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Masters Degrees (Biology Of Disease)

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EXPLORE THE INTERSECTION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL RESEARCH. The. Biology of Disease . programme is an interdisciplinary programme that positions you at the cutting edge of basic and clinical science, in particular in the cardiovascular research field. Read more

EXPLORE THE INTERSECTION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL RESEARCH

The Biology of Disease programme is an interdisciplinary programme that positions you at the cutting edge of basic and clinical science, in particular in the cardiovascular research field. In this programme, you study disease mechanisms in the broadest sense, and learn to conduct (cardiovascular) disease-related translational research in cooperation with clinical and pre-clinical staff.

Cardiovascular diseases are the primary focus in this programme. For this, the Cardiovascular Track has been designed. In addition, this Master’s programme offers you the opportunity to focus on more than one clinical speciality , enabling you to conduct research projects on different subjects and diseases while gaining experience in multiple labs. On completing the Biology of Disease programme, you are able to use advanced research techniques and function as an independent researcher in the cardiovascular field, or in your chosen specialty.

In the Biology of Disease programme you learn to translate a (cardiovascular) disease into a scientifically sound experiment or model or the other way around. Hereby, you study the underlying mechanism of the disease to expand the knowledge concerning the disease or to build bridges towards therapeutic leads. Research questions may relate to all organisational levels of the body.

WHY STUDY BIOLOGY OF DISEASE AT UTRECHT UNIVERSITY?

Compared to other Master’s programmes in (cardiovascular) disease mechanisms in the Netherlands, our programme in Utrecht:

  • Allows you to become an expert in the cardiovascular research field.
  • Gives you the opportunity to compose a personalised programme of multiple clinical specialties within disease biology.
  • Offers you the opportunity to carry out two hands-on research projects at renowned research groups and encourages you to do your minor research project abroad to gain additional skills and an international perspective on your chosen specialisation.
  • Has a solid mentoring system: you discuss your study progress with the Programme Coordinator and you work under the supervision of a PhD student or post-doc from amongst our enthusiastic and international staff.

CAREER IN BIOLOGY OF DISEASE

Biology of Disease graduates often work in a clinical/hospital research environment, where questions from the clinic are being translated into model systems to study the underlying cellular or molecular cause of the disease. Communication with doctors or veterinarians is therefore of great importance. Most Biology of Disease graduates find jobs as PhD's in clinical labs, as product managers, or in the R&D department of industries. Others have found a position in the communication and education field, as policy advisor, science journalism, or staff member at HVTO (the national expert organisation Girls/women and Science/Technology).



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We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments. Read more

We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments.

As a student you will be registered with a University research institute, for many this is the Institute for Cellular Medicine (ICM). You will be supported in your studies through a structured programme of supervision and training via our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

We undertake the following areas of research and offer MPhil, PhD and MD supervision in:

Applied immunobiology (including organ and haematogenous stem cell transplantation)

Newcastle hosts one of the most comprehensive organ transplant programmes in the world. This clinical expertise has developed in parallel with the applied immunobiology and transplantation research group. We are investigating aspects of the immunology of autoimmune diseases and cancer therapy, in addition to transplant rejection. We have themes to understand the interplay of the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by a variety of pathways, and how these can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. Further research theme focusses on primary immunodeficiency diseases.

Dermatology

There is strong emphasis on the integration of clinical investigation with basic science. Our research include:

  • cell signalling in normal and diseased skin including mechanotransduction and response to ultraviolet radiation
  • dermatopharmacology including mechanisms of psoriatic plaque resolution in response to therapy
  • stem cell biology and gene therapy
  • regulation of apoptosis/autophagy
  • non-melanoma skin cancer/melanoma biology and therapy.

We also research the effects of UVR on the skin including mitochondrial DNA damage as a UV biomarker.

Diabetes

This area emphasises on translational research, linking clinical- and laboratory-based science. Key research include:

  • mechanisms of insulin action and glucose homeostasis
  • insulin secretion and pancreatic beta-cell function
  • diabetic complications
  • stem cell therapies
  • genetics and epidemiology of diabetes.

Diagnostic and therapeutic technologies

Focus is on applied research and aims to underpin future clinical applications. Technology-oriented and demand-driven research is conducted which relates directly to health priority areas such as:

  • bacterial infection
  • chronic liver failure
  • cardiovascular and degenerative diseases.

This research is sustained through extensive internal and external collaborations with leading UK and European academic and industrial groups, and has the ultimate goal of deploying next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic systems in the hospital and health-care environment.

Kidney disease

There is a number of research programmes into the genetics, immunology and physiology of kidney disease and kidney transplantation. We maintain close links between basic scientists and clinicians with many translational programmes of work, from the laboratory to first-in-man and phase III clinical trials. Specific areas:

  • haemolytic uraemic syndrome
  • renal inflammation and fibrosis
  • the immunology of transplant rejection
  • tubular disease
  • cystic kidney disease.

The liver

We have particular interests in:

  • primary biliary cirrhosis (epidemiology, immunobiology and genetics)
  • alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • fibrosis
  • the genetics of other autoimmune and viral liver diseases

Magnetic Resonance (MR), spectroscopy and imaging in clinical research

Novel non-invasive methodologies using magnetic resonance are developed and applied to clinical research. Our research falls into two categories:

  • MR physics projects involve development and testing of new MR techniques that make quantitative measurements of physiological properties using a safe, repeatable MR scan.
  • Clinical research projects involve the application of these novel biomarkers to investigation of human health and disease.

Our studies cover a broad range of topics (including diabetes, dementia, neuroscience, hepatology, cardiovascular, neuromuscular disease, metabolism, and respiratory research projects), but have a common theme of MR technical development and its application to clinical research.

