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Masters Degrees (Biological Systems)

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The two-year MSc Bioinformatics concerns a new scientific discipline with roots in computer science, statistics and molecular biology. Read more

MSc Bioinformatics

The two-year MSc Bioinformatics concerns a new scientific discipline with roots in computer science, statistics and molecular biology. Bioinformaticians apply information technology to store, retrieve and manipulate these data and employ statistical methods capable of analysing large amounts of biological data to predict gene functions and to demonstrate relationships between genes and proteins.

Programme summary

DNA contains information about life, but how is this information used? Biological data, such as DNA and RNA sequence information produced by next-generation sequencing techniques, is accumulating at an unprecedented rate. Life scientists increasingly use bioinformatics resources to address their specific research questions. Bioinformaticians bridge the gap between complex biological research questions and this complex data. Bioinformaticians use and develop computational tools to predict gene function(s) and to demonstrate and model relationships between genes, proteins and metabolites in biological systems. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field that applies computational and statistical techniques to the classification, interpretation and integration of large-scale biological data sets. If different data types are joined then complex interactions in biological systems can be studied. The use of systems biology methods to study complex biological interactions offers a wealth of possibilities to understand various levels of aggregation and enables control of biological systems on different scales. Systems biology approaches are therefore quickly gaining importance in many disciplines of life sciences, such as in applied biotechnology where these methods are now used to develop strategies for improving production in fermentation. Other examples include bioconversion and enzymatic synthesis, and in the study of human metabolism and its alterations where systems biology methods are applied to understand a variety of complex human diseases, including metabolic syndromes and cancer. The Wageningen Master programme focuses on the practical application of bioinformatics and systems biology approaches in many areas of the Life Sciences. To ensure that students acquire a high level of understanding of modelling and computing principles, the students are trained in the fundamentals of database management, computer programming, structural and functional genomics, proteomics and systems biology methods. This training includes advanced elective courses in molecular biology and biostatistics.

Thesis tracks

Bioinformatics
The bioinformatics track focuses on the practical application of bioinformatics knowledge and skills in molecular life sciences. It aims at creating and using bioinformatics resources to address specific research questions. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in many life science disciplines such as molecular & cell biology, biotechnology, (human) genetics, health & medicine and environmental & biobased technology.

Systems Biology
The systems biology track focuses on the study of the complex interactions in biological systems and on the emerging properties derived from these. Systems biology approaches to complex biological problems offer a wealth of possibilities to understand various levels of aggregation. It enables control of biological systems on completely different scales, ranging from the molecular cellular level to marine, plant, or animal ecosystems to a desired state. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in many life science disciplines including molecular & cell biology, applied biotechnology, genetics, medicine and vaccine development, environmental and biobased technology.

Your future career

Bioinformatics and Systems Biology are new fast growing biology based interdisciplinary fields of research poorly served by the traditional curricula of Life Sciences. As demand has outpaced the supply of bioinformaticians, the first job after graduation is often a PhD project at a research institute or university. It is expected that five years after graduation, about one third will stay employed as a scientist at a university or research centre, while the others choose for careers at research-oriented pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies.

Alumnus Tom van den Bergh.
"It is sometimes difficult for doctors to diagnose genetic diseases caused by missense mutations. A missense mutation does not necessarily mean that you have the gene-associated disease and will become ill since not all missense mutations lead to appreciable protein changes." Tom created a database for Fabry’s disease for his final thesis. He wrote a computer programme that reads publications and stores all information about Fabry mutations in its database. Genetic researchers can, in turn, quickly access this database to determine if the mutation they found in a patient has already been addressed in literature and what the effects were.

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Plant Biotechnology

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This course provides you with a balance of molecular biology, engineering, computing and modelling skills necessary for a career in synthetic biology. Read more
This course provides you with a balance of molecular biology, engineering, computing and modelling skills necessary for a career in synthetic biology. Computational design of biological systems is important as the field of synthetic biology grows. This allows the construction of complex and large biological systems.

While laboratory approaches to engineering biological systems are a major focus, the course specialises in computational design. This provides you with essential computing and engineering skills to allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply. It is ideal if you are aiming for careers in industry or academia.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience that is essential for understanding synthetic biology. The programme draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Biology, as well as the Medical Faculty and the Institute of Human Genetics.

