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Masters Degrees (Biology Of Cancer)

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population. Read more
The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population.

The programme provides training in the modern practical, academic and research skills that are used in academia and industry. Through a combination of lectures, small-group seminars and practical classes, students will apply this training towards the development of new therapies.

The programme culminates with a research project that investigates the molecular and cellular basis of cancer biology or the development of new therapies under the supervision of active cancer research scientists.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/226/cancer-biology

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Each one-hour lecture is supplemented by two hours of small-group seminars and workshops in which individual themes are explored in-depth. There are practical classes and mini-projects in which you design, produce and characterise a therapeutic protein with applications in therapy.

In additional to traditional scientific laboratory reports, experience will be gained in a range of scientific writing styles relevant to future employment, such as literature reviews, patent applications, regulatory documents, and patient information suitable for a non-scientific readership.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)
BI837 - The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Cancer (15 credits)
BI838 - Genomic Stability and Cancer (15 credits)
BI840 - Cancer Therapeutics: From the Laboratory to the Clinic (15 credits)
BI857 - Cancer Research in Focus (15 credits)
BI845 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme features a combination of examinations and practically focused continuous assessment, which gives you experience within a range of professional activities, eg, report writing, patent applications and public health information. The assessments have been designed to promote employability in a range of professional settings.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide an excellent quality of postgraduate-level education in the field of cancer, its biology and its treatment

- provide a research-led, inspiring learning environment

- provide a regional postgraduate progression route for the advanced study of a disease that affects a high proportion of the population

- promote engagement with biological research into cancer and inspire you to pursue a scientific career inside or outside of the laboratory

- develop subject specific and transferable skills to maximise employment prospects

- promote an understanding of the impact of scientific research on society and the role for scientists in a range of professions.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/226

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If you're looking for a career in the fight against cancer - this is the course for you. This full-time MRes offers two research projects to give your future career in cancer biology a boost. Read more

Access advanced technology and approaches being used in cancer biology

If you're looking for a career in the fight against cancer - this is the course for you. This full-time MRes offers two research projects to give your future career in cancer biology a boost. With two streams on offer – Cancer Biology, and Cancer Informatics – we have the options available for you to choose the best way for you to use your life-sciences degree to meet your objective. We will provide you with a broad-training in research as well as theoretical and practical skills to help you take the next step in your career.

Streams

There are two streams available:

•Cancer Biology - http://www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/study/postgraduate/masters-programmes/mres-cancer-biology/
•Cancer Informatics - http://www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/study/postgraduate/masters-programmes/mres-cancer-biology-cancer-informatics/

Is this programme for you?

You will perform novel laboratory-based research, accumulate experimental findings and exercise critical scientific thought in the interpretation of those findings.

The course comprises both theoretical and practical elements, embracing cutting-edge developments in the field. You will experience some of the most technologically advanced approaches currently being applied to the broad field of cancer research.

As the taught component of the MRes is short, you will be expected to have sufficient lab experience in order to be able you to hit the ground running when you enter the lab.

You will need to be an independent person, who is looking for a challenge. If you're not afraid of hard work then we would welcome an application from you!

Application

Decisions on applications are made in batches, with the following deadlines for each batch:
•09:00 GMT (UTC) Tuesday, 31 January 2017
•09:00 BST (UTC+1) Wednesday, 26 April 2017
•09:00 BST (UTC+1) Monday, 31 July 2017

You will receive notification of a conditional offer or rejection in the weeks following these deadlines. If you do not hear from us, it is because you have been placed on the waiting list. We withhold the right to close application early, so ensure that you submit your application sooner, rather than later.

Please note that we are unable to consider your application without at least one academic reference from your most recent institution.

Programme structure

The course comprises an initial four/five week taught component in which the cellular and molecular basis of cancer biology are covered, plus an introduction to the clinical and pathological aspects of carcinogenesis. This information is contained within the lectures which will partly be on the lecturer's own research, making use of the excellent researchers we have within Imperial College London. Within this period will also be a series of workshops covering key transferable skills such as oral presentation of scientific data and grant writing.

This is followed by two separate research placements of roughly 20 weeks each within the recently created Imperial College Cancer Research UK Centre, the Faculty of Medicine at the Hammersmith Hospital campus of Imperial College, and other collaborating institutes across London (e.g. Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Francis Crick Institute).

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This Masters in Cancer Sciences will prepare you for a career in cancer science, whether you aim to pursue a PhD or further medical studies, or seek a career in the health services sector, in the life sciences, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries. Read more

This Masters in Cancer Sciences will prepare you for a career in cancer science, whether you aim to pursue a PhD or further medical studies, or seek a career in the health services sector, in the life sciences, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries. Our programme takes a 'bench to bedside' approach, enabling graduates to work within a multidisciplinary environment of world-leading scientists and cancer-specialists to address the latest challenges in cancer research.

Why this programme

  • University of Glasgow is rated in the UK top five and best in Scotland for cancer studies. You will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of world leading cancer scientists and clinicians within the Cancer Research UK Glasgow Centre.
  • This MSc in Cancer Sciences programme is unique in the UK as it delivers integrated teaching in molecular biology, pathology and clinical service.
  • The Cancer Research UK Glasgow Centre brings together scientists and clinicians from research centres, universities and hospitals around Glasgow to deliver the very best in cancer research, drug discovery and patient care. The centre’s world leading teams have made major advances in the understanding and treatment of many cancers. For more information, please visit: http://www.wecancentre.org/
  • In the first semester, each week is focused around one of the new Hallmarks of Cancer, with the focus on the molecular/cellular biology of this hallmark. A tutorial session will enable you to discuss and integrate your learning from the week. This will enable you to understand how research into the fundamental principles of cancer cell biology can translate to advances in cancer treatment.
  • The aim of this MSc in Cancer Sciences is to train cancer researchers who can break down the barriers that currently prevent discoveries at the bench from being translated into treatments at the bedside. By understanding the science, methodology and terminology used by scientists and clinicians from different disciplines, you will learn to communicate effectively in a multidisciplinary environment, to critically evaluate a wide range of scientific data and to research strategies and learn how to make a significant contribution to cancer research.

Programme structure

Semester 1: Hallmarks of Cancer

This 13 week core course aims to:

  • provide you with a critical understanding of the molecular and cellular events that drive cancer development and progression
  • demonstrate how an understanding of these events underpins current and future approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment
  • integrate the teaching of molecular biology, cell biology, diagnosis and treatment of cancer
  • describe how all these disciplines communicate and work together in the fight against cancer
  • provide you with theoretical training in fundamental molecular and cell biology techniques used in cancer research

One week of practical training is provided at the start of the course. This course is assessed through a lab notebook, group assessment, critical essay and an exam that focuses on data analysis and interpretation.