Musculoskeletal disease (including auto-immune arthritis)

We focus on connective tissue diseases in three, overlapping research programmes. These programmes aim to understand:

  • what causes the destruction of joints (cell signalling, injury and repair)
  • how cells in the joints respond when tissue is lost (cellular interactions)
  • whether we can alter the immune system and ‘switch off’ auto-immune disease (targeted therapies and diagnostics)

This research theme links with other local, national and international centres of excellence and has close integration of basic and clinical researchers and hosts the only immunotherapy centre in the UK.

Pharmacogenomics (including complex disease genetics)

Genetic approaches to the individualisation of drug therapy, including anticoagulants and anti-cancer drugs, and in the genetics of diverse non-Mendelian diseases, from diabetes to periodontal disease, are a focus. A wide range of knowledge and experience in both genetics and clinical sciences is utilised, with access to high-throughput genotyping platforms.

Reproductive and vascular biology

Our scientists and clinicians use in situ cellular technologies and large-scale gene expression profiling to study the normal and pathophysiological remodelling of vascular and uteroplacental tissues. Novel approaches to cellular interactions have been developed using a unique human tissue resource. Our research themes include:

  • the regulation of trophoblast and uNk cells
  • transcriptional and post-translational features of uterine function
  • cardiac and vascular remodelling in pregnancy

We also have preclinical molecular biology projects in breast cancer research.

Respiratory disease

We conduct a broad range of research activities into acute and chronic lung diseases. As well as scientific studies into disease mechanisms, there is particular interest in translational medicine approaches to lung disease, studying human lung tissue and cells to explore potential for new treatments. Our current areas of research include:

  • acute lung injury - lung infections
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • fibrotic disease of the lung, both before and after lung transplantation.

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics

Our research projects are concerned with the harmful effects of chemicals, including prescribed drugs, and finding ways to prevent and minimise these effects. We are attempting to measure the effects of fairly small amounts of chemicals, to provide ways of giving early warning of the start of harmful effects. We also study the adverse side-effects of medicines, including how conditions such as liver disease and heart disease can develop in people taking medicines for completely different medical conditions. Our current interests include: environmental chemicals and organophosphate pesticides, warfarin, psychiatric drugs and anti-cancer drugs.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.



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This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology. Read more

This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology.

This grounding leads into the study of the complex mechanisms of host/microbe interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of specific animal diseases, and provides insights into diagnosis and interventions, such as vaccines, essential for disease control.

You will enhance your critical and analytical skills and gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of veterinary diseases, such that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Who is the programme for?

This is a full or part-time programme, intended mainly for graduates, those already working in veterinary diagnostic/research laboratories and staff from other laboratories who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease.

Pharmaceutical research personnel, policymakers, veterinarians, public health personnel and environmental biologists will also benefit.

Part-time and short course study

Most modules are offered as standalone short courses. The fee structure for short courses is different to that for registered students, and details may be obtained via admissions enquiries, please refer to the contact details on this page.

The option to study the MSc on a part-time basis is only available following successful completion of three modules as stand-alone/CPD. Please contact the for further information.

Programme partners

This Masters programme is delivered by a consortium comprising the University of Surrey and two world class veterinary microbiology institutions: the BBSRC funded Pirbright Institute (PI), and the Government sponsored Animal & Plant Health Agency (APHA).

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) and Public Health England (PHE) also contribute to the programme.

Visits

You will have the unique opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of important veterinary diseases within the world reference laboratories of the APHA and Pirbright Institute (PI).

There will also be an opportunity to visit Public Health England (PHE) to gain a detailed knowledge of how zoonotic diseases outbreaks are investigated, and to visit the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), a livestock abattoir and an intensive livestock farm.

Colleagues from the CEFAS laboratory will also contribute to the programme, and further research training will be provided during your practical research project.

Educational aims of the programme

This is a one year full-time programme aimed at preparing graduates to work in a range of fields in which a detailed understanding of veterinary microbiology is a valuable asset.

These fields include research, commerce, government and policy, reference laboratory and diagnostic work, epidemiology and disease mapping, veterinary science, farming especially animal production, wild and zoo animal conservation and education.

As such, it is intended that graduates will achieve the highest levels of professional understanding of veterinary microbiology within a range of contexts.

The programme combines the study of the theoretical foundations of, and scholarly approaches to, understanding the application and various practices of veterinary microbiology within the contexts described above along with the development of practical and research skills.

The main aims are to enable students to:

  • Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of veterinary microbiology
  • Develop the skills to perform relevant interpretation and evaluation of data
  • Apply those acquired skills in practice through research
  • To utilise acquired knowledge and evaluative skills to communicate successfully with stakeholders

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

The learning outcomes have been aligned with the descriptor for qualification at level 7 given in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) produced by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education.

Knowledge and understanding

Following completion of the programme, students should display knowledge of:

  • The main principles of current veterinary microbiology
  • The methods and approaches used for the molecular characterisation, and diagnosis of disease agents
  • The main principles of infectious diseases epidemiology
  • The analysis of disease and disease carriage that impact on the development and application of control measures to combat diseases
  • Modes of control of infectious diseases
  • Modes of transmission
  • The various aspects of host pathology and immune responses to disease agents
  • Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions

Intellectual/cognitive skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Critically appraise scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the various aspects of veterinary microbiology
  • Critically analyse experimental data to enable the formulation of hypotheses
  • Design relevant experiments to test formulated hypotheses
  • Efficiently analyse new developments in technology and critically assess their utilisation to answer existing and new problems

Professional practical skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Plan and execute an experiment/investigation, act autonomously and demonstrate originality
  • Analyse numerical data using appropriate computer tools including specialist computer packages
  • Communicate experiments at a project level, including report writing
  • Perform specific specialised experimental skills

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Understanding the molecular basis of disease. Read more

Understanding the molecular basis of disease

Aspiring to contribute to the development of new therapies for metabolic, infectious and immunological diseases or cancer? Radboud University's internationally acclaimed Research Master's programme in Molecular Mechanisms of Disease provides an excellent foundation for a career in academic or commercial research.