Research is a large component of this course. The emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need in the future to meet the demands of industry and academia effectively. Newcastle's research in life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised.

The teaching staff are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked systems synthetic biology journals.

Our experienced and friendly staff are on hand to help you. You gain the experience of working in a team in an environment with the help, support and friendship of fellow students.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you real research experience in Synthetic Biology. You will have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry led projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. Read more
This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. It specialises in computational design, providing essential computing and engineering skills that allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

This interdisciplinary course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the Faculty of Medical Sciences and the School of Mathematics and Statistics. The course is ideal for students aiming for careers in industry or academia. We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering.

Computational Systems Biology is focused on the study of organisms from a holistic perspective. Computational design of biological systems is essential for allowing the construction of complex and large biological systems.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience essential for understanding systems biology. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, and Cell and Molecular Biosciences. The course also has strong links with Newcastle's Centre for Integrated Systems Biology of Ageing and Nutrition (CISBAN).

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply.

The course is part of a suite of related programmes that also include:
-Bioinformatics MSc
-Synthetic Biology MSc
-Computational Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics MSc

All four programmes share core modules, creating a tight-knit cohort. This encourages collaborations on projects undertaking interdisciplinary research.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you a real opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in depth in Systems Biology. You have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Placements

Students have a unique opportunity to complete a work placement with one of our industrial partners as part of their projects.

Previous students have found placements with organisations including:
-NHS Business Services Authority
-Waterstons
-Metropolitan Police
-Accenture
-IBM
-Network Rail
-Nissan
-GSK

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The 1-year Electrical Power Systems Masters/MSc is good, the 2-year Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research Masters/MSc is even better!. Read more
The 1-year Electrical Power Systems Masters/MSc is good, the 2-year Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research Masters/MSc is even better!

The 3rd energy industry revolution is taking place where the key is the development of electrical power systems in the contexts of smart grids. Electrical power systems are playing a pivotal role in the development of a sustainable energy supply, enabling renewable energy generation. Globally there is a big shortage of skilled engineers for designing, operating, controlling and the economic analysis of future electricity networks – smart grids

The new 2-year MSc Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research will give you the timely advanced skills and specialist experience required to significantly enhance your career in the electrical power industry. The programme builds on a very close involvement with the power industry, the education of power engineers and extensive research work and expertise as well as the successful experience on the 1-year MSc Electrical Power Systems at the University of Birmingham. The 2-year MSc Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research will be able to fill in the gap of skills between the 1-year MSc and PhD research.

Some modules will be taught by leading industry experts, which will give you the exciting opportunity to understand the real challenges that power industry is facing, hence propose innovative solutions. In addition, students working on relevant MSc projects may have the opportunity to work with leading industry experts directly.

The new 2-Year MSc Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research will run in parallel with the existing 1-Year MSc Electrical Power Systems. The taught credits in the 1st year of the 2 Year MSc are identical to that of the 1-Year MSc while the 2nd Year is mainly focused on a research project.

This programme also aims to provide graduates with the ability to critically evaluate methodologies, analytical procedures and advanced research methods. Year 1 of the programme is focussed on the taught modules covering:

Control concepts and methods
Advanced energy conversion systems and power electronic applications
Advanced power electronic technologies for electrical power networks – HVDC and FACTS
Electrical power system engineering - using state-of-the-art computational tools and methods, and design of sustainable electrical power systems and networks
Economic analysis of electrical power systems and electricity markets.
While Year 2 of the programme will give you the opportunity to work on an advanced research project. For some suitable projects, in conjunction with joint industry supervisions, industry placement may be available.

It is envisaged there will be the opportunity for students to transfer between the two programmes using the University’s procedures for transfers between programmes, subject to programme requirements. This opportunity would take place at the end of the taught part of the programme.