Semester 2

In the second semester, you can choose from a range of 3 week optional courses, before taking the core course “Designing a Research Project”.

  • Drug Discovery
  • Drug Development and Clinical trials
  • Viruses and Cancer
  • Diagnostic technologies and devices
  • Technology transfer and commercialisation of bioscience research
  • Current trends and challenges in biomedical research and health

or

  • Frontiers in Cancer Sciences – 5 week optional course
  • Omic technologies for the biomedical sciences: from genomics to metabolomics - – 5 week optional course

or

  • Designing a research project: biomedical research methodology - 6 week optional course

Semester 3

Bioscience Research Project

In this 14 week core course you will:

  • have an opportunity to perform a piece of original research to investigate a hypothesis or research questions within the area of cancer research. The project may be “wet” or “dry”, depending what projects are available
  • develop practical and/or technical skills, analyse data critically and draw conclusions, and suggest avenues for future research to expand your research findings

Note: students must have a minimum of grade C in semesters 1 and 2 in order to proceed to the research project.

Career prospects

The knowledge and transferable skills developed in this programme will be suitable for those contemplating a PhD or further medical studies, those wishing to work in the health services sector, and those interested in working in the life sciences, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries, including contract research organisations (CROs). This programme is designed for students with undergraduate degrees in the life sciences, scientists working in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, and clinicians and other healthcare professionals. 



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If you're looking for a career in the fight against cancer - this is the course for you. This full-time MRes offers two research projects to give your future career in cancer biology a boost. Read more

Research training at the computational/clinical translational science interface

If you're looking for a career in the fight against cancer - this is the course for you. This full-time MRes offers two research projects to give your future career in cancer biology a boost. With two streams on offer – Cancer Biology, and Cancer Informatics – we have the options available for you to choose the best way for you to use your life-sciences degree to meet your objective. We will provide you with a broad-training in research as well as theoretical and practical skills to help you take the next step in your career.

Streams

There are two streams available:

•Cancer Biology - http://www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/study/postgraduate/masters-programmes/mres-cancer-biology/
•Cancer Informatics - http://www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/study/postgraduate/masters-programmes/mres-cancer-biology-cancer-informatics/

Is this programme for you?

You will engage with both theoretical and practical elements. The theoretical elements will include why particular methods are used, assumptions they are based on and understanding the technical limitations and quality control of different data types. The practical elements will include data handling and the computational method employed for each data type.

When you enter your projects, you will perform novel bioinformatics-based research, accumulate experimental findings and exercise critical scientific thought in the interpretation of those findings. The research projects may also include a smaller component of wet-lab experiments to provide some validation of the findings from the bioinformatics research.

You will need to be an independent person, who is looking for a challenge. If you're not afraid of hard work, then we would welcome an application from you.

Application

Decisions on applications are made in batches, with the following deadlines for each batch:
•09:00 GMT (UTC) Tuesday, 31 January 2017
•09:00 BST (UTC+1) Wednesday, 26 April 2017
•09:00 BST (UTC+1) Monday, 31 July 2017

You will receive notification of a conditional offer or rejection in the weeks following these deadlines. If you do not hear from us, it is because you have been placed on the waiting list. We withhold the right to close application early, so ensure that you submit your application sooner, rather than later.

Please note that we are unable to consider your application without at least one academic reference from your most recent institution.

Programme structure

The course comprises an initial four/five week taught component in which the cellular and molecular basis of cancer biology are covered, plus an introduction to the clinical and pathological aspects of carcinogenesis. This information is contained within the lectures which will partly be on the lecturer's own research, making use of the excellent researchers we have within Imperial College London. Within this period will also be a series of workshops covering key transferable skills such as oral presentation of scientific data and grant writing. This is shared with the Cancer Biology stream.

While the Cancer Biology stream move into their first project, you will receive three weeks of specialist training in informatics which is comprised of lectures and workshops. You will then complete an initial assignment before beginning your first research placement of roughly 16 weeks, and then a second project of roughly 20 weeks. These will be within the recently created Imperial College Cancer Research UK Centre, the Faculty of Medicine at the Hammersmith Hospital campus of Imperial College, and other collaborating institutes across London (e.g. Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Francis Crick Institute).

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This MSc course offers an innovative interdisciplinary perspective on the study of cancer. Three core modules encompass biological and social sciences. Read more
This MSc course offers an innovative interdisciplinary perspective on the study of cancer.

Three core modules encompass biological and social sciences. These equip you to apply key theories and concepts critically, and to develop the skills required to engage in debates about the impact of cancer on the individual, the family and society.

A wide range of additional modules offers the opportunity to examine aspects of cancer in greater detail from different perspectives, ranging from professional practice to historical perspectives, from epidemiological and medical research to biotechnology.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/cancer-studies/

Why choose this course?

- Our lecturers maintain excellent practice links in their specialist areas locally, regionally and nationally.

- You will have access to state-of-the-art clinical skills simulation suites and resources.

- The department hosts the prestigious HRH Prince Sultan Chair in Cancer Care and the Cancer Care research group.

- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent.

- You will be undertaking advanced study in Oxford, which has a new Cancer Centre and a range of expert practitioners working in the cancer field.

- "Students on this course will gain important insights into the nature of cancer research and its broader implications." Sir Paul Nurse

Teaching and learning

You will be given opportunities to be involved in all aspects of your programme - its management and delivery.

Different students will bring varied experiences and cultures and will be encouraged to share these with each other. You will be expected to take responsibility for your own learning and also to contribute to the learning of your fellow students.

The programme includes a taught element, informed by relevant national and international research and evidence-based literature, designed to be a starting point for critical reading and reflection. Mutual support between students enhances the learning experience and will be strongly encouraged.

In order to make the most of the range of experience, skills and knowledge within the group, a variety of teaching and learning strategies will be employed.
- Lectures introduce you to new areas of study and provide the context for further independent reading and practical work.

- Group activities (eg seminars, workshops, presentations) are used as a means of sharing knowledge and experience, developing critical skills, and emphasising the inter-disciplinary nature of the course.

- Presentation skills are developed through student-led seminars, presentations to your fellow students for some of the assessments.

