• Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"black"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Black)

We have 112 Masters Degrees (Black)

  • "black" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 112
Order by 
This new and unique Masters importantly addresses black writing as a continuum. Its heritage in British culture is considered along a trajectory marked by historical presences as connecting with migratory, indigenous and global perspectives. Read more

This new and unique Masters importantly addresses black writing as a continuum. Its heritage in British culture is considered along a trajectory marked by historical presences as connecting with migratory, indigenous and global perspectives.

Introducing the MA Black British Writing - “It’s a story that hasn’t really been told”

This MA is:

  • World first. Nowhere else in the world can you study this field in such a richly, referenced way - in the actual country where the writing is produced.
  • Cross-disciplinary in teaching, studies, research. Writing as perceived in its broadest form on and off the page and screen.
  • Collaborative. It will be taught by Professor Joan Anim-Addo and Dr Deirdre Osborne, who share its vision and will co-teach the modules.
  • Inclusive. We welcome applications from a broad spectrum of people – those seeking academic careers, professionals who are returning to learning, artists who wish to develop their analytic and critical thinking skills.
  • Connected to local, national and international research streams. Both tutors have well-established research profiles with publications, and track records in convening public events in the field.

Modules & structure

The MA draws upon the expertise of literary, drama and theatre specialists from the Departments of Theatre and Performance and the Centre for Caribbean Studies.

The degree is made up of:

  • two compulsory core modules
  • a dissertation
  • two option modules

Full-time students study both compulsory modules and two options and write their dissertation across one year of study.

Part-time students select one compulsory module and one option per year across two years and write their dissertation in their second year of study.

Core modules

Option modules

You choose two options from those available in the Department of Theatre and Performance and the Department of English and Comparative Literature. 

This could include:

Intermediate exit points

It's possible to exit the programme early with a Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate if specific learning outcomes have been achieved. These options can be discussed with the course convenor.

Skills

You will develop transferable writing and oral skills at a high academic level, demonstrating the ability to think and work in an interdisciplinary manner using a range of methodologies. Your ability to work collaboratively and to facilitate and participate in group discussions will be enhanced. You will also develop skills in identifying the socio-cultural, historical, political and literary issues that shape and impact upon contemporary literary and performance texts.

We are oriented towards serving your individual goals and aspirations for self-development; it will generate an articulable body of transferable knowledge and skills.

Besides developing your knowledge of best current research methods and of facts and concepts specific to the featured field of study, the proposed programme will offer training in:

  • discerning vital literary and dramatic roots
  • recognising how the dynamics of creative and cultural movements interrelate
  • exchanging information effectively within a variety of intellectual, creative arts, and local communities

Careers

The MA’s design allows for a diverse range of applications of its contents to careers including education, counselling, community arts, arts practice, social services, cultural organisations, or towards research degrees (MPhil; PhD).

Our courses consolidate the influential presence of contemporary Black British writing. It is recognised as both intrinsic to conceptions of British cultural heritage but also distinctive within the body of British writing.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



Read less
This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches. Read more

This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches.

A broad transnational framework allows you to combine African, U.S., Caribbean, British and Southeast Asian history under the guidance of leading researchers in English, History, Gender Studies, Spanish, and Latin American studies. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and use varied materials such as novels, films, speeches, newspapers and organisational records to explore issues of race and resistance across very different periods and cultures.

Supported by the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you could study the slave trade, Mexican-American identity, race and feminism in the US, political violence in India or apartheid, among many others. It’s a fascinating and vital opportunity to gain an understanding of the roles that race and resistance have played in shaping the modern world – and how this complex relationship is evolving.

More Information

We have a wide range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. Among our library resources are microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers as well as journals relating to US civil rights. British and US government papers are also on microfilm, and an extensive set of British documents on end of empire and foreign affairs.

The Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and the Curzon papers are all available, and we have access to extensive online resources to access original material for your independent research.

With the chance to participate in our active research groups – such as Identity, Power and Protest; Women, Gender and Sexuality; and Health, Medicine and Society – and benefit from an impressive range of expertise among our tutors, you’ll find that the University of Leeds is a fantastic place to gain the knowledge and skills you need.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods and approaches to the study of race and resistance. You’ll explore issues such as diasporas and migration, the legacy of non-violence and sexuality and race.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules across different subject areas, on issues such as the Black Atlantic, postcolonial literature, British settler colonies in Africa and more.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Approaches to Race 30 credits
  • MA Race and Resistance: Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Something Rotten: Transatlantic Capitalism and the Literature of Waste 1945-Present 30 credits
  • Race, Empire, Romanticism 30 credits
  • Turks, Moors, and Jews: Staging the Exotic in the Renaissance 30 credits
  • Global Genders30 creditsMaking History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-184530 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Independent study is an important part of this degree, allowing you to develop your own ideas and improve your skills in research and analysis. You’ll then come together with tutors and other students for weekly seminars where you’ll discuss issues and themes in each of your modules.

Assessment

All of the modules on this programme are assessed by coursework. This can take a range of forms, including essays, discursive writing, bibliographies, reviews and presentations among others. Optional modules are usually assessed by two 3,000-word essays.

