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Masters Degrees (Biomedical Imaging)

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Imaging has contributed to some of the most significant advances in biomedicine and healthcare and this trend is accelerating. Read more
Imaging has contributed to some of the most significant advances in biomedicine and healthcare and this trend is accelerating. This MSc, taught by leading scientists and clinicians, will equip imaging students from all science backgrounds with detailed knowledge of the advanced imaging techniques which provide new insights into cellular, molecular and functional processes, preparing them for a PhD or a career in industry.

Degree information

Imaging is essential for diagnosis of disease and development of novel treatments. This programme focuses on translational medical imaging, and the development and use of preclinical imaging technologies to detect, monitor and prevent illnesses such as cancer, heart diseases and neurodegeneration. Students will undertake an independent research-based project in UCL’s world-class laboratories and develop their communication skills in biomedical science.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (120 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time) is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Advanced Biomedical Imaging Techniques I & II
-Practical Preclinical Research (including Home Office Personal Licence)
-Translational Biomedical Imaging of Disease and Therapy I & II
-Science Communication for Biomedicine
-Statistical Methods in Research
-Ethics and Regulation of Research

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words or a manuscript suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, laboratory work, site visits and practicals. Assessment is through examination, presentations, essays, practical reports and the dissertation.

Careers

UCL is involved in the dynamic and successful London-based entrepreneurial activity in biomedical imaging. It has a strong track record in placing postgraduates in key positions within industry (e.g. Siemens, Philips, GE Healthcare, GSK, SMEs and start-ups) and at other leading academic institutions with preclinical imaging facilities, including the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge in the UK, and MIT and NIH in the US. This MSc will provide ideal training for students who wish to apply to UCL’s EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Medical Imaging.

Employability
This programme belongs to the School of Life and Medical Sciences; one of the largest and most prestigious aggregations of academics in its field, with a global reputation for teaching informed by cutting-edge research. Our close links with major hospitals and industry allow students to perform significant research projects.

Students will foster an awareness of the commercial opportunities and diverse funding mechanisms for the development of new ideas, technologies and applications using imaging. Our learning methods will prepare students for careers in academic or industrial science, as well as providing transferable skills in presentation, writing, organisation and team work.

The first cohort of students on the Advanced Biomedical Imaging MSc are due to graduate in 2016, therefore no information on graduate destinations is currently available.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a world-class environment in medical imaging and hosts several medical and biomedical imaging centres of excellence.

The UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging is one of the world’s most advanced imaging centres, with 11 state-of-the-art imaging technologies, and is dedicated to developing imaging techniques of the future. Biomedical imaging is an interdisciplinary field drawing together biology, medicine, physics, engineering, and art.

The MSc is linked to University College London Hospitals (UCLH), including Great Ormond Street Hospital, the UCH Macmillan Cancer Centre and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. This will provide an ideal training for further research and applications for a PhD at UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Medical Imaging.

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This exciting, two year MSc programme is concerned with a wide range of biomedical imaging and sensing science and technology. Biomedical Imaging and Sensing is, in a broad sense, a set of competencies from engineering and sciences to support future quantitative biology and personalised medicine. Read more
This exciting, two year MSc programme is concerned with a wide range of biomedical imaging and sensing science and technology. Biomedical Imaging and Sensing is, in a broad sense, a set of competencies from engineering and sciences to support future quantitative biology and personalised medicine.

It will provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge to develop methods and systems for disease understanding, diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics where imaging and sensing play a key role.

Core modules

Interdisciplinary Seminars in Biomedical Imaging and Sensing
Mathematics of Imaging Sciences
Scientific Software Development for Biomedical Imaging

Departmental optional modules

Advanced Signal Processing
Computer Vision, Biomedical Signals and Systems
Physiological Signals and Sensing; Physics of Light Microscopy of Cells and Tissues
Physics of Medical Imaging with Ionising Radiation
Physical Principles of Imaging: Radiation-Matter Interaction
Medical Image Computing
Biomaging with Light and Sound
Microscopy Image Analysis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

Interdisciplinary optional modules

The programme allows you to explore some elective modules from interdisciplinary domains that relate to anatomy, physiology, cell biology, physics of the senses, and vision and neurosciences, among others.

Teaching and assessment

Research-led teaching from our department, and various interdisciplinary modules from other departments from the Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Dentistry.

Individual support for your research project and dissertation.

Assessment is by examination, a project, and coursework in the first year with future examinations and dissertation in your second year.

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1-year fully funded studentships still available (for EU students only). Read more
1-year fully funded studentships still available (for EU students only)

MRes in Experimental Physiology and Drug Discovery (Bio-Imaging) is a unique 12 month full-time multi-disciplinary course which aims to give all participants an introduction to the different aspects of biomedical imaging (including hardware and probe development, in vivo and in vitro experimental application, software development and data analysis). In addition, participants will be given training in comparative anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of laboratory animals, they will also obtain a Home Office Personal licence and hands-on experience of a range of in-vivo techniques used in research.


