• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University College London Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
"biomolecules"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Biomolecules)

We have 24 Masters Degrees (Biomolecules)

  • "biomolecules" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 24
Order by 
Biophysics provides structural and mechanistic insights into the biological world and uses this knowledge to create solutions for major global problems, such as food production, climate change, environmental damage and drug production. Read more
Biophysics provides structural and mechanistic insights into the biological world and uses this knowledge to create solutions for major global problems, such as food production, climate change, environmental damage and drug production. It spans the distance between the vast complexity of biological systems and the relative simplicity of the physical laws that govern the universe.

Our Biophysics and Molecular Life Sciences MSc provides interdisciplinary training by bringing together concepts from chemistry, physics and the life sciences. It is taught by staff actively pursuing research in these areas and from members of BrisSynBio, a flagship centre for synthetic biology research in the UK.

The programme gives you an opportunity to gain knowledge and practical experience by studying molecular interactions and mechanisms at the level of the cell to the single molecule. Topics for study include molecular structure determination, dynamic molecular mechanisms, molecular simulation, molecular design and single-molecule technologies. You can also choose an additional unit that reflects your personal interests, allowing you to broaden your knowledge of biomedical subjects whilst focusing on biophysics. You will also learn about the commercialisation of research outcomes, including intellectual property, setting up a business, getting investment, marketing and legal issues.

Graduates from this programme will be well-prepared for a PhD programme in biophysics or related fields. Additionally, the numerical, problem-solving, research and communication skills gained on this programme are highly desired by employers in a variety of industries.

Robust evidence is the cornerstone of science and on this programme you will gain research experience in laboratories equipped with state-of-the-art equipment, including atomic force and electron microscopy, biological and chemical NMR, x-ray crystallography and mass spectrometry.

Your learning will be supported throughout the programme in regular, small-group tutorials.

Programme structure

Core units
Biophysics and Molecular Life Sciences I
-The unit begins with a short series of lectures that introduce the general area of molecular life sciences for the non-specialist. The remaining lectures cover a variety of molecular spectroscopies, molecular structure determination, an introduction to systems approaches using proteomics, and the mechanistic characterisation of biomolecules using a variety of biophysical techniques.

Biophysics and Molecular Life Sciences II
-The unit describes highly specialised techniques at the interface of physics, chemistry and the life sciences. This includes techniques for studying biomolecules at the level of a single-molecule, synthetic biology, bioinformatics and molecular simulations.

Core Skills
-A series of practical classes, lecture-based teaching sessions, and tutorials that prepare you for the practical project, provide a foundation for further studies and develop a range of transferable skills.

Literary Project
-An extended essay on a subject chosen from an extensive list covering the topics described above. You work independently under the guidance of a member of staff.

Project Proposal and Research Project
-You work independently under the guidance of a member of staff to produce a written project proposal. This is followed by a 12-week research project investigating your chosen topic. The research project forms the basis for a dissertation.

Lecture-based option
You will study one lecture-based unit from:
-Cancer Biology
-Cardiovascular Research
-The Dynamic Cell
-Infection, Immunology and Immunity
-Neuroscience
-Pharmacology

Careers

Typically, biophysics careers are laboratory-based, conducting original research within academia, a government agency or private industry, although the transferable skills gained on the course are ideal for many other careers outside of science, including business and finance.

Read less
What is the Master of Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biotechnology all about?. The programme provides in-depth training in the multidisciplinary fields of biophysics and biochemistry, with particular emphasis on subfields in which KU Leuven's research expertise is internationally recognised. Read more

What is the Master of Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biotechnology all about?

The programme provides in-depth training in the multidisciplinary fields of biophysics and biochemistry, with particular emphasis on subfields in which KU Leuven's research expertise is internationally recognised: the determination of molecular structures, molecular and supramolecular modelling, the spectroscopy of biomolecules, the physical modelling of complex systems and the study of these models, the transport through ion channels in membranes, and the study of molecular interactions and physical principles in vitro, in complex biological machineries and in the living cell.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

Students may select one of two tracks - Biophysics or Biochemistry and Biotechnology. The track Biochemistry and Biotechnology has three orientations: Physiological, Molecular and Cellular. 

Alternatively, students who are not considering a research career can opt for Applied Biophysics.

Elective Courses 

Students choose courses from an additional list, which are different from their research orientation. Students may select courses from the entire programme offered by the university if they have the approval of the programme director. Students have to make sure that the entire programme of the master contains at least 120 credits.

International

We encourage students to complete part of their Master's training at another European university, preferably during the second year, when they can work on their Master's thesis or take specific subjects at one of the universities in our Erasmus exchange programme.