Career opportunities

This MA will give you a deeper understanding of how conceptions of race have shaped and been shaped by the world we live in, as well as the ways in which individuals and communities have employed different strategies of resistance. Crucially, it will equip you with sound intercultural awareness and allow you to look at situations from different points of view, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis, interpretation and written and oral communication.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers where they have been able to use their knowledge. These have included teaching and education, research and policy work for NGOs, think tanks and the charity sector. Many others have pursued PhD level study in related fields.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



Read less
In partnership with Black Country Living Museum and Dudley Archives service, Newman is offering a unique programme to enable those working in the heritage sector, or seeking to enter the heritage sector after graduation, to gain a relevant qualification delivered by a History department that has consistently achieved exceptionally high scores in National Student Surveys. Read more
In partnership with Black Country Living Museum and Dudley Archives service, Newman is offering a unique programme to enable those working in the heritage sector, or seeking to enter the heritage sector after graduation, to gain a relevant qualification delivered by a History department that has consistently achieved exceptionally high scores in National Student Surveys.

The course includes substantial practical experience at heritage sites and will be delivered by professionals working in the sector including Dr Chris Upton, reader in Public History at Newman University and leading historian of the West Midlands.

What does the course cover?

Drawing on a wide range of academic and professional expertise, this course will provide you with the skills and tools of understanding to deliver high quality and professional heritage projects. By arming you with an extensive body of expertise in collections management, conservation, public history, visitor experience and sustainability, the course will enable you to become an effective and successful professional capable of making a significant contribution to the sector.
Heritage and Public History PG Cert

Public History and Heritage: Theory and Practice
This module enables you to interpret the interface between the professional position and the public’s requirements, and to explore how the latter are constructed and experienced, along with the ethical issues associated with public history

Collections and Visitor Management
Heritage professions involve working with a finite resource which must be managed to ensure its long-term survival. This module attempts to familiarise you with a range of heritage and public history settings and address key concepts such as stewardship and sustainability. The module will be delivered by staff from Dudley Archives service and Black Country Living Museum at these two locations, ensuring students gain the best possible experience

Public History Placement Project
You will be placed in a group in your chosen heritage sector and tasked to complete a real project (such as cataloguing an archival acquisition, putting on a museum display, organising an educational workshop or carrying out a review of visitor experience) which will last for at least 6 months of the course

Assessment

Assessment will be through a series of theoretical and practical tasks designed in collaboration with professionals working in the heritage sector. There will be no exam element to this course.

Attendance

The course will run on one afternoon a week over 9 months, with 4 to 5 Saturday sessions. The first module and the Saturday sessions will be taught at Newman University and all other sessions will take place at Black Country Living Museum and Dudley Archives.

Read less
This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century. Read more

This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century.

A core module will allow you to sharpen your research skills, and you’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules spanning nations, continents, periods and themes to explore topics that interest you. You could study black internationalism alongside early modern Europe, the Spanish state, Stalinism, political violence in India or apartheid.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers as part of a large and diverse School of History and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, supported by active research groups and extensive library resources. Our research interests range from social history and identity to political history, nationalism and internationalism, meaning this flexible programme offers plenty of opportunities to gain important skills while focusing on issues that suit your interests.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with a wide range of resources. The world-class Brotherton Library has one of the best history collections in the UK, ranging from monographs and journals to conference papers, theses and over 100 digital databases of primary sources and other materials for fundamental research. The Brotherton also has its own special collections including the Leeds Russian Archive and the Feminist Archive North.

The Alf Mattinson Collection is full of printed works and papers related to the history of the Labour Party, and the Romany collection and Liddle Collection offer insights into Romany culture and the First World War respectively.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

You’ll study one core module in your first semester, introducing you to different research methodologies in history and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also select from a wide range of optional modules throughout the year, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you such as the history of Yorkshire, the European Enlightenment or issues surrounding global security.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ module.

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge, as well as high-level skills in research, interpretation and analysis. You’ll be able to demonstrate these when you complete your dissertation on a modern history topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Secrecy and Espionage in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Approaches to Contemporary European History 30 credits
  • 'The continuation of war by other means? : Case Studies in Wartime Diplomacy 1931-1945 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • Stalinist Terror 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • The War on Terror 30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Guns and Global Security 30 credits
  • Britain and the Slave Trade 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • The Fragility of the Spanish State: Identity, Conflict and Resistance, 1808-1939 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. Read more
Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations.

Emphasising the close relation between academic study and broader cultural interest in the past and its significance in everyday life, the programme enables the investigation of various cultural forms and practices, from oral history and autobiography to television and virtual reality.

The course comprises three pathways:

• Cultural Memory
• Making Histories: Public History and Heritage
• ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity

The general concerns of the masters programme are developed in relation to these pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus. The pathways also provide the basis for the PGCert and PGDip awards.

Why study with us?

• Chance to specialise through one of three pathways: Cultural Memory; Making Histories – Public History and Heritage; or Race, Nation and Ethnicity

• Practical emphasis on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations

• Lecturers with expertise across cultural, social and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies, and the history of ideas

• Interdisciplinary approach informed by cultural and critical theory

• Close relationship to the University of Brighton's Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories

• Flexible modes of study for students with personal or professional commitments

Syllabus

Cultural memory pathway:

Cultural History: Concepts, Theories and Methods
Cultural Memory in Ireland: Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles OR Holocaust Memory
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

Making histories pathway:

Making Histories: Making the History of Brighton and Hove
Slavery in the Atlantic World OR Britain in the Second World War
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

'Race', nation and ethnicity pathway:

Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities
The Making of the Black Atlantic: Transformations of History, Representation and Identity OR Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures: Fictions and Histories
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

To find out more about the course content please visit the website:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/cultural-history-memory-and-identity-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

The knowledge, intellectual skills and confidence acquired through study on this MA provides excellent training for doctoral research. All CHMI students are encouraged to participate in the rich programme of seminars, symposia and conferences, which includes an annual postgraduate conference organised by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, and the School of Humanities. CHMI graduates have a direct route on to our Humanities PhD programme, but have also gone on to doctoral research at other universities.