About the School of Electronic, Electrical & Systems Engineering

Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, is an exceptionally broad subject. It sits between Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Psychology, Materials Science, Education, Biological and Medical Sciences, with interfaces to many other areas of engineering such as transportation systems, renewable energy systems and the built environment.
Our students study in modern, purpose built and up to date facilities in the Gisbert Kapp building, which houses dedicated state-of-theart teaching and research facilities. The Department has a strong commitment to interdisciplinary research and boasts an annual research fund of more than £4 million a year. This means that wherever your interest lies, you can be sure you’ll be taught by experts in the field.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

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Bioinformatics is changing as high throughput biological data collection becomes more Systems oriented. This means that employers are looking for people able to work across the traditional disciplines. Read more
Bioinformatics is changing as high throughput biological data collection becomes more Systems oriented. This means that employers are looking for people able to work across the traditional disciplines.

The MSc in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology at Manchester reflects these exciting developments, providing an integrated programme taught by researchers at the forefront of fields spanning Bioinformatics, Genomics and Systems Biology.

Bioinformatics has been an identifiable discipline for more than a decade, driven by the computational demands of high volumes of biological data. It incorporates both the development and application of algorithms to decipher biological relationships.

Enormous success has been achieved, for example in defining homologous families of sequences at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. However, our appreciation of function is changing rapidly as experimental analysis scales up to cellular and organismal viewpoints.

At these levels, we are interested in the properties of a network of interacting components in a system, as well as the components themselves. The concepts or Systems Biology and Bioinformatics complement each other, and both are addressed in this course.
This combination reflects the current skills sought in academic and industrial (eg pharmaceutical) settings. An important feature is the extent to which computational biology is concerned with finding patterns in biological data, and generating hypotheses that feed back into experiments.

Teaching is delivered by more than ten academic staff working in the fields of Bioinformatics, Genomics and Systems Biology, representing the breadth and depth of these areas.

Aims

The Bioinformatics and Systems Biology course provides students with theoretical and practical knowledge of methods to analyse and interpret the data generated by modern biology. This involves the appreciation of biochemistry and molecular biology, together with the techniques of IT and computer science that will prepare students for multidisciplinary careers in research.

To achieve this there are three main objectives:
-Provide biological background to the data types of Genomics, Proteomics and Metabolomics.
-Develop the computational and analytical understanding necessary as a platform for processing biological data.
-Demonstrate applications and worked examples in the fields of Bioinformatics and System Biology, integrating with student involvement through project work.

Coursework and assessment

Research projects provide experience in carrying through a substantive research project including the planning, execution and communication of original scientific research. They are assessed by written report.

Taught units involve lectures, practicals and problem classes and are assessed through both coursework and exam.

Course unit details

The taught part of the course runs from September to April and consists of 60 credits delivered from four 15 credit units.
-Bioinformatics
-Programming Skills
-Computational Systems Biology
-Experimental Design and Statistics

You will undertake two research project, each of 60 credits, in Semester 2 and the summer. Additionally tutorials and the Graduate Training Programme (skills development) will run through the whole programme.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a wide range of subject specific and transferable skills and gain extensive research experience. Around half of each class find PhD positions straight after the MSc, whilst others build upon their training to enter careers in biology and IT. The combination of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics addressed in this course reflects the current skills sought in academic and industrial (e.g. pharmaceutical) settings.

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The Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems MRes, taught at the University of Cambridge and at the UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems, aims to train students to PhD level in the skills needed to produce new integrated photonic systems for applications ranging from information display to ultra-fast communications and industrial materials processing. Read more
The Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems MRes, taught at the University of Cambridge and at the UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems, aims to train students to PhD level in the skills needed to produce new integrated photonic systems for applications ranging from information display to ultra-fast communications and industrial materials processing.

Degree information

The programme offers a wide range of specialised modules, including electronics and biotechnology. Students gain a foundation training in the scientific basis of photonics and systems, and develop a good understanding of the industry. They are able to design an individual bespoke programme to reflect their prior experience and future interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Students take two compulsory research projects (90 credits), one transferable skills module (15 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and two elective modules (30 credits).
-Project Report 1 at either UCL or Cambridge
-Project Report 2 at either UCL, Cambridge or industry
-Transferable Business Skills

Optional modules - students choose three optional modules from the following:
-Nanotechnology
-Biosensors
-Advanced Photonic Devices
-Photonic Systems
-Solar-Electrical Power: Generation and Distribution
-Photonic Sub-systems
-Broadband Technologies and Components
-Management of Technology
-Strategic Management
-Telecommunication Business Environment

