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Masters Degrees (Body Image)

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Writing music for the moving image requires a unique combination of technical and creative skills. You will gain a solid grounding in the theories, techniques and practices essential for contemporary film and television music production. Read more
Writing music for the moving image requires a unique combination of technical and creative skills. You will gain a solid grounding in the theories, techniques and practices essential for contemporary film and television music production.

You will work with award-winning composers from the film and television industry on real-life projects. After developing your composition skills in a range of genres, you will also have the chance to work with colleagues from other media courses to develop your portfolio of work.

You will have access to a suite of high-quality professional music studios approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

We also have links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations as well as our very own Northern Film School, ensuring you have plenty of opportunities to sharpen your practical skills.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including in music, drama, dance and performing arts.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/musicmovingimage_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your course will give you the skills you need to help you create high-quality music for the moving image, film, television and media industries.

- Television Music Composer
- Film Score Composer
- Music Technologist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will have access to a suite of high-quality, professional music studios, approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

We have links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, as well as our very own Northern Film School, which ensures that you get the most from your course. We also provide regular visiting speakers from the music and film industries and a highly-skilled and experienced teaching team.

Core Modules

Collaborative Practice
Experience the collaborative working environment and develop your skills in fulfilling complex briefs.

Composing to Picture
Address the challenges of producing music for the moving image.

Film Music Analysis
Develop analysis techniques to enhance your understanding of historical, musical, stylistic and functional developments in film music.

Creative Sound Design
Gain the knowledge and skills you need to develop audio-based artefacts in the fields of electro-acoustic music, sonic art and sound design.

Research Practice
Examine the methods and skills which are required in order to carry out research into the ideas and practice of music technology.

Sound, Music & Image
Evaluate the relationships between sound, music and image, and devise and create examples of audio-visual media to a professional standard.

The Major Individual Project
This major project gives you the opportunity to engage in research and advanced practice in an area of your own choosing.

Negotiated Skills Development
Work closely with your tutors, researching and applying current theory and practice alongside a learning plan that meets your own aims and objectives.

Electro-acoustic Music
Explore the techniques and methods employed in electroacoustic composition and use those techniques and methods to create an original composition.

Orchestration Arrangement & Programming
Study contemporary approaches to orchestration and arrangement of music for the moving image and create scores and MIDI realisations to a professional standard.

Facilities

- Music Studios
"Being able to work in such good facilities gave me a buzz – I loved working in the studios." Piers Aggett of chart-topping, MOBO award-winning Rudimental

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in 100 acres of parkland with easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. Read more
This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. This places the programme at the forefront of postgraduate studies exploring moving image in its most creative form. The course offers a range of input from staff in filmmaking, and will enable you to develop a major body of practical work created within the context of a critical understanding of contemporary experimental film theory.

You will have access to our moving image resources and specialised filmmaking equipment, augmented by excellent technical and academic support. To complete a specific project brief, other materials will also be provided, enabling you to meet the learning outcomes of the course and/or project. However, if you choose to develop your own film options requiring additional resources, then you will have to meet any further costs associated with that. View a full list of our current moving image resources.

Key features
-The course provides an exploration of the relationship between film, moving image, sound and critical frameworks. This is supported by the excellent moving image resources at the Knights Park campus, including a moving-image studio, post-production facilities and high-end film equipment. One-to-one tutorials, seminars, exhibitions and discussion all feature in the programme.
-Taught by filmmakers, creative practitioners, curators and writers, including many off-site visits and visits by professional artists, filmmakers and curators. This includes the opportunity to participate in a public screening programme at BFI Southbank, and a seminar forum at FID Marseille International Film Festival.
-Every year, the course nominates a graduate to participate in the European workshop on artists' moving image at the Schermo dell'Arte film festival in Florence, where they receive professional mentoring.

What will you study?

The curriculum offers three distinct areas of critical and practical inquiry options, supported by a specialised seminar/lectures series: artists' moving image; independent film; and the materiality of film.

You will undertake self-initiated research supported by taught modules and an experienced group of research-active staff, and will explore the critical and historical frameworks within which experimental film work can be understood and conceptualised.

Assessment

Presentation and exhibition/screening/documentation, tutorials and seminar/discussion.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Project 1
-Theory – Seminar
-Experimental Filmmaking Practices
-Experimentation in Moving Image
-Masters Project (Exhibition and Research Publication)

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The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. Read more
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. From the basic biology of neurons through to complex processes of perception and decision-making behaviour, we address how the mind, brain, and body work together and translate this knowledge into clinical applications for patient benefit.

We offer MPhil supervision in the following research areas:

Motor systems development, plasticity and function

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies of normal and abnormal development and plasticity of the motor system. We run functional studies and computer modelling of motor system activity throughout the neuraxis. We also research the development and assessment of novel therapies for motor disorders/lesions including stem cell and brain-machine interface.