CHMI students have used the MA to secure work in the education, heritage and museum, health and voluntary sectors, and the course has proved attractive to those looking to develop their careers by augmenting existing skills and experience or by opening new professional paths within their workplace or organisation. We have established a small number of voluntary work placements for our students with the local community history group, Brighton and Hove Black History, and hope to maintain this opportunity as well as establish further volunteering opportunities in future.

Read less
Photography at Brighton is taught within the context of the fine arts and oriented around the development of individual projects. Read more
Photography at Brighton is taught within the context of the fine arts and oriented around the development of individual projects.

The aim is for you to develop a strong and sustainable artistic practice and body of work that you can confidently exhibit and publish. This will give you a strong foundation for developing a career as an independent photographer/artist, or alternatively for more commercial or community-based activities.

The course has a strong theoretical component, as we believe all students should understand how to conceptualise and contextualise their practice and communicate it clearly to a variety of audiences.

We encourage students to engage with the latest developments in photography, fine art and wider media culture, and to constantly challenge the limits of the medium. Work that crosses technological boundaries and engages with film, video, sound and installation is encouraged – but so is photography's engagement with performance, painting and sculpture.

More than anything, we are committed to an exploratory and thoughtful form of picture-making that is adequate to representing our experiences of the modern world.

Why study with us?

• Creative and critical environment in which to practise and think about photography
• Opportunity to build a professional profile as an independent practitioner
• Fine art approach to photographic practice
• Course tutors who are experienced professional photographers and photographic researchers
• Advice on professional development
• Chance to develop a sustainable individual practice, graduating with a body of work ready for exhibition, a publication and a piece of critical writing that will help to position your work

Areas of study

Practice-based projects are supported by briefings, tutorials, lectures, seminars and technical workshops. Workshops include demonstrations in the latest digital and traditional analogue processes, involving camera use, lighting, and black-and-white and colour printing. Key professional practice sessions include talks and seminars by photographers, artists, writers and other professionals concerned with commissioning, publishing and exhibiting photography.

Semester 1:

• Experimental Practice(20 credits): a themed practice module designed to help you explore your own approach to practice in more depth

• Research Methods in Theory and Practice (20 credits): developing skills in research, experimentation and critical reflection

• Contemporary Debates (20 credits): a theoretical seminar considering how photography has developed as a reflexive medium straddling fine art practice and more documentary contexts

Semester 2:

• Photography Research Project, Part 1 (20 credits): laying the foundations and making initial work in your specialist area of practice

• Professional Practice (20 credits): built around lectures from visiting artists, curators and editors and a series of workshops teaching skills in public speaking, fundraising, research and web design

• Dissertation (20 credits): between 6,000 and 8,000 words exploring a theoretical or historical topic related to your specialist area of practice

Summer Semester:

• Photography Research Project, Part 2 (40 credits): developing and resolving a body of work for exhibition

• Photobooks and Publications (20 credits): realising your project as a publication

Photography in Brighton

Brighton has an established photographic culture. Photography has featured as a significant part of the Brighton Festival and has had a strong presence within the many visual arts spaces of the city. This continues to grow, particularly through the presence of the Brighton Photo Biennial and Photoworks, a commissioning and publishing organisation. Furthermore, the Brighton Photo Fringe, MiniClick and ArtsForum all organise regular events, exhibitions and talks, contributing to a lively photography scene across the city.

Facilities

The following resources are exclusively for MA and BA(Hons) photography students:

• Fully equipped photographic studios
• Dedicated photographic computing facilities
• A digital print bureau
• Traditional colour darkrooms with enlargers that accept a range of negative sizes up to 10 x 8”, capable of enabling the production of exhibition-standard prints
• A traditional black-and-white processing area and darkroom
• A selection of film and digital single lens reflex cameras – and medium-format and large-format film cameras – to supplement your own equipment

The university’s art and design library has a well-stocked photography area and provides access to a wide range of online resources.

Careers and employability

Our Photography MA has led to students developing strong portfolio careers in the field of the arts and gaining considerable recognition for their work through prizes and exhibitions. Many of our students have gone on to do doctoral study or take up lecturing posts in higher education; others have developed roles working in galleries, publishing, picture editing and community projects.

Alumni include Lisa Barnard, Corinne Silva, Virgilio Ferreira, Matt Henry, Stephen Vaughan – successful artists in the world of contemporary photography who exhibit internationally and produce challenging new work.

Read less
Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures. Read more

Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures.

You’ll develop your understanding of research in literary studies through a core module, but then choose from optional modules which look at the histories, contexts, structures and language that give postcolonial and colonial texts their uniqueness.

We focus on literature, but the programme also introduces you to other forms of cultural production such as music and cinema – and you’ll think about the relationships between literary studies and disciplines such as geography, anthropology and history. Supported by our Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you’ll gain a cross-disciplinary insight into how writers from around the world have engaged with issues such as identity, place, independence, development and race among many others.

The University of Leeds was the first UK university to establish ‘Commonwealth Literature’ as an academic discipline at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We’re still leading the way in research and teaching, supported by the expertise of staff within and outside of the cross-disciplinary Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with access to extensive resources for your research and placing literature and culture in their historical and political context. Microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers, parliamentary papers relating to the British Empire, US government and presidential files, the Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and British documents on the end of empire, foreign affairs and policy overseas are just some of the resources at your fingertips. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to explore your interests and gain key skills.

This programme is also available to study part-time.

Course content

You’ll take one core module in your first semester, introducing you to the challenges, methods and approaches used in researching literature and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also choose one of our optional modules, before studying another two in your second semester.

