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Masters Degrees (Biological Psychiatry)

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This multidisciplinary Masters course in Biological Psychiatry explores the relationship between basic principles, biological factors and clinical features in mental health disorders, allowing students to translate scientific understanding into effective clinical practice. Read more
This multidisciplinary Masters course in Biological Psychiatry explores the relationship between basic principles, biological factors and clinical features in mental health disorders, allowing students to translate scientific understanding into effective clinical practice. It is aimed primarily at graduates with a background in psychiatry (or related health care disciplines), psychology, biological or social sciences, who wish to develop their research skills and broaden their research interests. The course will aid in equipping participants with the skills to progress into a career in psychiatry and psychiatric research or to embark on a doctoral programme.

The following six modules (10 ECTS each) are mandatory, and make up the taught component of the course (60 ECTS): Statistics and Research Methodology; Clinical Neuropsychology and Cognitive Genomics; Neuroimaging and Biomarkers; Molecular Neuroscience; Neuropsychiatric Genetics; Molecular Psychiatry. In addition, in their second year students will be required to submit a dissertation (30 ECTS) based on an empirical research project conducted in one of the many research groups located within the Dept of Psychiatry.

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The MSc Psychiatry course is run by the Institute of Postgraduate Medicine in collaboration with Brighton and Sussex Medical School, KSS Deanery and Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. Read more
The MSc Psychiatry course is run by the Institute of Postgraduate Medicine in collaboration with Brighton and Sussex Medical School, KSS Deanery and Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. The course at a basic level prepares doctors for papers 1-3 and CASC membership examinations for the Royal College of Psychiatrists, and offers wider academic opportunities via a higher qualification. A research dissertation is incorporated into the course with associated supervision. Students are normally expected to be at postgraduate level and currently employed in a psychiatry-related post with demonstrable clinical skills. However, applications will be considered from non-medical staff who have been working for a minimum of two years in a relevant role within mental health and who are able to demonstrate an ability to study at masters level. Modules 4 and 5 are particularly aimed at psychiatrists in training but applicant eligibility can be reviewed on an individual basis.

Professional accreditation
The six taught modules of the course closely follow the membership exam syllabus for the Royal College of Psychiatrists. (Professional accreditation is not linked to university accreditation for this course).

Course structure
Students studying for the postgraduate diploma and MSc Psychiatry will undertake six modules in years one and two (a total of 120 credits) and in the third year the latter group will undertake a 16,000 word dissertation to obtain the remaining 60 credits required for the award. Those studying for the postgraduate certificate will take three modules (a total of 60 credits). The course is run on a part-time basis for modules 1-5 with teaching taking place for a full day on alternate Thursdays. Module 6 takes place over one full week. A choice of weeks throughout the year is available for this module. All teaching takes place at the Sussex Education Centre, Mill View Hospital, Hove with the exception of module 6 which takes place at the Falmer campus. Teaching sessions will encompass lectures, group discussion, clinical assessment workshops and exam practice sessions. There will also be opportunities for students to give presentations. Students are encouraged to contribute work-based experience to group work to enhance the relevance of the content. Learning outside the classroom will include recommended scientific, clinical and research reading.

Areas of study
The first year of the course covers the principles of psychiatry and their scientific background, incorporating both behavioural and organic science. The second year covers clinical application of these principles and the clinical subspecialties of psychiatry. The research methods module provides the background to the research dissertation year. Students will develop the ability to critically appraise a host of clinical and research information relevant to psychiatric practice. The course develops clinical judgement skills and facilitates the integration of research methodology and findings to enhance applied clinical skills, notably accurate diagnosis and management of common psychiatric disorders and the accurate relaying of this knowledge to other health professionals, patients and their families. Participants on the course further benefit from shared learning and networking opportunities with other health professionals and long-term career discussions with an academic supervisor.