Visual system development, plasticity and repair]]
We research the development and assessment of novel neuro-technological approaches to retinal dystrophy repair including brain-machine interface and stem cells. We use in vitro approaches to look at retinal development and visual system wiring.

[[Neural computation and network systems
We conduct experimental and theoretical (computational) studies aimed at understanding how neurones throughout the brain interact in localised networks to compute complex tasks. Our research looks at the role of network activity in a wide range of neurological, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

Auditory neuroscience

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies aimed at understanding the brain mechanisms involved in detection, discrimination and perception of sound. We are interested in how these mechanisms are affected in individuals with brain disorders, including dementia, autism and stroke.

Pain

Our research focuses on:
-Understanding mechanisms underlying pain, analgesia, and anaesthesia
-The development of methods to assess pain and to alleviate pain in animals and humans

Psychobiology

We conduct studies in laboratory animals, healthy volunteers and patient populations investigating the mechanisms underlying mood, anxiety and addiction disorders and their treatment. Allied research looks at normal neuropsychology, and the physiology and pharmacology of neurotransmitter and endocrine systems implicated in psychiatric disorders.

Neurotoxicology

Our research focuses on delineating the effects and understanding the mechanisms of action of established and putative neurotoxins, including environmental and endogenous chemicals, and naturally occurring toxins.

Forensic psychiatry and clinical psychology

Our research covers:
-The assessment, treatment and management of sex offender risk
-Development and assessment of cognitive models
-Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety and developmental disorders
-Developmental disorders of perception and cognition

Systems and computational neuroscience

We conduct theoretical (computational) and experimental studies aimed at understanding the neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology of vision, visual attention and episodic memory.

Behaviour and evolution

Many research groups take an evolutionary and comparative approach to the study of brain and/or behaviour, comparing brain function and behaviour among such disparate groups as insects, birds and mammals, and studying the ecological and evolutionary functions of behaviour. Much of our work is at the forefront of the fields of neuroethology, behavioural ecology and comparative cognition, and has important implications for the study and practice of animal welfare.

Visual perception and human cognition

We research:
-Colour and depth perception - perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention - memory
-Word learning in children
-Body image dysfunction
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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Coventry University offers a postgraduate certificate in Teenage/Young Adult Cancer Care through e-learning. Read more
Coventry University offers a postgraduate certificate in Teenage/Young Adult Cancer Care through e-learning. The course is delivered through close working with Teenage Cancer Trust - the leading UK charity in this field - professional organisations and clinical experts from across the multi-disciplinary team, including young people with cancer themselves.

This collaborative working ensures that contemporary clinical practice is strongly embedded in what we do and supports the strategic development of the workforce and services for this niche group of patients.

The Postgraduate Certificate (60 M level credits) comprises three modules (20M level credits each) all of which are mandatory. These are:
-The Developing Teenager/Young Adult with Cancer - M58CPD (Term 1)
-Caring for the Teenager/Young Adult with Cancer - M57CPD (Term 2)
-Independent Study - M05HLS (Term 3)

This is aimed at all of the multidisciplinary team who are involved with teenage cancer care and encourages students to work together online, to develop specialist knowledge and learn how the various roles combine to offer evidenced-based teenage cancer care. Through the presented materials, students will examine the complex social and political nature of health and social care impacting teenagers with cancer and help shape their professional development.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-The course will update you on current developments in practice and theory on the care of Teenagers/Young Adults with cancer
-It will enhance your own professional development and professional portfolio
-It will demonstrate compliance with Manual for Cancer Services: Teenagers and Young Adults Measures (NCAT 2011)
-You can bring new knowledge and ideas into the workplace, inspiring local changes in practice and contributing to service improvement
-It will provide you with a platform to network with fellow colleagues in the field of Teenage Cancer Care

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

-The development of TYA from a biological and psychosocial perspective
-TYA Cancers-aetiology and demography
-Legal and ethical issues
-Policies and organisations of health services/care delivery
-Assessment of care needs of the TYA with cancer. Palliative and end of life care. Survivorship and late effects
-Response to life-changing experience - body image, self esteem, hope and expectations, life goals, changes in development (physical/hormonal/emotional and mental health), education and employment. External support systems, eg charities, youth groups
-Family systems – peer relationships, social/community networks
-Communication with the Teenager/Young Adult with Cancer and their families
-An opportunity to explore the literature on a student selected topic
-Opportunity to present work to peers in a mock conference setting

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

Successful completion of this course will demonstrate higher order thinking skills and knowledge acquisition in the subject of caring for Teenagers and Young Adults with cancer.

Students will be awarded with a postgraduate qualification from a highly regarded UK University.

Students will possess an award in Teenage Cancer Care that it nationally and internationally renowned.

