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Top up your existing postgraduate qualification in body psychotherapy to a full MA. Receive a high level of academic and research input as you work on a clinically-focused arts therapies project, in our purpose-built therapy centre in Cambridge. Read more
Top up your existing postgraduate qualification in body psychotherapy to a full MA. Receive a high level of academic and research input as you work on a clinically-focused arts therapies project, in our purpose-built therapy centre in Cambridge.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/body-psychotherapy

Overview

If you’re already qualified as a body psychotherapist, our part-time course will give you the chance to work on a substantive piece of academic research, with access to our resources and internationally renowned therapies staff.

You’ll be assigned an academic supervisor to support your work, and will be able to attend our research methodologies training. You can also attend lectures and seminars from our MA Dramatherapy and MA Music Therapy courses, which will give you further insight into arts therapies theory and practice.

Our teaching team includes internationally recognised researchers as well as practising arts therapists. You’ll work alongside other students from our Music Therapy, Dramatherapy and Psychodrama courses, broadening your understanding of the field. You won’t need to undertake further clinical placements, meaning you can focus on your academic studies.

This course is a collaboration between the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre and our University. You’ll need to have a recognised postgraduate diploma in Body Psychotherapy from the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre, and registration with the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy Therapists (UKCPT) to apply.

Careers

Our course will advance your practice of body psychotherapy, whether you work in private practice or for health or education providers in the UK or overseas. It will equip you with crucial research skills that, according to the QAA Benchmarking for Counselling and Psychotherapy, are required by all counsellors and psychotherapists to '…enable them to read and interpret research evidence related to practice…', '…monitor and evaluate both individual practice and the work of a service or team…' and 'contribute to the developing knowledge and evidence base for their profession'.

You’ll benefit from our links with employers, such as the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre, health providers and charities.

Modules

Core module:
MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll submit a 15,000-word Major Project, which will be clinically focused and evaluative.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art studios. You’ll also have access to the Department of Music and Performing Arts facilities, which include a fully-equipped drama studio, two other drama rehearsal spaces, a large recital hall and a suite of computer music studios.

Students and staff work in an energetic and creative environment, with regular seminars, productions, performances and research- or therapy-based events.

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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The aim of this MSc is to provide a postgraduate education in pharmacovigilance, including relevant techniques, the basis of adverse drug reactions, regulations and guidelines, handling safety issues including labelling and risk management and systems and processes. Read more
The aim of this MSc is to provide a postgraduate education in pharmacovigilance, including relevant techniques, the basis of adverse drug reactions, regulations and guidelines, handling safety issues including labelling and risk management and systems and processes. Teaching consists of lectures and workshop activities in small groups and takes into account real world situations. There are opportunities for sharing experiences and networking which contributes to the development of your knowledge and understanding of pharmacovigilance issues.

Flexible programme

This is a flexible programme designed to meet the needs of those in either full or part-time employment who are likely to have a spread of responsibilities. Students are able to complete the MSc course in under three years if able to attend all modules at the earliest opportunity. Alternatively, they can take up to five years, progressing at a slower pace.

Participants will normally be graduates and/or experienced personnel and usually will need to have held positions in drug safety for one to several years. The programme is run as a series of intensive short courses supplemented with substantial pre and post-course reading and set coursework. In addition, if you are studying for an MSc, you will undertake a research project that is normally carried out at your workplace but may be done at the University, or an institution with appropriate experience of pharmacovigilance or adverse drug reactions.

The programme has attracted students from European Union countries, Norway, Switzerland, Japan and the USA and its success has led to the organisation of an annual Pharmacovigilance Update day for those who have completed their studies.

Recruitment will take place at the beginning of each taught module and the programme offers the awards of a PgC, PgD or MSc. Students are typically able to obtain any one of the awards in a minimum of two years; however you have a maximum registration of up to five years in order to complete the course. This course has the option of being a diploma if you do not feel you can commit to the full MSc programme.

Why choose this course?

-The MSc/PgD/PgC in Pharmacovigilance is a programme developed by the School of Life and Medical Sciences and the Pharmaceutical Information and Pharmacovigilance Association (PIPA).
-In addition to offering this course, The University of Hertfordshire is also part of the Eu2P European Programme in Pharmacovigilance and Pharmacoepidemiology, an online pan European e-learning/e-teaching MSc course.
-The programme includes eight taught modules, provided as intensive three-day workshops, and for the MSc award, a research project.
-It is taught mainly through teams of staff drawn from the professions appropriate to pharmacovigilance. This is a major feature of the programme, the majority of staff delivering the courses will be acknowledged experts.
-The aim is to provide a postgraduate education in pharmacovigilance, including relevant techniques, the basis of adverse drug reactions, regulations and guidelines, handling safety issues and the role of systems and processes.