Department

The Department of Biology is committed to excellence in teaching and research and is comprised of four divisions with diverse research activities ranging from molecular and physiological research at the level of cells and organisms to ecological research on populations, communities, and ecosystems. Although many research groups conduct in-depth analyses on specific model organisms, as a whole the department studies an impressive diversity of lifeforms.

Our research is internationally renowned and embedded in well-established worldwide collaborations with other universities, research institutes, and companies. Our primary goal is to obtain insight into patterns and processes at different levels of biological organisation and to understand the basis and evolution of the mechanisms that allow organisms to adapt to their constantly changing environment. This knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits. The department attracts many students and hosts approximately 250 staff members.

Objectives

Upon completing the programme, the graduate will have acquired:

  • thorough understanding of the properties of biomolecules, their functions and interactions with other molecules at a cellular and higher level, and particularly their structure-function relationship;
  • profound knowledge of recent developments in disciplines such as biophysical modelling, bioinformatics, genome and proteome analysis, and ability to integrate this knowledge and to apply it to new problems;
  • abilities to thoroughly familiarise oneself in a reasonably short time with several subject areas of biophysics and biochemistry, and to keep oneself informed of relevant developments in the field of study; this implies the abilities to consult and understand relevant literature, to acquire new insights and to formulate new hypothesis based on these sources;
  • abilities to independently identify and analyse physical and molecular aspects of a biophysical problem, to plan a strategy for the solution and to propose and perform appropriate experiments;
  • appropriate attitudes to work in a team environment and to make a constructive contribution to scientific research at an international level, at the university, in the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries, at research institutions or public services;
  • abilities to make a systematic and critical report of personal biophysical or (applied) biochemical research and to present this to an audience of specialists;
  • attitudes of continued attention to the risks associated with the conducted experiments, with respect to safety and the environment, and to thoroughly analyse these risks.

Career perspectives

A range of career options are available in the pharmaceutical and bioscience industries, where structure determination, modelling and the direct study of molecular interactions in the living cell play a major role. Because of the growing importance of the bioscience industry in today's society and the increasing need for sophisticated high-tech instruments and research methods, the demand for biophysicists and biochemists is expected to exceed supply in the near future.

Graduates may also pursue a career in medical sciences research or academic research. A considerable number of graduates, particularly those who choose for a research route, go on to undertake a PhD at one of our associated research laboratories.



Read less
Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

How do genes regulate the development and functioning of cells, tissues and organisms? How do molecules, cells and tissues function and communicate with each other, and how are their functions studied? These are the key issues for understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms, whose disruption can contribute to the onset and progression of various diseases. Researchers in the fields of genetics, genomics, cellular and developmental biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and biosciences of health are searching for the answers to these questions.

Upon completing the Master’s Programme in Genetics and Molecular Biosciences:

  • You will have in-depth knowledge of genetics and molecular biosciences and of the experimental methods used in them.
  • You will understand the characteristics and functions of genes and biomolecules at the cellular, tissue and organism levels.
  • You will be able to analyse scientific knowledge critically and communicate it to different audiences.
  • You will have the ability to produce new scientific information about the properties of genes, biomolecules and cells by means of experimental studies.
  • You will be able to take advantage of existing research data and biological databases.
  • You will have mastered good scientific practice and know how to act accordingly.
  • You will have the capacity for independent project management and problem solving, as well as for maintaining and developing your own expertise.
  • You will have the ability to work in multi-disciplinary and multicultural communities.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The Master's programme is based on basic scientific research. In the programme you will acquire knowledge and skills in modern genetics and molecular biosciences, which you will deepen in your chosen field of specialisation. The programme is tightly integrated with the experimental research carried out at the University of Helsinki in genetics, genomics, biochemistry, structural biology, and cellular and developmental biology. By combining course units, you will be able to acquire a broad-based understanding of biological phenomena and of the molecules that have an effect on health, including their interactions and functions at the levels of cells, tissues and organisms. 

Courses include a variety of working methods: seminars, lectures, laboratory work, oral and written presentations, project work in small groups, independent studies and study circles formed by the students. The instruction will utilise digital learning environments.

These diverse teaching methods require active involvement from you. They will develop your ability to search, structure and present new information, as well as to draw conclusions. You will learn about the principles and methods of research during laboratory exercises, and about practical work in research groups and when writing your Master's thesis. In addition to academic excellence, you will acquire general working life skills such as fact-finding, problem solving, communication, project management and teamwork. You will acquire competence both for post-graduate studies in a Doctoral Programme and for expert positions immediately after gaining your Master's degree.