Successful completion of this course will enhance career prospects and enhance knowledge to work as a health care professional in palliative, acute or longer-term care, particularly in teenage cancer care.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

Whilst there is no practice element to this course, the online environment provides a platform for discussion between students from across the world.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The Department of Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University boasts research expertise of international repute. Read more
The Department of Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University boasts research expertise of international repute. Choosing to study with us will not only provide you with an intellectually stimulating degree, but also by providing you with access to the latest research expertise and specialist equipment, we will develop your thirst for knowledge and inspire you to question, research and analyse your theories.

We are committed to ensuring that our graduates are employable professionals. It is increasingly important that your postgraduate degree programme develop the skills that employers are after and alongside the acquisition of academic knowledge, our students will develop and apply skills in:
-Assessment
-Verbal communication
-Professional report writing
-Evaluation
-Analytical thinking

Adding value to your employability skills

Whilst there are no dedicated placement opportunities on this programme, our students have the opportunity to visit local courts and prisons to see their learning in practice.

“I really enjoyed the visit to the court. I think it was good experience to get to talk to the judge, barrister and the probation officer and have the opportunity to ask them questions. It was useful how they talked about their job roles and also talked about the work they have done with psychologists and how psychologists have helped them with their job”

“I really enjoyed the visit to Manchester Crown Court. I think that it is a fantastic opportunity to talk to those who work in this field and ask them direct questions about their job. The barrister, circuit judge and the probation officer were able to give us direct feedback of the work they have done in collaboration with psychologists and how much they value the work done with them. It enables us, as master’s students, to discuss our dissertation with the probation officer, barrister and circuit judge and hear ideas from a different perspective”

Student feedback, trip to Manchester Crown Court, Nov 2015

International Research

Research in the department primarily focuses on solving real world problems, ensuring that our theoretically strong work has an impact outside academia. Currently holding grants from the Medical Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council our research is not only relevant and underpinned by a unique blend of qualitative and quantitative orientations but has international reach and esteem.

Members of the Forensic Psychology team conduct applied and practitioner focused research. Particular areas of expertise are:
-The investigation of crime; homicide and police decision making
-Eyewitness and alibi evidence
-Expert witness evidence
-Juror decision making

As well as publishing hundreds of peer reviewed articles and journals, many of our staff have published popular and well established Psychology books in the areas listed below:
-'Preventing self-injury and suicide in women's prisons', Dr Tammi Walker
-'Body image', Professor Sarah Grogan
-'Mental toughness', Professor Peter Clough
-'Culture and Psychology', Dr Andrew Stevenson

Features and benefits of the course

-Accredited by the British Psychological Society, if students enter this programme with eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) from their undergraduate Psychology degree then successful completion of this programme will fulfil stage one of the requirements towards Chartered Membership of the Society and full membership of the Division of Forensic Psychology.
-130 high quality academic papers in print over the last 12 months
-96% of students are satisfied with the quality of our teaching (NSS)
-We have a clear focus on student employability, offering psychometric testing and workshops to support students in their personal progression and future job applications.

Assessment details

Students are assessed utilising a variety of assessment formats including: essays, professional reports and presentations.

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Students studying this course will be better prepared to understand the place sport and exercise have within society and apply this to a range of vocational careers in the field. Read more
Students studying this course will be better prepared to understand the place sport and exercise have within society and apply this to a range of vocational careers in the field.

Why Study Sociology of Sport and Exercise with us?

Our MSc in the Sociology of Sport and Exercise is delivered by research-informed teaching staff in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, whose commitment to research-informed teaching makes the course academically rigorous while creating a relaxed learning environment that the students find enjoyable.

Our graduates have successfully gained careers including: teaching in further/higher education institutions; full-time funded doctoral research; local, national and international sports organisations; research and consultancy; physical education teaching; and the health and fitness industry. There are also opportunities to pursue voluntary placements with local employers in the field to supplement your studies.

What will I learn?

All modules will enable you to explore, theoretically and empirically, research topics that interest you. These include: sport and health, sport policy and development, physical education and youth sport, journalism, the media, drugs, and body image.

How will I be taught?

The course is delivered at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester. Throughout the course you will be taught in lead lectures, studentled group discussions and workshops, and weekly one-to-one tutorials.
You will have six hours’ contact time per week, plus additional student tutorials. You will also be expected to engage in up to 20 hours’ private study per week

How will I be assessed?

Assessment involves 100% coursework and takes the form of essays, individual presentations, poster presentations, and a research dissertation.

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression. Read more
Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course will encompass all these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic art supervisors.

Why study Forensic Art at Dundee?

Forensic Art is the presentation of visual information in relation to legal procedures. A forensic artist may aid in the identification or location of victims of crime, missing persons or human remains, and may facilitate the identification, apprehension or conviction of criminals.

Forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge. The course provides training and expertise at the cutting-edge of the forensic art profession

What's so good about studying Forensic Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching methods include traditional and online lectures, practical workshops in the studio and dissecting room and small group discussions. These encourage debate around theoretical research-based solutions to current practical problems.

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

This highly innovative one-year taught MSc will encompass these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic artists.

Semester 1 (60 credits)

In semester 1 the focus is on the study of anatomy through dissection, prosection study, illustration and facial sculpture and applying this to life art practice. Students will also be introduced to research methods and digital media.

Anatomy 1 - Head and Neck (15 credits)

Anatomy 2 - Post Cranial (15 credits)

Life Art (10 credits)

Digital Media Practice (10 credits)

Research Methods (10 credits)

Semester 1 may be also taken as a stand-alone PGCert entitled ‘Anatomy for Artists’.


Semester 2 (60 credits)

Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison (25 credits)

Forensic Art (25 credits)

Medical-Legal Ethics (10 credits)

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Forensic Art and Facial Identification.

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a self-directed project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods are employed, including anatomy spot-tests; oral and visual presentations; portfolio assessment of 2D/3D image acquisition and of artwork; written coursework and examination, such as forensic case reports.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional vocational training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in forensic art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In forensic art, potential careers exist within the police force and overseas law enforcement. Possible careers include:

Police art & design departments producing law enforcement documents, image enhancement, CCTV surveillance, image collection, staff posters and presentations.
SOCO/CSIs in UK or overseas law enforcement agencies
Facial composite practitioner and witness interview expert in police force
Archaeological artist working with museums, institutes and exhibitions
Facial identification services
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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In this program you will. Learn anatomy through dissection. Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching. Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging. Read more

In this program you will:

  • Learn anatomy through dissection
  • Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching
  • Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging.
  • Contribute to world leading anatomical and/or biomedical research

Our programme aims to improve your theoretical and practical knowledge of human anatomy through an intensive on-campus dissection course, as well as the development and learning of theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

This programme has two main strands. One is the in-depth study of the anatomy of the human body. Anatomical knowledge will be learned to a level to teach undergraduate and postgraduate students and professions allied to medicine. This strand will involve the dissection of a body in groups of three to five students over two semesters. This part of the course is largely self-directed, with regular “surgeries” when teaching staff are present to answer questions and help students with the dissections.

The other is anatomy pedagogy, covering the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Next to theoretical lectures and workshops the first semester will focus on observing the teaching of anatomy to medical undergraduate students. The second semester will focus on being involved in preparing and carrying out teaching sessions to both small and large groups of students. The learned theoretical material, the observations and practical experiences will be compiled in an end-of year teaching portfolio. The experience that you will gain can be used towards an application as associate fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Complementing these strands will be a lecture-based embryology course providing you with an understanding of normal human development and how normal development can go wrong, manifested in commonly observed congenital abnormalities. You will also study neuroanatomy, the health and safety of embalming procedures and handling bodies, the legal and historical aspects of anatomy in Scotland and the UK, an introduction to the ethics of using bodies in medical education and explore clinical techniques used to image the body.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of six courses plus a summer dissertation project. The courses "Teaching Anatomy" and "Basic Human Anatomy 1 & 2" make up the majority of the degree with 40 credits each. The other courses are 10 credit courses that are spread out over two semesters as follows (10 credits equal 100 hours of work):

Semester one:

  • Basic Human Anatomy 1: Gross anatomy of the Limbs and Thorax (20 credits)
  • Anatomy Law and Ethics: Divided into 3 parts: Health & Safety of anatomy and body handling, the legislation that governs the activities of anatomy departments both in Scotland and throughout the UK, and the ethics of using human material for the teaching of anatomy (10 credits)

Semester two:

  • Basic Human Anatomy 2: Gross anatomy of the Abdomen, Pelvis, Head & Neck (20 credits)
  • Neuroanatomy: Gross Anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, sensory and motor pathways, cranial nerves, spinal cord, spinal nerves and autonomic nervous system (10 credits)

Semesters one and two:

  • Teaching Anatomy: Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students (40 credits).
  • Embryology: From ovulation of the egg to fetal development of all body systems (10 credits)
  • Medical Imaging and Anatomy: explore anatomy using images produced by clinical tools such as X-ray, CT and MRI. (10 credits)

Summer period:

  • Dissertation Project: 10,000 word dissertation and oral presentation (60 credits)

Teaching is by lectures, seminars and tutorials. Courses are assessed by either, or a combination of, oral examinations, essays, multiple choice question exams, extended matching question exams, presentations and practical anatomy exams.

You have the option to finish after the second semester graduating with a Diploma in Human Anatomy, or to gain your masters by completing a summer dissertation project that can be either library-, practical- or laboratory-based.