You can choose all of your modules from within postcolonial literary and cultural studies, but you also have the option to expand your studies by choosing one from those available across the School of English, from the early medieval period to contemporary literature.

By the end of the programme, you’ll demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve developed when you submit your dissertation or research project on a postcolonial literary or cultural topic of your choice.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Africas of the Mind 30 credits
  • Global Indigeneity 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Postcolonial Literary and Cultural Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Postcolonial Literary and Cultural Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have weekly seminars in each module where you discuss the themes and issues arising from your reading, and you’ll be able to enhance your learning by attending the wide range of research seminars and talks by visiting speakers that we arrange throughout the year. However, independent study is a vital part of the degree, as it allows you to build your skills and explore your own ideas.

Assessment

Most of our modules are assessed by a single essay of around 4,000 words, which you submit at the end of the semester in which you studied the module. You may also be expected to submit unassessed essays to gain feedback on your work, or give presentations in your seminars.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a wide range of high-level transferable skills which are valuable in a wide range of careers.

You’ll be a confident researcher who can work independently as well as within a team. You’ll be a strong communicator, both verbally and in writing, and be able to think critically and analytically. In addition, you’ll have a strong level of cultural and critical awareness, and you’ll be able to look at a situation from different points of view.

All of these qualities are attractive to employers across sectors, and you’ll have the skills to pursue a career in fields including teaching, journalism, publishing, advertising, broadcasting and law. Many of our graduates also progress to PhD-level study and you’ll be well equipped for a career in academia.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



Read less
This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. Read more
This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. It also makes use of the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works.

Course Overview

Underpinned by instruction in advanced research methods and skills and the comparative study of theoretically informed critical approaches, this MA, based on the Lampeter Campus of the University, enables students to undertake an advanced level study of literature in English and associated aspects of culture in the period from 1790 to the present day.

Romanticism, post-Romanticism, the Victorian, Decadence, Modernism, Post-modernism – are explored in two core modules, ‘Visions of Society’ and ‘The Shock of the New’. Informed by established and emerging theoretical positions, these will critically examine the connections and tensions between the ideas and kinds of literary production traditionally associated with those movements: for example, the emergence of the individual, shifts in religious belief, the importance of the city and urbanisation, attitudes to class, race and gender, the dominance of the novel and the impact of new media forms, commodification and the emergence of competing views of the real.

These modules are supported by topic-specific modules reflecting staff expertise, for example the consideration of the figure of the child as a shifting ideological construct within and across these movements; writing by American Black Women writers; and the utopian urge in the literature of the period.

Modules

-Research Methods
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Visions of Society
-The Shock of the New

And optional modules in topics such as:
-Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
-The Child in Time
-Black American Women Writers

Key Features

The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-Online and distance learing option

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

Read less
Developing an elaborate understanding of European and international law, including in-depth knowledge of the external dimension of EU law and the rules that govern the Union’s international relations. Read more
Developing an elaborate understanding of European and international law, including in-depth knowledge of the external dimension of EU law and the rules that govern the Union’s international relations.

The Master’s specialisation in International and European Law Advanced gives you the opportunity to acquire an advanced understanding of the core issues of European Union law and public international law. This specialisation offers considerable freedom to focus on the subjects that you find most relevant for your future career. Besides EU competition law and external relations law, you may choose to enrol in courses on topics of public international law, including international arbitration or international individual criminal responsibility. You may also further deepen your knowledge of EU internal market law, immigration law, or European private law. You can therefore apply a particular focus yourself, and opt for a thematic package instead of a purely disciplinary one, something that is not common in other programmes and law schools.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/advanced

Peace, security, human rights and sustainable development

All important issues that are relevant in today’s globalised landscape will be discussed in the courses, for example, maintaining peace and security, protecting human rights, and promoting sustainable development. The core programme centres on how the European Union law upholds these principles, and how it relates to and influences other actors like the United States, the BRIC countries, and international organisations such as the United Nations. Students will become fully aware of the dynamic interplay between national, European and international law: a process that develops and changes constantly.

Unlike other specialisations in the Master’s programme of European Law, this specialisation aims at training students to become a generalist in the field: a person with intricate and comprehensive knowledge of international and European law who grasps the bigger picture. The programme is therefore well-suited to those interested in a profession in academia and research, legal consultancy or diplomacy.

Why study International and European Law Advanced at Radboud University?

- Many of our lecturers are also law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain rules, legal instruments or strategies.

- You’ll study at a Law School that is rated number one in the Netherlands for student satisfaction.

- The Faculty of Law in Nijmegen was the first in the Netherlands to set up a dedicated European Law programme. It has built an international reputation in the field of European law, immigration law and private law, and is part of a large network that includes more than fifty universities in Europe, the United States, Asia and Australia.

- The international mix of students gives the classes and project work a multicultural touch. This will give you the extra benefit of gaining multicultural communication skills as well as a multitude of legal and cultural perspectives in this field. By the time you receive your Master's diploma, you’ll have gained excellent skills to work in the Netherlands or in any other country.

- Students of Radboud University regularly take part in international and European Law moot court competitions, enabling you to put academic theory into legal practise during your studies.

- You have the option of going abroad, either for an internship or to follow additional courses as an exchange student at our academic partner institutions. This adds to your personal international experience as well as increasing your knowledge further. Our professors have a good network, and are willing to assist you in finding a position that meets your interests, for example at the OSCE or the Council of Europe.