Only by dissecting the molecular mechanisms that trigger and advance diseases and dysfunctions can we design effective treatments and medicines. The Research Master's in Molecular Mechanisms of Disease (MMD) offers you an intensive two-year programme that provides you with in-depth knowledge and research experience of disease-related molecular mechanisms. In addition, you will acquire skills such as academic writing and presentation skills and learn how to successfully apply for grants and market yourself.

Passion for molecular biomedical research

As an MMD student you will be part of the unique research community that is found within the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (RIMLS). Like you, RIMLS researchers have a strong passion for research. They will assist you throughout the programme with guidance and expertise, supporting you in acquiring knowledge and developing excellent research skills. The RIMLS is one of the research institutes of the Radboud university medical center, so their research is closely linked to the clinic and thus aimed at translating results into treatments for patients. Examples include the translation of insights into the biology of antigen-presenting cells into new immunological cancer therapies and understanding the mutations underlying blindness into the development of gene therapies for patients with inherited blindness.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mmd

Why study Molecular Mechanisms of Disease at Radboud University?

- You will follow a broad biomedical programme that allows you to specialise in your specific field-of-interest.

- You will have intense daily contact with established researchers.

- You will participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small group of highly motivated national and international students.

- A personal mentor will help you to reflect on your study programme and career perspective.

- You will do two 6-months research internships one of which will be abroad.

- There is a 92% pass rate of MMD students within the two years.

- International MMD students can apply for scholarships from the Radboudumc Study Fund.

Career prospects

There is considerable demand for experts in the molecular biomedical sciences as well as in their application to the development of treatments for diseases such as cancer, autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, and metabolic diseases.

Graduates in MMD are equipped with cutting-edge knowledge of multidisciplinary research in the mechanisms of disease and in state-of-the-art diagnostic methods and technologies. During the programme, you will develop a highly critical, independent approach to problem-solving. You will also acquire the basic management skills needed to lead R&D projects in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.

Most of our graduates will enter an international PhD programme to continue with research in academia or industry.

PhD opportunities

The MSc Molecular Mechanisms of Disease aims to provide all skills and knowledge necessary to rapidly enter an international PhD programme. In the Netherlands and many places in Europe, it is impossible to start a PhD programme directly after obtaining a Bachelor's degree. This research Master’s programme seriously increases your chances for obtaining an excellent PhD training position by giving you a mature perspective and a broad range of experimental approaches. In fact, over 90% of our graduates has started a (funded) PhD project.

The Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (RIMLS) recruits about fifty PhD students a year. MMD graduates are excellent candidates for these positions. Furthermore, the Radboud university medical centre offers the opportunity for its research-oriented Master's students to write their own research project. The best candidates are awarded a fully funded four-year PhD studentship at the department of their choice.

Our approach to this field

The molecular regulation of cellular processes is crucial for human development, and maintenance of health throughout life. It's evident that cellular malfunction is the cause of common multi-factorial diseases such as diabetes, immune and inflammatory disorders, renal disease, cardiovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases as well as obesity and cancer.

The Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (RIMLS) Graduate School plays a key role in developing new therapies for the fight against such diseases. RIMLS aims to improve diagnostics and develop new treatments by generating basic knowledge in the molecular biomedical life sciences and translating it into clinical application and experimental research in patients.

The RIMLS – which is part of Radboud university medical center – offers an exclusive Master's programme in Molecular Mechanisms of Disease. Top researchers and clinicians teach the programme.

Key themes

The MMD programme is organised along three major educational themes which reflect the main research areas present in the RIMLS and which each include both a fundamental and a disease-related aspect:

- Theme 1 Infection, Immunity and Regenerative Medicine / Immunity-related Disorders and Immunotherapy

- Theme 2 Metabolism, Transport and Motion / Metabolic Disorders

- Theme 3 Cell Growth and Differentiation / Developmental Disorders and Malignancies

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mmd

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population. Read more
The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population.

The programme provides training in the modern practical, academic and research skills that are used in academia and industry. Through a combination of lectures, small-group seminars and practical classes, students will apply this training towards the development of new therapies.

The programme culminates with a research project that investigates the molecular and cellular basis of cancer biology or the development of new therapies under the supervision of active cancer research scientists.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/226/cancer-biology

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Each one-hour lecture is supplemented by two hours of small-group seminars and workshops in which individual themes are explored in-depth. There are practical classes and mini-projects in which you design, produce and characterise a therapeutic protein with applications in therapy.

In additional to traditional scientific laboratory reports, experience will be gained in a range of scientific writing styles relevant to future employment, such as literature reviews, patent applications, regulatory documents, and patient information suitable for a non-scientific readership.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)
BI837 - The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Cancer (15 credits)
BI838 - Genomic Stability and Cancer (15 credits)
BI840 - Cancer Therapeutics: From the Laboratory to the Clinic (15 credits)
BI857 - Cancer Research in Focus (15 credits)
BI845 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme features a combination of examinations and practically focused continuous assessment, which gives you experience within a range of professional activities, eg, report writing, patent applications and public health information. The assessments have been designed to promote employability in a range of professional settings.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide an excellent quality of postgraduate-level education in the field of cancer, its biology and its treatment

- provide a research-led, inspiring learning environment

- provide a regional postgraduate progression route for the advanced study of a disease that affects a high proportion of the population

- promote engagement with biological research into cancer and inspire you to pursue a scientific career inside or outside of the laboratory

- develop subject specific and transferable skills to maximise employment prospects

- promote an understanding of the impact of scientific research on society and the role for scientists in a range of professions.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/226

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This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. Read more
This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. It also provides a sound educational background so that you can go on to lead academic oral biology programmes within dental schools.