Elective modules - students choose a further two elective modules from the list below:
-Solid State Devices and Chemical/Biological Sensors
-Display Technology
-Analogue Integrated Circuits
-Robust and Nonlinear Systems and Control
-Digital Filters and Spectrum Estimation
-Image Processing and Image Coding
-Computer Vision and Robotics
-Materials and Processes for Microsystems
-Building an Internet Router
-Network Architecture
-Software for Network Services
-Optical Transmission and Networks
-Nanotechnology and Healthcare
-RF Circuits and Sub-systems
-Physics and Optics of Nano-Structure
-Broadband Communications Lab
-Analogue CMOS IC Design Applications

Dissertation/report
All students undertake two research projects. An independent research project (45 credits) and an industry-focused project (45 credits).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, projects, seminars, and laboratory work. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examination and coursework (written assignments and design work).

Careers

Dramatic progress has been made in the past few years in the field of photonic technologies. These advances have set the scene for a major change in commercialisation activity where photonics and electronics will converge in a wide range of information, sensing, display, and personal healthcare systems. Importantly, photonics will become a fundamental underpinning technology for a much greater range of companies outside the conventional photonics arena, who will in turn require those skilled in photonic systems to have a much greater degree of interdisciplinary training, and indeed be expert in certain fields outside photonics.

Employability
Our students are highly employable and have the opportunity to gain industry experience during their MRes year in large aerospace companies like Qioptiq, BAE Systems, Selex ES; medical equipment companies such as Hitachi; and technology and communications companies such as Toshiba through placements based both in the UK and overseas. Several smaller spin-out companies from both UCL and Cambridge also offer projects. The Centre organises industry day events which provide an excellent opportunity to network with senior technologists and managers interested in recruiting photonics engineers. A recent 2014 graduate is now working as a Fiber Laser Development Engineer for Coherent Scotland. Another is a Patent Attorney for HGF Ltd.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The University of Cambridge and UCL have recently established an exciting Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems, leveraging their current strong collaborations in research and innovation.

The centre provides doctoral training using expertise drawn from a range of disciplines, and collaborates closely with a wide range of UK industries, using innovative teaching and learning techniques.

This centre, aims to create graduates with the skills and confidence able to drive future technology research, development and exploitation, as photonics becomes fully embedded in electronics-based systems applications ranging from communications to sensing, industrial manufacture and biomedicine.

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Most things in the real world are complex and difficult to understand, from biological systems to the financial markets to industrial processes, but explaining them is essential to making progress in the modern world. Read more
Most things in the real world are complex and difficult to understand, from biological systems to the financial markets to industrial processes, but explaining them is essential to making progress in the modern world. Mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool in the challenge to understand many of these systems, and is an essential part of contemporary applied mathematics. By developing, analysing and interpreting mathematical and computational models we gain insight into these complex processes, as well as giving a framework in which to interpret experimental data.

To fully capitalise on these tools, there is a fundamental need in both academic research and industry for a new generation of scientists trained to work at the interdisciplinary frontiers of mathematics and computation. These scientists require the ability to assimilate and understand information from other disciplines, communicate with and enthuse other researchers, as well as having the advanced mathematical and computational skills needed.

MSc Mathematical Modelling is a one year master’s level course at the interfaces of Mathematics, Computer Science, Systems Biology and Chemical Engineering. Interdisciplinary mathematical modelling in the School of Mathematics at the University of Birmingham takes place in a thriving outward-facing community with specialities including mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, mathematical finance and industrial modelling. The School collaborates widely with multiple disciplines, including Biological and Medical Sciences, Chemical Engineering and within industry. In particular, Birmingham is an emerging centre for multidisciplinary Biological Systems Science research, and is in a unique position, being adjacent to one of the largest super-hospitals in Europe, catering for a highly diverse population.

The programme is specifically tailored to develop students from a strong mathematics background into becoming genuinely multidisciplinary scientists. You will have the opportunity to develop your mathematical and computational modelling skills, whilst at the same time being trained in cutting-edge interdisciplinary techniques, including the option of practical work. You will learn how to diversify your skills into other fields, and how to work with research leaders and other students from different disciplines.