Change perspective

At Radboud University you will not only learn what the law entails, but also why it has come to be this way. And if a different approach might be possible. In this way you will come to a profound understanding of the law. A theoretic study is combined with practical insights to provide a good mix. Many teachers still practice law in one form or another and enrich their lectures with real-life cases. This will broaden your horizon and enhance your perspective as a lawyer.

Career prospects

Besides in-depth knowledge of international and European law, you’ll also acquire the skills needed to conduct high-level legal research, or policy analysis in adjacent fields. In the field of law, linguistic skills are also extremely important. This intensive Master’s programme enables non-native speakers to improve their legal English, in order to successfully pursue a career in an international, often English-speaking, environment.

The specialisation offers you a broad perspective on European Union and international law, and is therefore most suited to students interested to take up positions in research, consultancy or diplomacy. At the same time, graduates are also well-qualified for work in the practise of law, counselling and advocacy. Prospective employers interested in your expertise include NGOs and international organisations such as the European Commission, the European Central Bank, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, the United Nations, international courts and tribunals, lobby organisations, and charity foundations.

Our approach to this field

At Radboud University, we strive for clear practical relevance of academic knowledge.
1. Many of our lecturers are also law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain rules, legal instruments or strategies.

2. Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their experiences, enlightening students with real-world scenarios, and providing them with tips on how to deal with cases that don’t follow the official norms.

3. In the Master’s programme in European Law we focus on the law in force, and in accordance with the approach of professionals, focus on justifying decisions in legal terms, in reference to legal rules, principles, and precedents. However, we don’t shy away from critically analysing those rules, principles and precedents, indicating possible alternatives and desired emendations where necessary.


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/advanced

Read less
Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. Read more

About he course

Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. You will be able to identify, organise, retrieve and make accessible information across paper, electronic and multimedia formats. This MA or Diploma will equip you to fulfil the essential role that companies and professional bodies need to compete effectively in a fast-moving national and international business environment. This course features a range of optional modules which allow you to direct your studies into areas which particularly fascinate you.

The MA and Diploma are accredited by both CILIP and the Institute of Information Scientists making it one of the best courses for professional practice.

The Department of Information Studies at Aberystwyth has an impressive track record. In the department’s forty years of teaching, we have produced some of the UK's, and indeed the world's, leading librarians and information professionals. Our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations.

You can tailor your learning towards a wide range of career paths, such as children and schools work (with the Focus on the Child: Children's Literature and Schools Libraries and Learning Resources modules) and business services (including the modules on Business Information Services, and Management Information Systems).

This highly practical course is built around a variety of reports, essays, presentations, and case studies which will enable you to relate theoretical knowledge to the workplace. These challenges will also encourage you to improve your ICT, personal management and interpersonal skills, making you into a well-rounded, competent and highly employable individual.

This degree will suit you:

• If you wish to obtain a Masters degree or Diploma from one of the UK’s leading departments;
• If you wish to gain the knowledge and skills for professional work within Information and Library fields;
• If you wish to work in various types of information and library services or gain transferable skills for the pursuit of related careers such as media management and book publishing;
• If you wish to continue your studies to a more advanced level through undertaking further postgraduate level research.

Course structure and content

The course curriculum will focus on both theory and practice but you will be actively encouraged to draw upon any relevant experience that you have already acquired. Course visits to relevant organisations and guest lectures, will further enhance your exposure to professional practice.

Semester 1: core modules addressing the information society, the organisation and retrieval of information as well as the provision of information services.

Semester 2: core modules covering both organisational management and the management of collections.

There is also the opportunity to complement these core modules with an optional module which will enable you to develop an area of special interest. In addition to these taught modules, you will also be able to access a series of research training sessions that will help to prepare you for the 15,000 word Masters dissertation in Semester 3.

Semester 3: 15,000 word Masters dissertation

With staff guidance and support, here you will have to the opportunity to conduct a piece of independent research within the information and library field. Not only will this enable you to further develop a specialism, but you will also acquire a range of transferrable research skills that are highly desirable in today’s employment market.

Core modules:

Information Organisation and Retrieval
Information Services: Planning for Delivery
Information and Society
Collection Management
Studies in Management
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Digital Information: Management for Access and Preservation
Rare Books and Special Collections
Records and Information Governance

Contact time

Contact time is 6-10 hours a week during the first two semesters. In semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned dissertation supervisor.

Assessment

The taught part of the course, which is 120 credits, is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies and course work. Successful completion of 60 credits of taught modules makes you eligible for a Postgraduate Certificate, 120 credits gives eligibility for a CILIP accredited Postgraduate Diploma, or successful completion of your postgraduate dissertation leads to an accredited Master’s degree.

Accreditation

The Masters degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and the Institute of Information Scientists. Graduates will have a qualification which is recognised for admission to the Register of Chartered Librarians (subject to the Institute's chartership regulations).

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth University’s Masters in Information and Library Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. Successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so by building your CV; but more significant is the hugely enhanced array of knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate.

As a graduate, you will possess a wealth of subject-specific expertise, such as a thorough understanding of how ethical, legal, and social factors affect the flow of information; information literacy and the effect of 'information deprivation'; and the ongoing challenges of organising, storing, and retrieving information. You will also be confident in the use of system and their tools which you will use to order, store and retrieve information. These skills, which are fundamental to the subject, are applicable across a diverse array of workplaces. Likewise, the study skills, research methods and interpersonal awareness that you will learn within the context of study can be applied in any place of work where people and systems meet. In such situations, you will be at a tremendous advantage over your competitors.