Syllabus
Year 1
Module 1 Principles of Psychiatry
Module 2 Behavioural Science and Psychotherapy
Module 3 Biological Sciences

Year 2
Module 4 Subspecialities I
Module 5 Subspecialities II
Module 6 Research Methods

Career and progression opportunities
The course provides a strong platform for professional development and enhanced career progression

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he MSc Psychiatry course is run in collaboration with Health Education Kent, Surrey and Sussex. The first year of this course follows the Royal College of Psychiatrists core knowledge curriculum, with an opportunity to exit with a PGcert. Read more
he MSc Psychiatry course is run in collaboration with Health Education Kent, Surrey and Sussex.

The first year of this course follows the Royal College of Psychiatrists core knowledge curriculum, with an opportunity to exit with a PGcert.

The second year incorporates development of wider clinical professional skills in leadership and teaching. The third year provides a structured research opportunity within the mental health field, working towards completion of a dissertation.

KEY AREAS OF STUDY

• Core principles of psychiatry
• Psychopathology
• Behavioural science and psychotherapy
• Biological sciences in psychiatry
• Research methods and critical appraisal
• Leadership and change management in clinical services
• Communication, learning and teaching in health and social care

COURSE STRUCTURE

PGCert:

MDM84 Principles of Psychiatry (20 credits)
MDM85 Behavioural science and psychotherapy (20 credits)
MDM86 Biological Sciences in Psychiatry (20 credits)

PGDip:

MDM122 Communication, Learning & Teaching in Health & Social Care (20 credits)
MDM110 Leadership and change management in clinical services (20 credits)
MDM10 Research Methods and Critical Appraisal (20 credits)

MSc:

MDM164 Research Dissertation (60 credits)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The first year prepares students for Paper A of the Royal College of Psychiatrists membership examination.
A higher academic qualification enhances evidence of experience for competitive interviews and offers entry to an academic career.

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Our Genes, Environment & Development in Psychology & Psychiatry MSc course provides interdisciplinary training in a range of behavioural genetics topics and research methods relevant to psychology and psychiatry. Read more

Our Genes, Environment & Development in Psychology & Psychiatry MSc course provides interdisciplinary training in a range of behavioural genetics topics and research methods relevant to psychology and psychiatry. You will study three required modules and undertake a research project on one of the broad range of subject areas that are considered fundamental to an understanding of behavioural genetics.

Key benefits

  • Offers specialised interdisciplinary graduate training in several subject areas and research methods.
  • Taught by the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, a department recognised as a world-leader in the field of interdisciplinary studies in psychology, psychiatry and behaviour.
  • Opportunity to attend the weekly SGDP Centre research seminars led by renowned researchers, such as Professor Francesca Happé, Professor Robert Plomin, Professor Terrie Moffitt and Professor Sir Michael Rutter.
  • Extensive collaborations within King’s as well as with other universities.
  • Study with students from from diverse and rich backgrounds.
  • Access to large sets of data for populations who have been studied and followed up over many years.
  • Located in a beautiful modern building designed to foster interaction.
  • Our state-of-the-art molecular genetics laboratory provides a complete suite of resources for research.

Description

The MSc Genes, Environment & Development in Psychology and Psychiatry (GED PP) programme takes a highly interdisciplinary approach to the study of how genetics and the environment ('nature and nurture') combine during human development to produce behaviour, diseases and psychiatric disorders. Students are taught by world leading experts and receive training across multiple research fields: molecular & behavioural genetics, twin modelling, statistical genetics, epigenetics, bioinformatics, social and cognitive psychology and developmental psychiatry. Topics are taught from an introductory to advance level through both theoretical and hands-on practical sessions (wet and computer labs), followed by a supervised research project in an area of the student's interest. Students come from a range of academic backgrounds (e.g. genetics, psychology, maths, computing, medicine) and on completion of the course will be exceptionally well equipped to pursue a PhD or work for a pharmaceutical or healthcare organisation. More than half of the students secure PhD studentships while completing the MSc

In addition to disorder characterisation and presentation of the genetic, social and otherenvironmental risk factors, our course also covers the molecular mechanisms and the specialised analysis methods relevant to interdisciplinary research in this field. By focusing on current research in this area, our course will enhance your understanding of research methods and enable you to critically appraise the relevant scientific literature.