About the School of Mathematics

The School of Mathematics is one of seven schools in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences. The school is situated in the Watson Building on the main Edgbaston campus of the University of Birmingham. There are about 50 academic staff, 15 research staff, 10 support staff, 60 postgraduate students and 600 undergraduate students.
At the School of Mathematics we take the personal development and careers planning of our students very seriously. Jointly with the University of Birmingham's Careers Network we have developed a structured programme to support maths students with their career planning from when they arrive to when they graduate and beyond.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This MRes programme aims to train students in the fast-growing area of synthetic bgiology, a discipline which takes the knowledge and understanding we now have of the individual parts of biological systems and uses them in a defined way to design and build novel artificial biological systems. Read more
This MRes programme aims to train students in the fast-growing area of synthetic bgiology, a discipline which takes the knowledge and understanding we now have of the individual parts of biological systems and uses them in a defined way to design and build novel artificial biological systems.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the areas making up synthetic biology, including engineering principles, mathematical modelling, molecular biology, biochemical engineering and chemistry. Modules also provide the necessary skills for acquisition and critical analysis of the primary scientific literature and transferrable research development skills. The programme includes a major research project that will give in-depth training in synthetic biology research methods.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits) and an extended research project (120 credits). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Synthetic Biology
-The Scientific Literature
-Biosciences Research Skills

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent laboratory-based extended research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000–18,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars and tutorials, combining research-led and skills based courses. The taught courses are assessed by assignments and coursework. The research project is assessed by an oral presentation, submission of a dissertation and is subject to oral examination.

Careers

Synthetic biology is a fast growing area of research and will have a major economic and social impact on the global economy in the coming decades. The involvement of engineers, physical scientists, chemists and biologists can create designed cells, enzymes and biological modules that can be combined in a defined manner. These could be used to make complex metabolic pathways for pharmaceuticals, novel hybrid biosensors or novel routes to biofuels. A future integration of biological devices and hybrid devices as components in the electronic industry might lead to a whole new high value industry for structured biological entities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Science Technician, King Richard's School
-Scientific consultant, Labcitec
-PhD Synthetic Biology, UCL
-PhD Biochemistry, University of Oxford
-PhD Bioenergy and Industrial Biotechnology, University of Cambridge

Employability
The Synthetic Biology MRes will qualify students to go on to work in the growing number of small companies engaged in synthetic biology both here in London and across the UK and the world. There are many large companies that are building their own synthetic biology potential and some of students are already working with these groups. Our students often go on to do further research in PhDs and EngDs globally. Our graduates have practical experience in unique facilities of generating novel research that makes them of great value to employers and collaborators.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is recognised as one of the world's best research environments within the field of biochemical engineering and synthetic biology as well as biological and biomedical science.

UCL Biochemical Engineering is in a unique position to offer tuition and research opportunities in internationally recognised laboratories and an appreciation of the multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology research.

Students on this new MRes programme undertake a major research project where topics can be chosen spanning the expertise in six departments across UCL.

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This Masters in Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) focuses on the technologies and techniques that underpin a vast range of societal, research and industrial needs. Read more
This Masters in Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) focuses on the technologies and techniques that underpin a vast range of societal, research and industrial needs. It is delivered and awarded jointly by the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. Sensing and sensor systems are essential for advances in research across all fields of physics, engineering and chemistry and are enhanced when multiple sensing functions are combined into arrays to enable imaging. Industrial applications of sensor systems are ubiquitous: from mass-produced sensors found in modern smart phones and every modern car to the state-of-the-art, specialist high-value sensors routinely used in oil and gas recovery, scientific equipment, machine tools, medical equipment and environmental monitoring. This is an industry-focused programme, designed for people looking to develop skills that will open up opportunities in a host of end applications.