Why study Oral Biology at Dundee?

This course is specifically designed for individuals who wish to pursue career pathways in academic oral biology, with a focus, though not exclusively, on developing individuals who can deliver and, more importantly, lead oral biology courses within dental schools.

Oral Biology is a significant subject area that is integral to undergraduate and postgraduate dental training worldwide. The scope of Oral Biology includes a range of basic and applied sciences that underpin the practise of dentistry. These subjects include: oral and dental anatomy; craniofacial and dental development; oral physiology; oral neuroscience; oral microbiology. These subjects will be integrated with the relevant disease processes, for example, craniofacial anomalies, dental caries and tooth surface loss.

What's so good about studying Oral Biology at Dundee?

This programme focuses on the research and education experience of the staff in the Dental School in Dundee. Such expertise lies in the fields of craniofacial development and anomalies; pain and jaw muscle control; salivary physiology; cancer biology; microbiology; cariology and tooth surface loss.

In addition it makes use of the extensive resources available for postgraduate programmes: extensive histological collections; virtual microscopy; oral physiology facilities; cell biology and dental materials laboratories.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Oral Biology is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in academic oral biology. The course will be of particular interest for those wishing to establish themselves as oral biology teachers, innovators and course leaders within a dental school.

Teaching and Assessment

The Dental School is well placed to deliver such a course with an established staff of teaching and research active within oral biology, and its related fields, an in-house e-learning technologist and substantial links to the Centre for Medical Education in the School of Medicine. There will be an opportunity for students to exit with a PGCert in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 -4 or a Diploma in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 - 7.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered via a blend of methodologies including: face-to-face lectures / seminars / tutorials; on-line learning; directed and self- directed practical work; self-directed study; journal clubs.
What you will study

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August). Semester one (Modules 1 – 4) and Semester 2A, 2B (Modules 5 – 8) will provide participants with wide ranging, in-depth knowledge of oral biology, together with focused training in research (lab-base, dissertation or e- Learning) and its associated methodology. The MSc course is built largely on new modules (5) supported by 2 modules run conjointly with the Centre for Medical Education within the Medical School. All modules are compulsory:

Semester 1:

Module 1: Academic skills 1: principles of learning and teaching (15 credits)
Module 2: Cranio-facial development and anomalies (15 credits)
Module 3: Dental and periodontal tissues, development and structure (20 credits)
Module 4: Oral mucosa and disorders (10 credits)

Semesters 2A and 2B

Module 5a: Academic skills 2a: principles of assessment (15 credits)
Module 5b: Academic Skills 2b:educational skills
Module 6: Neuroscience (20 credits)
Module 7: Oral environment and endemic oral disease (20 credits)
Module 8: Project (60 credits)

The project is designed to encourage students to further develop their skills. This could take the form of a supervised laboratory research project, a literature based dissertation or an educational project. The educational project would be based around the development of an innovative learning resource utilising the experience of the dental school learning technologist.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Careers

The MSc Oral Biology is aimed at dental or science graduates who are either early in their careers or wish to establish themselves as oral biologists within dental schools. Oral Biology is a recognised discipline in many dental schools worldwide. Graduates will have gained sufficient knowledge and skills to enable them to be teachers, innovators and educational leaders in the field. In addition, successful graduates will be well placed to undertake further postgraduate study at PhD level. In some cases, this may possible within the existing research environments within the Dental School, the wider College of Medicine Dentistry and Nursing and the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification of the University of Dundee.

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IDOH (Infectious Diseases and One Health) is a partnership of some of Europe's leading research-intensive universities in the field of infectious diseases and the "one health" concept. Read more

IDOH (Infectious Diseases and One Health) is a partnership of some of Europe's leading research-intensive universities in the field of infectious diseases and the "one health" concept. The three founding partners are Université de Tours, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the University of Edinburgh.

Infectious diseases represent a major threat to public health. Fighting emerging, or re-emerging, infections requires that both animal and human health be treated as "One Health". This will enhance biomedical research discoveries, to the great benefit of both humans and animals.

The objective of the programme is to provide students from all over the world with education in One Health concepts, host pathogen interactions, immunology, zoonotic and emerging infections, translational animal models and management of infectious diseases.

This programme will allow students to study at three of Europe's leading research-intensive universities in the field of infectious diseases and complete an internships at one of the three academic partners or any of 35 associated partners (academic and industrial) located worldwide.

Programme structure

The programme will take place over two academic years and students will spend a semester at each of the three academic partners before completing a fourth semester as an internship either at one of the academic partners or one of the 35 associated partners (academic and industrial) located worldwide.

Year 1

Semester 1: Université de Tours

  • Introductory course in Immunology
  • Public Health
  • Immunology and Immunity of Mucosal Surfaces
  • Host Pathogen Interactions
  • Virulence and Resistance
  • Biodrugs, Bioinformatics and Development
  • French Language

Semester 2: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

  • One Health and Major and Endemic Zoonoses
  • One Health and Emergent Diseases in Special Situations
  • One Health in Food Safety and Security
  • Biosafety and Biosecurity
  • Spanish Language

Year 2

Semester 3: University of Edinburgh

  • Comparative Animal Models for Infectious Diseases and One Health
  • Laboratory Tools for Infectious Diseases and One Health
  • Analysis of Biological Data
  • Principles of Animal Welfare and Bioethics

Semester 4:

  • Internship leading to Dissertation in Infectious Diseases and One Health

Summer school

There is also a week long summer school between semesters 2 and 3 focused on generic transferable skills.