More information on anatomy at the University can be found on our website:

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help you gain a highly regarded qualification in anatomy and the teaching of anatomy. It will provide you with a set of major transferable skills such as dissecting experience, teaching experience, expertise in health and safety and anatomy law and ethics.

This programme can therefore open up possibilities in for example anatomy teaching, anatomy laboratories, further studies in medical and biomedical sciences, further research leading to a PhD, and many more increasing your long-term career prospects.



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Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. Read more

Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. The growth of online digital cultures - and the impact of digital image creation on traditional image making - requires flexible and adaptable practitioners, and it provides unique opportunities for the entrepreneurial illustrator.

Our MA Illustration course offers you the chance to challenge the boundaries of illustration, both in its practice and its context, and is primarily concerned with the illustrated narrative. It offers you a creative and intellectual environment in which you can rigorously pursue a project of self-directed study, and produce a body of work on a topic of your interest within the field of illustration.

Our course enjoys a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas. As a student here you'll get to explore narrative storytelling, authorship, self-publishing, book production and visual narratives through the development of a personal project.

This MA course supports you to develop your own independent voice and to identify an audience. You're encouraged to take a self-directed entrepreneurial approach, developing and exploring creative opportunities and options for your work. This entrepreneurial emphasis will be supported by access to specialist facilities such as digital media suites, photography, printmaking and bookmaking.

Our course also provides you with the opportunity for extended critical debate, a high degree of critical reflection and integration of theoretical and practical concerns as part of the realisation of an ambitious body of work. It will also promote in-depth, rigorously conducted research, to ensure you're able to contextualise your own work in relation to the leading edge practice in illustration.

Visiting lecturers and practitioners inform and cultivate professional development, encouraging you to question and debate. Recent visiting lecturers have included Graham Rawle, Olivier Kugler, Nick White, Luke Best, Mathew Richardson and Posy Simmonds.

Industry Partners

Illustration at UCA Farnham has a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas.

Students on MA Illustration also benefit from well-established industry connections.

Careers

Graduates from our MA Illustration course go on to establish careers in a diverse range of exciting areas, such as:

-Freelance illustration

-Self-publishing

-Artist practice

-Printmaking

-Curation

-Editing

-Animation

-Project management

-Education

-Design

-Digital imaging

-Web authoring

-Multi-media production.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/

The programme is particularly relevant for students who have an MA degree and are looking to postion and develop their research and practice work.

It will be tailor-made to your individual research area and practice, giving you the opportunity to develop research skills and pursue your own area of interest.

You'll work closely with a personal supervisor to develop your work in the areas of filmmaking, photography and digital arts.

You’ll also receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to your chosen subject.

The programme meets the needs of two groups:

students who have completed an MA in Filmmaking, Photography, or Electronic Arts and cognate programmes (for example, our MA in Photography: The Image & Electronic Arts)
film, photography and electronic arts professionals who wish to extend their research-based practice

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sean Cubitt.

Structure

A personalised programme
The programme is personalised for each student, and is based on your individual research into your chosen practice. It gives you the opportunity to develop appropriate research skills and to pursue a research practice project of your own design, developed and reworked in discussion with a personal supervisor.

The curriculum is personalised for individual students, but all students will share a common curriculum and receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to their chosen subject.

The course will add value to recent MA practice graduates and to film, photography and electronic arts professionals by giving a deeper and more specialised engagement in a major research project supervised by staff experienced in both creative and professional research. Research training will give you the skills to design and complete your own research and to work to research briefs.

All students undertake the Practice-Based Research Methods Seminar in the first term, producing a detailed 5000 word project outline at the end. They will also take in the second term one of a selected range of optional modules to help develop their critical and theoretical awareness. In the first term, they begin work with their personal supervisor on the design and execution of their project. Supervision will determine the specific means used: some students will embark directly on a single piece of work; others may undertake a series of workshop-based activities.

Aims

The programme's subject-specific learning outcomes require you to think critically about a range of issues concerning the media, understood in the widest sense, and to be able to justify their views intellectually and practically. The central outcome will be to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project.

As appropriate to each individual project, you will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise your chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media. You will learn to produce high quality research under time constraints, by working independently.

All students will develop a range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: ‘the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development’. You will be guided to work independently and to think through the intellectual issues.

Progress is carefully monitored, to make sure that you are making progress towards the achievement of the outcomes. Different kinds of practical and intellectual skills are required for each part of the programme. In consultation with supervisors, you will be guided to the most appropriate practical and intellectual approaches, and to the most appropriate technical and critical sources.