Professional Accreditations

PIPA (Pharmaceutical Information and Pharmacovigilance Association)

Careers

Potential candidates will normally be in either full or part-time employment and are likely to have a spread of responsibilities, mostly in pharmacovigilance and medical information, monitoring safety data in either pre- and post-marketing studies or from spontaneous reports. They will be graduates and/or experienced personnel and usually will have held positions in drug safety for one to several years. Some applicants may have doctorates and may be medically qualified. Following successful completion of the course the knowledge gained should enable the post-graduates to make a greater contribution to the pharmacovigilance industry.

Teaching methods

Taught modules normally consist of approximately 24 hours class contact. In addition, about 120 hours will be needed to complete the pre and post-course activities. The actual amount of time spent will depend upon your existing knowledge and ability. All modules are free-standing. Satisfactory completion of four modules is compulsory for the PgCert; all eight modules are required for the PgDip and MSc. Coursework will contribute significantly to assessment and may comprise some or all of the following: summaries of pre-course reading, written reports of class discussions, essays, performances in seminars, poster presentations, problem solving or data interpretation exercise, short projects and case studies. Unseen written examinations will feature in some courses; they may be used to examine understanding of pre-course reading material. Attendance at the taught component and satisfactory completion of both coursework and examinations (where present), with a minimum mark of 50% in each element, is normally required to pass each module.

Structure

Year 1
Optional
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems I
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems II
-Drug Safety in Clinical Trials
-Labelling and Risk Management
-Management of Pharmacovigilance Data
-Pharmacoepidemiology
-Pharmacovigilance Regulations and Guidelines
-Principles of Pharmacovigilance

Year 2
Optional
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems I
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems II
-Drug Safety in Clinical Trials
-Labelling and Risk Management
-Management of Pharmacovigilance Data
-Pharmacoepidemiology
-Pharmacovigilance Regulations and Guidelines
-Principles of Pharmacovigilance

Year 3
Optional
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems I
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems II
-Drug Safety in Clinical Trials
-Labelling and Risk Management
-Management of Pharmacovigilance Data
-Pharmacoepidemiology
-Pharmacovigilance Regulations and Guidelines
-Principles of Pharmacovigilance
-Project, Pharmacovigilance

Year 4
Optional
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems I
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems II
-Drug Safety in Clinical Trials
-Labelling and Risk Management
-Management of Pharmacovigilance Data
-Pharmacoepidemiology
-Pharmacovigilance Regulations and Guidelines
-Principles of Pharmacovigilance
-Project, Pharmacovigilance

Year 5
Optional
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems I
-Adverse Drug Reactions by Major Body Systems II
-Drug Safety in Clinical Trials
-Labelling and Risk Management
-Management of Pharmacovigilance Data
-Pharmacoepidemiology
-Pharmacovigilance Regulations and Guidelines
-Principles of Pharmacovigilance
-Project, Pharmacovigilance

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/. Read more
This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

Sociology
Media and Communications
Humanities
Science and Technology Studies
Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Convenors

Autumn term convener - Nirmal Puwar
Spring term convener - Sara Ahmed

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Programmes Officer.

Modules & Structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
gender and migration and the new international division of labour
feminism
You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms.

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Essays and dissertation.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. Read more
The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. The programme aims to provide expertise for those intending to use the knowledge gained in a learning and teaching environment.

The programme is the only one of its kind in the UK
It combines whole body dissection with practicing techniques for the presentation of material for learning and teaching
Provides an introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques
Full body dissection of Thiel embalmed (soft fix) cadavers
Opportunity for self-directed original research

What does the course involve?

The programme is based around human gross anatomy, being supplemented by relevant embryology, neuroanatomy, clinical and surgical anatomy topics and anatomical techniques. Many components are examined entirely by course work through seminar presentations, essays, practical techniques and the development of web-based teaching tutorials and websites.

Both semesters 1 and 2 have a strong emphasis on gross anatomy through whole body dissection working in groups of no more than four per cadaver. Semester 1 also has modules in Embryology and Developmental Anatomy and in Anatomical techniques, while semester 2 has modules in Neuroanatomy and in Clinical and Surgical Anatomy Topics.

Semester 3 allows students to focus on an independent and novel research project in one of the following areas:

Thiel cadaveric anatomy
The anatomy of a specific region of clinical/surgical interest
Functional anatomy
Anatomy and biomechanics
Education

Our reputation

The College of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee was ranked ahead of all other Universities in Scotland and is one of the UK's top 5 universities in the category of Biological Sciences out of 51 Universities.
Staff have international reputations in practice and research.
The award-winning staff of the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body.

Benefits of studying with us

Study human gross anatomy in the renowned Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification
Access to Thiel embalmed cadavers
Introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques and skills
Exposure to a wide range of IT and personal presentation skills

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In this program you will. Learn anatomy through dissection. Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching. Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging. Read more

In this program you will:

  • Learn anatomy through dissection
  • Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching
  • Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging.
  • Contribute to world leading anatomical and/or biomedical research

Our programme aims to improve your theoretical and practical knowledge of human anatomy through an intensive on-campus dissection course, as well as the development and learning of theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

This programme has two main strands. One is the in-depth study of the anatomy of the human body. Anatomical knowledge will be learned to a level to teach undergraduate and postgraduate students and professions allied to medicine. This strand will involve the dissection of a body in groups of three to five students over two semesters. This part of the course is largely self-directed, with regular “surgeries” when teaching staff are present to answer questions and help students with the dissections.