Read less
IN BRIEF. Train for a career in the newly emerging industries of the post-genomic eraWork at the interface between biology and chemistryExcellent career prospectsPart-time study optionInternational students can apply. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Train for a career in the newly emerging industries of the post-genomic eraWork at the interface between biology and chemistryExcellent career prospectsPart-time study optionInternational students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Following completion of the Human Genome Project, the pharmaceutical industry is preparing for a revolution in cancer and inherited disorder therapies. This course is training a new generation of bioscientists to meet challenges at the interface between biology and chemistry, and to apply pharmaceutical and analytical knowledge directly to improve quality of life.

The course develops a broad knowledge and conceptual base in the field of drug design and discovery, with an emphasis on new developments and advances in drug identification, understanding drug pharmacology and novel therapeutics, and appreciating how these topics interact with bioscience businesses and enterprise.

This programme is designed to enable you to gain systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current problems and new insights regarding the analysis of biomolecules. There is particular reference to drug design and discovery, along with a comprehensive and critical understanding of applied techniques and their current application in research in the field of biomolecule analysis and drug design.

This course is aimed at students who wish to acquire the specialised skills needed to design drugs for the 21st century. It is ideal for anyone with primarily either a chemistry or biochemistry based undergraduate degree wishing to broaden their knowledge base. The part-time route is well suited to those who already work in industry as it is possible to carry out research projects within the place of work. Prospective students must be committed to developing their skills and knowledge for a career in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology sectors.

TEACHING

Teaching is through:

  • Lectures to provide thorough grounding in the techniques of biomolecule characterisation and drug design.
  • Practical sessions and workshops to demonstrate techniques and methods used in biomolecule characterisation and drug design, and provide a structured opportunity for you to practice techniques and methods in analytical biosciences and drug design.
  • Guided reading that will recommend texts, key articles and other materials in advance of, or following, lecture classes.  
  • The research project which will enable you to practice the application of appropriate, and selected, bioscientific techniques in an academic or industrial context, and demonstrate research methodologies and skills appropriate to and valuable with biomolecule characterisation and drug design. During your research project You will be supervised by expert staff who are actively engaged in international research programmes.

ASSESSMENT

There are eight taught 15 credit modules each of which have only one assessment (100%). Each exam is 2 hours.

EMPLOYABILITY

Although particularly relevant to those looking for a career in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, this course will also equip you for a career in research, teaching and many other professions including cosmetic science, animal health, food science, medical laboratory research, patent law, scientific journalism and health and safety.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Research projects may be carried out at other institutions (recently Universities in Bremen or France and the Paterson Institute, UK). We also invite visiting lecturers to share their expertise on the subject areas.

FURTHER STUDY

After completion of this course you may wish to specialise in a chosen subject area in one of the School’s two main research centres: Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre (EER) or Biomedical Research Centre (BRC).



Read less
Do you want to take up a career in research and development? We’re recruiting ambitious students with degrees in Chemistry, Physics, Life Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics or Statistics. Read more
Do you want to take up a career in research and development? We’re recruiting ambitious students with degrees in Chemistry, Physics, Life Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics or Statistics.

We offer you a coherent training programme in Analytical Science, a central and interdisciplinary science which supports research and development in a huge number of key industries. Analytical Science underpins many aspects of biological and clinical sciences,environmental sciences, pharmaceutical sciences, materials science and synthetic chemistry. This course offers expertise from international experts within academia and collaborating companies like Syngenta and AstraZeneca.

You’ll gain hands-on experience in a variety of relevant techniques, enabling you to work in any modern laboratory since the skills you acquire will be readily transferable between disciplines. You’ll also have an incredible opportunity to undertake cutting-edge research with a world-leading group or company. By the end of the course you’ll be positioned to take up employment in research and development roles within a number of sectors, or to take up further study with a PhD.

Structure

The course spans 1 year, the first 23 weeks are lecture-based, providing you with a diverse toolbox in analytical sciences enabling you to complete a successful 20 week research project.
Term 1 and Term 2 (23 weeks):
-Mass Spectrometry
-Chromatography & Separation Science
-Team Research Project: Real World Analysis
-Electrochemistry & Sensors
-Principles & Techniques in Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis
-Magnetic Resonance
-Techniques for the Characterisation of Biomolecules
-Microscopy & Imaging
-Statistice for Data Analysis
-Transferable Skills

Then choose 1 of:
-Advanced Electron Microscopy - Theory & Practice
-Advanced Statistics & Chemometrics

Research Project (20 weeks):
-Immerse yourself in a real research project, supervised by our renowned academics.

Read less
This programme falls within the theme ‘Sustainable Power Generation and Supply’ of the Research Councils’ Energy Programme, the first of its kind in the UK. Read more
This programme falls within the theme ‘Sustainable Power Generation and Supply’ of the Research Councils’ Energy Programme, the first of its kind in the UK.