Course format and assessment

You will be taught through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials.

Year 1

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations.

Examination (15%) | Coursework (70%) | Practical (15%)

Extra information

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to further full-time study in an academic research environment or in a taught clinical programme, gain employment in an academic, clinical or pharmaceutical organisation. Some students may enter scientific publishing.



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Research profile. Our Division of Psychiatry is internationally recognised as a world-class clinical research and teaching centre. Read more

Research profile

Our Division of Psychiatry is internationally recognised as a world-class clinical research and teaching centre.

We focus on the mechanisms underlying the development of major psychiatric disorders, including autism, bipolar disorder, depression, dementia and schizophrenia.

Expertise and studies

We have a particular expertise in longitudinal, clinical and biological studies of large cohorts of people at high risk of psychotic disorders drawn from across Scotland. Our studies include:

  • the Edinburgh High Risk Study, which examines 200 young people at high genetic risk of schizophrenia over a period of ten years
  • the Edinburgh Study of Co-Morbidity, which examines teenagers at high cognitive risk for schizophrenia
  • the Bipolar Family Study, which examines over 200 young people at familial risk of bipolar disorder and controls

In psychiatric genetics, we take part in international genome wide association studies and focus on analyses of candidate genes including DISC-1, NDE-1 and DLG-2.

We also have a major focus on the functional genetics of psychiatric illness and have investigated the effects of variation in genes, such as DISC-1, on brain structure and function, as well as their programming during development in stem cell models.

We have demonstrated, for the first time, that structural and functional MRI changes precede the onset of psychosis and could be used as a diagnostic aid.

We have also demonstrated that imaging can be used to separate autism from learning disability in people of matched IQ.

We have made substantial progress in the discovery of genes, including DISC-1, associated with psychosis and have played a leading role in understanding how genetic variation alters brain structure and function and risk for mental illness.

Research methods

The principal methods used are state-of-the-art structural and functional imaging techniques and genetic studies. We are also involved in a number of clinical trials of novel therapeutic interventions.

Major conditions of interest

Our major interests (that straddle the disciplines of Neurology and Psychiatry) include:

  • Autism and learning disability (Andrew Stanfield)
  • Dementia prevention (Craig Ritchie)
  • Bipolar disorder and depression (Andrew McIntosh)
  • Schizophrenia (Stephen Lawrie, Mandy Johnstone)
  • Cognition and Behaviour (collaborations with the Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology
  • Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology

We are also closely involved in two philanthropically funded Specialist Centres of Excellence:

Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences

The Division of Psychiatry is a part of the Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences (CCBS) in the Edinburgh Medical School. CCBS integrates laboratory and clinical research to study the causes, consequences and treatment of major brain disorders.

Training and support

Postgraduate students are mentored and supported by at least two supervisors and receive long-term guidance from their thesis committee.

We offer a transferable skills programme and project-specific courses, including opportunities to become involved in science communication and public engagement. In addition, the Division provides clinical case demonstrations and specialist seminars.

Facilities

We offer well-characterised cohorts of patients and expertise in a wide variety of techniques to study biological aspects of psychiatric disorders.



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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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- Aims. It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). Read more

Overview

- Aims
It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other career.

- Support
The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

- Seminars
Students attend a variety of Unit Seminars given by distinguished scientists. They are able to draw from the CBU’s panels of research volunteers, both normal and clinical, and enjoy the benefits of superb computing facilities and support staff, including a Graphics/Multimedia Officer.