Why this programme

◾This is a jointly taught and awarded degree from the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh, developed in with conjunction with CENSIS.
◾CENSIS is a centre of excellence for Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) technologies, CENSIS enables industry innovators and university researchers to collaborate at the forefront of market-focused SIS innovation, developing products and services for global markets.
◾CENSIS, the Innovation Centre for Sensor and Imaging Systems, is one of eight Innovation Centres that are transforming the way universities and business work together to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship across Scotland’s key economic sectors, create jobs and grow the economy. CENSIS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (£10m) and supported by Scottish Enterprise, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the Scottish Government.
◾CENSIS has now launched its collaborative MSc in Sensor and Imaging Systems, designed to train the next generation of sensor system experts.
◾This programme will allow you to benefit from the commercial focus of CENSIS along with the combined resources and complementary expertise of staff from two top ranking Russell Group universities, working together to offer you a curriculum relevant to the needs of industry.
◾The Colleges of Science and Engineering at the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh delivered power and impact in the 2014 Research Excellent Framework. Overall, 94% of Edinburgh’s and 90% of Glasgow’s research activity is world leading or internationally excellent, rising in Glasgow’s case to 95% for its impact.
◾Fully-funded places and bursaries are available to Scottish/EU candidates. Further information on funded places.

Programme structure

The programme comprises a mix of core and optional courses. The curriculum you undertake is flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, your particular research interests, and the specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme.

Graduates receive a joint degree from the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Programme timetable
◾Semester 1: University of Glasgow
◾Semester 2: University of Edinburgh
◾Semester 3: MSc project, including the possibility of an industry placement

Core courses
◾Circuits and systems
◾Fundamentals of sensing and imaging
◾Imaging and detectors
◾Technology and innovation management
◾Research project preparation.

Optional courses
◾Biomedical imaging techniques
◾Biophysical chemistry
◾Biosensors and instrumentation
◾Chemical biology
◾Digital signal processing
◾Electronic product design and manufacture
◾Electronic system design
◾Entrepreneurship
◾Lab-on-chip technologies
◾Lasers and electro-optic systems
◾Microelectronics in consumer products
◾Microfabrication techniques
◾Nanofabrication
◾Physical techniques in action
◾Waves and diffraction.

Career prospects

You will gain an understanding of sensor-based systems applicable to a whole host of markets supported by CENSIS.

Career opportunities are extensive. Sensor systems are spearheading the next wave of connectivity and intelligence for internet connected devices, underpinning all of the new ‘smart markets’, e.g., grid, cities, transport and mobility, digital healthcare and big data.

You will graduate with domain-appropriate skills suitable for a range of careers in areas including renewable energy, subsea and marine technologies, defence, automotive engineering, intelligent transport, healthcare, aerospace, manufacturing and process control, consumer electronics, and environmental monitoring.

Globally, the market for sensor systems is valued at £500Bn with an annual growth rate of 10%. The Scottish sensor systems market is worth £2.6Bn pa. There are over 170 sensor systems companies based in Scotland (SMEs and large companies), employing 16,000 people in high-value jobs including product R&D, design, engineering, manufacturing and field services.

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Learn how to create artificial information systems that mimic biological systems as well as how to use theoretical insights from AI to better understand cognitive processing in humans. Read more
Learn how to create artificial information systems that mimic biological systems as well as how to use theoretical insights from AI to better understand cognitive processing in humans.
The human brain is a hugely complex machine that is able to perform tasks that are vastly beyond current capabilities of artificial systems. Understanding the brain has always been a source of inspiration for developing artificially intelligent agents and has led to some of the defining moments in the history of AI. At the same time, theoretical insights from artificial intelligence provide new ways to understand and probe neural information processing in biological systems.
On the one hand, the Master’s in Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems addresses how models based on neural information processing can be used to develop artificial systems, probing of human information processing in closed-loop online settings, as well as the development of new machine learning techniques to better understand human brain function.
On the other hand it addresses various ways of modelling and understanding cognitive processing in humans. These range from abstract mathematical models of learning that are derived from Bayesian statistics, complexity theory and optimal control theory to neural information processing systems such as neural networks that simulate particular cognitive functions in a biologically inspired manner. We also look at new groundbreaking areas in the field of AI, like brain computer interfacing and deep learning.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/computation

Why study Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems at Radboud University?
- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Behavioural Science Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- Master’s students are free to use the state-of-the-art facilities available on campus, like equipment for brain imaging as EEG, fMRI and MEG.

- Exceptional students who choose this specialisation have the opportunity to study for a double degree in Artificial Intelligence together with the specialisation in Brain Network and Neuronal Communication. This will take three instead of two years.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You will be able to use these facilities for developing new experimental research techniques, as well as for developing new machine learning algorithms to analyse the brain data and integrate them with brain-computer interfacing systems.

