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Masters Degrees (Bioterrorism)

We have 2 Masters Degrees (Bioterrorism)

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This certificate is designed for public health, environmental health, occupational health, and emergency professionals along with managers and educators who need to upgrade their skills in the area of protecting people in emergencies. Read more
This certificate is designed for public health, environmental health, occupational health, and emergency professionals along with managers and educators who need to upgrade their skills in the area of protecting people in emergencies. HEA520 provides a solid preparation in fundamental skills such as epidemiology and public health practice, while ENV530 allows the student to learn how to identify, measure and control environmental hazards. ENV545 and ENV551 expand the student’s knowledge about risks and how they are measured, modeled and communicated. ENV570 and 575 focus on the specifics of emergency preparedness and on the mitigation of the risks of chemical and biological hazards.

The 18-credit certificate consists of the following courses:

• HEA520: Public Health Epidemiology
• ENV530: General Environmental Health
• ENV545: Risk Assessment
• ENV551: Environmental Toxicology
• ENV570: Emergency Preparedness
• ENV575: Bioterrorism & Public Health

All courses are taught in convenient evening and/or condensed formats, ideally suited to the working professional.

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The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Read more

The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the US and beyond and the analysis of intelligence collection. The M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations is offered online worldwide.

National security affairs is one of the fastest growing professions with positions open in the public sector in the federal, state and local governments and in the private sector. This program is designed for professionals in the field seeking career advancement, those who aspire to enter the field, individuals in related professions, and those retired from the military and government seeking consulting and other positions. Examples of potential students include personnel in the military, federal, state and local governments, law enforcement, corporations, and academia, as well as recent college graduates.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes. 

M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the U.S. and beyond, and the analysis of intelligence collection. Students will also develop a deep understanding of the international context in which U.S. national security issues are shaped.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes.

Following completion of the program core, students must complete 15 credits of coursework from the list of available electives. The majority of the elective offerings were developed specifically for the national security and international relations program, with a small number drawn from closely related fields. The elective list contains both courses that emphasize domestic security and courses that have a broader international focus, resulting in sufficient breadth of subject matter to allow students to tailor their choices around particular academic or professional interests.

Students interested in Cyber Security can choose to take a specific concentration in this area. Students who choose this option must complete 9 credits from the Cyber Security concentration and 6 credits from the elective list. Before choosing this option, students must secure permission from the Department of History and Political Science. After a consultation, it will be determined whether the student can enter the Cyber Security concentration, or if additional foundation courses will be required in order to enter and successfully complete the concentration.

Core Courses (21 credits)

  • NSAM 5001 - Current Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5003 - National Intelligence Collection and Analysis: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5004 - Border Protection and Military Issue (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5005 - Research and Evaluation in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5010 - US Foreign Policy and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5014 - Ethical Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5016 - International Relations: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

Electives (15 credits)

  • NSAM 5002 - Terrorists and Terrorism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5015 - Civil Liberties and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5020 - International Law and Institutions (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5030 - American Government and Domestic Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5040 - Cyber Conflict and Statecraft (3 credits)
  • DEM 5090 - Weapons of Mass Threat and Communicable Diseases (3 credits)
  • MHS 5314 - Bioterrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5502 - Directed Readings in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5650 - Economic Statecraft in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6130 - Practicum/Internship (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6690 - Special Topics in National Security Affairs and International Relations (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6700 - Directed Thesis in National Security Affairs and International Relations (6 credits)

Optional Cyber Security Concentration

  • MMIS 0683 - Fundamentals of Security Technologies (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0684 - Information Security Management (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0685 - Information Security Governance (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0686 - Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0687 - Information Security Project (3 credits)

Practicum

In addition to successfully completing all course work, students must pass a tabletop examination to be awarded the M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations. When a student has completed all coursework, has maintained a minimum of 3.0 GPA with no "incomplete" grades, and is a "student in good standing" with no disciplinary actions pending or disciplinary tasks to complete, the student will be eligible to take the tabletop examination. The tabletop exam is an assessment of the student's ability to integrate the knowledge and skills gained through course work.The exam tests the student's written ability to critically analyze and apply conflict assessment, theory, and research methodology to hypothetical conflict situations. The exam also tests knowledge of material specific to the academic curriculum.



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