Structure

You take the following modules:

Practice-Based Research Methods (30 credits)
This module provides research methods training for the MRes in Film Photography and Electronic Arts, and may be taken by practice-based students in the MPhil programme in Media and Communications. In all years it will address the legal and ethical constraints operating on research by practice. In any given year, the syllabus will address such topics as technique (colour, composition, editing, post-production, sound-image relations, text-image relations), anti-racist, feminist and decolonial critique; hardware and software studies; environmental impacts of media production, dissemination and exhibition; media critical approaches to art, political economy, and truth. The interests of students and supervisors will guide the selection of specific content of the course in its delivery, whose aim is to inculcate advanced thinking on the making, delivery and audiences for research-based practice.

Research Project (120 credits)
The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other. The length of the textual element should normally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. The practical component should be a ‘substantial’ body of work. Given the potential range of media that can be used, and their differing potential relationships with the research process and the textual component, it is impossible to be precise. In the case of film/video it would normally entail the submission of a work (or works) of about 25 minutes in length (or more), but detailed requirements will be worked out on a case-by-case basis.

Students will undertake to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project in collaboration with their supervisor. The project will be informed by research, as appropriate, into the materials, techniques and critical contexts of production, distribution and exhibition in audiovisual, electronic image and allied arts. As appropriate to each individual project, students will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise their chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media, especially in relation to anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, environmental and other key ethical and political dimensions of their aesthetic practice. They will learn to produce high quality research under pressure, by working independently. The exact conceptual and methodological direction of the research must initially come from the student, though this will be developed and reworked in discussion with the personal supervisor. Areas of research can be drawn from a wide remit, including the full range of media and cultural forms of contemporary societies and may be theoretical or empirical; technically- or more academically-based. Projects which are conceptually coherent, and practicable in their aims and methods can be considered, subject only to the in-house expertise of staff. The module encourages the development of knowledge and skills specific to the production, distribution and exhibition of contemporary media.

Assessment

There are two assessment points:

A: You are required to write one 5,000 word essay linked to the Practice-Based Research Methods seminar. The exact theme and title will be decided in discussion between you and your supervisor and relate to your specialist field of research, but as a guide it will demonstrate your readiness to undertake the project through critical evaluation of legal, ethical, critical and reflexive parameters and functions of practice-based research.

In addition, you will be assessed in the option module you undertake during the Spring Term.

B: The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other.

Department

We are ranked:
22nd in the world for communication and media studies**
1st in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for media professionals, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

The department includes some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – the pioneers of media, communications and cultural studies. They actively teach on our programmes, and will introduce you to current research and debate in these areas. And many of our practice tutors are industry professionals active in TV, film, journalism, radio and animation.

We also run EastLondonLines.co.uk – our 24/7 student news website – which gives students the opportunity to gain experience working in a real-time news environment.

And we run regular public events featuring world-renowned writers and practitioners that have recently included Danny Boyle, Gurinda Chadha, Noel Clark and Tessa Ross. So you’ll get to experience the latest developments and debates in the industry.

Skills & Careers

The course is designed to support students who wish to strengthen their opportunities in professional media, including the media industries and creative practice, private sector firms, public sector institutions and civil society organisations with communications departments.

We envisage that a small proportion of graduates will seek careers in teaching, including secondary and higher education, in which case their projects and supervision will be tailored to that end.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification provides a wide range of modules in key aspects of Medical Art and Forensic Art & Facial Identification which are offered on a stand-along basis. Read more
The Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification provides a wide range of modules in key aspects of Medical Art and Forensic Art & Facial Identification which are offered on a stand-along basis.

These modules enable the student to develop specialist expertise or perhaps refresh knowledge.

Our academic staff offer postgraduate modules in their specialist areas, therefore, students are taught by experts in the field.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

Students benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

The modules are delivered through traditional lectures, dissection, study groups and anatomical illustration workshops. These will be supplemented with tutorials to allow for small and large group-based discussion as well as life drawing critique sessions.

-Core modules
Anatomy for Artists
Medical Art 1: Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2: Communication and Education
Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison
Forensic Art

Progression

These modules form part of our postgraduate portfolio. You can continue from a single module to a Postgraduate Certificate, by combining the modules as follows:

Anatomy for Artists
Medical Art 1: Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2: Communication and Education (requires completion of Medical Art 1 or prior professional experience)
Upon completion of all three a PGCert in Medical Art will be awarded

Anatomy for Artists
Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison
Forensic Art (requires completion of Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison or prior professional experience)
Upon completion of all three a PGCert in Forensic Art and Facial Identification will be awarded.

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MA Photography at London College of Communication has created many celebrated photographers and artists around the globe. This fine art photography MA has an international reputation for conceptually driven, research-led practices. Read more

Introduction

MA Photography at London College of Communication has created many celebrated photographers and artists around the globe. This fine art photography MA has an international reputation for conceptually driven, research-led practices. Based in the still image, an interdisciplinary approach encourages students to explore the ever-expanding boundaries of the photographic medium to develop a distinctive body of work that is contextualised within a wider critical framework.