Some examples of possible thesis subjects:
- Deep learning
Recent breakthroughs in AI have led to the development of artificial neural networks that achieve human level performance in object recognition. This has led companies like Google and Facebook to invest a lot of research in this technology. Within the AI department you can do research on this topic. This can range from developing deep neural networks to map and decode thoughts from human brain activity to the development of speech recognition systems or neural networks that can play arcade games.

- Brain Computer Interfacing
Brain computer interfaces are systems which decode a users mental state online in real-time for the purpose of communication or control. An effective BCI requires both neuro-scientific insight (which mental states should we decode?) and technical expertise (which measurement systems and decoding algorithms should be used?). A project could be to develop new mental tasks that induce stronger/easier to decode signals, such as using broadband stimuli. Another project could be to develop new decoding methods better able to tease a weak signal from the background noise, such as adaptive-beam forming. Results for both would assessed by performing empirical studies with target users in one of the EEG/MEG/fMRI labs available in the institute.

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Google, Facebook, IBM, Philips and the Brain Foundation. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems could get:
- PhD researcher on bio-inspired computing
- PhD researcher on neural decoding
- PhD researcher on neural information processing
- Machine learning expert in a software company
- Company founder for brain-based computer games
- Hospital-based designer of assistive technology for patients
- Policy advisor on new developments in neurotechnology
- Software developer for analysis and online visual displays of brain activity

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Sweden and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/computation

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he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. Read more
he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. This discipline encompasses a wide range of life science areas, including ecology (e.g. population dynamics), epidemiology (e.g. spread of diseases), medicine (e.g. modelling cancer growth and treatment) and developmental biology.

This programme aims to equip students with the necessary technical skills to develop, analyse and interpret models applied to biological systems. Course work is supported by an extended and supervised project in life science modelling.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Dynamical Systems;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine.

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Stochastic Simulation;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Biologically Inspired Computation;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Modelling Invasive Tumour Growth;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Wiring of Nervous System;
Vegetation Patterning in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

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The molecular approach to studying biological systems has underpinned huge advances in knowledge and promises much for the future in the understanding and application of biological principles. Read more
The molecular approach to studying biological systems has underpinned huge advances in knowledge and promises much for the future in the understanding and application of biological principles. At Nottingham we are using molecular approaches to study a wide range of model as well as innovative biological systems. Currently projects are available in research groupings that are investigating eukaryotic gene expression and vertebrate embryogenesis, including aspects of the development of the nervous system, germ cells and stem cell maturation, and the behaviour of cellular systems with respect to the many interactions of macromolecules within cells and their membranes. In addition there are projects to study in microbes the systems responsible for maintaining genome integrity and securing accurate chromosome transmission in bacteria, archaea and yeast, as well as the basis of bacterial motility. There are also projects concerned with the biology of fungi in relation to their stress responses and to their interactions with their environment in general, as well as with the use of fungi as cell factories for the production of proteins and pharmaceuticals. Finally there are projects in research groups studying ion channels, receptor-mediated carcinogenesis and ecotoxicology that use natural and synthetic toxins to dissect the properties of signalling molecules in nervous and muscle tissues and employ cutting-edge techniques to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of toxins and the mechanisms of disease.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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The two year MSc Biology concerns understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. Read more

MSc Biology

The two year MSc Biology concerns understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. The biosciences aim to understand living systems and to help preserve biodiversity and our environment and simultaneously produce sufficient healthy and safe food.

Programme summary

Biological issues are at the forefront of the technological progress of modern society. They are central to global concerns about how we effect and are affected by our environment. Understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. The MSc Biology allows students to get a broad overview of the latest developments in biology, ranging from genes to ecosystems. They learn to critically discuss the newest scientific developments in the biological sciences. Within their area of specialisation, students deepen their knowledge and skills in a certain subject. To prepare for a successful international career, we strongly encourage our students to complete part of their programme requirements abroad.

Specialisations

The MSc Biology offers nine specialisations:

Animal Adaptation and Behavioural Biology
This specialisation focuses mainly on subjects as adaptation, mechanisms involved in these adaptations and behaviour of animals.