Masters graduates will have a systematic knowledge and understanding of hydrogen, fuel cells and their applications, including developments and problems at the forefront of the discipline. They will be able to evaluate current research critically, and be original in the application of their knowledge, proposing new hypotheses as appropriate.

Typical Masters graduates will be able to deal with complex issues, making sound judgements in the absence of complete information, and will be able to communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences. They will be self-motivating and able to act autonomously, and will have the qualities and transferable skills necessary to exercise initiative and personal responsibility, to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations, and to have the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development.

Their high level of numeracy and skills in problem solving, team working, communication and information technology will equip them for successful careers outside as well as within the process and allied industries.

The MRes in Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and their Applications:

Demonstrates the exciting future promise of hydrogen, fuel cells and their applications in a zero-emission world
Shows that industry supports the developments and that jobs are plentiful
Stresses the international nature of the course, with travel overseas
Emphasises the high quality nature of the teaching in top grade RAE Schools
Supports entrepreneurial spirit, with three spin-out companies in hydrogen and fuel cells founded during the past 12 months at the University of Birmingham
Programme content

The programme will focus on taught modules (60 credits) in science, engineering and team building, as well as business and management, and a dissertation.

Further core modules deal with topics such as:

Materials for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies
The Energy System
Marketing and TQM
Effective Project Management
Business Methods, Economics and Strategy
Optional modules

A wide range of optional modules enables you to gain specific knowledge relating to hydrogen energy and fuel cell technology. You may also choose to study business, management and public engagement modules, or develop mathematical modelling skills.

The programme can be studied full-time over one year, or part-time over two or three years. Modules are also available individually to fulfil continuing professional development needs.

Dissertation

The research thesis will focus on any of the following areas: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Engineering for Domestic Applications, Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) Stack Engineering for Automotive, Hybrid Vehicular Systems, Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) & Electrocatalyst development, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Stack Engineering for Portable Applications, Alkaline Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells, Discovery of New Nano-Materials for Hydrogen Production & Storage, Discovery of non-PGM alloys Materials, Hydrogen Production from Biomolecules by Novel Methods, Development of Novel Pd Alloy Thin-films for Use in High temperature Hydrogen Membrane Reactors.

Successful Masters students will have the opportunity to study for the PhD with Integrated Study in Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and their Applications.

About the School of Chemical Engineering

Birmingham has one of the largest concentrations of Chemical Engineering expertise in the UK, with an excellent reputation in learning, teaching and research.
Investment totalling over £3.5 million in our buildings has resulted in some of the best teaching, computing and laboratory facilities anywhere in the UK.
We have achieved an excellent performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) – the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. 87% of the research in the School was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent. It was ranked joint fourth overall in the UK for its research prowess and first nationally for research impact.
The enthusiasm that the academic staff have for their research comes through in their teaching and ensures that they and you are at the cutting edge of chemical engineering.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
This exciting interdisciplinary MSc programme focuses on providing advanced academic training in the cellular and molecular processes that relate to the production of biomedicines for use in healthcare. Read more
This exciting interdisciplinary MSc programme focuses on providing advanced academic training in the cellular and molecular processes that relate to the production of biomedicines for use in healthcare.

This is coupled with rigorous practical training in the design, production and characterisation of biomolecules using state-of-theart biotechnological and bioengineering analytical and molecular technologies.

You acquire practical, academic and applied skills in data analysis, systems and modelling approaches, and bioinformatics, together with transferable skills in scientific writing, presentation and public affairs. On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to integrate these skills to develop novel solutions to modern biotechnological issues from both academic and industrial perspectives.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/213/biotechnology-and-bioengineering

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

The MSc in Biotechnology and Bioengineering involves studying for 120 credits of taught modules, as indicated below. The taught component takes place during the autumn and spring terms, while a 60-credit research project take place over the summer months.

The programme is taught by staff from the Industrial Biotechnology Centre, an interdisciplinary research centre whose aim is to solve complex biological problems using an integrated approach to biotechnology and bioengineering. It is administered by the School of Biosciences who also contribute to the programme.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)
BI852 - Advanced Analytical and Emerging Technologies for Biotechnology and Bio (30 credits)
BI857 - Cancer Research in Focus (15 credits)
CB612 - New Enterprise Startup (15 credits)
CB613 - Enterprise (15 credits)
BI840 - Cancer Therapeutics: From the Laboratory to the Clinic (15 credits)
BI845 - Research project (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the research project.

Programme aims

You will gain the following transferable skills:

- the ability to plan and manage workloads

- self-discipline and initiative

- the development of reflective learning practices to make constructive use of your own assessment of performance and use that of colleagues, staff and others to enhance performance and progress

- communication: the ability to organise information clearly, create and respond to textual and visual sources (eg images, graphs, tables), present information orally, adapt your style for different audiences.