Content

MA Photography is a fine art photography programme aimed at developing a personal, distinctive and conceptually strong practice grounded in research and critical thinking. While based in the still image it embraces cross-media and cross-genre practice. Recent alumni have won awards such as the Dazed/Converse Emerging Artist, Magenta Flash Forward Emerging Photographers and IdeasTap/Magnum Photographic Award, and have been selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries.

MA Photography at London College of Communication is renowned for producing some of the most successful contemporary emerging photographers and artists. Part of the School of Media, the course offers a unique opportunity for photographers to develop a major body of research-based practice in the context of a critical understanding of contemporary photographic culture.

The course encourages students to work experimentally and produce work that tests the boundaries of the medium, encompassing the still image, video, installation, performance and digital media, and culminating in a public exhibition. The School of Media offers a longstanding tradition of photography education with a highly regarded research culture, and the course has close ties with the Photography and the Archive Research Centre and the Kubrick Archive, both based at LCC. Located close to central London, the course has excellent links with galleries, museums and archives.

MA Photography attracts a broad range of practitioners, from backgrounds in fine art photography, documentary photography, commercial photography and other areas of media practice. They are united by a desire to develop a distinctive personal practice with a high level of conceptual resolution. Graduates of the course go on to be successful fine artists as well as documentary and commercial photographers, gallerists, curators and writers, academics and teachers, and arts organisers of various kinds. Many prefer to find ways of supporting their art practice through combining it with teaching, commercial photography or other related activities. Students who may wish to progress to practice-led PhD are encouraged to develop their practice as research.
There are both analogue and digital photography facilities at LCC, including colour and black-and-white darkrooms, photographic studios and a Mac-based digital suite including Imacon scanners, as well as medium and large format analogue cameras, digital cameras, HD video cameras and lighting equipment. Students also have access to other technical facilities such as a 3D workshop or screenprinting.

Structure

Unit 1 - Exploring the Possibilities

Unit 2 - Taking an Idea Forward

Unit 3 - Collaborative Unit

Unit 4 - Resolving Outcomes

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If you are a non-radiotherapy graduate who would like to become a registered therapeutic radiographer, this postgraduate course in radiotherapy and oncology will prepare you to become one. Read more

If you are a non-radiotherapy graduate who would like to become a registered therapeutic radiographer, this postgraduate course in radiotherapy and oncology will prepare you to become one. By graduating from this course, you are allowed to register for this role through the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

By qualifying in this area you are able to respond to the increasing demand for therapeutic radiographers in the health service. Medical, technological and professional advances in radiotherapy mean the role of the therapeutic radiographer is ever changing.

Your on-campus training is based at the £13 million purpose-built Robert Winston Building. Here you use the state-of-the-art virtual environment for radiotherapy training (VERT). It creates a life-size 3D replica of a clinical environment. We also have 20 networked eclipse planning computers and 10 image review licences with specialist staff on hand to teach you radiotherapy planning and image matching. We are one of the only universities outside of the USA that can offer these facilities.

You get real insights into all aspects of radiography with our professionally approved teaching programme. You learn from a lecturing team who are all qualified radiographers involved in research at a national level.

In addition to this expertise, we invite guest lecturers to teach that are leaders in their field. You also meet and hear from ex-patients who share their experiences of treatment.

As part of the course, you gain important clinical experience in one of our nine participating hospitals. This gives you the knowledge, skills and confidence to undertake and develop your professional role.

Clinical placements may be taken in

  • St James' Hospital, Leeds
  • Royal Derby Hospital
  • James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough
  • Leicester Royal Infirmary
  • Lincoln County Hospital
  • The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle
  • Nottingham City Hospital
  • Castle Hill Hospital, Hull
  • Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield.

To begin with, your studies focus on the theoretical knowledge you need for your clinical experience. We encourage you to question and analyse, not simply accept the theory wholesale. You also learn to look at the complete picture from the view of the patient, healthcare team and associated scientific principles.

You gradually learn to apply theory to practice and tailor treatment to each patient by accurately targeting high dose radiation beams and sparing surrounding normal tissues.

Your studies enable you to develop and adapt your clinical expertise through reflective practice. You learn to analyse and evaluate your experience as you gain and develop new skills and competencies and to look for areas that need changing.

The course is designed in response to recent government initiatives to modernise healthcare education, increase recruitment into the health service and improve cancer care services.

Radiotherapy open days

To build your knowledge and understanding of radiotherapy and oncology you may be interested in attending an open day at one of our partner hospitals. More information about current opportunities to attend a hospital open day are shown here

CPD online

CPD Online, part of our CPD Anywhere™ framework, is being offered free to new graduates of this course for 12 months, as part of our commitment to support your lifelong learning.

CPD Online is an online learning environment which provides information to help your transition into the workplace. It can enhance your employability and provide opportunities to take part in and evidence continuing professional development to help meet professional body and statutory requirements.