As information is increasingly recognised as a core resource for organisations of all kinds, the range of posts to which our graduates progress widens all the time. In addition to the traditional library and information service sector, our graduates also go on to work as Information Officers, Information Managers, Information Systems Officers, Information Analysts and Computer Systems Officers. The most prestigious of our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the newly appointed first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations. In addition, companies which acknowledge the value of information also benefit from our graduates’ information skills when applied to the areas of management, sales, production or marketing. Your personal adaptability, coupled with the critical information and library skills, will make you a strong candidate for any post where excellence in organisations and systems management is prized.

Study in a practical context

The content of this MA/Diploma is weighted in favour of mastering the practical applications of Information and Library Studies. The University of Aberystwyth boasts library resources which are amongst the best in Europe. The Department’s specialist Thomas Parry Library is one of the leading libraries for Information Studies. As a student, you will have access to this exceptional resource where you can apply your learning in activities which will convert the purely academic theory into the proven know-how of experience.

In addition to this, you will also have access to the University's Hugh Owen Library which houses more than 700,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 3,500 current periodicals. Also, the National Library for Wales next to the campus is one of the UK's five copyright libraries housing more than 6,000,000 volumes. In addition to the University's computing facilities, you will also have access to the Department's own extensive computer workstation rooms, all housed in a purpose built Department on the attractive Llanbadarn campus.

Skills in management of systems and stakeholders

The MA/Diploma is designed to give you a broad knowledge of a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests, particularly in your Masters dissertation. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand management abilities; this course aims to support your progression into professional employment beyond by including such training.

You will become well versed in contemporary management theory and practice of relevance to the management of the relationship between information and organisations. You will learn to analyse and control how information is transmitted to users, including access to information and measurement of use. The monitoring an analysis of data is crucial to the success of business organisations and initiatives. Mastering it will enable you to manage within a changing and turbulent environment and provide you with an understanding of the inter-relationship of the organisation with its customers and stakeholders.

As business relies on meeting needs, this training will be a significant advantage to you when you enter the jobs market.

Read less
Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies by distance learning will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. Read more

About the course

Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies by distance learning will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. You will be able to identify, organise, retrieve and make accessible information across paper, electronic and multimedia formats. This MA or Diploma will equip you to fulfil the essential role that companies and professional bodies need to compete effectively in a fast-moving national and international business environment.

The MA and Diploma are accredited by both CILIP and the Institute of Information Scientists making it one of the best courses for professional practice.

The Department of Information Studies at Aberystwyth has an impressive track record. In the department’s forty years of teaching, we have produced some of the UK's, and indeed the world's, leading librarians and information professionals. Our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations.

This course features an extensive list of optional modules which allow you to direct your studies into areas which particularly fascinate you.

As a Distance Learner in employment, you should find that your work experience enhances your studies, while your studies enable you to reflect on your work experience in new ways. Your studies can also help you to promote the best current practice in your workplace.

Although this postgraduate programme is primarily designed to meet the needs of those who wish to work in various types of information and library services, you can exploit the transferable skills mastered during the programme to pursue careers in related professions (e.g. media management and book publishing), or continue your studies to a more advanced level through undertaking further postgraduate level research.

This degree will suit you:

•If you wish to obtain a Masters degree or Diploma from one of the UK’s leading departments;
•If you wish to gain the knowledge and skills for professional work within Information and Library fields;
•If you wish to work in various types of information and library services or gain transferable skills for the pursuit of related careers such as media management and book publishing;
•If you wish to continue your studies to a more advanced level through undertaking further postgraduate level research.

Course content

Core modules:

Collection Management
Dissertation
Information Organisation and Retrieval
Information Services: Planning for Delivery
Information and Society
Research in the Profession
Studies in Management

Optional modules:

Archive Management: Principles & Techniques
Digital Information : Discovery to Delivery
Digital Preservation
Focus on the Child : Reading and Libraries
Knowledge and Information Architecture
Music Librarianship
Publishing and the Web:Exploring New Technologies
Rare Books Librarianship i
Rare Books Librarianship ii
Records and Information Governance

Contact time

Contact time can be arranged remotely with your tutor. Attendance at at least two study schools is required and these provide the main contact.

Assessment

The programme is assessed on the basis of coursework in Part One and the dissertation in Part Two. Successful completion of Part One allows the award of a Diploma. The subsequent successful submission of your research dissertation (Part Two) leads to the award of an MA.

Accreditation

The Masters degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and the Institute of Information Scientists. Graduates will have a qualification which is recognised for admission to the Register of Chartered Librarians (subject to the Institute's chartership regulations). Please note that the Diploma qualification is recognised as an accredited course.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth University’s Masters in Information and Library Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. Successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so by building your CV; but more significant is the hugely enhanced array of knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate.

As a graduate, you will possess a wealth of subject-specific expertise, such as a thorough understanding of how ethical, legal, and social factors affect the flow of information; information literacy and the effect of 'information deprivation'; and the ongoing challenges of organising, storing, and retrieving information. You will also be confident in the use of system and their tools which you will use to order, store and retrieve information. These skills, which are fundamental to the subject, are applicable across a diverse array of workplaces. Likewise, the study skills, research methods and interpersonal awareness that you will learn within the context of study can be applied in any place of work where people and systems meet. In such situations, you will be at a tremendous advantage over your competitors.

As information is increasingly recognised as a core resource for organisations of all kinds, the range of posts to which our graduates progress widens all the time. In addition to the traditional library and information service sector, our graduates also go on to work as Information Officers, Information Managers, Information Systems Officers, Information Analysts and Computer Systems Officers. The most prestigious of our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations. In addition, companies which acknowledge the value of information also benefit from our graduates’ information skills when applied to the areas of management, sales, production or marketing. Your personal adaptability, coupled with the critical information and library skills, will make you a strong candidate for any post where excellence in organisations and systems management is prized.

