychodrama courses, broadening your understanding of the field. You won’t need to undertake further clinical placements, meaning you can focus on your academic studies.

This course is a collaboration between the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre and our University. You’ll need to have a recognised postgraduate diploma in Body Psychotherapy from the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre, and registration with the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy Therapists (UKCPT) to apply.

Careers

Our course will advance your practice of body psychotherapy, whether you work in private practice or for health or education providers in the UK or overseas. It will equip you with crucial research skills that, according to the QAA Benchmarking for Counselling and Psychotherapy, are required by all counsellors and psychotherapists to '…enable them to read and interpret research evidence related to practice…', '…monitor and evaluate both individual practice and the work of a service or team…' and 'contribute to the developing knowledge and evidence base for their profession'.

You’ll benefit from our links with employers, such as the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre, health providers and charities.

Modules

Core module:
MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll submit a 15,000-word Major Project, which will be clinically focused and evaluative.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art studios. You’ll also have access to the Department of Music and Performing Arts facilities, which include a fully-equipped drama studio, two other drama rehearsal spaces, a large recital hall and a suite of computer music studios.

Students and staff work in an energetic and creative environment, with regular seminars, productions, performances and research- or therapy-based events.

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This new programme is an NHS funded training programme and reflects the values of the NHS constitution. Read more
This new programme is an NHS funded training programme and reflects the values of the NHS constitution. The programme will offer Psychology graduates the opportunity to prepare for practice as a speech and language therapist and to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Speech and Language Therapists are concerned with the management of disorders of language, speech, fluency, voice, communication and swallowing in children and adults. This programme will focus in particular on creating research-active graduates who will contribute to evidence-based practice within the profession.

Applicants must have Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society
The recruitment process for this programme includes assessing applicants by interview for the core values of the NHS Constitution.

Features and benefits of the course

-Accelerated master's programme for Psychology graduates wishing to gain certification to work as speech and language therapists
-Mix of university based and practice placement learning
-Opportunity to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions council upon successful completion of the course

About the Course

Commissioned by Health Education England, this programme will run over two years with 45 weeks of study per year as required by the professional body, the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

There will be a mix of university-based and placement-based learning throughout the programme, drawing upon students' previous undergraduate Psychology studies to develop confident and knowledgable practitioners over an accelerated period of professional study.

Students will take a range of units across two years of study. Some units are taken in year 1 and others in year 2 as indicated below, but in addition the following units will be taken across both years of study:
-Professional Competency in Speech and Language Therapy
-Research Methods and Dissertation

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The MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is aimed at graduate teachers and other English Language Teaching professionals with at least two years' English language teaching experience who wish to further their academic and professional development. Read more

Course Outline

The MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is aimed at graduate teachers and other English Language Teaching professionals with at least two years' English language teaching experience who wish to further their academic and professional development.

This degree will provide you with:

A critical understanding of key issues and debates in many areas of applied linguistics and of how these relate to English Language Teaching.
A body of knowledge that will enhance your ability to undertake language teaching at a range of levels in different cultural and institutional contexts.
The ability to reflect, analyse and critically evaluate language teaching and learning concepts and theories, and to understand and examine the assumptions underlying different classroom practices.
The skills to undertake effective practitioner research in your specific area of interest.

We are one of the longest established providers of postgraduate studies in Applied Linguistics and TESOL in the UK. On this course you will join teachers from all over the world. You will also benefit from our active involvement in research in different areas of Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

If you have a particular interest in lexis (vocabulary), you can specialize in Lexical Studies. This involves taking both the 'Words and Dictionaries' and 'Corpus Approaches to Lexis' modules and writing your Dissertation on a related topic. This entitles you to an MA in 'Applied Linguistics and TESOL with Lexical Studies' when you graduate.

Course Structure

Core Modules:
Grammar Awareness
Language in Society
Phonology and Pronunciation
Second Language Teaching
Second Language Learning

Option Modules:

Choose one from:
Continuing Professional Development for English Language Teachers
Intercultural Communication
Words and Dictionaries

Plus two from:
Corpus Approaches to Lexis
Discourse Analysis
Language Testing and Assessment
Materials Design and Development
Psychological Issues in Language Learning

Plus your dissertation. In your third term you will undertake a dissertation in a subject of your choice. You will be supervised by a member of staff with expertise in your chosen area who will guide and support you.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

Email:

Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL provides professional development and training in applied linguistics appropriate to more experienced teachers of English, including. Read more

Course Outline

The MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL provides professional development and training in applied linguistics appropriate to more experienced teachers of English, including:

-A critical understanding of key issues and debates in many areas of applied linguistics and of how these relate to English Language Teaching.
-A body of knowledge that will enhance your ability to undertake language teaching at a range of levels and cultural and institutional contexts.
-The ability to reflect, analyse and critically evaluate language teaching and learning concepts and theories, and to understand and examine the assumptions underlying different classroom practices.
-The ability to analyse language in use from different perspectives relevant to language teaching and learning.
-The skills to undertake effective practitioner research in your specific area of interest.