Students will follow already taught courses in Biomedical Imaging, and Experimental Physiology and Drug Discovery. Students will also be taught transferrable skills subjects, such as safety awareness, intellectual property management, time and project management and presentation and communication skills. In addition, students will undertake an individual research project throughout the course and submit a research thesis.


Aims and Objectives

Provide science graduates with:

- an introduction to the different aspects of biomedical imaging
- the ability to perform biomedical imaging, such as probe development or the experimental applicatoin of imaging in vivo
- intensive hands-on in vivo functional biology research training
- the ability to perform the physiological and pharmacological studies in drug development


Content and Structure

Part A: Bio-imaging, animal handling, Home Office training course, comparative anatomy and physiology and drug discovery.

Part B: Six practical modules focused on in vivo research skills (problem solving, e-learning, journal club and lectures).

Part C: 21 week in vivo research project

Career opportunities

The course will provide students with an insight into the principles of drug discovery and translational medical science. Importantly, those students wanting to undertake a PhD in in-vivo science will have gained a Home Office personal licence and be confident in animal handling and techniques. The students will thus be well equipped to make rapid progress in research. Furthermore, having learnt about biomedical imaging from development to application, they will also be better equipped to develop a fully integrative approach to their research problem. The multidisciplinary nature of the course will give students the ability to appreciate the importance of translating the results of scientific and cliical discoveries into potential benefits to healthcare.

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Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course. This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. Read more
Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course.

Who is it for?

This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. It is open to science and engineering graduates and those working within hospitals or related industry who want to work in healthcare organisations, in the medical devices industry, or in biomedical engineering research.

The course will suit recent graduates and/or clinical engineers with a technical background or those working in healthcare who want to move into a management position.

Objectives

With several medical conditions requiring extensive and continuous monitoring and early and accurate diagnosis becoming increasingly desirable, technology for biomedical applications is rapidly becoming one of the key ingredients of today and tomorrow’s medical care.

From miniaturised home diagnostic instruments to therapeutic devices and to large scale hospital imaging and monitoring systems, healthcare is becoming increasingly dependent on technology. This course meets the growing need for biomedical and clinical engineers across the world by focusing on the design of medical devices from conception to application.

One of the few accredited courses of its kind in London, the programme concentrates on the use of biomedical-driven engineering design and technology in healthcare settings so you can approach this multidisciplinary topic from the biological and medical perspective; the technological design and development perspective; and from the perspective of managing the organisation and maintenance of large scale equipment and IT systems in a hospital.

This MSc in Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course has been created in consultation and close collaboration with clinicians, biomedical engineering researchers and medical technology industrial partners. The programme fosters close links with the NHS and internationally-renowned hospitals including St. Bartholomew's (Barts) and the Royal London Hospital and Great Ormond street so that you can gain a comprehensive insight into the applied use and the management of medical technology and apply your knowledge in real-world clinical settings.

Placements

In the last few years there have been some limited opportunities for our top students to carry out their projects through placements within hospital-based healthcare technology groups or specialist London-based biomedical technology companies. Placement-based projects are also offered to selected students in City’s leading Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE). As we continue our cutting-edge research and industrial and clinical collaborations, you will also have this opportunity.

Academic facilities

As a student on this course you will have the opportunity to work with cutting-edge test and measurement instrumentation – oscilloscopes, function generators, analysers – as well as specialist signal generators and analysers. The equipment is predominantly provided by the world-leading test and measurement equipment manufacturer Keysight, who have partnered with City to provide branding to our electronics laboratories. You also have access to brand new teaching labs and a dedicated postgraduate teaching lab. And as part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught through face-to-face lectures in small groups, where there is a lot of interaction and feedback. Laboratory sessions run alongside the lectures, giving you the opportunity to develop your problem-solving and design skills. You also learn software skills in certain modules, which are taught inside computer labs. We also arrange hospital visits so you gain hands-on experience of different clinical environments.

We arrange tutorials for setting coursework, highlight important subject areas, conduct practical demonstrations, and offer support with revision. You are assessed by written examinations at the end of each term, and coursework assignments, which are set at various times throughout the term.

You also work towards an individual project, which is assessed in the form of a written thesis and an oral examination at the end of the summer. The project can be based on any area of biomedical engineering, telemedicine or technology management and will be supervised by an academic or clinical scientist with expertise in the subject area. Many projects are based in hospital clinical engineering departments, or if you are a part-time student, you can base the project on your own workplace. You will have regular contact with the supervisor to make sure the project progresses satisfactorily. Some of the programme’s current students are working on a project focusing on devices that use brain signals to move external objects such as a remote control car and a prosthetic arm.

Some of the previous projects students have worked on include:
-A cursor controller based on electrooculography (EOG)
-Modelling a closed-loop automated anaesthesia system
-Design of a movement artefact-resistant wearable heart rate/activity monitor
-Review of progress towards a fully autonomous artificial mechanical heart
-Design of smartphone-based healthcare diagnostic devices and sensors.