The other is anatomy pedagogy, covering the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Next to theoretical lectures and workshops the first semester will focus on observing the teaching of anatomy to medical undergraduate students. The second semester will focus on being involved in preparing and carrying out teaching sessions to both small and large groups of students. The learned theoretical material, the observations and practical experiences will be compiled in an end-of year teaching portfolio. The experience that you will gain can be used towards an application as associate fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Complementing these strands will be a lecture-based embryology course providing you with an understanding of normal human development and how normal development can go wrong, manifested in commonly observed congenital abnormalities. You will also study neuroanatomy, the health and safety of embalming procedures and handling bodies, the legal and historical aspects of anatomy in Scotland and the UK, an introduction to the ethics of using bodies in medical education and explore clinical techniques used to image the body.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of six courses plus a summer dissertation project. The courses "Teaching Anatomy" and "Basic Human Anatomy 1 & 2" make up the majority of the degree with 40 credits each. The other courses are 10 credit courses that are spread out over two semesters as follows (10 credits equal 100 hours of work):

Semester one:

  • Basic Human Anatomy 1: Gross anatomy of the Limbs and Thorax (20 credits)
  • Anatomy Law and Ethics: Divided into 3 parts: Health & Safety of anatomy and body handling, the legislation that governs the activities of anatomy departments both in Scotland and throughout the UK, and the ethics of using human material for the teaching of anatomy (10 credits)

Semester two:

  • Basic Human Anatomy 2: Gross anatomy of the Abdomen, Pelvis, Head & Neck (20 credits)
  • Neuroanatomy: Gross Anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, sensory and motor pathways, cranial nerves, spinal cord, spinal nerves and autonomic nervous system (10 credits)

Semesters one and two:

  • Teaching Anatomy: Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students (40 credits).
  • Embryology: From ovulation of the egg to fetal development of all body systems (10 credits)
  • Medical Imaging and Anatomy: explore anatomy using images produced by clinical tools such as X-ray, CT and MRI. (10 credits)

Summer period:

  • Dissertation Project: 10,000 word dissertation and oral presentation (60 credits)

Teaching is by lectures, seminars and tutorials. Courses are assessed by either, or a combination of, oral examinations, essays, multiple choice question exams, extended matching question exams, presentations and practical anatomy exams.

You have the option to finish after the second semester graduating with a Diploma in Human Anatomy, or to gain your masters by completing a summer dissertation project that can be either library-, practical- or laboratory-based.

More information on anatomy at the University can be found on our website:

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help you gain a highly regarded qualification in anatomy and the teaching of anatomy. It will provide you with a set of major transferable skills such as dissecting experience, teaching experience, expertise in health and safety and anatomy law and ethics.

This programme can therefore open up possibilities in for example anatomy teaching, anatomy laboratories, further studies in medical and biomedical sciences, further research leading to a PhD, and many more increasing your long-term career prospects.



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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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Pharmaceutical Science will appeal to those of you who want to understand how the human body functions at a molecular level and the science that we can use to manage human health. Read more
Pharmaceutical Science will appeal to those of you who want to understand how the human body functions at a molecular level and the science that we can use to manage human health.

Based in our state-of-the-art Science Centre, you will explore the biochemical and cellular make-up of the human body, investigate what happens when things go wrong through, for example disease or illness, and how these may be prevented or cured by the action of drugs.

Alongside this, you will build a clear understanding of drugs and medicines, their structures, discovery and development, their biological delivery and activity, and their testing, regulation, production and quality assurance by analytical methods.

The MSci course combines Bachelors-level and Masters-level study in one integrated programme, giving you the opportunity to undertake professional work experience or an extended research project. However, whichever degree you choose to complete, you’ll develop wide ranging specialist skills and an in-depth knowledge of pharmaceutical science and its industry.

If you would like to study this degree but your current qualifications do not meet our entry requirements for degree level study, our Pharmaceutical Science with a Foundation Year is available.

Course content

In Year 1, you’ll be introduced to the theoretical principles and practical techniques of pharmaceutical science and pharmacology. You’ll study the underpinning biology and chemistry and learn about the activity of drugs on the human body.

During Year 2, you’ll look more thoroughly at the analysis and quality assurance of drugs using a range of laboratory techniques and QA methodologies. Your understanding of the human body will extend to the molecular and cellular levels, giving you the depth of knowledge to understand the functions of a healthy body and when disease and illness strike.

Between years 2 and 3 you will take the sandwich placement year. By doing this, you’ll complete a one-year placement with a company within the pharmaceutical industry specifically or a wider scientific field. You might work in drug discovery, isolating and characterising new potential drugs, undertake laboratory or clinical trials, or be involved in full scale industrial drug production that will further develop your employability skills. You will be supported by an onsite placement supervisor and receive regular visits and support from your academic supervisor too.