Learning outcomes

The programme will provide core competencies in skills identified as being required by industry and academia. Therefore, the purpose of this programme is to:

  • Provide students with a detailed knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases, immunology and modes of transmission.
  • Provide students with practical experience in a range of animal science techniques.
  • Develop an increased understanding and awareness of the application of scientific principles to the study of infectious and non-infectious causes of disease in animals and humans.
  • Develop the ability to apply scientific knowledge and technical skills in research.
  • Establish the ability to utilise effective and modern methods for interpreting, analysing and describing scientific data.
  • Enhance the ability to communicate, in writing and verbally, scientific results and information in research.
  • Ensure an understanding of the principles of “One Health, One Biology, One Medicine”, to enable the undertaking of independent research.

Throughout the programme, lectures, tutorials, interactive sessions, the “flipped classroom” approach and practicals will be the main teaching format, with the balance varying depending on the partner institution. The small class size allows for extensive participation and interaction among students and between students and academics.

Assessment items reflect the practice of science and are integrated into the course, for example with students presenting the results of a literature review to the class (peer teaching). Concepts from lectures are developed in laboratory sessions and through assessment items. Students are encouraged to question the validity of information provided and critically appraise information sourced through the literature and other resources.

Independent learning is encouraged throughout the programme, particularly during the research project, but also during preparation of assessment items and classroom work. Group work and cooperation is encouraged and enhances the learning process. Formal class contact is supported by regular meetings with course organisers and tutors. A feature of the University of Edinburgh component of the programme is the intensive hands on approach to learning. Students will participate in a wide range of laboratory activities both at The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and the Roslin Institute.

Career opportunities

On completion of the degree, graduates will have a wide range of skills in the area of infectious disease biology, interactions between disease, environment and host, modern animal science and laboratory techniques.

You will also have obtained valuable generic skills in producing and presenting scientific material, communicating with people from a wide range of geographies and cultures and hypothesis development and testing. This will give you a unique background for progressing to further study (PhD or professional qualifications) or going straight into employment.

You could work in developing countries where the burden of infectious disease on both humans and livestock is significant, and thus will help improve food sustainability and the transition from poverty in these countries. In developed countries infectious diseases also cause major losses in productivity of humans and animals, and this will increase as globalisation increases. Depending on your initial background (medical, veterinary, scientific, therapeutic) graduates will find employment that exploits their new knowledge to reduce the impact of infectious disease



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Postgraduate Loans are now Open for Home/EU students. -. https://www.gov.uk/postgraduate-loan/how-to-apply. Scholarships & Discounts available. Read more

Postgraduate Loans are now Open for Home/EU students - https://www.gov.uk/postgraduate-loan/how-to-apply

Scholarships & Discounts available

Molecular biology and genomics play an increasingly important and exciting role in research on medically important parasites and arthropods, and this award provides advanced training in this field. It provides an important foundation of knowledge of the basic biology of parasites and vectors, followed by specialised modules on the molecular and cellular biology and functional genomics of parasites and vectors, as well as related public health, and tropical health issues. There is a significant practical component throughout the programme, and the laboratory work undertaken provides a wide range of techniques that would be highly relevant to a future research career. Following the taught component, participants complete a dissertation including a period of applied research either overseas or in Liverpool.

AIMS

LSTM education courses are taught within a dynamic environment by staff working at the cutting-edge of research in tropical medicine and global health. They are designed to enable the professional development of the student, to be relevant to students from both the UK and overseas and to promote approaches to study that will enable students to continue their learning into the future. 

This course aims to: 

Equip students with the knowledge and practical skills to develop a career in molecular research in parasitology or vector biology.

Provide practical experience of a range of specialised technical and analytical skills relevant to the study of the molecular biology of parasites and disease vectors.

Enable students to conduct independent research in the laboratory and/or field.

Produce graduates who are experienced, committed, informed, proactive and effective professionals, capable of taking substantial and leading professional roles.

Facilitate high quality learning that is informed by critical analysis of current research.

Develop independent and reflective approaches to study that will enable graduates to continue to learn in the future.

CAREERS

Many alumni of LSTM hold prominent positions in health ministries, universities, hospitals, and international organisations throughout the world. Graduates are competitively placed to begin PhD programmes, seek employment as research assistants, work in developing countries with a wide variety of employers, or return to previous employers with enhanced knowledge and skills with which to advance their existing careers. Graduates of the MSc Molecular Biology of Parasites and Disease Vectors have undergone excellent general preparation for a career in laboratory research in biological sciences, in which molecular biology is widely applied, and are particularly well placed for careers in research or training in areas related to the molecular biology of parasitic and vector-borne tropical diseases.

TESTIMONIALS

Professor Mark Taylor "Parasitology at LSTM studies how best to treat and control parasitic diseases such as malaria and the Neglected Tropical Diseases. We cover the entire spectrum of translational research from the discovery of new drugs, vaccines and diagnostics through to large scale global programmes aimed at eliminating diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. In addition to the traditional parasites and their vectors, we also work on other important tropical diseases such as snakebite, arboviruses, and tuberculosis."



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Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics. The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases. Read more

Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics

The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases.

Our skin cells, liver cells and blood cells all contain the same genetic information. Yet these are different types of cells, each performing their own specific tasks. How is this possible? The explanation lies in the epigenome: a heritable, cell-type specific set of chromosomal modifications, which regulates gene expression. Radboud University is specialised in studying the epigenome and is the only university in the Netherlands to offer a Master’s programme in this field of research.