Studying on this course will give you in-depth knowledge of cancer from the molecular level to the personal, social, societal and international levels. In doing so, you will draw on knowledge from life sciences, psychology, sociology, history, and the health care professions. This means that the course requires a flexible mind and a willingness to see familiar subjects in challenging new ways.
This course does not provide a specialised clinical training in medicine or any other health profession, but it does provide professionals with an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the nature of cancer.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is designed to ensure that you develop and demonstrate the required knowledge and skills to successfully complete your programme. Types of assessments within your programme are varied and appropriate for individual module and programme learning outcomes and content, the academic standard expected and different learning styles.

Assessment is mainly by essay writing, helping you to develop high levels of critical analysis, original thinking and clarity of expression.

Assessments are used to give you an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge as well as the critical and reflective analysis required for professional practice. You will be given the opportunity to submit draft work for feedback and formative assessment.

Endorsements

Sir Paul Nurse (Nobel Laureate and former chief executive of Cancer Research UK)

"Students on this course will gain important insights into the nature of cancer research and its broader implications. As the influence of science on society continues to grow, such insights are as important to scientists as they are to the wider public."

Jon Snow (Journalist, broadcaster and former Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University)

"Cancer and how it is dealt with needs to be seen in its wider social and political context. Oxford Brookes University provides a great environment in which students can engage with these issues."

Attendance pattern

Most modules on the programme involve attendance in the classroom once a week over a 12-week semester period.

How this course helps you develop

You will be given opportunities to develop your academic abilities at master's level, including critical reading and writing skills, digital literacy, communication and teamwork skills. Your contact with other students from different disciplines will provide you with networks that may be of value to you in the development of your future career.

Careers

You will be provided with additional knowledge and expertise to enable you to pursue your chosen career, whether this is in the biological, social sciences or humanities.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Cancer research is a key focus and the department hosts the prestigious HRH Prince Sultan Chair in Cancer Care. This is a very exciting addition to our portfolio, as it enables us to play a leading role in research development and education to improve the experience of patients undergoing cancer treatment and palliative care.

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent. The university has been careful to nurture emerging research strengths, and the international standing achieved by subjects allied to health demonstrates significant progress since 2008.

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We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments. Read more

We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments.

As a student you will be registered with a University research institute, for many this is the Institute for Cellular Medicine (ICM). You will be supported in your studies through a structured programme of supervision and training via our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

We undertake the following areas of research and offer MPhil, PhD and MD supervision in:

Applied immunobiology (including organ and haematogenous stem cell transplantation)

Newcastle hosts one of the most comprehensive organ transplant programmes in the world. This clinical expertise has developed in parallel with the applied immunobiology and transplantation research group. We are investigating aspects of the immunology of autoimmune diseases and cancer therapy, in addition to transplant rejection. We have themes to understand the interplay of the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by a variety of pathways, and how these can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. Further research theme focusses on primary immunodeficiency diseases.

Dermatology

There is strong emphasis on the integration of clinical investigation with basic science. Our research include:

  • cell signalling in normal and diseased skin including mechanotransduction and response to ultraviolet radiation
  • dermatopharmacology including mechanisms of psoriatic plaque resolution in response to therapy
  • stem cell biology and gene therapy
  • regulation of apoptosis/autophagy
  • non-melanoma skin cancer/melanoma biology and therapy.

We also research the effects of UVR on the skin including mitochondrial DNA damage as a UV biomarker.

Diabetes

This area emphasises on translational research, linking clinical- and laboratory-based science. Key research include:

  • mechanisms of insulin action and glucose homeostasis
  • insulin secretion and pancreatic beta-cell function
  • diabetic complications
  • stem cell therapies
  • genetics and epidemiology of diabetes.

Diagnostic and therapeutic technologies

Focus is on applied research and aims to underpin future clinical applications. Technology-oriented and demand-driven research is conducted which relates directly to health priority areas such as:

  • bacterial infection
  • chronic liver failure
  • cardiovascular and degenerative diseases.

This research is sustained through extensive internal and external collaborations with leading UK and European academic and industrial groups, and has the ultimate goal of deploying next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic systems in the hospital and health-care environment.

Kidney disease

There is a number of research programmes into the genetics, immunology and physiology of kidney disease and kidney transplantation. We maintain close links between basic scientists and clinicians with many translational programmes of work, from the laboratory to first-in-man and phase III clinical trials. Specific areas:

  • haemolytic uraemic syndrome
  • renal inflammation and fibrosis
  • the immunology of transplant rejection
  • tubular disease
  • cystic kidney disease.

The liver

We have particular interests in:

  • primary biliary cirrhosis (epidemiology, immunobiology and genetics)
  • alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • fibrosis
  • the genetics of other autoimmune and viral liver diseases

Magnetic Resonance (MR), spectroscopy and imaging in clinical research

Novel non-invasive methodologies using magnetic resonance are developed and applied to clinical research. Our research falls into two categories:

  • MR physics projects involve development and testing of new MR techniques that make quantitative measurements of physiological properties using a safe, repeatable MR scan.
  • Clinical research projects involve the application of these novel biomarkers to investigation of human health and disease.

Our studies cover a broad range of topics (including diabetes, dementia, neuroscience, hepatology, cardiovascular, neuromuscular disease, metabolism, and respiratory research projects), but have a common theme of MR technical development and its application to clinical research.

Musculoskeletal disease (including auto-immune arthritis)

We focus on connective tissue diseases in three, overlapping research programmes. These programmes aim to understand:

  • what causes the destruction of joints (cell signalling, injury and repair)
  • how cells in the joints respond when tissue is lost (cellular interactions)
  • whether we can alter the immune system and ‘switch off’ auto-immune disease (targeted therapies and diagnostics)

This research theme links with other local, national and international centres of excellence and has close integration of basic and clinical researchers and hosts the only immunotherapy centre in the UK.

Pharmacogenomics (including complex disease genetics)

Genetic approaches to the individualisation of drug therapy, including anticoagulants and anti-cancer drugs, and in the genetics of diverse non-Mendelian diseases, from diabetes to periodontal disease, are a focus. A wide range of knowledge and experience in both genetics and clinical sciences is utilised, with access to high-throughput genotyping platforms.

Reproductive and vascular biology

Our scientists and clinicians use in situ cellular technologies and large-scale gene expression profiling to study the normal and pathophysiological remodelling of vascular and uteroplacental tissues. Novel approaches to cellular interactions have been developed using a unique human tissue resource. Our research themes include:

  • the regulation of trophoblast and uNk cells
  • transcriptional and post-translational features of uterine function
  • cardiac and vascular remodelling in pregnancy

We also have preclinical molecular biology projects in breast cancer research.