In Year 3, your final year, you’ll follow the complete process – from the stages involved in identifying potential new drugs, synthesising them for laboratory and then clinical trials, and subsequently, how their approval and production for commercial markets. You will also undertake independent research in an area of your choice, designing your research to probe a current issue in pharmaceutical science.

As an MSci student, your fourth year will provide the opportunity to gain an even greater breadth and depth of specialist knowledge. You’ll also hone your professional skills by completing a work placement or research assistantship, where there may be the opportunity to work closely with a leading employer.

Year 1 (Core)
-Introduction to Pharmaceutical Science and Pharmacology
-Introduction to Scientific Practice
-Molecules to Cells
-Basic Chemical Principles
-Molecular Structure and Synthesis

Year 2 (Core)
-Drug Analysis and Quality Assurance
-Genetics and Cell Biology
-Human Biochemistry and Physiology
-Professional Practice and Placement

Year 3 (Core)
-Drug Testing, Trials and Legislation
-Pharmaceuticals Industry and Drug Production
-Independent Project
-Drug Design, Synthesis and Characterisation

Year 3 (Options)
-Neuropharmacology
-Clinical Immunology
-Toxicology
-Medical Genetics

Year 4 (Core)
-Placement or Research Assistantship
-Advanced Research Methods
-Advanced Pharmaceutical Science

Year 4 (Options)
-Choice of one Year 3 option

Employment opportunities

Graduates can progress into a wide range of roles either within the pharmaceutical industry specifically or a wider scientific field. You might work in drug discovery, isolating and characterising new potential drugs, undertake laboratory or clinical trials, or be involved in full scale industrial drug production. Graduates with an in-depth scientific knowledge are also highly sought after to work in marketing, sales and business management in this and other scientific industries.

Our courses aim to provide you with the relevant knowledge, approach and skill set demanded of a practicing scientist. You will develop skills and knowledge to study a variety of topics relevant to your degree, and the acquisition of Graduate skills and attributes developed in core modules will allow you to find employment in a variety of laboratory based environments such as the biopharmaceutical industry, food processing and quality assurance, veterinary and agricultural laboratories.

Some graduates apply for Graduate Entry Programmes in various healthcare professions such as Medicine, Dentistry, Physiotherapy and Nursing. A significant number of our graduates apply for postgraduate study. Those who aspire to a career in teaching progress to a PGCE, whereas graduates with an interest in a research choose to continue onto Masters and PhD programmes.

Graduates from science courses are increasingly sought after due to their skills in numeracy, IT, problem solving and abilities to analyse and evaluate. Consequently, many of the non-laboratory based industries such as regulatory affairs, scientific editing, technical sales and marketing, insurance and management preferentially employ graduate scientists. All students carry out a work placement in year 2. These are flexible so you can angle your experience towards your career aspirations. Your final year research project in a topic of your choice enables you to undertake a major piece of investigative work culminating in a professional style paper, suitable to present to prospective employers.

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In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. Read more
In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. HR specialists help organisations achieve success by providing knowledge, expertise and insight into a wide range of HRM activities from talent resourcing and selection, performance management, learning and development, change management and employee engagement. HR can be an exciting, rewarding and challenging career that can take you anywhere in the world.

If you are seeking roles within HR, you may find that employers require a qualification that leads to membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). This programme is accredited by the CIPD and has been specifically designed to meet the needs of HR professionals wishing to further their career and progress into senior roles.

If you have some experience within the working environment and want to develop your HRM knowledge or have completed an HRM (or related) degree, find out more about the opportunities on offer through the MA in Human Resource Management.

CIPD Membership

The CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) is the professional body for HR and people development which aims to champion better work and better working lives. As a HRM student you will become part of this professional body and on completion of the programme will be able to upgrade your status to a chartered member of the CIPD.

All students are required to enrol as CIPD student members and to remain in membership throughout the duration of the programme.

Subscription fee is payable direct to CIPD and excluded from the course fee. For more information on the fees please refer to the CIPD Website: http://www.cipd.co.uk/

Students will be encouraged to join, support and participate in local CIPD branch activities. These are the Northampton and Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire groups. Although you will, officially, be a member of only one CIPD group, you are welcome to attend any of the group meetings some of which will be delivered by Northants branch as part of the programme.

For more information on the local branch see the Northampton (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/midlands-area-partnership/northamptonshire/default.aspx) or Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/bedfordshire-milton-keynes/) websites.

Course content

The aim of this course is to develop you as an HR professional. You will be introduced to specialised knowledge and research evidence giving you an in depth understanding of successful people management in organisations. Perhaps more importantly, you will practice the tools and techniques of strategic and operational HRM giving you practical, insight-driven experience which will help further your career.

The modules on this course are designed to provide you with expert knowledge of distinct HR subject areas together with exposure to contemporary debates, policies and practices, keeping you at the forefront of developments in your field.

You will develop an understanding of HRM within a range of organisational contexts, and you will be equipped with the analytical and diagnostic skills required of HR professionals.