Study in a Practical Context

The content of this MA/Diploma is weighted in favour of mastering the practical applications of Information and Library Studies. The University of Aberystwyth boasts library resources which are amongst the best in Europe. The Department’s specialist Thomas Parry Library is one of the leading libraries for Information Studies. As a student, you will have access to this exceptional resource where you can apply your learning in activities which will convert the purely academic theory into the proven know-how of experience.

In addition to this, you will also have access to the University's Hugh Owen Library which houses more than 700,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 3,500 current periodicals. Also, the National Library for Wales next to the campus is one of the UK's five copyright libraries housing more than 6,000,000 volumes. In addition to the University's computing facilities, you will also have access to the Department's own extensive computer workstation rooms, all housed in a purpose built Department on the attractive Llanbadarn campus.

Skills in Management of Systems and Stakeholders

The MA/Diploma is designed to give you a broad knowledge of a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests, particularly in your Master’s dissertation. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand management abilities; this course aims to support your progression into professional employment beyond by including such training.

You will become well versed in contemporary management theory and practice of relevance to the management of the relationship between information and organisations. You will learn to analyse and control how information is transmitted to users, including access to information and measurement of use. The monitoring an analysis of data is crucial to the success of business organisations and initiatives. Mastering it will enable you to manage within a changing and turbulent environment and provide you with an understanding of the inter-relationship of the organisation with its customers and stakeholders.

As business relies on meeting needs, this training will be a significant advantage to you when you enter the jobs market.

Read less
Whether you are an established choreographer intent on refining and hot-housing your practice, a dance artist looking to retrain or a recent graduate from a performance-related subject, this course will give you the opportunity to find new and innovative ways to produce exciting choreography. Read more
Whether you are an established choreographer intent on refining and hot-housing your practice, a dance artist looking to retrain or a recent graduate from a performance-related subject, this course will give you the opportunity to find new and innovative ways to produce exciting choreography.

A range of modules will allow you to explore your practice and create a bespoke programme of study that allows you to interrogate your artistic interests and make several new pieces of choreography. You will engage with the latest academic research and insights and learn how to apply this to real-world situations, developing the skills to respond to a brief, curate inventive work for festivals and events, and to collaborate on or initiate interdisciplinary and experimental projects.

You will explore traditional and alternative settings for dance and performance, from the studio and theatre to galleries and museums, and you will have the opportunity to work with groups in the community developing new choreographic methods that may require participatory, immersive or specialised collaborative approaches.

You will share ideas and experiences with fellow students from a range of backgrounds, collaborating, critiquing and engaging with each other's choreographic identity.

Visit the website https://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/MCHOR/

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your career opportunities will be varied and personal to your ambitions as a choreographer. You could go on to further develop your specialism and find your identity as a professional choreographer, work as an independent artist leading your own work or responding to commissions, or you could become the artistic director of a company. Your course will also prepare you to lead on community projects or take up roles such as festival programmer or festival producer. You could also work as a dance critic or movement director.

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will be taught by a small, dedicated dance team of industry professionals who perform, create and write alongside teaching. They are engaged with leading choreographers, dance companies and festivals nationally and internationally, and their insights will feed into your learning. Professional curators, producers, choreographers and dramaturgs will be invited to share their experiences and inspire your learning.

You will have access to our dance studios at Headingley Campus and black box spaces at City Campus, as well as studios at Northern Ballet and Yorkshire Dance. All of these spaces are of a professional standard and will allow you to explore working in a range of settings and atmospheres. We will also encourage you to explore alternative spaces such as galleries, museums and the outdoors as venues for your work.

Beth Cassani

Senior Lecturer

"Watching choreographers push their ideas and challenge their practice as postgraduate students is fascinating and exciting. I feel privileged to be directly involved in fostering choreographic talent and supporting the critical development of the artists who will shape the choreography of the future."

An independent choreographer, Beth is a specialist in contemporary practices and in mentoring emerging artists. Beth has created commissioned work for Scottish Dance Theatre and Company Chameleon. She has taught company class for DV8, Phoenix Dance Theatre and Swedish Dance Theatre amongst others. Her awards include a National Critics’ Choice award, a Herald Angels award and the Peter Darrell Choreographic Award.

Facilities

-Beckett dance studios
Our Leeds Beckett performance spaces include dance studios at Headingley Campus and black box spaces at City Campus.

-Yorkshire dance studios
You will also work in the dance studios at Yorkshire Dance, based in the centre of Leeds.

-Northern Ballet studios
As a choreography student, you will work alongside two professional dance companies and benefit from the facilities at Northern Ballet and Phoenix Dance Theatre's centre for dance.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Read less
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this is a research-focused Master's training course in Wildlife Behaviour and Conservation. Read more

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this is a research-focused Master's training course in Wildlife Behaviour and Conservation.

Robust scientific evidence is a critical tool for conservation scientists responding to the challenges of mitigating biodiversity loss. This course focuses on developing investigative research skills while addressing applied questions in wildlife behaviour and conservation.

The course provides a strong foundation, giving you the opportunity to develop a career in academic or applied wildlife science. Our lecturers work with a diverse range of study species, including mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and invertebrates, both in the wild and ex situ. Members of the team are recognised as conservation specialists by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and manage two European Endangered Species Programmes.

Why Study Biological Sciences: Wildlife Behaviour and Conservation with us?

Our lecturers work with a diverse range of study species, including mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and invertebrates, both in the wild and ex situ. Members of the team are recognised as conservation specialists by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and manage two European Endangered Species Programmes.