Health and disease

The epigenome consists of small and reversible chemical modifications of the DNA or histone proteins, such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. It changes the spatial structure of DNA, resulting in gene activation or repression. These processes are crucial for our health and also play a role in many diseases, like autoimmune diseases, cancer and neurological disorders. As opposed to modifications of the genome sequence itself, epigenetic modifications are reversible. You can therefore imagine the great potential of drugs that target epigenetic enzymes, so-called epi-drugs.

Big data

In this specialisation, you’ll look at a cell as one big and complex system. You’ll study epigenetic mechanisms during development and disease from different angles. This includes studying DNA and RNA by next-generation sequencing (epigenomics) and analysing proteins by mass spectrometry (proteomics). In addition, you‘ll be trained to design computational strategies that allow the integration of these multifaceted, high-throughput data sets into one system.

Why study Medical Epigenomics at Radboud University?

- Radboud University combines various state-of-the-art technologies – such as quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation DNA sequencing – with downstream bioinformatics analyses in one department. This is unique in Europe.

- This programme allows you to work with researchers from the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life sciences (RIMLS), one of the leading multidisciplinary research institutes within this field of study worldwide.

- We have close contacts with high-profile medically oriented groups on the Radboud campus and with international institutes (EMBL, Max-Planck, Marie Curie, Cambridge, US-based labs, etc). As a Master’s student, you can choose to perform an internship in one of these related departments.

- Radboud University coordinates BLUEPRINT, a 30 million Euro European project focusing on the epigenomics of leukaemia. Master’s students have the opportunity to participate in this project.

Career prospects

As a Master’s student of Medical Epigenomics you’re trained in using state-of-the art technology in combination with biological software tools to study complete networks in cells in an unbiased manner. For example, you’ll know how to study the effects of drugs in the human body.

When you enter the job market, you’ll have:

- A thorough background of epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease, which is highly relevant in strongly rising field of epi-drug development

- Extensive and partly hands-on experience in state-of-the-art ‘omics’ technologies: next-generation sequencing, quantitative mass spectrometry and single cell technologies;

- Extensive expertise in designing, executing and interpreting scientific experiments in data-driven research;

- The computational skills needed to analyse large ‘omics’ datasets.

With this background, you can become a researcher at a:

- University or research institute;

- Pharmaceutical company, such as Synthon or Johnson & Johnson;

- Food company, like Danone or Unilever;

- Start-up company making use of -omics technology.

Apart from research into genomics and epigenomics, you could also work on topics such as miniaturising workflows, improving experimental devices, the interface between biology and informatics, medicine from a systems approach.

Or you can become a:

- Biological or medical consultant;

- Biology teacher;

- Policy coordinator, regarding genetic or medical issues;

- Patent attorney;

- Clinical research associate;

PhD positions at Radboud University

Each year, the Molecular Biology department (Prof. Henk Stunnenberg, Prof. Michiel Vermeulen) and the Molecular Developmental Biology department (Prof. Gert-Jan Veenstra) at the RIMLS offer between five and ten PhD positions. Of course, many graduates also apply for a PhD position at related departments in the Netherlands, or abroad.

Our approach to this field

- Systems biology

In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation you won’t zoom in on only one particular gene, protein or signalling pathway. Instead, you’ll regard the cell as one complete system. This comprehensive view allows you to, for example, model the impact of one particular epigenetic mutation on various parts and functions of the cell, or study the effects of a drug in an unbiased manner. One of the challenges of this systems biology approach is the processing and integration of large amounts of data. That’s why you’ll also be trained in computational biology. Once graduated, this will be a great advantage: you’ll be able to bridge the gap between biology, technology and informatics , and thus have a profile that is desperately needed in modern, data-driven biology.

- Multiple OMICS approaches

Studying cells in a systems biology approach means connecting processes at the level of the genome (genomics), epigenome (epigenomics), transcriptome (transcriptomics), proteome (proteomics), etc. In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation, you’ll get acquainted with all these different fields of study.

- Patient and animal samples

Numerous genetic diseases are not caused by genetic mutations, but by epigenetic mutations that influence the structure and function of chromatin. Think of:

- Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

- Cancer, in the forms of leukaemia, colon cancer, prostate cancer and cervical cancer

- Neurological disorders, like Rett Syndrome, Alzheimer, Parkinson, Multiple Sclerosis, schizophrenia and autism

We investigate these diseases on a cellular level, focusing on the epigenetic mutations and the impact on various pathways in the cell. You’ll get the chance to participate in that research, and work with embryonic stem cell, patient, Xenopus or zebra fish samples.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology/epigenomics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This MSc is aimed at students who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise in the eye as an integrated biological system. Read more

This MSc is aimed at students who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise in the eye as an integrated biological system. The programme provides a unique and integrated review of the physiology and biology of the eye, covering molecular and developmental cell biology, complex genetics, immunology and behavioural neuroscience.