In addition to the modules making up this course you will attend a two day off-site residential at the end of the taught programme focusing specifically on skills development activities. Attendance at the residential is a course requirement and the cost is included in the course fees.

Semester 1

HRM in Context – You will explore HRM in a business context to develop your understanding of the increasingly complex environments HR must work within both inside and external to organisations. This module allows learners to develop analysis skills to facilitate informed choices on which strategies may be most and least appropriate.

Investigating a Business Issue – You will diagnose and investigate a live business issue from a HR perspective, locate the issue within the body of contemporary knowledge, collect and analyse data, derive supportable conclusions and make practical and actionable recommendations for change and enhancement of current practice.

Resourcing and Talent Management – You will evaluate strategies for resourcing and managing talent within the organisation. There is a focus on activities concerned with resourcing the organisation; the practical aspects of recruitment, selection, employee retention and dismissal, and also on the strategic aspects of planning an organisation’s long and short term human resource requirements. This requires analysis of external labour markets and considerations of flexibility, as well as consideration of how internal labour markets may be made more productive and effective.

Performance Management – You will investigate the management of employee performance within the organisation, exploring the evidence that people are a major source of competitive advantage and the challenge of how best to develop and manage people to maximize their performance. You will assess the major systems for enhancing the performance of employees at all levels and advise organisations on the most appropriate methods for managing performance.

Semester 2

Leading Managing and Developing People – You will analyse key factors in leading, managing and developing people for organisational success. Every organisation is made up of individuals whose behaviour, individually or collectively will impact on its ability to succeed. Organisational performance can be enhanced and competitive advantage increased through the strategic management, leadership and development of people. This module enables you to gain an in-depth knowledge of HRM and HRD and to explore major themes from the growing literature and research in this subject area.

Learning and Talent Development – You will develop a critical understanding of the role and influence of a range of contextual factors associated with the design, delivery and evaluation of learning and development in a variety of organisational contexts. You will also explore and evaluate the contribution of learning and talent development strategies and practices in meeting the aspirations, ambitions and objectives of the organization and the individual. This is a seven week module.

Employment Relations – You will develop and reflect upon your knowledge and understanding of Employment Relations from a number of different perspectives. The holistic significance of employment relations within an organisation is emphasised together with the importance of aligning HR policies with business strategy, change processes, employee voice and involvement practices. Good employee relations are important for an organisation’s success in the achievement of its business objectives and for gaining employee commitment to those objectives. Increasing legislation in this area has also brought pressure to develop appropriate managerial strategies to ensure employee commitment to organisational success. This is a seven week module.

Semester 3

Research Methods and Dissertation – In this semester you will work on completing a 16,000 word dissertation. You will undertake this as self-study and you will be allocated a supervisor who will guide and support you through this process. Meetings with your supervisor are not compulsory but are strongly recommended.

At the end of teaching you will undertake a two day residential course that will explore how to put all the skills from the course into developing good HR practices.

Course modules (16/17)

-HRM in Context
-Leading, Managing and Developing People
-Investigating a Business Issue
-Performance Management
-Dissertation and Research Methods
-Resourcing and Talent Management
-Learning and Talent Development
-Employment Relations

Methods of Learning

The learning and teaching style on this course is designed to enable you to take responsibility for your own learning and skills development within a caring environment facilitated by high quality academic support from tutors. You will be introduced to much of the core course content through activities that can be undertaken in your own time, off campus. These will usually be facilitated through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment – a web-based portal where you will be able to participate in learning activities, on-line discussions, reading and reflection. During on-campus sessions, the emphasis will be on participative and interactive activities designed to consolidate and develop your understanding through debate, discussion, role-play and participation in events such as guest speakers and a mock employment tribunal.

The course uses a carefully balanced combination of in-course assignments designed to enrich your learning which include business projects, reflective activities, group work presentation, examinations and a substantial research dissertation

This course usually has a diverse student group and this diversity provides a rich basis for sharing of different experiences and thinking on organisational and people issues. Peer networking and action learning sets will be facilitated and encouraged to maximise the learning to be gained from different student experiences.

Full-time students will take four modules in both Semester 1 and 2, part-time students will take two modules in both Semester 1 and 2.

Each module will require you to attend a three hour workshop per week.

For full-time students, taught sessions will normally be delivered over two days each week. For part-time students, it would normally be one day per week.

To maximise chances of success on this course, we recommend students spend approximately 12 hours a week per module in self-directed study time to prepare for the sessions and complete assignments.

Assessments

Assessment will be undertaken by a range of methods including written assignments, business reports, projects, reflective activities, group work, presentations and examinations.

The 16,000 word Dissertation is a major component of this course and allows students to demonstrate a range of knowledge, skills and insight in their chosen topic area.

Facilities and Special Features

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), Europe’s largest professional body supporting and developing those responsible for the management and development of people within organisations. The MA HRM reflects and incorporates CIPD knowledge and competence requirements. Completing the MA HRM will provide you with the underpinning knowledge required for Chartered CIPD membership. If you have the relevant experience you can then apply for full membership based on your workplace activities and behaviours through the CIPD.