Respiratory disease

We conduct a broad range of research activities into acute and chronic lung diseases. As well as scientific studies into disease mechanisms, there is particular interest in translational medicine approaches to lung disease, studying human lung tissue and cells to explore potential for new treatments. Our current areas of research include:

  • acute lung injury - lung infections
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • fibrotic disease of the lung, both before and after lung transplantation.

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics

Our research projects are concerned with the harmful effects of chemicals, including prescribed drugs, and finding ways to prevent and minimise these effects. We are attempting to measure the effects of fairly small amounts of chemicals, to provide ways of giving early warning of the start of harmful effects. We also study the adverse side-effects of medicines, including how conditions such as liver disease and heart disease can develop in people taking medicines for completely different medical conditions. Our current interests include: environmental chemicals and organophosphate pesticides, warfarin, psychiatric drugs and anti-cancer drugs.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.



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Cell-to-cell signalling in development and disease. Do you have a clear and specific interest in cancer, stem cells or developmental biology? Our Master’s programme. Read more

Cell-to-cell signalling in development and disease

Do you have a clear and specific interest in cancer, stem cells or developmental biology? Our Master’s programme Cancer, Stem Cells and Developmental Biology combines research in three areas: oncology, molecular developmental biology and genetics. The focus is on molecular and cellular aspects of development and disease, utilising different model systems (mice, zebrafish, C. elegans, organoids and cell lines). The programme will guide you through the mysteries of embryonic growth, stem cells, signalling, gene regulation, evolution, and development as they relate to health and disease.

The right choice for you?

Given that fundamental developmental processes are so often impacted by disease, an understanding of these processes is vital to the better understanding of disease treatment and prevention. Adult physiology is regulated by developmental genes and mechanisms which, if deregulated, may result in pathological conditions. If you have a specific interest in cancer, stem cells or developmental biology, this Master’s programme is the right choice for you. Cancer, Stem Cells and Developmental Biology offers you international, high ranked research training and education that builds on novel methodology in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and bioinformatics technology applied to biomedical and developmental systems and processes.

What you’ll learn

In the Cancer, Stem Cells and Developmental Biology programme you will learn to focus on understanding processes underlying cancer and developmental biology using techniques and applications of post-genomic research, including microarray analysis, next generation sequencing, proteomics, metabolomics and advanced microscopy techniques. You explore research questions concerning embryonic growth, stem cells, signaling pathways, gene regulation, evolution and development in relation to health and disease using various model systems. As a Master’s student you will take theory courses and seminars, as well as master classes led by renowned specialists in the field. The courses are interactive, and challenge you to further improve your writing and presenting skills.

Why study Cancer, Stem Cells and Developmental Biology at Utrecht University?

Compared to most other Master’s programmes in cancer and stem cell biology in the Netherlands, in Utrecht we offer:

  • Strong focus on fundamental molecular aspects of disease related questions, particularly questions related to cancer and the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine
  • A unique emphasis on Developmental Biology, a process with many connections to cancer
  • The opportunity to carry out two extensive research projects at renowned research groups
  • An intensive collaboration with national and international research institutes, allowing you to do your internship at prestigious partner institutions all around the world

Career in Cancer, Stem Cells and Developmental Biology

As a MSc graduate trained in both fundamental and disease-oriented aspects of biomedical genetics you are in great demand. You’ll be prepared for PhD study in one of the participating or associated groups. Alternatively, leaving after obtaining your MSc degree you will profit from a solid education in molecular genetics, in addition to your specialised knowledge of developmental biology. You’ll find your way to biotechnology, the pharmaceutical industry or education.



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Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics. The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases. Read more

Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics

The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases.

Our skin cells, liver cells and blood cells all contain the same genetic information. Yet these are different types of cells, each performing their own specific tasks. How is this possible? The explanation lies in the epigenome: a heritable, cell-type specific set of chromosomal modifications, which regulates gene expression. Radboud University is specialised in studying the epigenome and is the only university in the Netherlands to offer a Master’s programme in this field of research.

Health and disease

The epigenome consists of small and reversible chemical modifications of the DNA or histone proteins, such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. It changes the spatial structure of DNA, resulting in gene activation or repression. These processes are crucial for our health and also play a role in many diseases, like autoimmune diseases, cancer and neurological disorders. As opposed to modifications of the genome sequence itself, epigenetic modifications are reversible. You can therefore imagine the great potential of drugs that target epigenetic enzymes, so-called epi-drugs.

Big data

In this specialisation, you’ll look at a cell as one big and complex system. You’ll study epigenetic mechanisms during development and disease from different angles. This includes studying DNA and RNA by next-generation sequencing (epigenomics) and analysing proteins by mass spectrometry (proteomics). In addition, you‘ll be trained to design computational strategies that allow the integration of these multifaceted, high-throughput data sets into one system.

Why study Medical Epigenomics at Radboud University?

- Radboud University combines various state-of-the-art technologies – such as quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation DNA sequencing – with downstream bioinformatics analyses in one department. This is unique in Europe.

- This programme allows you to work with researchers from the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life sciences (RIMLS), one of the leading multidisciplinary research institutes within this field of study worldwide.

- We have close contacts with high-profile medically oriented groups on the Radboud campus and with international institutes (EMBL, Max-Planck, Marie Curie, Cambridge, US-based labs, etc). As a Master’s student, you can choose to perform an internship in one of these related departments.

- Radboud University coordinates BLUEPRINT, a 30 million Euro European project focusing on the epigenomics of leukaemia. Master’s students have the opportunity to participate in this project.

Career prospects

As a Master’s student of Medical Epigenomics you’re trained in using state-of-the art technology in combination with biological software tools to study complete networks in cells in an unbiased manner. For example, you’ll know how to study the effects of drugs in the human body.

When you enter the job market, you’ll have:

- A thorough background of epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease, which is highly relevant in strongly rising field of epi-drug development

- Extensive and partly hands-on experience in state-of-the-art ‘omics’ technologies: next-generation sequencing, quantitative mass spectrometry and single cell technologies;

- Extensive expertise in designing, executing and interpreting scientific experiments in data-driven research;

- The computational skills needed to analyse large ‘omics’ datasets.