If you successfully complete eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. Completing four modules (60 credits) will lead to a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

Along with the 60 credit dissertation eight core modules cover diverse subject areas including biomedical electronics and instrumentation, technology infrastructure management, as well as the latest advances in medical imaging and patient monitoring.

The course includes a special module which gives you an introduction to anatomy, physiology and pathology designed for non-clinical science graduates.

The most innovative areas of biomedical and clinical engineering are covered and the content draws from our research expertise in biomedical sensors, bio-optics, medical imaging, signal processing and modelling. You will learn from academic lecturers as well as clinical scientists drawn from our collaborating institutions and departments, which include:
-Charing Cross Hospital, London
-The Royal London Hospital
-St Bartholomew's Hospital, London
-Basildon Hospital
-Department of Radiography, School of Community and Health Sciences, City, University of London

Modules
-Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology (15 credits)
-Physiological Measurement (15 credits)
-Biomedical Instrumentation (15 credits)
-Medical Electronics (15 credits)
-Cardiovascular Diagnostics and Therapy (15 credits)
-Medical Imaging Modalities (15 credits)
-Clinical Engineering Practice (15 credits)
-Healthcare Technology Management (15 credits)

Career prospects

This exciting MSc programme offers a well-rounded background and specialised knowledge for those seeking a professional career as biomedical engineers in medical technology companies or research groups but is also uniquely placed for offering skills to clinical engineers in the NHS and international healthcare organisations.

Alumnus Alex Serdaris is now working as field clinical engineer for E&E Medical and alumna Despoina Sklia is working as a technical support specialist at Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. Other Alumni are carrying out research in City’s Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE).

Applicants may wish to apply for vacancies in the NHS, private sector or international healthcare organisations. Students are encouraged to become members of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) where they will be put in touch with the Clinical Engineering community and any opportunities that arise around the UK during their studies. Application to the Clinical Scientist training programme is encouraged and fully supported.

The Careers, Student Development & Outreach team provides a professional, high quality careers and information service for students and recent graduates of City, University of London, in collaboration with employers and other institutional academic and service departments. The course also prepares graduates who plan to work in biomedical engineering research and work within an academic setting.

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Medical imaging is a rapidly developing field of growing importance both in patient management and clinical decision making and in drug development and evaluation. Read more
Medical imaging is a rapidly developing field of growing importance both in patient management and clinical decision making and in drug development and evaluation. Dramatic developments in imaging both anatomy and molecular processes, especially using Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Research and development in the field is highly multi-disciplinary with key roles played by computing scientists and mathematicians, chemists, pharmacists, physicists, biologists, and of course clinicians. The Division of Imaging Sciences & Biomedical Engineering hosts a multidisciplinary team of academics directing a wide range of cutting-edge research projects, with an emphasis on translation “from bench to bedside”.

Key benefits

- Access to state of the art preclinical and clinical imaging facilities

- Clinically applied modules

- Two 4 month research projects within the Imaging Sciences’ Wellcome/EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre or CRUK/EPSRC Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre

- Research facilities based within a hospital environment enabling basic imaging science to be translated quickly into the clinic

- May constitute first year of a 4-year PhD

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-imaging-sciences-mres.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Medical Imaging Sciences aims to provide graduates of chemistry, physics, computing, mathematics, biology, pharmacy or medicine, with advanced training in the imaging field. Intended mainly as preparation for a PhD, but also serves as training for employment in hospitals and industry. Key components are two research projects, which may be linked around different aspects of a single research area in medical imaging.

- Course purpose -

Medical imaging is a rapidly expanding field that needs input from team members with knowledge and skills in these different areas (chemistry, physics, computing, mathematics, biology, pharmacy, medicine) to achieve its promise in improving patient care. The aim of this MRes programme is to provide students who have graduated in any of these subject areas with advanced training to prepare them to apply their specialist graduate skills in the imaging field. The programme is intended mainly as a preparation for a PhD in the field, at King's or elsewhere, but it also serves as training for employment in hospitals and industry.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught modules are presented in a variety of formats, including lectures, workshops, laboratory practicals, site visits etc. Assessment is based on coursework and examination.

Both research projects are carried out under the supervision of academics within the Division’s five departments (Biomedical Engineering; Cancer Imaging; Cardiovascular Imaging; Imaging Chemistry and Biology and Perinatal Imaging and Health). Some research projects may take place in a collaborating laboratory elsewhere in King's or at a collaborating institution.

Career prospects

Expected destinations are study for PhD, employment (research or service) in the NHS and commercial nuclear medicine services, the pharmaceutical or medical engineering industry.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Masters in Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary programme that will equip you for employment within the biomedical engineering sector. Read more
The Masters in Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary programme that will equip you for employment within the biomedical engineering sector. This programme addresses all the key aspects of biomedical engineering.