- enhanced understanding of group work dynamics and how to work as part of a group or independently.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/213

Read less
Thesis-based research on Heavy Metal Complex Formation with Biomolecules, using different spectroscopic techniques, including multinuclear NMR, vibrational spectroscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Read more
Thesis-based research on Heavy Metal Complex Formation with Biomolecules, using different spectroscopic techniques, including multinuclear NMR, vibrational spectroscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Successful candidates may take the Qualifying Exam within 22 months of their M.Sc. program to be transferred to Ph.D.

Read less
Medical Life Sciences is an English-taught two-year Master’s programme in molecular disease research and bridges the gap between the sciences and medical studies. Read more
Medical Life Sciences is an English-taught two-year Master’s programme in molecular disease research and bridges the gap between the sciences and medical studies. You will get to know clinical research from scratch; you will learn how to investigate diseases/disease mechanisms both in ancient and contemporary populations, how to translate research results into prevention, diagnosis and therapies of diseases.
From the basics of medical science to lab experiments for the Master’s thesis, individual scientific training takes first priority. Experimental work in state-of-the-art research labs is essential in Medical Life Sciences; clinical internships, data analysis, lectures, seminars and electives complement the Medical Life Sciences curriculum.
Evolutionary biology will train you in thinking from cause to consequence. Molecular paleopathology and ancient DNA research tell you a lot about disease through human history. These insights help to fight disease today, which is why evolutionary medicine is becoming a cutting-edge research field. Whether you want to focus on ancient populations and paleopathology or on specific disease indications nowadays, here you get the tools and skills to do both.
To lay the foundation for working in medical research, Medical Life Sciences includes courses on clinical manifestations of diseases, molecular pathology and immunology. Hands-on courses in molecular biology, bioinformatics, clinical cell biology, medical statistics, and human genetics broaden your knowledge and make the interfaces between medicine and the sciences visible. You will learn how to acquire knowledge, verify and use it.. That biomedicine has many facets to discover is the great thing that keeps students fascinated and well-equipped for finding a job in academia or the industry.

Focus Areas

From the second semester, you additionally specialise in one of the following focus areas:

INFLAMMATION takes you deep into the molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammatory diseases, the causal network between inflammatory processes and disease, genetics and environment. New research results for prevention, diagnosis and therapy will be presented and discussed. An internship in specialised clinics helps to see how “bed to bench side”, i.e. translational medicine, works.

EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE looks at how interrelations between humans and their environment have led to current disease susceptibility. Why do we suffer from chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity? Is our lifestyle making us sick? Why are certain genetic variants maintained in populations despite their disease risk? Evolutionary medicine focuses on bridging the gap between evolutionary biology and medicine by considering the evolutionary origins of common diseases to help find new biomedical approaches for preventing and treating them.

ONCOLOGY delves deep into molecular research on malignant diseases, the interplay of genetics and environment, cell biology of tumours, and many other aspects. You will achieve a better understanding of unresolved problems and opportunities of current research approaches.

LONGEVITY focuses on molecular mechanisms that seem to counteract the detrimental effect of ageing. The disease resilience and metabolic stability of extraordinarily fit people well over 90 years of age are of special interest. This research is complemented by experiments on model organisms. You will also look at the molecular pathways of ageing, and which role genes and the environment play. How the intricate web of counteracting effects triggering ageing and/or longevity works stands as the central focus of this area.

Scientists and clinicians will make you familiar with these topics in lectures and seminars. You will discuss different research approaches, perspectives and the latest developments in medical research. Lab practicals in state-of-the-art research labs, a lab project, and the experimental Master's thesis will provide ample opportunity to be involved in real-time research projects.

Electives

To widen your perspective, you choose one of three electives designed to complement the focus areas. The schedules are designed so that you can take part in more than one elective if places are available. Tracing Disease through Time looks at disease etiology by analysing biomolecules, diets and pathogens in archaeological specimens. You may opt for Epidemiology to immerse yourself in epidemiological approaches with special emphasis on cardiovascular diseases, one of the greatest health threats in modern societies. Another option is Molecular Imaging, which gives you insight into the world of high-tech imaging in medical research.

Additional electives such as Neurology, Tissue Engineering or Epithelial Barrier Functions and Soft Skills courses such as Project Management, Career Orientation and English Scientific Writing are integrated into the curriculum.

Read less
This programme focuses on applied aspects of advanced and emerging analytical technologies to address current issues in food safety, nutrition and food supply. Read more

Research Strategies

This programme focuses on applied aspects of advanced and emerging analytical technologies to address current issues in food safety, nutrition and food supply. It covers the entire food chain from farm to fork and places a strong emphasis on the link between improved food safety and nutrition and improved public health.