With this background, you can become a researcher at a:

- University or research institute;

- Pharmaceutical company, such as Synthon or Johnson & Johnson;

- Food company, like Danone or Unilever;

- Start-up company making use of -omics technology.

Apart from research into genomics and epigenomics, you could also work on topics such as miniaturising workflows, improving experimental devices, the interface between biology and informatics, medicine from a systems approach.

Or you can become a:

- Biological or medical consultant;

- Biology teacher;

- Policy coordinator, regarding genetic or medical issues;

- Patent attorney;

- Clinical research associate;

PhD positions at Radboud University

Each year, the Molecular Biology department (Prof. Henk Stunnenberg, Prof. Michiel Vermeulen) and the Molecular Developmental Biology department (Prof. Gert-Jan Veenstra) at the RIMLS offer between five and ten PhD positions. Of course, many graduates also apply for a PhD position at related departments in the Netherlands, or abroad.

Our approach to this field

- Systems biology

In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation you won’t zoom in on only one particular gene, protein or signalling pathway. Instead, you’ll regard the cell as one complete system. This comprehensive view allows you to, for example, model the impact of one particular epigenetic mutation on various parts and functions of the cell, or study the effects of a drug in an unbiased manner. One of the challenges of this systems biology approach is the processing and integration of large amounts of data. That’s why you’ll also be trained in computational biology. Once graduated, this will be a great advantage: you’ll be able to bridge the gap between biology, technology and informatics , and thus have a profile that is desperately needed in modern, data-driven biology.

- Multiple OMICS approaches

Studying cells in a systems biology approach means connecting processes at the level of the genome (genomics), epigenome (epigenomics), transcriptome (transcriptomics), proteome (proteomics), etc. In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation, you’ll get acquainted with all these different fields of study.

- Patient and animal samples

Numerous genetic diseases are not caused by genetic mutations, but by epigenetic mutations that influence the structure and function of chromatin. Think of:

- Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

- Cancer, in the forms of leukaemia, colon cancer, prostate cancer and cervical cancer

- Neurological disorders, like Rett Syndrome, Alzheimer, Parkinson, Multiple Sclerosis, schizophrenia and autism

We investigate these diseases on a cellular level, focusing on the epigenetic mutations and the impact on various pathways in the cell. You’ll get the chance to participate in that research, and work with embryonic stem cell, patient, Xenopus or zebra fish samples.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology/epigenomics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. Read more
This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. It also provides a sound educational background so that you can go on to lead academic oral biology programmes within dental schools.

Why study Oral Biology at Dundee?

This course is specifically designed for individuals who wish to pursue career pathways in academic oral biology, with a focus, though not exclusively, on developing individuals who can deliver and, more importantly, lead oral biology courses within dental schools.

Oral Biology is a significant subject area that is integral to undergraduate and postgraduate dental training worldwide. The scope of Oral Biology includes a range of basic and applied sciences that underpin the practise of dentistry. These subjects include: oral and dental anatomy; craniofacial and dental development; oral physiology; oral neuroscience; oral microbiology. These subjects will be integrated with the relevant disease processes, for example, craniofacial anomalies, dental caries and tooth surface loss.

What's so good about studying Oral Biology at Dundee?

This programme focuses on the research and education experience of the staff in the Dental School in Dundee. Such expertise lies in the fields of craniofacial development and anomalies; pain and jaw muscle control; salivary physiology; cancer biology; microbiology; cariology and tooth surface loss.

In addition it makes use of the extensive resources available for postgraduate programmes: extensive histological collections; virtual microscopy; oral physiology facilities; cell biology and dental materials laboratories.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Oral Biology is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in academic oral biology. The course will be of particular interest for those wishing to establish themselves as oral biology teachers, innovators and course leaders within a dental school.

Teaching and Assessment

The Dental School is well placed to deliver such a course with an established staff of teaching and research active within oral biology, and its related fields, an in-house e-learning technologist and substantial links to the Centre for Medical Education in the School of Medicine. There will be an opportunity for students to exit with a PGCert in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 -4 or a Diploma in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 - 7.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered via a blend of methodologies including: face-to-face lectures / seminars / tutorials; on-line learning; directed and self- directed practical work; self-directed study; journal clubs.
What you will study

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August). Semester one (Modules 1 – 4) and Semester 2A, 2B (Modules 5 – 8) will provide participants with wide ranging, in-depth knowledge of oral biology, together with focused training in research (lab-base, dissertation or e- Learning) and its associated methodology. The MSc course is built largely on new modules (5) supported by 2 modules run conjointly with the Centre for Medical Education within the Medical School. All modules are compulsory:

Semester 1:

Module 1: Academic skills 1: principles of learning and teaching (15 credits)
Module 2: Cranio-facial development and anomalies (15 credits)
Module 3: Dental and periodontal tissues, development and structure (20 credits)
Module 4: Oral mucosa and disorders (10 credits)

Semesters 2A and 2B

Module 5a: Academic skills 2a: principles of assessment (15 credits)
Module 5b: Academic Skills 2b:educational skills
Module 6: Neuroscience (20 credits)
Module 7: Oral environment and endemic oral disease (20 credits)
Module 8: Project (60 credits)

The project is designed to encourage students to further develop their skills. This could take the form of a supervised laboratory research project, a literature based dissertation or an educational project. The educational project would be based around the development of an innovative learning resource utilising the experience of the dental school learning technologist.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Careers

The MSc Oral Biology is aimed at dental or science graduates who are either early in their careers or wish to establish themselves as oral biologists within dental schools. Oral Biology is a recognised discipline in many dental schools worldwide. Graduates will have gained sufficient knowledge and skills to enable them to be teachers, innovators and educational leaders in the field. In addition, successful graduates will be well placed to undertake further postgraduate study at PhD level. In some cases, this may possible within the existing research environments within the Dental School, the wider College of Medicine Dentistry and Nursing and the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification of the University of Dundee.

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Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies. Read more

Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies.

You will learn how to master experimental cancer through a combination of traditional teaching and hands-on learning, spending a year as a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Team at The Christie while also taking four structured taught units.

The taught units will see you learn the details of designing and delivering Phase 1 clinical studies, understanding the pre-clinical data required before a clinical programme can commence, and how to optimise early clinical studies to provide evidence for progressing a promising drug into Phase II/III clinical testing.

Alongside the taught elements, you will be allocated to one or more clinical trials that are being conducted by The Christie experimental cancer medicine team. You will have a named trainer and be exposed to tasks required in the setup, delivery, interpretation and audit of a clinical study.