Bio-interactions
In this specialisation, you obtain knowledge about interactions between organisms. You learn to understand and interpret interactions on different levels, from molecular to ecosystem level.

Molecular Ecology
In this specialisation, you learn to use molecular techniques to solve ecological questions. You will use, for example, molecular techniques to study the interaction between a virus and a plant.

Conservation and Systems Ecology
This specialisation focuses initially on fundamental processes that play a key role in ecology. You learn to interpret different relations, for example, the relation between chemical (or physical processes) and bioprocesses. Furthermore, you learn to analyse different ecosystems. You can use this knowledge to manage and conserve these ecological systems.

Evolution and Biodiversity
The systematics of biodiversity in an evolutionary perspective is the central focus of this specialisation. Subjects that will be addressed in this specialisation are: evolution, genetics, biosystematic research and taxonomic analysis.

Health and Disease
This specialisation focuses on regulatory mechanisms that have a central role in human and animal health.

Marine Biology
Choosing this specialisation means studying the complexity of the marine ecosystem. Moreover, you learn about the impacts of, for instance, fishery and recreation on this ecosystem or the interaction between different species in this system.

Molecular Development and Gene Regulation
This specialisation focuses on gene regulations and the different developmental mechanisms of organisms.

Plant Adaptation
This specialisation focuses on the adaptations that different plants gained in order to adjust to various conditions. You learn to understand the regulation processes in plants that underlie these adaptations.

Your future career

Many graduates from the MSc Biology study programme enter careers in fundamental and applied research or go on to become PhD students. Some find a position as communication officer, manager or policymaker. Compared with other Dutch universities, many biology graduates from Wageningen University find a position abroad.

Alumna Iris de Winter.
"I work as a PhD student at Wageningen University. In my research, I aim to understand the effect of human disturbance on the parasites prevalence in lemurs. I also look at the potential risks of the transmission of diseases and parasites from lemurs to humans, but also vice versa, from humans (and their livestock and pets) to wild lemur population. I alternate my fieldwork in Madagascar with parasite identification, analyses and writing manuscripts in the Netherlands. With this research, I hope to gain more insight in the factors that increase parasite prevalence in natural systems and hereby to improve the protection of both lemurs and their natural habitat."

Related programmes:
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Plant Biotechnology
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Organic Agriculture.

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The 3rd energy industry revolution is taking place where the key is the development of electrical power systems in the contexts of smart grids. Read more
The 3rd energy industry revolution is taking place where the key is the development of electrical power systems in the contexts of smart grids. Electrical power systems are playing a pivotal role in the development of a sustainable energy supply, enabling renewable energy generation. Globally there is a big shortage of skilled engineers for designing, operating, controlling and the economic analysis of future electricity networks – smart grids

The MSc Electrical Power Systems will give you the timely skills and specialist knowledge required to significantly enhance your career prospects in the electrical power industry. This programme will develop your power engineering skills through expert teaching and extensive research work undertaken in collaboration with power industry partners.

Some modules will be taught by leading industry experts, offering exciting opportunities to understand the real challenges that the power industry is facing and will work with you to develop and provide innovative solutions. In addition, students working on relevant MSc projects may have the opportunity to work with leading industry experts directly

This programme also aims to provide graduates with the ability to critically evaluate methodologies, analytical procedures and research methods in:

Control concepts and methods
Advanced energy conversion systems and power electronic applications
Advanced power electronic technologies for electrical power networks – HVDC and FACTS
Electrical power system engineering - using state-of-the-art computational tools and methods, and design of sustainable electrical power systems and networks;
Economic analysis of electrical power systems and electricity markets.

About the School of Electronic, Electrical & Systems Engineering

Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, is an exceptionally broad subject. It sits between Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Psychology, Materials Science, Education, Biological and Medical Sciences, with interfaces to many other areas of engineering such as transportation systems, renewable energy systems and the built environment.
Our students study in modern, purpose built and up to date facilities in the Gisbert Kapp building, which houses dedicated state-of-theart teaching and research facilities. The Department has a strong commitment to interdisciplinary research and boasts an annual research fund of more than £4 million a year. This means that wherever your interest lies, you can be sure you’ll be taught by experts in the field.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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