Research Strengths

•Advanced and emerging technology platforms (biosensors and omics)

•Animal food and feed safety

•Animal health and disease diagnostics

•Food and nutrition metabolomics

•Food and nutrition quality measurements

•Food chemistry

•Food safety detection methodology

•Food traceability and authenticity

•Immunodiagnostics for food contaminant and toxin detection

•Natural compounds and their health applications

•Novel and functional foods

•Therapeutic biomolecules

Special Features

•Students will be based in modern, world-class laboratory facilities equipped with state-of-the-art, highly advanced analytical instruments.

•Students will gain excellent practical experience of advanced and emerging analytical techniques for food safety analysis and monitoring.

•The School has a wide range of strong, international links with governments, academia and industry.

Read less
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

Read less
Learning how to make discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the fundamental behaviour of molecules and materials. Read more

Learning how to make discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the fundamental behaviour of molecules and materials.

Most chemical research involves synthesising and characterising new molecules. So basically, a trial and error system. This specialisation goes one step further: it aims at fundamentally unravelling the properties of molecules and materials. How do pharmaceutical molecules arrange in different forms and how does this affect their efficiency as a drug? And in what way does the molecular structure of a polymer influence the mechanical strength of plastics? We try to find the answers by developing theory and applying physical set-ups for advanced spectroscopic experiments, such as high magnetic fields, free-electron lasers and nuclear magnetic resonance.

Thanks to all our research facilities being located on the Radboud campus, you’ll be able to perform your research with advanced spectroscopic methods. You get to choose the focus of your research. Some students work on biomolecules while others prefer for example solar cells, plastics or hydrogels. It’s even possible to specialise in the development of new technology.

Studying at the interface between physics and chemistry means collaborating and communicating with people from different scientific backgrounds. Moreover, you’ll be trained to work with large-scale facilities and complex devices. These qualities will be useful in both research and company environments. Jobs are plentiful, as almost all industrial processes involve physical chemistry.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/science/physical

Why study Physical Chemistry at Radboud University?

- Unlike at (many) other universities, all physical and chemical Material Science departments are combined in one institute: the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Therefore, collaborating is second nature to us.

- Radboud University hosts a large number of advanced spectroscopic facilities. As a Master’s student, you’ll get the chance to work with devices that are unique in Europe and even some that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.

- We have multiple collaborations with companies that, for example, analyse complex mixtures such as biofuels, characterising hydrogels, and develop anti-caking agents for rock-salt.

- During the courses and internship(s), you’ll meet a wide group of researchers in a small-scale and personal setting: a good starting point for your future network.

Career prospects

About 75 percent of our students start their career with a PhD position. However, eventually most students end up as researchers, policy advisors, consultants or managers in companies and governmental organisations. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:

Solve complex problems in a structured way

Understand the professional jargon of different disciplines and work in a multidisciplinary environment

Use mathematical computer tools

Perform measurements with complex research equipment

Graduates have found jobs at for example:

- ETH Zurich

- MIT

- UC Berkeley

- ASML

- AkzoNobel

- DSM

- Shell

- Unilever

- Various spin-off companies, like Noviotech and Spinnovation

Our approach to this field

Physical Chemistry at Radboud University goes beyond the characterisation of molecules and materials. We focus on fundamental knowledge: What do spectroscopic measurements really mean? And how can we explain the behaviour of certain molecules or materials?

- Advanced spectroscopy

Radboud University hosts a large range of advanced spectroscopic facilities. Think of the High Field Magnetic Laboratory, FELIX laboratory for free-electron lasers, NMR facility, scanning probe lab, etc. As a Master’s student in Physical Chemistry, you’ll get an overview of all these different methods, and you’ll be able to apply your knowledge as a member of a laboratory. Some of our students choose to focus on the development of new scientific methods.

- Bridging the gap between chemistry and physics

We believe in knowledge transfer between chemists and physicists. That’s why in Nijmegen all material research is combined in one institute: the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). During your Master’s, you’ll experience this interplay in the lectures and internships. Once graduated, you’ll be able to understand the vernacular of both disciplines and in that way bridge the gap between chemistry and physics.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/science/physical

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



Read less
Chemistry. Molecular Chemistry. Molecular chemistry is a creative science, where chemists synthesize molecules with new biological or physical properties to address scientific or societal challenges. Read more

Chemistry: Molecular Chemistry

Molecular chemistry is a creative science, where chemists synthesize molecules with new biological or physical properties to address scientific or societal challenges. Think of new catalytic conversions, lead compounds for future medicines or the next generation of conducting polymers. The specialisation Molecular Chemistry offers education in connection with top-level research in the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), enabling you to develop in-depth knowledge of the design, synthesis and characterization of unprecedented functional molecular structures.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry/molecular

Why study Molecular Chemistry at Radboud University?