Why this programme

◾The University of Glasgow’s School of Engineering has been delivering engineering education and research for more than 150 years and is the oldest School of Engineering in the UK.
◾Biomedical Engineering is the newest division of the School, bringing together our long standing expertise. Research covers four themes, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Bionanotechnology, Rehabilitation Engineering, Biosensors and Diagnostics.
◾The course is based on in-depth modules and individual projects, which are designed to give graduates an opportunity to specialise in specific areas of Biomedical Engineering or to cover a more general Biomedical Engineering syllabus.
◾This taught MSc/PG Dip offers a wide exposure to the philosophy and practice of Biomedical Engineering whilst simultaneously enabling the students to deepen their knowledge of specific areas of biomedical engineering disciplines, which have been chosen on the basis of the research strengths of the Discipline. The choice includes Biomaterials and Biomechanics including their application in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Rehabilitation Engineering includes applied within Glasgow hospital and bioelectronics and diagnostic systems, designed to be applied from advanced hospitals to out-in-the-field situations.
◾The compulsory part provides the basic underlying knowledge need throughout biomedical engineering these core courses are taken in both semesters to allow a wide range of optional subjects to be available.
◾You will broaden and/or deepen your knowledge of biomedical engineering disciplines.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Biomedical Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, team work and study trips in the UK. You will undertake an MSc project working on a specific research area with one of the academics.

Core courses
◾Applications of biomedical engineering
◾Biological fluid mechanics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Energy in biological systems
◾Medical imaging
◾Statistics for biomedical engineering
◾MSc project.

Optional courses
◾Advanced imaging and therapy
◾Applied engineering mechanics
◾Bioinformatics and systems biology
◾Biomechanics
◾Biosensors and diagnostics
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nanofabrication
◾Rehabilitation engineering
◾Scaffolds and tissues
◾Signal processing of bio-signatures
◾Tissue and cell engineering.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits.
◾The project will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Biomedical Engineering. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.

Example projects
Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

[[Accreditation ]]
The MSc Biomedical Engineering is accredited in the “Further Learning” category accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

This means that a student with an accredited BEng undergraduate degree can take the accredited "Further Learning" MSc to top-up their academic qualifications in order to meet the full academic requirements for conferral of the title of Chartered Engineer. This is an alternative route to the 5-year undergraduate MEng route.

Industry links and employability

◾The MSc in Biomedical Engineering has been developed for students with different backgrounds in engineering who wish to enter the field of Biomedical Engineering; and it is particularly suitable if you intend to work in Biomedical Engineering industries.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in a wide range of industries.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in rehabilitation engineering, biomaterials for reconstructive surgery, biosensors, device and implant design and development, and biosignal processing.

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This programme pathway is designed for students with an interest in the engineering aspects of technology that are applied in modern medicine. Read more
This programme pathway is designed for students with an interest in the engineering aspects of technology that are applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of bioengineering principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

Degree information

Students study in detail the engineering and physics principles that underpin modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical imaging and patient monitoring. The programme covers the engineering applications across the diagnosis and measurement of the human body and its physiology, as well as the electronic and computational skills needed to apply this theory in practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Imaging with Ionising Radiation
-Clinical Practice
-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Optics
-Medical Electronics and Control
-Professional Skills module

Optional modules
-Aspects of Biomedical Engineering
-Biomedical Engineering
-Computing in Medicine

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of physics and engineering in medicine which culminates in a written report of 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, practicals, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework, the dissertation and an oral examination.

Careers

Graduates from the Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging stream of the MSc programme have obtained employment with a wide range of employers in healthcare, industry and academia sectors.

Employability
Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the UCL Hospitals Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development, as well as new biomedical engineering facilities at the Royal Free Hospital and Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore.

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With constant developments across all disciplines, biomedical science is a fast-paced, ever-evolving field. Read more
With constant developments across all disciplines, biomedical science is a fast-paced, ever-evolving field. Looking for a programme that will help you deepen your theoretical knowledge, hone your clinical skills and broaden your professional experience? We give you a suite of award pathways that allow you to explore different research areas, develop your specialisms and focus your study into a practical clinical research project.

Key features

-Tap into the expertise of academic lecturers and tutors actively researching and developing new techniques in modern biomedical science. Our programme has a strong international reputation in translational research, with significant financial investment in laboratory infrastructure.
-Hone your skills and critical thinking, and grow your clinical experience.
-Work with high specification, regularly updated facilities serving post-genomics and proteomics, cell biology and imaging.
-Enrich your learning with teaching, expertise and insight from our NHS partners, plus members of Plymouth University School of Biomedical and Healthcare Sciences.
-Deepen your understanding with modules that explore modern practice, emerging techniques and the impact of new technologies on research methods.
-Benefit from a programme that’s reinforced by the research, facilities and expertise of the Centre for Biomedical Research and the Systems Biology Centre. Attend research events and work with leading scientists in a wide range of fields, including immunology, haematology and genomics.
-Focus your specific interests under the guidance of your personal project advisor and develop an individual final project within the Centre for Biomedical Research and the Systems Biology Centre.
-Gain the skills needed to study at masters level with specialist modules on research techniques and project development.