About this degree

The programme offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and expertise in ocular cell biology, genetics, visual neuroscience, development and immunology. On completion of the programme, students gain an enhanced knowledge and understanding of scientific communication skills, scientific design and analysis, sophisticated laboratory techniques and valuable research experience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Ocular Cell Biology
  • Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
  • Ocular Immunology
  • Microvascular Biology
  • Visual Neuroscience

Optional modules

  • Either Advanced Visual Neuroscience (30 credits)
  • Or Microvascular Biology (15 credits) and Visual Neuroscience (15 credits)

Dissertation/research project

All MSc students undertake either a research or informatics project using state-of-the-art techniques and equipment. The project culminates in a dissertation of 15,000–18,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, problem classes, journal clubs, self-directed studies and laboratory practical courses. Assessment is through long essays, coursework, laboratory practicals, oral examination and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Biology of Vision MSc

Careers

This programme provides excellent preparation for a PhD or a successful research career in academia or for positions in the public or commercial sectors. Previous students have also successfully obtained specialist trainee positions in ophthalmology at hospitals across the country.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Doctor, Mile End Hospital (NHS)
  • GP (General Practitioner), Barnet Hospital (NHS)
  • Research Associate, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust
  • PG Dip in Clinical Ophthalmology, UCL
  • Research Degree, Institute of Ophthalmology, UCL

Employability

The programme aims to train first-class basic and clinical scientists in the field of ophthalmology.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology is one of the premier centres in the world for the study of vision and the mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy of eye disease. We embrace fundamental research, through the entire spectrum of translational medicine to clinical trials.

This MSc programme draws upon the extensive basic and clinical research experience available at the institute and at Moorfields Eye Hospital. Students gain expertise in basic cell biology, genetics, neuroscience and physiology, specialise in the biology of the eye as an integrated biological system and conduct a six-month research project within a world-class research environment.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Ophthalmology

80% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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Postgraduate Loans are now Open for Home/EU students. -. https://www.gov.uk/postgraduate-loan/how-to-apply. Scholarships & Discounts available. Read more

Postgraduate Loans are now Open for Home/EU students - https://www.gov.uk/postgraduate-loan/how-to-apply

Scholarships & Discounts available

This programme provides advanced contemporary training in parasitology and the study of disease vectors. The broad scope of the programme ranges from the biology, immunology, ecology and population biology of the organisms to public health, disease epidemiology and tropical health issues. In addition to providing a solid foundation in parasite and vector biology, the programme provides practical experience of essential techniques, as well as significant theoretical and practical knowledge in all important and topical areas of the field. Following the taught component, participants complete a dissertation including a period of applied research either overseas or in Liverpool.

AIMS

LSTM education courses are taught within a dynamic environment by staff working at the cutting-edge of research in tropical medicine and global health. They are designed to enable the professional development of the student, to be relevant to students from both the UK and overseas and to promote approaches to study that will enable students to continue their learning into the future. 

This course aims to: 

To equip students with the knowledge and practical skills needed to develop a career in research, training or control of parasitic and vector-borne diseases.

To provide practical experience of a range of specialised technical and analytical skills relevant to the study of parasites and disease vectors.

To enable students to conduct independent research in the laboratory and/or field.

To produce graduates who are experienced, committed, informed, proactive and effective professionals, capable of taking substantial and leading professional roles.

To facilitate high quality learning that is informed by critical analysis of current research.

To develop independent and reflective approaches to study that will enable graduates to continue to learn in the future.

CAREERS

Over many years, we have educated hundreds of Masters students, many of whom have established successful careers in research in the academic or private sectors, or who have gone on to work in development as part of government or NGO teams. Graduates of the MSc Biology & Control of Parasites and Disease Vectors typically follow careers in research (some in LSTM) or training in areas related to the control of infectious disease, in particular parasitic and vector-borne tropical diseases. Other careers paths have led to teacher training, working overseas for NGO’s, military and public health-related careers.



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Whether you are a new graduate or already employed and seeking to further your career prospects, this course offers a solid career development path. Read more

Whether you are a new graduate or already employed and seeking to further your career prospects, this course offers a solid career development path. You can also choose this course if you wish to pursue research in biotechnology at PhD level.

Biotechnology is the application of biological processes and is underpinned by • cell biology • molecular biology • bioinformatics • structural biology. It encompasses a wide range of technologies for modifying living organisms or their products according to human needs.

Applications of biotechnology span medicine, technology and engineering.

Important biotechnological advances including

  • the production of therapeutic proteins using cloned DNA, for example insulin and clotting factors
  • the application of stem cells to treat human disease
  • the enhancement of crop yields and plants with increased nutritional value
  • herbicide and insect resistant plants
  • production of recombinant antibodies for the treatment of disease
  • edible vaccines, in the form of modified plants
  • development of biosensors for the detection of biological and inorganic analytes

You gain

  • up-to-date knowledge of the cellular and molecular basis of biological processes
  • an advanced understanding of DNA technology and molecular biotechnology
  • knowledge of developing and applying biotechnology to diagnosis and treatment of human diseases
  • practical skills applicable in a range of bioscience laboratories
  • the transferable and research skills to enable you to continue developing your knowledge and improving your employment potential

The course is led by academics who are actively involved in biotechnology research and its application to the manipulation of proteins, DNA, mammalian cells and plants. Staff also have expertise in the use of nanoparticles in drug delivery and the manipulation of microbes in industrial and environmental biotechnology.

You are supported throughout your studies by an academic advisor who will help you develop your study and personal skills.

What is biotechnology

Biotechnology is the basis for the production of current leading biopharmaceuticals and has already provided us with the 'clot-busting' drug, tissue plasminogen activator for the treatment of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. It also holds the promise of new treatments for neurodegeneration and cancer through recombinant antibodies.

Genetically modified plants have improved crop yields and are able to grow in a changing environment. Manipulation of cellular organisms through gene editing methods have also yielded a greater understanding of many disease states and have allowed us to understand how life itself functions.

Course structure

You begin your studies focusing on the fundamentals of advanced cell biology and molecular biology before specialising in both molecular and plant biotechnology. Practical skills are developed throughout the course and you gain experience in molecular biology techniques such as PCR and sub cloning alongside tissue culture.

Core to the program is the practical module where you gain experience in a range of techniques used in the determination of transcription and translational levels, for example.