Careers

The MA HRM opens the way for a career in HRM/HRD. The programme provides opportunities for individuals to develop enhanced, specialist, higher level knowledge, skills and leadership capabilities and equips students with enhanced career pathways in the HRM/HRD field within different organisational contexts.

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Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential. Read more
Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include Early Modern art and architecture; the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

To supplement what you learn in the classroom, frequent staff-led visits to London museums and galleries will expose you to the some of the world’s best museums and galleries, and you will be strongly encouraged to apply for a placement in order to gain experience in the museum and gallery world. On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

This course is available on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example Structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History and Theory - MA
-Dissertation - MA Schemes
-Researching Art History
-Art, Science, Knowledge (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Critique and Curating (optional)
-Curating Inside Out (optional)
-Exhibition (Joint Project) (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Topics in Art History (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)

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This course aims to produce graduates with qualities and transferable skills for demanding employment in the engineering sector. Graduates will have the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development and acquiring new skills at the highest level. Read more

About the course

This course aims to produce graduates with qualities and transferable skills for demanding employment in the engineering sector. Graduates will have the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development and acquiring new skills at the highest level.

Students may elect to follow one of two streams: Thermofluids or Solid Body Mechanics.

Engineering courses within the Department are underpinned by research activities in aerospace engineering, automotive/motorsport engineering, solid and fluid mechanics, and energy and the environment. Staff generate numerous publications, conference presentations and patents, and have links with a wide range of institutions both within and outside the UK.

Aims

Mechanical engineers apply their scientific knowledge to solve problems and design machines that help us enjoy a better lifestyle. They have an enviable choice of industries open to them and this advanced course helps you develop the versatility to deal with complex challenges faced by senior engineers.

On this course you will:
Develop the versatility and depth to deal with new and unusual challenges across a range of engineering areas
Develop imagination and creativity to enable you to follow a successful engineering career with national and international companies and organisations
Continue your professional development to Chartered Engineer status with confidence and acquire new skills at the highest level.

Brunel offer a number of mechanical engineering MSc courses, all accredited by professional institutes as appropriate additional academic study (further learning) for thos seeking to become qualified to register as Chartered Engineers (CEng).

Our collaborative research with numerous outside organisations includes major oil companies, vehicle manufacturers, and other leading industrial firms and governmental laboratories. We have links with at least six teaching hospitals and work with universities in China, Poland, Egypt, Turkey, Denmark, Japan, Brazil, Germany, Belgium, Greece, Italy and the US.

Accrediting professional institutes vary by course and include The Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE),The Energy Institute (EI) and The Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE).

Course Content

During the first two terms (September - March) you will take eight modules, out of which:
Four are the same for both streams (compulsory modules - 15 credits each)
The other four (15 credits each) are different for the two streams.

In May the final examinations for the taught modules will take place and in their third term (June - September) students will complete the final dissertation.

You have the option to choose one of two specialisations, or ‘streams,’ for your dissertation:
Thermofluids, or
Solid Body Mechanics.

Compulsory Modules

Strategic Management, Innovation and Enterprise
Research Methods and Sustainable Engineering
Advanced Modelling and Design
Computer Aided Engineering 1
Dissertation (Individual project)

Optional Modules

Choose one of the two themes below:

Theme 1 – Thermofluids
Advanced Thermofluids
Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer
Energy Conversion Technologies
Renewable Energy Technologies

Theme 2 – Solid Body Mechanics
Advanced Solid Body Mechanics
Dynamics and Modal Analysis
Structural Design and FEA
Human Factors in Design

Special Features

Excellent facilities
We have extensive and well-equipped laboratories, particular areas of strength being in fluid and biofluid mechanics, IC engines, vibrations, building service engineering, and structural testing. Our computing facilities are diverse and are readily available to all students

The University is fully networked with both Sun workstations and PCs. Advanced software is available for finite and boundary element modelling of structures, finite volume modelling of flows, and for the simulation of varied control systems, flow machines, combustion engines, suspensions, built environment, and other systems of interest to the research groups.

Accreditation

Advanced Mechanical Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineering (IMechE). This will provide a route to Chartered Engineer status in the UK.
At Brunel we provide many opportunities and experiences within your degree programme and beyond – work-based learning, professional support services, volunteering, mentoring, sports, arts, clubs, societies, and much, much more – and we encourage you to make the most of them, so that you can make the most of yourself.

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This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills. Read more
This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills.

GSA is one of the UK’s leading accredited drama schools, providing dedicated conservatoire training within a purpose built environment on the University of Surrey campus.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Acting programme is specifically designed for those seeking a career in the performing arts, and who already have an undergraduate degree or have a minimum of five years’ professional experience.

This intensive programme offers practical training which focusses on the acquisition of technical skills in acting, voice and movement.

These support a range of rehearsal projects, screen acting projects and public performances. Students also take professional development workshops and classes in audition technique.

Cohorts are kept small to ensure that students receive the maximum amount of personal attention and contact.