Your project will contribute directly to one of our partnerships with national and international in situ and ex situ conservation programmes.

Your individual supervisor will guide your acquisition of professional skills and facilitate networking and engagement in your specialist field. Our proactive, diverse and expanding research community provides extensive opportunities for peer-learning and collaboration in conservation research.

What will I learn?

A compulsory wildlife research methods taught module provides advanced training in core specialisations, including project design, field techniques, statistical analysis and geographical information systems.

You will select a further taught specialist module relevant to your research project, which may include conservation genetics, wildlife behaviour or wildlife health.

The individual research project is undertaken throughout the year and is the primary focus of this course.

International Field Projects

  1. Study of Desert Birds on Lanzarote: An Example of how Geodiversity Underpins Biodiversity (with Lanzarote Island Council and Desert Watch).
  2. Habitat Usage of Re-introduced Scarlet Macaws on the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica (with ASOMACAO Friends of the Scarlet Macaw).

Please note these projects will require a student contribution in addition to course fees of a maximum of £3000. 

UK Based Native Species Field Projects

  1. Newt occupancy on Black Isle - with Scottish Natural Heritage.
  2. Pond colonisation on Black Isle - with Scottish Natural Heritage.
  3. Conservation genetics of the Natterjack Toad - with Cheshire Wildlife Trust.

Desk based Projects

  1. Using atlas data to estimate bird density and occupancy.
  2. Conservation of the endangered Ibis species in Cambodia’s dry forests - with Wildlife Conservation Society.
  3. The global conservation status and threats to Rails (Rallidae) - with Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and Mississippi State University.

How will I be taught?

Teaching is delivered through lecturers, laboratory practicals, field trips and seminars supplemented by online materials such as discussion boards and analytical exercises.

You will contribute to research seminars, a journal club and tutorials.

Modules consist of 32 hours of taught activities and 168 hours of self study.

How will I be assessed?

Taught modules are assessed through coursework assignments.

The dissertation projects consists of at least 1,400 hours' study to produce a paper suitable for peer review publication.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Students apply to specific projects which change on an annual basis, but in recent years studies have studied in Ghana, Cambodia, the Philippines, across Europe and in the UK.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



Read less
The MRes programme in Contemporary literature is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes programme in Contemporary literature is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. It covers a wide range of literary topics from the Romantics to contemporary literary theory and is tailored to allow students to pursue their own particular interests.

Course Overview

This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. It also makes use of the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works.

Underpinned by instruction in advanced research methods and skills and the comparative study of theoretically informed critical approaches, this MRes, based on the Lampeter Campus of the University, enables students to undertake an advanced level study of literature in English and associated aspects of culture in the period from 1790 to the present day.

Romanticism, post-Romanticism, the Victorian, Decadence, Modernism, Post-modernism – are explored in a range of modules. For example two modules, ‘Visions of Society’ and ‘The Shock of the New’, critically examine the connections and tensions between the ideas and kinds of literary production traditionally associated with those movements: for example, the emergence of the individual, shifts in religious belief, the importance of the city and urbanisation, attitudes to class, race and gender, the dominance of the novel and the impact of new media forms, commodification and the emergence of competing views of the real. Other areas of focus include the consideration of the figure of the child as a shifting ideological construct within and across various C19th cultural movements; writing by American Black Women writers; and the utopian urge in the literature of the period.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methods (compulsory)
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Visions of Society
-The Shock of the New
-Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
-The Child in Time
-Black American Women Writers

Key Features

The programme is delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-Available as an online and distance learning option

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

Read less
Our Ecological Consultancy MSc gives you knowledge, specialised technical skills and professional awareness. It will prepare you for a career as an ecological consultant or in other environmental roles. Read more
Our Ecological Consultancy MSc gives you knowledge, specialised technical skills and professional awareness. It will prepare you for a career as an ecological consultant or in other environmental roles. The course has a professional focus, preparing you for the workplace.

We equip you with key skills which will enable you to pursue careers in ecology, including:
-Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing
-Experimental and survey design
-Wildlife surveying
-Wildlife legislation and natural history
-Environmental Impact Assessment

Graduates of this course have an excellent track record of gaining employment in the environmental sector. Within one year of graduation 18 of the 19 students from the 2011-12 cohort were employed, most in the environmental sector and the majority with ecological consultancy companies.

Examples of recent graduate destinations include students now working in ecological jobs for:
-Wardell-Armstrong
-Mott MacDonald
-BSG Ecology
-E3 Ecology

We provide a link to cutting-edge research that feeds into ecological consultancy, e.g.:
-Research projects on black grouse and wind farms. Paper in review with the Journal of Applied Ecology
-Noise and bird behaviour. Paper in revision in PLOS ONE
-Contracts for the Scottish Bird Wind Farm Steering Group. The class of 2013-14 helped collect data for one of these contracts. They were authors on the paper which is being written up on the data they collected.

Placements

Each Ecological Consultancy project runs in conjunction with an industrial client. These tend to be consultancies or NGOs, e.g.:
-E3 Ecology
-BSG Ecology
-Baker Consultants
-Denny Ecology
-Mott MacDonald
-RSPB
-Natural England
-IUCN
-Northumberland Natural History Society
-Durham Wildlife Trust

Ecological consultants contribute to the course via informal talks. For example, E3 Ecology run a workshop in induction week where company directors discuss how to get into the industry.

Practitioners with extensive UK wildlife legislation and wildlife management experience teach on some modules.

Accreditation

We are in the process of applying for accreditation from the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM).

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X