Choose from our modules to follow a path of study resulting in one of following MSc awards:
-Biomedical Science (Cellular Pathology)
-Biomedical Science (Clinical Biochemistry)
-Biomedical Science (Haematology and Transfusion)
-Biomedical Science (Immunology)
-Biomedical Science (Medical Genetics)
-Biomedical Science (Medical Microbiology)
-Begin your career with the confidence that the MSc Biomedical Science suite of awards are accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science.
-Take the course as a full-time intercalated degree programme for those wishing to interrupt their studies as a medical or dental student.

For more information about the part-time version of this course, view this web-page: https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/msc-biomedical-science-2

Course details

You’ll take five modules: three core modules, one diagnostic research applications module, plus one discipline-specific module to determine your final award. You'll design and execute a research project, supported by your project advisor. Other core modules include molecular biology (genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics) and project design and development, where you’ll also critically review scientific literature. Options for the diagnostic research applications include bioinformatics, contemporary applications of cell biology, and contemporary science of infection and immunity. Focussing in on the discipline that interests you the most for your final award, you can choose from a range of modules including: clinical immunology, clinical microbiology, haematology and transfusion, medical genomics and personalised medicine, molecular and cellular pathology and clinical biochemistry.

Core modules
-BIOM5005 Project Design and Development
-BIOM5001 Molecular Biology: Genomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics
-BIOM5006 Research Project

Optional modules
-BIOM5008 Clinical Microbiology
-BIOM5002 Contemporary Applications of Cell Biology
-BIOM5003 Contemporary Science of Infection and Immunity
-BIOM5014 Bioinformatics
-BIOM5007 Cellular Basis of Clinical Immunology
-BIOM5009 Haematology and Transfusion
-BIOM5010 Medical Genomics and Personalised Medicine
-BIOM5011 Molecular and Cellular Pathology
-BIOM5012 Clinical Biochemistry

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Biomedical Engineering is a field of engineering that relies on highly inter- and multi-disciplinary approaches to research and development, in order to address biological and medical problems. Read more
Biomedical Engineering is a field of engineering that relies on highly inter- and multi-disciplinary approaches to research and development, in order to address biological and medical problems. Specialists in this area are trained to face scientific and technological challenges that significantly differ from those related to more traditional branches of engineering. Nevertheless, at the same time Biomedical Engineering makes use of more traditional engineering methodologies and techniques, which are adapted and further developed to meet specifications of biomedical applications.

This MSc programme covers the following topics:
• Fundamentals of human physiology;
• Ethics and regulatory affairs in the biomedical field;
• Medical imaging modalities and digital signal processing, their uses and challenges;
• Analysis and design of instrumentation electronics present in a wide range of medical devices;
• Instrumentation and technologies used for clinical measurements;
• Design, analysis and evaluation of critical systems in the context of clinical monitoring, including safety;
• Origin of biological electricity, measurement of bioelectric signals, principles of bioelectric stimulation, and their applications. Applications are welcome from students with a background in Engineering or Physics.

The programme is a joint effort of the School of Engineering and Materials Science and the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. It has strong roots within the well-recognised expertise of academics from the two Schools that deliver the lectures, who have international standing in cutting-edge research on Imaging and Instrumentation. This fact ensures that the programme is delivered with the highest standards in the field. The students also benefit from access to state-of-the-art facilities and instrumentation while undertaking their research projects.The programme is designed with a careful balance of diversified learning components, such that, on completion of their studies, the postgraduates acquire extensive knowledge and skills that make them able to undertake careers in a wide range of professional ambits within the biomedical field, including health care services, industry and scientific research.

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The programme disseminates imaging knowledge, skills and understanding, in order to enable effective and efficient use of imaging, clinically, in research and in industry. Read more

Programme description

The programme disseminates imaging knowledge, skills and understanding, in order to enable effective and efficient use of imaging, clinically, in research and in industry.

Our flexible, intermittent, part-time, online distance learning (OLDL) programme aims to:
•provide an understanding of imaging theory, techniques, analysis and applications
•develop research planning and designing skills, incorporating imaging
•enable interpretation and analysis of relevant imaging data
•relate imaging research to clinical applications

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

You may choose to study to Certificate, Diploma or Masters level.