- The IMM at Radboud University hosts an internationally renowned cluster of molecular chemistry groups, where you will participate in challenging research projects.

- The IMM Organic Chemistry department was recently awarded a 27 million euro NWO Gravity programme grant. Among the teaching staff are two ERC advanced grant and two ERC starting grant winners.

- Teaching takes place in small groups and in a stimulating, personal setting.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Science or a related area

In general, you are admitted with the equivalent of a Dutch Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Science with relevant subjects, or a related programme in molecular science. In case of other pre-education, students must have passed preliminary examinations containing the subject matter of the following well-known international textbooks (or equivalent literature). Any deficiencies in this matter should be eliminated before you can take part in this specialisation. If you want to make sure that you meet our academic requirements, please contact the academic advisor.

- Organic chemistry: e.g. Organic Chemistry (Bruice)

- Biochemistry: e.g. Biochemistry (Lehninger)

- Physical chemistry: e.g. Physical chemistry (Atkins)

- 30 EC of chemistry or chemistry-related courses at third year Bachelor's level

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- A TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >90 (internet based)

- An IELTS score of ≥6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Approximately 40% of our graduates take up a PhD position, either in Nijmegen or elsewhere in the world. Our research institutes, in particular the Institute for Molecules and Materials, have vacancies for PhD projects every year. Our graduates also find work as researchers and managers in the chemical industry, or in one of our spin-off companies. A small proportion will not work in science, but for instance as a policymaker at a governmental organisation.

Our approach to this field

The Master's specialisation in Molecular Chemistry offers main stream chemistry courses and research topics, for those students that aim to deepen their knowledge and experimental skills in the heart of chemistry. The Institute for Molecules and Materials offers a state-of-the-art research infrastructure and hosts world-class research groups where you can conduct independent research, under the personal guidance of a researcher. Often, this leads to a scientific publication with you as a co-author.

Besides an internship in fundamental science, you can also chose to perform research in an industrial environment. Approximately one third of our students do one of their internships in a chemical company, both large (e.g. DSM, Synthon, AkzoNobel) and small (e.g. MercaChem, FutureChemistry, Chiralix).

Interested in going abroad? Contact one of our researchers, they can easily connect you to top groups elsewhere in the world. In the past few years, molecular chemistry students did internships in Oxford (UK), Princeton (US), Berkeley (US), Karolinska Institute (Sweden), ETH Zurich (Switzerland), etc.

Our research in this field

In the Master's specialisation Molecular Chemistry, the unique research facilities that Radboud University has to offer are coupled with the top level research within the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). A selection of research groups for this specialisation are:

- Synthetic organic chemistry (Prof. Floris Rutjes): The group focuses on the development of new and sustainable synthetic (multistep)reactions by using bio-, organo- or metal-catalysts or combinations thereof, synthesis of druglike compound libraries, synthesis of bio-orthogonal click-reactions and chemical synthesis in continuous flow microreactors

- Analytical chemistry (Prof. Lutgarde Buydens): Research involves new chemometric methodologies and techniques for the optimisation of molecular structures. The research programme is designed around four areas: Methodological chemometrics, spectroscopic image analysis, molecular chemometrics, and analysis of genomics, metabolomics and proteomics data.

- Bio-organic chemistry (Prof. Jan van Hest): This groups uses Nature as inspiration for the design of functional molecules. Research lines that fit in this specialisation include: design and synthesis of modified peptides to alter their biological function, hybrid polymers containing biomolecules for use as antibacterial materials, and smart compartmentalisation strategies to enable multi-step reactions in a single reaction flask.

- Molecular materials (Prof. Alan Rowan): The aim of the group is the design and synthesis of novel polymers, self-organising molecules and ordered crystals and the subsequent investigation of their properties. Research topics related to his specialisation are: functional systems for application in catalysis, new OLEDS (organic LEDS), and liquid crystals.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry/molecular

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



Read less
The MPhil is offered by the Department of Chemistry as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Read more
The MPhil is offered by the Department of Chemistry as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Students are integrated into the research culture of the Department by joining a research group, supervised by one of our academic staff, in one of the following areas of Chemistry:

Biological:

with a focus on enzymes, nucleic acids, protein folding and misfolding, and physical techniques; with relevance to health and disease, drug discovery, sensors, nanotechnology, ageing and energy research applications.

Materials Chemistry:

including surfaces, interfaces, polymers, nanoparticles and nanoporous materials, self assembly, and biomaterials, with applications relevant to: oil recovery and separation, catalysis, photovoltaics, fuel cells and batteries, crystallization and pharmaceutical formulation, gas sorption, energy, functional materials, biocompatible materials, computer memory, and sensors.