Nursing and physician students will be expected to participate in patient care, including new and follow-on patient clinics, treatment and care-giving episodes with patients.

For clinical trials coordinators, no direct patient contact is envisaged and duties will involve clinical trial setup, protocol amendments, database setup, data entry, costing and billing for clinical research.

You will be able to choose two aspects of your direct clinical trial research experience to write up for your two research projects in a dissertation format. This will give you the skills and knowledge required to critically report medical, scientific and clinically related sciences for peer review.

Aims

The primary purpose of the MRes in Experimental Cancer Medicine is to provide you with the opportunity to work within a premier UK Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit and, through a mix of taught and experiential learning, master the discipline of Experimental Cancer Medicine.

Special features

Extensive practical experience

You will spend most of your time gaining hands-on experience within The Christie's Experimental Cancer Medicine Team.

Additional course information

Meet the course team

Dr Natalie Cook is a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie. She completed a PhD at Cambridge, investigating translational therapeutics and biomarker assay design in pancreatic cancer.

Professor Hughes is Chair of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Strategic Director of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team at The Christie. He is a member of the research strategy group for Manchester Cancer Research Centre. He serves on the Biomarker evaluation review panel for CRUK grant applications.

Professor Hughes was previously Global Vice-President for early clinical development at AstraZeneca, overseeing around 100 Phase 0/1/2 clinical studies. He was previously Global Vice-President for early phase clinical oncology, having been involved in over 200 early phase clinical studies.

Dr Matthew Krebs is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie.

He has a PhD in circulating biomarkers and postdoctoral experience in single cell and ctDNA molecular profiling. He is Principal Investigator on a portfolio of phase 1 clinical trials and has research interests in clinical development of novel drugs for lung cancer and integration of biomarkers with experimental drug development.

Teaching and learning

Our course is structured around a 2:1 split between clinical-based research projects and taught elements respectively.

Taught course units will predominantly use lectures and workshops.

For the research projects, teaching and learning will take place through one-to-one mentoring from a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team.

The clinical and academic experience of contributors to this course will provide you with an exceptional teaching and learning experience.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and dissertation.

For each research project, you will write a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words. Examples of suitable practical projects include the following.

Research proposal

  • Compilation of a research proposal to research council/charity
  • Writing a protocol and trial costings for sponsor
  • Research and write a successful expression of interest selected by grant funder for full development

Publication-based/dissertation by publication

  • Writing a clinical study report
  • Authoring a peer-review journal review/original article

Service development/professional report/ report based dissertation

  • Public health report/outbreak report/health needs assessment/health impact assessment
  • Proposal for service development/organisational change
  • Audit/evaluate service delivery/policy
  • Implement recommended change from audit report

Adapted systematic review (qualitative data)

  • Compiling the platform of scientific evidence for a new drug indication from literature
  • Review of alternative research methodologies from literature

Full systematic review that includes data collection (quantitative data)

  • Referral patterns for Phase 1 patients

Qualitative or quantitative empirical research

  • Design, conduct, analyse and report an experiment

Qualitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing quantitative data

  • Compilation, mining and analysis of existing clinical data sets

Quantitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing qualitative data/theoretical study/narrative review

  • Policy analysis or discourse analysis/content analysis
  • A critical review of policy using framework analysis

Facilities

Teaching will take place within The Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Withington.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to physician, nursing and clinical research students who are considering a career in Phase 1 clinical studies.

The course provides a theoretical and experiential learning experience and offers a foundation for roles within other experimental cancer medicine centres within the UK and EU, as well as careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, clinical trials management and medicine.

The MRes is ideal for high-calibre graduates and professionals wishing to undertake directly channelled research training in the clinical and medical oncology field.



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The Cancer MSc reflects the depth and breadth of research interests, from basic science to translational medicine, within the UCL Cancer Institute. Read more

The Cancer MSc reflects the depth and breadth of research interests, from basic science to translational medicine, within the UCL Cancer Institute. The programme, taught by research scientists and academic clinicians, provides students with an in-depth look at the biology behind the disease processes which lead to cancer.

About this degree

This programme offers a foundation in understanding cancer as a disease process and its associated therapies. Students learn about the approaches taken to predict, detect, monitor and treat cancer, alongside the cutting-edge research methods and techniques used to advance our understanding of this disease and design better treatment strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), four specialist modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time 12 weeks) is offered.

Core modules

  • Basic Biology and Cancer Genetics
  • Cancer Therapeutics

Specialist modules

  • Behavioural Science and Cancer
  • Biomarkers in Cancer
  • Cancer Clinical Trials
  • Haematological Malignancies and Gene Therapy

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake a laboratory project, clinical trials project or systems biology/informatics project, which culminates in a 10,000–12,000 word dissertation and an oral research presentation.

Teaching and learning

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of cancer through lectures, self-study, database mining, wet-lab based practicals, clinical trial evaluations, laboratory training, assigned reading and self-learning. Each taught module is assessed by an unseen written examination and/or coursework. The research project is assessed by the dissertation (75%) and oral presentation (25%).

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Cancer MSc

Careers

The knowledge and skills developed will be suitable for those in an industrial or healthcare setting, as well as those individuals contemplating a PhD or medical studies in cancer.

Employability

Skills include critical evaluation of scientific literature, experimental planning and design interpretation of data and results, presentation/public speaking skills, time management, working with a team, working independently and writing for various audiences.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is one of Europe's largest and most productive centres of biomedical science, with an international reputation for leading basic, translational and clinical cancer research.

The UCL Cancer Institute brings together scientists from various disciplines to synergise multidisciplinary research into cancer, whose particular areas of expertise include: the biology of leukaemia, the infectious causes of cancer, the design of drugs that interact with DNA, antibody-directed therapies, the molecular pathology of cancer, signalling pathways in cancer, epigenetic changes in cancer, gene therapy, cancer stem cell biology, early phase clinical trials, and national and international clinical trials in solid tumours and blood cancers.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Cancer Institute

80% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. Read more
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. The MRes in Translational Medicine provides high quality graduates with the research rigour, the innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution and so develop a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific medical/dental and veterinary graduates.

Translational Medicine allows experimental findings in the research laboratory to be converted into real benefit for the health and well-being of the patient, through the development of new innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches.