We are one of the longest established providers of postgraduate studies in Applied Linguistics and TESOL in the UK. On this course you will join teachers from all over the world. You will also benefit from our active involvement in research in different areas of Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

We pride ourselves on the level of support we provide our distance learning students. Our award-winning library has world-class facilities for distance learning students. You will have full access to our other support services and will be assigned a personal tutor. Our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, offers a wide range of study support material, and you will have the opportunity to join an interactive web-based community of fellow students around the world.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Course Structure

Modules:
Second Language Teaching and Learning
Description of English
Language, Discourse and Society
Two option modules
Plus your Dissertation

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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The SOAS MA programme in Taiwan Studies is the first postgraduate degree focussing on contemporary Taiwan in the English speaking world. Read more
The SOAS MA programme in Taiwan Studies is the first postgraduate degree focussing on contemporary Taiwan in the English speaking world. It provides an unrivalled programme of advanced interdisciplinary courses on Taiwan’s politics, society and culture, film, rights and law, and languages.

- Why study Taiwan?

Taiwan occupies a critical geo-strategic position in the Asia-Pacific Region and the development of its relationship with Mainland China, as well as the countries of North East and South East Asia is already an important shaping influence on economic and political developments throughout the region. Analysis of the development experience of contemporary Taiwan serves to highlight a unique, but transferable model of economic growth, social transformation and political modernisation.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/taiwanstudies/mataiwanstudies/

Programme Specification

MA Taiwan Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/taiwanstudies/mataiwanstudies/file80896.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Taiwan studies from SOAS equips students with essential skills such as competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Dutch Golden Age MA is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, focusing on the Dutch Republic during its 17th-century efflorescence. Read more
The Dutch Golden Age MA is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, focusing on the Dutch Republic during its 17th-century efflorescence. Jointly offered by UCL, King's College London, and the Courtauld Institute, the programme draws on the full range of resources and expertise in London for study of this subject.

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Advanced
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

This interdisciplinary programme combines three fields: history, art history, and Dutch language and literature. It aims to provide a knowledge and understanding of the political, economic, cultural and religious history of the Netherlands in the period c.1550–1700.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three or four core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and the research dissertation (90 credits).

- Core Modules
Research Skills Seminar
Literature of the Dutch Golden Age
or one module on the history of Dutch art

- Recent optional modules included:
Dutch Genre Painting
From Renaissance to Republic: The Netherlands c.1555-1609
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe
Signs, Mind and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language
The Body Between Art and Science
Golden Age Kingship: Theory and Practice
Transformation of Jewish Culture in Early Modern Europe

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project based on 16th and/or 17th-century (primary) resources, which culminates in a dissertation up to 15,000 words.

Teaching and Learning

The programme takes the form of lectures, small-group seminars and individual tutorials. Through the research skills seminar students will visit various libraries and collections, in particular the Institute for Historical Research, British Library, and Warburg Institute. Assessment is through written coursework essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Dutch Golden Age MA http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_dutch_golden_age

Funding

For the most recent information on funding available for 2015/16 entry please see the UCL HIstory website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_funding .

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Carol Chattaway Scholarship
Value: £2,500 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- Furlong Bursary for MA Study in the Ancient Near East
Value: £7,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- Jean Orr Scholarship
Value: £7,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

First destinations of recent graduates of the programme include: East Side Community Heritage; Volunteer, Warburg Institute; University of London: Research Degree in Art History; and University of Amsterdam: PhD Golden in the Age in Dutch Art.

- Employability
This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

The department is strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading historians.

Students benefit from London's extraordinary resources, including major collections of Dutch and Flemish art. The British Library, within walking distance of UCL, houses the largest collection of Dutch books anywhere outside the Low Countries.

Student / staff ratios › 39 staff including 8 postdocs › 101 taught students › 46 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is suitable for students with a first degree in a relevant arts, humanities or social science discipline. Prior knowledge of the Dutch language is not required; depending on their linguistic skills, students will be placed in one of three language/literature courses and trained in the reading of Dutch texts.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Dutch Golden Age at graduate level
- why you want to study Dutch Golden Age at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your academic background meets the demands of a challenging academic environment
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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