All practicals are supported by experienced academic staff, skilled in the latest biotechnological techniques.

Research and statistical skills are developed throughout the program. Towards the end of the program you apply your skills on a two month research project into a current biotechnological application. Employability skills are developed throughout the course in two modules.

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits. 

Core modules:

  • Cell biology (15 credits)
  • Biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Plant biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Molecular biology (15 credits)
  • Applied biomedical techniques (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Optional modules :

  • Human genomics and proteomics (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of disease (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of cancer (15 credits)

Assessment

As students progress through the course they are exposed to a wide range of teaching and learning activities. The assessment strategy of the postgraduate course considers diverse assessment methods. Some modules offer dedicated formative feedback to aid skills development with assessments going through several rounds of formative tutor and peer feedback. Summative assessment methods are diverse, with examinations present in theory-based modules to test independent knowledge and data analysis. Several modules are entirely coursework-based, with a portfolio of skills such laboratory practical's and research proposals generated throughout the course forming the summative tasks. In all cases, the assessment criteria for all assessed assignments are made available to student prior to submission. 

Employability

The course is suitable for people wishing to develop their knowledge of molecular and cell biotechnology and its application to solving health and industrial problems.

You can find career opportunities in areas such as

  • biotechnology research
  • medical research in universities and hospitals
  • government research agencies
  • biotechnology industry
  • pharmaceutical industry.

Students on this course have gone on to roles including experimental officers in contract research, research and development in scientists, diagnostics specialists and applications specialists. Many of our graduates also go on to study for PhDs and continue as academic lecturers.



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Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. Read more
Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. In Neuroscience it is being increasingly used to study the physiological correlates of mental processes. In Clinical practice it plays a prominent role in the detection and diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in the evaluation of new treatments. The techniques are getting increasingly sophisticated and as a result there is a high demand for well-trained professionals.

Our Neuroimaging MSc is one of only a few programmes dealing with modern neuroimaging in the UK. It is exceptional in its focus on practical and biomedical aspects of Neuroimaging. The success of the program is reflected in the success of our students with 60% either in further higher education, or fully employed in the first year after degree completion. This figure rises to 100% within 3 years of the degree.

The Neuroimaging MSc is designed to provide students with the background knowledge and technical skills to design, analyze and evaluate imaging data. The Neuroimaging MSc focuses on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based techniques, including functional MRI, anatomical imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, and Spectroscopy. Imaging techniques will be discussed with reference to relevant applications. The programme puts a strong emphasis on practical skills. In a dedicated computer lab, the students will learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Under supervision of our world-class academic staff, students will design their own imaging based studies, which will be run using the in-house 3T MRI scanner. Additional classes will provide students with a broad scope of professional skills.

The Neuroimaging MSc is especially suited for:
students interested in pursuing an Academic career in the field of Neuroimaging;
students looking to find a job as research staff in industry or academic labs involved in translational research;
medical professional, looking to develop skills in a new emergent technology and research field;
students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science who want to move into cognitive or clinical neuroscience;
students with a background in psychology or biology who want to improve your technical skills for a neuroscience career.

Content
The core of the Neuroimaging MSc consists of two modules on Neuroimaging. The first module concentrates on methodological aspects. It includes an introduction to the physics of MR imaging, the physiological basis of functional signals, processing and analysis of imaging data and the design of research studies. The second module provides an in-depth introduction to a number of specialized imaging techniques used to understand the biology of brain function in health and disease. The latter module aims to illustrate the use of imaging in the context of translational and clinical studies of disease processes affecting the human brain.

Both modules combine formal lectures, and computer-based laboratories, in which students learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Weekly practical labs and programming classes are held in a dedicated computer laboratory available to all students. The work done in the lab sections constitute 50% of the grade in first module, and 30% of the grade in the second module. The latter also includes student-led discussion of published scientific and clinical research.

In the weekly Bangor Imaging Group (BIG) meeting, academic staffs, postdocs and students discuss current research. All MSc and PhD students propose their research here.

Additional optional modules provide an in-depth view of several content areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience (see below). Students are also welcome to attend weekly review of clinical scans performed at the local hospital for the purpose of patient recruitment and a monthly neuroradiology conference where cases of clinical interest are discussed. Journal-clubs and research meetings concerning fMRI, EEG, and TMS methodologies are open to all students.

Students are also required to take at least one additional module in advanced statistics or advanced computing. The module Communicating Research completes the curriculum by training students in a broad scope of professional skills.

The Bangor Imaging Unit houses a state-of-the-art 3T MRI machine, available for student projects. Setups for the measurement of eye-movement, arm and hand movement, and physiological parameters are also available.

In the beginning of the year you will choose your academic supervisor. The supervisor will be responsible for helping you plan, design and draft your research thesis. From your project proposal you will review the relevant literature, and formally outline your study. In the weekly Bangor-Imaging Group meeting we learn about and discuss proposed, ongoing and completed studies and important new publications in the field. Moreover, all MSc and PhD students present their proposed plan of research in this forum. Thus, you are tightly integrated into the research environment at the Bangor Imaging Unit, and profit from interactions with older PhD students, post-docs, and other supervisors. Your final research project is conducted over the summer months, most likely using the in-house, research-dedicated 3T MRI scanner. The course ends with the successful submission of your research thesis.

Structure
The Neuroimaging MSc consists of two parts. Part one comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take the two core modules in Neuroimaging, which include a large component of laboratory work. You will also choose two 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of neuroscience. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to hone your research skills. In addition, you will partner with one of the academic faculty in order to jointly develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester), when you will carry out your research study and write your thesis.

Research Thesis
The thesis is the 'crown' of the Neuroimaging MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.
Career Prospects

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