Performance opportunities include a devised project, a final public production led by a production team of industry professionals, and a West End Showcase.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Advanced Practice module. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Industry Practice 1
-The Integrated Body 1
-Acting
-Contextual Practice 1
-Industry Practice 2
-The Integrated Body 2
-Contextual Practice 2
-Public Production
-Advanced Practice

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-To deepen experiential knowledge and critical understanding of the practice of acting
-To develop a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and methodologies that constitute a personally evolved rehearsal process
-To develop an integrated technical approach to the practice of acting in rehearsal and performance
-To provide an ensemble training context for the development of professional acting skills based on practical and theoretical understanding and reflective practice

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
-An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
-A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
-An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
-A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
-Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
-Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
-Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
-Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills
-Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
-Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
-Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
-Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
-Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills
-Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
-Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
-Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
-Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
-Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
-Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

TESTIMONIALS

"I am really pleased that I came to GSA as it has given me the ideal grounding to work across the industry with not only a high level of quality to my work but also a distinguished level of professionalism that never goes unnoticed. I put these things down to the excellent training that I received at GSA." - Marina Waters, MA Acting 2010-2011

"The MA Acting course has been an intensely rigorous journey which has endlessly flexed my creative muscles, heightened my self-awareness and deepened my understanding of what it means to nurture an individual's body, spirit and mind through an ensemble, while remaining true to one's self." - Rebecca Yeo, MA Acting 2011-2012

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As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. Read more
As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world.

It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/219/dickens-victorian-culture

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation on a subject related to Dickens and/or Victorian culture between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In 2015 the following three specialist modules were available: EN836 Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel, EN876 Dickens and the Condition of England, EN835 Dickens, the Victorians and the Body. Students would be required to take at least two. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture

- build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/staff).

- Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid:

Lecturer in English and American Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture, especially representations of nature and the environment, time, history, queer theory; sublimity; ecology and psychogeography.

- Dr Sara Lyons:

Lecturer in Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture; Victorian poetry and critical prose; fin-de-siècle aestheticism and decadence; the interrelations between literature, religion, secularism in the long nineteenth century.

- Professor Wendy Parkins:

Professor of Victorian Literature
Victorian modernity; gender and sexuality in the 19th century; the Victorian novel (especially Dickens, Gaskell, Collins); literature of the fin-desiècle period; aestheticism and William Morris.

- Dr Catherine Waters:

Professor of 19th-Century Studies
Victorian literature and culture, especially fiction and journalism; Dickens; Sala; George Eliot; literature and gender.

- Dr Sarah Wood:

Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature
Creative critical writing; 19th and 20th-century poetry and fiction, especially Robert Browning and Elizabeth Bowen; writing and visual art; literary theory; deconstruction, especially Derrida; psychoanalysis; continental philosophy.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Study Sport and Clinical Biomechanics in the world-leading School of Sport and Exercise Science at Liverpool John Moores University. Read more
Study Sport and Clinical Biomechanics in the world-leading School of Sport and Exercise Science at Liverpool John Moores University. This Masters degree features extensive training in lab-based skills plus analysis of contemporary issues.

•Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2-3 years)
•Developed by world-leading researchers from our pioneering School of Sport and Exercise Science
•Modules complement the specific expertise of the biomechanics staff and include: clinical gait analysis and virtual rehabilitation, muscle and tendon mechanics and biomechanical assessment and injury prevention
•Access to state-of-the-art biomechanics laboratories in the award-winning Tom Reilly Building, including the Movement Function Research Laboratory
•Exciting career opportunities in clinical or sports biomechanics and/or academic and professional development
•Ideal for physiotherapists who wish to deepen their biomechanical expertise

Study under the guidance of world-leaders in biomechanics and take your own knowledge into our state-of-the-art facilities. We welcome applications from those interested in the movement and mechanism of the human body, and dedicated to the application and advancement of this field of study.

Biomechanics is the study of the mechanical functioning of the biological system. This course applies biomechanical knowledge in both a sporting and clinical context.

The curriculum is research-led with a number of core modules being directly informed by the current research activity of staff. Extensive training is provided in laboratory-based skills and in the interpretation of biomechanical findings and there is comprehensive coverage of contemporary issues in biomechanics.

The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorial support, practical sessions and workshops which encourage critical, reflective engagement with a range of theoretical and applied topics.

You will also be exposed to a wide range of research questions in biomechanics and learn how to critically appraise and interpret the literature. The diversity of assessment methods, including written coursework and oral viva assessment, are innovative and well received by students.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Technical Training in Biomechanics: provides technical training in laboratory techniques appropriate to sport and clinical biomechanics. It will enable you to develop laboratory skills including 2D, and 3D motion analysis, force analysis and biomechanical modelling so that you can collect and interpret biomechanical measurement and protocols to benchmark standards. The topic is taught in the laboratories in a hands-on, interactive manner.

Research Methods: provides mastery and expertise in quantitative research strategies, methods and techniques, specifically focussed on quantitative data so that you can undertake postgraduate research. It aims to encourage critical understanding of how quantitative data should be handled and analysed using a variety of approaches. The module enables you to develop critical analysis of statistical concepts and procedures, trains you to use statistical analysis software and extend your knowledge of the experimental and research design process.