For further information, visit the CPD Anywhere™ website at http://www.shu.ac.uk/faculties/hwb/cpd/anywhere.

Care experience

Before you apply for health courses, we require you to have gained some practical experience relating to your subject area. Download our applicant experience guidelines for information about the kinds of experience we expect you to have and the best places to gain it. Evidence of the experience gained, understanding of the profession and a genuine, reasoned commitment to studying a professional course must be explicit in your personal statement to be selected for interview.

Professional recognition

This course is pending accreditation by the College of Radiographers.

This course is subject to approval by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Graduates are eligible to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and apply to become members of the Society and College of Radiographers. You must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in order to practise as a therapeutic radiographer in the UK.

Course structure

Year one modules

  • Principles of Oncology, Radiotherapy and Technology 1
  • Body Systems and Anatomical Image Interpretation
  • Researching for practice • Introduction to Professional Practice
  • Personal and Professional Development 1
  • Competency for Practice 1

Year two modules

  • Principles of Oncology, Radiotherapy and Technology 2
  • Dissertation
  • Personal and Professional Development 2
  • Competency for Practice 2

Assessment

  • individual assignments
  • personal and professional development portfolio
  • clinical assessment and appraisal
  • case studies
  • formatively assessed learning packages
  • placement reports
  • viva
  • dissertation

Employability

After successfully completing the course and registering with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) you will be qualified to work in radiotherapy departments throughout the UK and overseas. Opportunities exist to specialise in particular areas of clinical practice such as management, quality assurance , treatment planning and patient information/counselling.

Alternatively, you may choose to enter the teaching profession.



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Our Physics MSc is highly flexible, giving you the opportunity to structure your course to meet your individual career aspirations. Read more

Our Physics MSc is highly flexible, giving you the opportunity to structure your course to meet your individual career aspirations.

The course gives you the opportunity to broaden and deepen your knowledge and skills in physics, at the forefront of research in the area. This will help to prepare you to progress to PhD study, or to work in an industrial or other business related area.

A key feature of the course is that you can choose to study a wide range of optional modules or focus on a particular area of research expertise according to your interests and future career aspirations.

Under the umbrella of an MSc in physics, you can specialise in astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging. Or you can take a diverse range of modules to suit your interests and keep their options open.

Course content

The course offers you a very wide range of optional modules, giving you the opportunity to specialise in areas such as astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging.

Modules studied may include: quantum field theory; superconductivity; general relativity; medical image analysis; cosmology; bionanophysics; magnetism in condensed matter; statistical mechanics; star and planet formation; elementary particle physics; quantum matter; and photonics.

Alongside your optional modules, you will undertake an advanced and extensive research project in one of the School of Physics and Astronomy’s internationally recognised research groups. This will enable you to develop advanced skills in research planning, execution and reporting, possibly leading to publication of your work in an international journal.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 75 credits
  • Advanced Literature Review 15 credits
  • Current Research Topics in Physics 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Cardiovascular Medical Imaging 10 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 10 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 10 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 10 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 10 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 10 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Cosmology 15 credits
  • Photonics 15 credits
  • Molecular Simulation: Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Star and Planet Formation 15 credits
  • Advanced Quantum Mechanics 15 credits
  • Quantum Photonics 15 credits
  • Quantum Matter 15 credits
  • Magnetism in Condensed Matter 15 credits
  • Statistical Mechanics 15 credits
  • Advanced Mechanics 15 credits
  • Bionanophysics 1 15 credits
  • Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics 15 credits
  • Soft Matter Physics: Liquid Crystals 15 credits
  • Quantum Many-Body Physics 15 credits
  • Winds, Bubbles and Explosions 15 credits
  • Bionanophysics 2: Advanced Bionanophysics Research 15 credits
  • Advanced Group Industrial Project 15 credits
  • Superconductivity 15 credits
  • Soft Matter Physics: Polymers, Colloids and Glasses 15 credits
  • Quantum Transport in Nanostructures 15 credits
  • Quantum Field Theory 15 credits
  • General Relativity 15 credits
  • Quantum Information Science 15 credits
  • Advanced Physics in Schools 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Physics MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching methods include a combination of lectures, seminars, supervisions, problem solving, presentation of work, independent research, and group work (depending on the modules you choose to study).

Assessment

Assessment of modules are by problem solving exams and research assignments. The project is assessed on the ability to plan and conduct research and communicate the results in written and oral format.

Career opportunities

The specialist pathways offered by this course (in astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging) allow you to tailor your course and focus on a particular area of research expertise according to your interests and future career aspirations.

Physicists are highly employable due to their high level of numeracy and mathematical competence, their computer skills, and their high level of technical academic scientific knowledge. They are employed by: industry, financial sector, defence, education, and more.

This course is also a clear route to PhD level study.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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