Year 1: Certificate
You will complete the compulsory courses:

Techniques & physics (core – 20 credits)
Practicalities & safety (core – 10 credits)

You will complete 30 credits from the following options:

Applications in disease research (optional – 10 credits)
Clinical applications (optional – 10 credits)
Digital image processing & analysis (optional – 20 credits)
Image interpretation & evaluation (optional – 20 credits)

Year 2: Diploma
You will complete the compulsory courses:

Statistics (core - 10 credits)
Study design (core - 10 credits)

You will complete 40 credits from the following options:

Biomechanics (optional - 10 credits)
Light microscopy (optional – 10 credits)
Preclinical imaging (optional - 10 credits)
Neuro-anatomy (optional – 10 credits)
Body anatomy (optional – 10 credits)
Translational imaging (optional – 10 credits)
Cardiovascular imaging (optional – 10 credits)
Oncologic imaging (optional – 10 credits), and


Year 3: Masters
You will complete practical work (a project) and assessed activities.

Postgraduate Professional Development

If you are looking for a shorter course option, we offer online credit-bearing courses which run for 11 weeks at a time. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development scheme. These credits will be recognised in their own right at postgraduate level, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc.

Career opportunities

Clinical graduates will exit the programme with improved clinical image management skills, and will also be better able to advise companies and businesses which develop tools and techniques for their specialties, where imaging is required. For pre-clinically focused students, an imaging skill set expands academic possibilities and is more likely to assist with translational techniques necessary to bridge the preclinical and clinical sciences.

The degree will also be attractive as a preliminary qualification before undertaking career training in hospital Medical Physics (for physicists and engineers), as well as a preliminary qualification before taking a PhD or research scientist post involving medical physics, medical imaging, biomechanics in academia or industry.

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/18/chemistry

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Research areas

- Applied Optics Group (AOG):

Optical sensors
This activity largely covers research into the fundamental properties of guided wave interferometers, and their application in fields ranging from monitoring bridge structures to diagnostic procedures in medicine.

Biomedical imaging/Optical coherence tomography (OCT)
OCT is a relatively new technique which can provide very high-resolution images of tissue, and which has a major application in imaging the human eye. We are investigating different time domain and spectral domain OCT configurations.

The Group is developing systems in collaboration with a variety of different national and international institutions to extend the OCT capabilities from systems dedicated to eye imaging to systems for endoscopy, imaging skin and tooth caries. Distinctively, the OCT systems developed at Kent can provide both transverse and longitudinal images from the tissue, along with a confocal image, useful in associating the easy to interpret en-face view with the more traditional OCT cross section views.

The Group also conducts research on coherence gated wavefront sensors and multiple path interferometry, that extend the hardware technology of OCT to imaging with reduced aberrations and to sensing applications of optical time domain reflectometry.

- Forensic Imaging Group (FIG):

The research of the forensic imaging team is primarily applied, focusing on mathematical and computational techniques and employing a wide variety of image processing and analysis methods for applications in modern forensic science. The Group has attracted approximately £850,000 of research funding in the last five years, from several academic, industrial and commercial organisations in the UK and the US. The Group also collaborates closely with the Forensic Psychology Group of the Open University.

Current active research projects include:

- the development of high-quality, fast facial composite systems based on evolutionary algorithms and statistical models of human facial appearance

- interactive, evolutionary search methods and evolutionary design

- statistically rigorous ageing of photo-quality images of the human face (for tracing and identifying missing persons)

- real and pseudo 3D models for modelling and analysis of the human face

- generating ‘mathematically fair’ virtual line-ups for suspect identification.

- Functional Materials Group (FMG):
The research in FMG is concerned with synthesis and characterisation of functional materials, as exemplified by materials with useful optical, catalytic, or electronic properties, and with an
emerging theme in biomaterials. The Group also uses computer modelling studies to augment
experimental work. The research covers the following main areas:

- Amorphous and nanostructured solids
- Soft functional material
- Theory and modelling of materials

- Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science (CAPS):
The group’s research focuses on observational and modelling programmes in star formation, planetary science and early solar system bodies, galactic astronomy and astrobiology. We gain data from the largest telescopes in the world and in space, such as ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the New Technology Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. We also use our in-house facilities which include a two-stage light gas gun for impact studies.

Staff are involved in a wide range of international collaborative research projects. Areas of particular interest include: star formation, extragalactic astronomy, solar system science and instrumentation development.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (individual course pages). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)
Plus: Dissertation (60 credit)

Optional Modules

60 credit to be selected from the following optional modules:
Design of Mechatronic Systems (15 credit)
Biomedical Imaging (15 credit)
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credit)
Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications (15 credit)
Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control (30 credit)

Module Descriptions

Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control

Main topics:

Sensors and instrumentation – Sensor characteristics and the principles of sensing; electronic interfacing with sensors; sensor technologies – physical, chemical and biosensors; sensor examples – position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, strain, pressure, temperature; distributed sensor networks; instrumentation for imaging, spectroscopy and ionising radiation detection; 'lab-on-a-chip'.

Control – Control theory and matrix/vector operations; state-space systems, multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, nonlinear systems and linearization. Recurrence relations, discrete time state-space representation, controllability and observability, pole-placement for both continuous and discrete time systems, Luenberger observer. Optimal control systems, Stochastic systems: random variable theory; recursive estimation; introduction to Kalman filtering (KF); brief look at KF for non-linear systems and new results in KF theory.

Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications

Main topics include: audiology and cochlear implants; prostheses; artificial limbs and rehabilitation engineering; life support systems; robotic surgical assistance; telemedicine; nanotechnology.

Biofluid Mechanics

Main topics include: review of the cardiovascular system; the cardiac cycle and cardiac performance, models of the cardiac system, respiratory system and respiratory performance, lung models, physiological effects of exercise, trauma and disease; blood structure and composition, blood gases. oxygenation, effect of implants and prostheses, blood damage and repair, viscometry of blood, measurement of blood pressure and flow; urinary system: anatomy and physiology, fluid and waste transfer mechanisms, urinary performance and control, effects of trauma, ageing and disease; modelling of biofluid systems, review of mass, momentum and energy transfers related to biological flow systems, fluid mechanics in selected topics relating to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; measurements in biomedical flows.

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Biomedical Imaging

Principle and applications of medical image processing – Basic image processing operations, Advanced edge-detection techniques and image segmentation, Flexible shape extraction, Image restoration, 3D image reconstruction, image guided surgery

Introduction of modern medical imaging techniques – Computerized tomography imaging (principle, image reconstruction with nondiffracting sources, artifacts, clinical applications)

Magnetic resonance imaging (principle, image contrast and measurement of MR related phenomena, examples of contrast changes with changes of instrumental parameters and medical applications)

Ultrasound imaging (description of ultrasound radiation, transducers, basic imaging techniques: A-scan, B-scan and Doppler technique; clinical application)

Positron emission tomography (PET imaging) (principle, radioactive substance, major clinical applications)

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Design of Mechatronic Systems

Microcontroller technologies. Data acquisition. Interfacing to power devices. Sensors (Infrared, Ultrasonic, etc.). Optoelectronic devices and signal conditioning circuits. Pulse and timing-control circuits. Drive circuits. Electrical motor types: Stepper, Servo. Electronic Circuits. Power devices. Power conversion and power electronics. Line filters and protective devices. Industrial applications of digital devices.

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. Read more
Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. In Neuroscience it is being increasingly used to study the physiological correlates of mental processes. In Clinical practice it plays a prominent role in the detection and diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in the evaluation of new treatments. The techniques are getting increasingly sophisticated and as a result there is a high demand for well-trained professionals.

Our Neuroimaging MSc is one of only a few programmes dealing with modern neuroimaging in the UK. It is exceptional in its focus on practical and biomedical aspects of Neuroimaging. The success of the program is reflected in the success of our students with 60% either in further higher education, or fully employed in the first year after degree completion. This figure rises to 100% within 3 years of the degree.

The Neuroimaging MSc is designed to provide students with the background knowledge and technical skills to design, analyze and evaluate imaging data. The Neuroimaging MSc focuses on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based techniques, including functional MRI, anatomical imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, and Spectroscopy. Imaging techniques will be discussed with reference to relevant applications. The programme puts a strong emphasis on practical skills. In a dedicated computer lab, the students will learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Under supervision of our world-class academic staff, students will design their own imaging based studies, which will be run using the in-house 3T MRI scanner. Additional classes will provide students with a broad scope of professional skills.

The Neuroimaging MSc is especially suited for:
students interested in pursuing an Academic career in the field of Neuroimaging;
students looking to find a job as research staff in industry or academic labs involved in translational research;
medical professional, looking to develop skills in a new emergent technology and research field;
students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science who want to move into cognitive or clinical neuroscience;
students with a background in psychology or biology who want to improve your technical skills for a neuroscience career.

Content
The core of the Neuroimaging MSc consists of two modules on Neuroimaging. The first module concentrates on methodological aspects. It includes an introduction to the physics of MR imaging, the physiological basis of functional signals, processing and analysis of imaging data and the design of research studies. The second module provides an in-depth introduction to a number of specialized imaging techniques used to understand the biology of brain function in health and disease. The latter module aims to illustrate the use of imaging in the context of translational and clinical studies of disease processes affecting the human brain.

Both modules combine formal lectures, and computer-based laboratories, in which students learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Weekly practical labs and programming classes are held in a dedicated computer laboratory available to all students. The work done in the lab sections constitute 50% of the grade in first module, and 30% of the grade in the second module. The latter also includes student-led discussion of published scientific and clinical research.

In the weekly Bangor Imaging Group (BIG) meeting, academic staffs, postdocs and students discuss current research. All MSc and PhD students propose their research here.

Additional optional modules provide an in-depth view of several content areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience (see below). Students are also welcome to attend weekly review of clinical scans performed at the local hospital for the purpose of patient recruitment and a monthly neuroradiology conference where cases of clinical interest are discussed. Journal-clubs and research meetings concerning fMRI, EEG, and TMS methodologies are open to all students.

Students are also required to take at least one additional module in advanced statistics or advanced computing. The module Communicating Research completes the curriculum by training students in a broad scope of professional skills.