Physical Chemistry:

including atmospheric sciences, surfaces and interfaces, materials, and physical and chemical aspects of the behaviour of biopolymers and other soft systems.

Synthetic Chemistry:

including complex molecule synthesis, synthetic catalysis, synthetic assembly, synthetic biology and medicine, new technology for efficient synthesis, green synthesis, and preparation of new materials.

Theory, Modelling and Informatics:

including quantum dynamics, modelling soft materials, protein folding and binding, biomolecules in motion, pharmacological activity, molecular switches, redox chemistry, designing bioactive molecule and drugs, chemical biology, crystallography, and simulation of spectroscopic studies.

Potential supervisors and their area of research expertise may be found at Department of Chemistry (Research): http://www.ch.cam.ac.uk/research

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcchmpmch

Course detail

Educational aims of the MPhil programme:

- to give students with relevant experience at first degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and

- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests and a broader set of transferable skills.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The MPhil involves minimal formal teaching. Students may attend the Department's programme of research seminars and other graduate courses, including the Transferable Skills programme that forms part of the PhD programme. Informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring and other opportunities by fellow students and members of staff. However, most research training is provided within the research group structure and all students are assigned a research supervisor.

All graduate students receive termly reports written by their supervisors.

Assessment

The scheme of examination for the MPhil in Chemistry shall consist of a thesis, of not more than 15,000 words in length, exclusive of tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, submitted for examination at the end of 11 months. The examination shall include an oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. The thesis shall provide evidence to satisfy the Examiners that a candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspectives of the subject.

Continuing

The Department offers a PhD in Chemistry course and MPhil students can apply to continue as a graduate student on this course.

MPhil students currently studying a relevant course at the University of Cambridge will need to pass their MPhil course (if examined only by thesis) or obtain a minimum merit (if there is a marked element) in order to be eligible to continue onto the PhD in Chemistry.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science. Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Read more
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science

Why choose this course?

Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Uniquely, however, it is the only course in the UK to combine this discipline with the molecular analysis of human remains. Nowhere else can you immerse yourself in the study of stable isotopes, lipid residue analysis, palaeoproteomics and ancient DNA – and play an active role in the development of new techniques in this constantly evolving branch of archaeology. In 2014, seven of the top 100 discoveries in science were in archaeology, and BioArCh staff were involved in three of these.
-Advanced training in human osteoarchaeology, delivered by the UK’s leading practitioners
-Study ancient biomolecules in world-class facilities at the BioArch centre and Department of Biology
-Unique opportunity to combine bioarchaeology with complementary subjects and tailor a course to suit your interests
-Access an incredible range of in-house analytical equipment
-Take part in cutting-edge science and build essential practical skills
-Work alongside leading researchers and academics in a diverse range of specialisms
-Work on diverse material that is often ‘fresh out of the ground’ and make valuable contributions to live projects Receive career and research guidance from staff with significant experience in the sector and a track record of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and dissertation research, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of bioarchaeology theory, investigation and practice.

Uniquely, you can combine bioarchaeology with a range of subjects and tailor your degree to your own interests. You could adopt a ‘period’ focus, for example, to specialise in the bioarchaeology of the Medieval, Viking, Mesolithic or early prehistoric periods. You could combine human bioarchaeology with zooarchaeology and orientate your course towards more advanced studies of bone function and anatomy. Or you could focus on skills such as GIS modelling and field archaeology.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students with a passionate interest in the future of archaeology, who want to work at the frontiers of archaeological science. The degree is primarily aimed at those whose previous experience is in archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, but we do accept students from diverse backgrounds. The common factor among our student intake is a keen interest in science and in human remains at a biomolecular or bone level.

What can it lead to?

Molecular analysis is used increasingly widely in archaeology, but the range of osteological and molecular skills offered by the course provide valuable training and expertise for a wide range of careers and further study.

Many students go on to take PhDs at York and other institutions around the world. Others pursue a wide range of professional careers, from osteoarchaeology and environmental archaeology to the medical humanities and laboratory technician work.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Bioarchaeology course you will be able to:
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Understand advanced methods for analysing bone tissues, including biomolecular methods
-Apply chemical and biomolecular methods to skeletal material
-Understand the processes of decay and diagenesis of bone tissue
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Work effectively within a laboratory environment
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many our MSc Bioarchaeology postgraduates go on to further research in bioarchaeological and environmental fields. The BioArch department has a successful track record of placing students on PhD courses in York and institutions worldwide.

Here’s a selection of the career and research destinations of some of our recent students: US graduate school programmes
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X