The main objective of the MRes Programme in Translational Medicine is to provide high quality candidates with the research rigour, innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution. Students will receive expert training in all aspects of translational medicine including how new experimental findings are translated into treatments for patients; the experimental steps in the process, the development of innovative solutions, management and leadership skills and an appreciation of marketing and financial aspects of translational medicine through interaction with business leaders and scientists from Biotech and Pharmacy

This research intensive programme incorporates a 38 week research project in an area selected by the student in consultation with the research project co-ordinator. student selected area.

QUB has an international reputation in translational medicine, achieved through the recognised metrics of high impact peer review publications, significant international research funding, the generation of exploitable novel intellectual property and the establishment of successful spin-out biotech companies. This ethos of innovation was recently recognised with the award of the Times Higher Education Entrepreneurial University of the Year.

This unique course offers students the chance to choose one of these three research streams with the indicated specialist modules:

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Precision Cancer Medicine

This stream provides students with a unique opportunity to study cancer biology and perform innovative cancer research within the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Prospective students are immersed in this precision medicine milieu from Day 1, providing for them the opportunity to understand the key principles in discovery cancer biology and how these research advances are translated for the benefit of cancer patients. The strong connectivity with both the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also opening up potential doors for the student's future career.

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Cardiovascular Medicine

This stream contains two complementary modules which significantly build on the foundation provided by undergraduate medicine or biomedical science to provide students with an advanced insight into current understanding of cardiovascular pathobiology and an appreciation of how this knowledge is being applied in the search for novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical management of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Students who select the Cardiovascular Medicine Stream will be taught and mentored within the Centre for Experimental Medicine which is a brand new, purpose-built institute (~7400m2) at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus. This building represents a significant investment (~£32m) by the University and boasts state-of-the-art research facilities which are supported by a world-leading research-intensive faculty, ensuring that all of our postgraduate students are exposed to a top quality training experience.

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Inflammation, infection and Immunity

This stream exposes students to exciting concepts and their application in the field of infection biology, inflammatory processes and the role of immunity in health and disease. There will be detailed consideration of the role of the immune system in host defence and in disease. There is a strong emphasis is on current developments in this rapidly progressing field of translational medicine. Students learn how to manipulate the inflammatory/immune response and their interaction with microbes to identify, modify and prevent disease. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of clinical trials for new therapeutics, and the basic approach to designing a trial to test novel methods to diagnose/prevent or treat illness.

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We are pleased to deliver an innovative Level 7 Masters, MCh in Surgery with four individual awards in the specialist surgical pathways of. Read more
We are pleased to deliver an innovative Level 7 Masters, MCh in Surgery with four individual awards in the specialist surgical pathways of:
-Orthopaedics and Regenerative Medicine
-Otorhinolaryngology
-Urology
-Ophthamology*

*Subject to validation

Surgical pathways such as in General Surgery and Gynaecology and Emergency Obstetrics are planned to be included for the near future.

The theme of regenerative medicine and the teaching of practical skills through simulation runs through each of the specialist pathways and modules.

Orthopaedics and Regenerative Medicine

The specialist surgical field of orthopaedics has been central in the use of regenerative medicine. The focus in modern orthopaedics is changing as research exposes ever greater knowledge widening the spectrum of therapeutic options encompassing reconstruction, regeneration and substitution (Kim, S-J. and Shetty, A.A., 2011; Shetty, A.A. and Kim, S-J., 2013; Kim, J-M., Hans, J.R. and Shetty, A.A., 2014).

Research methods, studies in regenerative medicine and other emerging technologies feature poorly in the standard curriculum of the orthopaedic trainee. This limits the quality of research output, reduces the potential for innovation and slows the rates of adoption of transformative treatments for patients, while leaving the surgeon unable to critically evaluate new treatments.

This programme targets this deficiency with a strong emphasis on research methodology and critical analysis that is based on a platform formed of in-depth scientific knowledge and proven by translation into clinical practice.

Otorhinolaryngology

Otorhinolaryngology (Ear, Nose and Throat surgery – ENT) is a diverse surgical specialty that involves the management of both children and adults. In contrast to other surgical specialties the management of a significant number of conditions requires a non-surgical approach. An understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of pathology is essential. This surgical specialty is rapidly evolving. Significant progress has been made through regenerative medicine and technology, some locally through mobile platforms.

Entry into Otorhinolaryngology is competitive. This is often despite the fact that whilst at University many medical students may have had little, if any, formal training in ENT. Some junior trainees entering the specialty have had limited exposure which may affect their decision making.

The MCh in Surgery (Otorhinolaryngology) course aims to prepare a trainee to meet the challenges of the current and future challenges in Otorhinolaryngology. It provides an evidence based approach for the management of patients, and provides a foundation for those who will eventually undertake formal exit examinations in this specialty.

Urology

Urology is a surgical specialty dealing with the problems associated with the urinary tract and it deals with cancer, non-cancer, functional problems and diseases (Khan, F., Mahmalji, W., Sriprasad, S. and Madaan, S., 2013). In urology many problems can be managed with medications (for example treating erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms have become largely by pharmaceutical agents) and this underpins the importance of understanding the basic science and molecular biology as applied to the specialty.

This surgical field is constantly evolving with technology being the main driver. Improvements have been made through lasers, optics, gadgets and robotics (Jeong, Kumar and Menon, 2016). Regenerative medicine is fast evolving in urology. The architectural simplicity of hollow structures (such as bladder) and tubes (such as the ureters and urethra) make them particularly amenable.

Despite the fact that many medical students may not have had a urology placement during their training (Derbyshire and Flynn, 2011) the specialty is very much sought after. Getting into urological training is very competitive. Doctors typically undertake research, obtain higher degrees and publish papers in peer-reviewed journals in order to advance their surgical training. A MCh in Surgery (Urology) will therefore be significantly valuable to you for not only your professional knowledge and skills but also to help you reach your goals of becoming a Consultant.

The MCh in Surgery (Urology) will prepare you to meet the challenges of current and future urologic medicine and surgery. All this provides a platform for further advancement of your scientific knowledge, innovative and forward thinking, career progression and camaraderie with fellow students.

Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology is a surgical specialty dealing with disorders of the eye and visual pathways. Although the treatment of eye conditions involves a range of therapeutic options, including medicine, laser and surgery, the surgical field in particular is constantly evolving with technology being the main driver. Improvements are being made through lasers, optics, and minimally invasive surgical procedures with enhanced outcomes for patients.