Current Issues in Biomechanics: develops and extends your opportunity to investigate issues of current importance in Biomechanics. You will be presented with a variety of cutting-edge research topics in biomechanics applied to sport, exercise and clinical applications. You will need to read up-to-date literature in the appropriate fields and to evaluate past and current directions. Laboratory content will involve using measurement skills developed in the Technical Training module to replicate an experimental study from the literature.

Muscle-tendon mechanics: introduces the main biomechanical characteristics of human muscles and tendons and the implications for human movement, performance and biomechanical testing. The mechanical parameters and behaviour of these tissues of the human body in-vivo will also be examined in response to chronic loading and disuse to understand basic, musculoskeletal mechanisms and adaptations underpinning changes in whole-body function and performance.

Biomechanical assessment in sport and exercise: provides the conceptual and practical knowledge base that develops and extends understanding of biomechanical assessment. With continuous developments of equipment, software, and knowledge, there is a growing need for biomechanical assessment in sport and exercise. This has a role both in performance evaluation, in injury prevention, and in injury rehabilitation. You will be exposed to a large variety of tools, each time first gaining a better understanding of the theoretical framework that justifies the use of such tool.

Clinical Movement Analysis: provides the conceptual and practical knowledge base that develops and extends your understanding of clinical movement analysis. You will learn how to interpret gait analysis results in a clinical context through exposure to the current literature, specialised methods, and clinical case studies. You will also be exposed to the latest research developments in the unique area of virtual rehabilitation.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Ready to take your career to the next level? Southampton Solent’s project management master’s programme is a professionally tailored course aligned to the Association for Project Management’s Body of Knowledge. Read more

Overview

Ready to take your career to the next level? Southampton Solent’s project management master’s programme is a professionally tailored course aligned to the Association for Project Management’s Body of Knowledge. You’ll study the methodologies, techniques and processes of project management at a globally-accredited institution and gain sought-after PRINCE2® Practitioner and Agile Project Management™ qualifications.

- The course is delivered by a team of academics with strong links to the project management profession and the wider industry.
- Southampton Solent is the only university in the UK to offer and combine internationally recognised PRINCE2® Practitioner and Agile Project Management™ Practitioner accreditation opportunities.
- The course content aligns with requirements for the Association for Project Management’s (APM) Body of Knowledge.
- Students can convert any existing PRINCE2® Practitioner or Agile Project Management™ Practitioner accreditation into credits towards this MSc.
- The University has strong links to APMG-International, ensuring the course team and students are kept fully up to date with current trends in project management.
- The course concludes with a research methods unit and a dissertation.
- For the research project, students identify their own research topic and explore the application of various management and research methods.
- For their dissertation, students will have the opportunity to undertake in-depth study of an issue which is of personal interest and is related to the overall objectives of the project management course.

The industry -

According to the Project Management Institute (2015), 80 per cent of organisations understand the value of strong project managers in a bid to reduce the money wasted on poorly managed projects. Reflecting this, the project management profession is expanding dramatically with an estimated 1.5 million additional roles expected to be created globally every year until 2020.

Studying on Southampton Solent’s project management master’s degree course can leave students well placed for a wide variety of careers in national or international businesses across all sectors.

The programme -

The course is split into eight distinct units, divided into three levels of postgraduate qualification. To find out more about the content of each specific unit, please see the ‘course content’ tab.

As well as helping to equip students with specialised project management skills, the course also encourages the development of leadership abilities, financial acumen and people management techniques. Students will gain a general understanding of governance, develop management accounting skills, and explore the methodology behind the world’s most popular project management qualification, PRINCE2®.

Students will also examine the structures and processes necessary for any organisation to deliver a project effectively, explore the theories that have created advances in the fields of organisational behaviour, human resource management and leadership, and learn the Agile Project Management methodology, specifically the proven DSDM Atern framework.

Course Content

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught via workshop/structured learning, group activities, individual exercises, independent learning and work-related learning.

Assessment -

Assessment formats include presentations, written assignments, exams, reports, projects, vivas and dissertations.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

According to the Project Management Institute (PMI) and Anderson Economic Group, 1.5m additional project management roles will be created globally every year until 2020.

Following this course, you will be well placed for a variety of careers in a wide variety of sectors.

Links with industry -

This course has input from the Association of Project Managers (APM) and is aligned to the APM Body of Knowledge. The University also has strong links with APMG-International to identify current trends in project management.

Transferable skills -

You will develop a range of transferable skills, encompassing group working, presentation, research and analysis, working to deadlines and applying knowledge to real-world scenarios.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £5,665

International full-time fees: £12,380

UK and EU part-time fees: £2,835 per year

International part-time fees: £6,190 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think you’ve got what it takes to succeed in project management? With its close alignment to the APM’s Body of Knowledge and incorporation of PRINCE2 and Agile PM qualifications, Southampton Solent’s project management master’s degree can help you gain the competitive edge in your career.

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