The Bangor Imaging Unit houses a state-of-the-art 3T MRI machine, available for student projects. Setups for the measurement of eye-movement, arm and hand movement, and physiological parameters are also available.

In the beginning of the year you will choose your academic supervisor. The supervisor will be responsible for helping you plan, design and draft your research thesis. From your project proposal you will review the relevant literature, and formally outline your study. In the weekly Bangor-Imaging Group meeting we learn about and discuss proposed, ongoing and completed studies and important new publications in the field. Moreover, all MSc and PhD students present their proposed plan of research in this forum. Thus, you are tightly integrated into the research environment at the Bangor Imaging Unit, and profit from interactions with older PhD students, post-docs, and other supervisors. Your final research project is conducted over the summer months, most likely using the in-house, research-dedicated 3T MRI scanner. The course ends with the successful submission of your research thesis.

Structure
The Neuroimaging MSc consists of two parts. Part one comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take the two core modules in Neuroimaging, which include a large component of laboratory work. You will also choose two 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of neuroscience. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to hone your research skills. In addition, you will partner with one of the academic faculty in order to jointly develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester), when you will carry out your research study and write your thesis.

Research Thesis
The thesis is the 'crown' of the Neuroimaging MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.
Career Prospects

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Degree. Master of Science (two years) with a major in Biomedical Engineering. Teaching language. English. Read more
Degree: Master of Science (two years) with a major in Biomedical Engineering
Teaching language: English

Biomedical Engineering encompasses fundamental concepts in engineering, biology and medicine to develop innovative approaches and new devices, materials, implants, algorithms, processes and systems for the medical industry. These could be used for the assessment and evaluation of technology; for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases; for patient care and rehabilitation and for improving medical practice and health care delivery.

The first year of the Biomedical Engineering programme is focused on mandatory courses expanding students’ engineering skills and knowledge in areas like anatomy and physiology but also biology and biochemistry. Courses in mathematics, statistics, multidimensional biomedical signal generation and analysis, combined with medical informatics and biomedical modelling and simulation, create a solid foundation for the continuation of the programme.

In the second year, three areas of specialisation, medical informatics, medical imaging and bioengineering, are introduced. Coinciding with the specialisation, a course in philosophy of science is mandatory, preparing and supporting the onset of the degree project.
A graduate of the Biomedical Engineering programme should be able to:

• formulate and solve engineering problems in the biomedical domain, encompassing the design of devices, algorithms, systems, and processes to improve human health and integrating a thorough understanding of the life sciences.
• use, propose and evaluate engineering tools and approaches.
• identify and manage the particular problems related to the acquisition, processing and interpretation of biomedical signals and images.
• integrate engineering and life science knowledge, using modelling and simulation techniques.
• communicate engineering problems in the life science domain.

The Biomedical Engineering curriculum supports and sustains "Engineering for Health" through a relevant mixture of mandatory and elective courses. This enables both broad-based and in-depth studies, which emphasises the importance of multidisciplinary and collaborative approaches to real-world engineering problems in biology and medicine.

Welcome to the Institute of Technology at Linköping University

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As a biomedical engineer you develop new methods for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Commonly, you work in multidisciplinary teams with medical doctors, engineers, biologists and biochemists. Read more
As a biomedical engineer you develop new methods for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Commonly, you work in multidisciplinary teams with medical doctors, engineers, biologists and biochemists.

Current-day medical practice relies increasingly on technology. You can think of microelectronics, information technology, and mechanical and material engineering. As a biomedical engineer you develop new methods; from ever more advanced imaging instruments to scaffolds for tissue engineering; and from modelling software to new surgical appliances.

If you are interested in health care and technology, the Master's programme Biomedical Engineering offers you the opportunity to gain in-depth information on a broad-range of topics. You will study topics in the fields of imaging techniques, physiological control engineering, rehabilitation engineering, implant engineering, cell and tissue engineering and infection prevention, as well as aspects of medical ethics and law. You also become well-versed in medical and biological basic knowledge.

In addition, the University of Groningen offers you state-of-the-art medical facilities and a unique professional cooperation with the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG).

We also offer an Erasmus Mundus programme in Biomedical Engineering: A joint project between four European universities. Students will start the programme at one of these universities and will spend at least one semester at a partner university.

Why in Groningen?

- State-of-the-art medical facilities
- Unique cooperation with the University Medical Center Groningen

Job perspectives

When you have completed the Master Biomedical Engineering, there a numerous employment possibilities in both research and management-oriented jobs. The multidisciplinary nature of Biomedical Engineering adds significantly to employment possibilities in both research and management-oriented jobs in:
- Industry
- Research agencies
- Hospitals
- Universities
- Government organizations dealing with health-related products and services

Biomedical engineers may contribute to research, to engineering design and product development, or to business aspects of engineering and technical management. They are also experts who may advise on the development of long-term strategies and policies in the field of medical life sciences.

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