There is very little ophthalmology teaching in modern medical school curricula. However, the speciality is highly sought after with intense competition for a limited number of training positions. Therefore, doctors typically undertake research, obtain higher degrees and publish papers in peer-reviewed journals in order to advance their surgical training and improve their chances of achieving a training number. A MCh in Surgery (Ophthalmology) will provide you with a solid foundation and valuable qualification to enhance selection onto a career pathway in this highly competitive field, culminating in a Consultant appointment. The MCh in Surgery (Ophthalmology) will prepare you as a trainee surgeon to meet the challenges of current and future ophthalmology. Specifically, you will be taught to critically analyse and evaluate data through learning research methodology. You will then learn to apply this to clinical practice and to evaluate the different treatment options and new technologies with respect to patient benefit and outcomes. There will be the opportunity of studying a range of conditions and treatments in depth. All this provides a platform for further advancement of your scientific knowledge, innovative and forward thinking. A unique aspect of the MCh programme is the teaching of regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine is fast evolving in ophthalmology, and this programme will help you to appreciate this area of medicine as applied to eye conditions. This is especially so in retinal conditions, optic neuropathies and glaucoma. The knowledge gained is critical not just for the local students from the United Kingdom but to any trainee from anywhere in the world.

The theme of regenerative medicine will run through each of the specialist pathway modules with its application, research and emerging technologies being critically explored. Although a key component and theme through this programme will be regenerative medicine, a further theme that will run through each of the modules is the teaching of practical surgical skills in each of the pathways and modules through simulation.

Aims of the Course

In order for you to be able to think in an innovative manner and to be prepared for modern challenges in surgery, this programme aims to develop your scientific insight into current and emerging technologies that will inform your clinical practice and help you to apply basic scientific discoveries to your clinical work for the benefit of your patients.

It aims to facilitate you to develop a critical understanding of current novel and potentially beneficial therapies that use regenerative medicine and digital health platforms in a way that will inspire and encourage you to use this knowledge and develop your own ideas. To be a competent, safe and compassionate surgeon, you need to be able to develop your critical, analytical and problem solving abilities.

The programme therefore will enable you to critically and analytically consider the evidence base presented to you, to confidently challenge this evidence and make comprehensive, considered and robust decisions on patient care. In doing so you will be enabled to think and work creatively and intellectually which in turn will stimulate you to search for new knowledge for the benefit of your patients and health care provision.

Further, this programme will enable you to be a lifelong learner, having developed critical, analytical and evaluative skills at Masters level, to undertake your own high quality research and search for innovation, which in turn will further progress your area of expertise. Integral to the programme is the need to develop and enhance a culture in you that ensures a willingness to challenge poor or bad clinical practice, improve service delivery and effect change.

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Whether you are a new graduate or already employed and seeking to further your career prospects, this course offers a solid career development path. Read more

Whether you are a new graduate or already employed and seeking to further your career prospects, this course offers a solid career development path. You can also choose this course if you wish to pursue research in biotechnology at PhD level.

Biotechnology is the application of biological processes and is underpinned by • cell biology • molecular biology • bioinformatics • structural biology. It encompasses a wide range of technologies for modifying living organisms or their products according to human needs.

Applications of biotechnology span medicine, technology and engineering.

Important biotechnological advances including

  • the production of therapeutic proteins using cloned DNA, for example insulin and clotting factors
  • the application of stem cells to treat human disease
  • the enhancement of crop yields and plants with increased nutritional value
  • herbicide and insect resistant plants
  • production of recombinant antibodies for the treatment of disease
  • edible vaccines, in the form of modified plants
  • development of biosensors for the detection of biological and inorganic analytes

You gain

  • up-to-date knowledge of the cellular and molecular basis of biological processes
  • an advanced understanding of DNA technology and molecular biotechnology
  • knowledge of developing and applying biotechnology to diagnosis and treatment of human diseases
  • practical skills applicable in a range of bioscience laboratories
  • the transferable and research skills to enable you to continue developing your knowledge and improving your employment potential

The course is led by academics who are actively involved in biotechnology research and its application to the manipulation of proteins, DNA, mammalian cells and plants. Staff also have expertise in the use of nanoparticles in drug delivery and the manipulation of microbes in industrial and environmental biotechnology.

You are supported throughout your studies by an academic advisor who will help you develop your study and personal skills.

What is biotechnology

Biotechnology is the basis for the production of current leading biopharmaceuticals and has already provided us with the 'clot-busting' drug, tissue plasminogen activator for the treatment of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. It also holds the promise of new treatments for neurodegeneration and cancer through recombinant antibodies.

Genetically modified plants have improved crop yields and are able to grow in a changing environment. Manipulation of cellular organisms through gene editing methods have also yielded a greater understanding of many disease states and have allowed us to understand how life itself functions.

Course structure

You begin your studies focusing on the fundamentals of advanced cell biology and molecular biology before specialising in both molecular and plant biotechnology. Practical skills are developed throughout the course and you gain experience in molecular biology techniques such as PCR and sub cloning alongside tissue culture.

Core to the program is the practical module where you gain experience in a range of techniques used in the determination of transcription and translational levels, for example.

All practicals are supported by experienced academic staff, skilled in the latest biotechnological techniques.

Research and statistical skills are developed throughout the program. Towards the end of the program you apply your skills on a two month research project into a current biotechnological application. Employability skills are developed throughout the course in two modules.

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits. 

Core modules:

  • Cell biology (15 credits)
  • Biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Plant biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Molecular biology (15 credits)
  • Applied biomedical techniques (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Optional modules :

  • Human genomics and proteomics (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of disease (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of cancer (15 credits)

Assessment

As students progress through the course they are exposed to a wide range of teaching and learning activities. The assessment strategy of the postgraduate course considers diverse assessment methods. Some modules offer dedicated formative feedback to aid skills development with assessments going through several rounds of formative tutor and peer feedback. Summative assessment methods are diverse, with examinations present in theory-based modules to test independent knowledge and data analysis. Several modules are entirely coursework-based, with a portfolio of skills such laboratory practical's and research proposals generated throughout the course forming the summative tasks. In all cases, the assessment criteria for all assessed assignments are made available to student prior to submission. 

Employability

The course is suitable for people wishing to develop their knowledge of molecular and cell biotechnology and its application to solving health and industrial problems.

You can find career opportunities in areas such as

  • biotechnology research
  • medical research in universities and hospitals
  • government research agencies
  • biotechnology industry
  • pharmaceutical industry.

Students on this course have gone on to roles including experimental officers in contract research, research and development in scientists, diagnostics specialists and applications specialists. Many of our graduates also go on to study for PhDs and continue as academic lecturers.



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