- The Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.
All public talks are publicised on the University talks website, which also contains an archive of older lectures. All scientists at the CBU are expected to attend the two public talk series, held on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

- Facilities and Linkages
The CBU has excellent facilities for experimental behavioural studies involving normal populations and patients with brain damage, as well as institutional links with Addenbrooke’s hospital giving access to various types of patient populations, including stroke and progressive neural degenerative diseases. There is a 3 Tesla MRI scanner on the premises, as well as MEG and EEG facilities. Through its partnership with the University of Cambridge Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, the CBU has excellent access to PET and additional fMRI (3 Tesla) facilities. The CBU also offers state of the art computing facilities, supporting Unix, PC, and Mac platforms, and handling the large volumes of neuro-imaging data as well as extensive computational modelling. All students have their own networked desktop computer, with internet access through JANET.
The Unit’s close links with the University Department of Psychology and the Department of Psychiatry are strengthened through the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, a joint programme of termly Seminars given by members of each Department and attended by all graduate students.
The CBU is also an active member of the wider neuroscience community in Cambridge, supported by the Cambridge Neuroscience network.

- Completion on time
For MPhil students a personalised training and research programme will be agreed during the early weeks of the degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:
• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

Teaching

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

- Feedback
Continuous assessment and supervision. Students can expect to receive an online feedback report each term.

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available, which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

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CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. Read more
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Course detail

It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other

Format

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;

• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;

• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;

• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Assessment

Examined by thesis (20,000 words), with an oral viva to review.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available (see MRC eligibility details), which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. Read more
This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. The UCL Division of Psychiatry offers teaching and supervision from leaders in international research in fields from neuroscientific to social and epidemiological, along with a range of relevant options from other leading UCL departments. This diversity of options allows students to tailor a programme that closely fits their needs.

Degree information

This programme will equip students with the research skills needed to undertake doctoral-level research and/or to collaborate in major research projects. They will produce a piece of original research ready to submit for publication, and will acquire current knowledge of cutting-edge research in mental health.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
-Statistical Methods in Mental Health

Optional modules - students will select at least 60 credits from the following modules of which at least 30 credits must be from the Division of Psychiatry’s own modules:
-Culture in the Clinic
-Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
-Current Research in Dementia
-Current Research in Learning Disability
-Current Research in Psychosis
-Epidemiological and Social Methods in Mental Health (double module)
-Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health
-Mental Health Services – Policy, Design and Evaluation

Other approved modules:
-Cellular and Molecular Modules of Disease (Institute of Neurology)
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health (Department of Epidemiology & Public Health)
-Health Inequalities across the Lifecourse (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
-Social Determinants of Global Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Or any other module approved by the Programme Director as having a large research component relevant to mental health.

The final 15 credits may be obtained from any available module at UCL, subject to the Programme Director approving the overall selection for each student.

Final report
All students undertake a final research project. This is reported as a research paper of 6,000-8,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk.

Teaching and learning
This programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include unseen exams, coursework including designing questionnaires and systematic review strategies, developing protocols, analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters. There is a strong emphasis on developing practical research skills.

Careers

This new programme will equip graduates with strong practical research skills and understanding of the current status and direction of mental health research in their area of interest, preparing them to pursue doctoral studies, including through applications for nationally funded fellowships. Clinicians will be equipped to participate fully in collaborative studies and to begin to function as independent investigators. For those without clinical qualifications, the programme is likely to assist students in embarking on a career in mental health research by obtaining research posts and opportunities for PhD places.

Employability
Students will be taught by and carry out projects with leading researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields, learning about research directly from experts rather than from textbooks. Previous Division of Psychiatry MSc graduates have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their research projects in peer-reviewed journals, and of going on to further academic posts and to doctoral studies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a cluster of international research leaders in mental health in fields including genetics, epidemiology, and applied clinical research. Optional modules provide an entrance to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. in neuroscience and epidemiology.

The programme is strongly focused on student participation and acquisition of the practical skills needed to embark on a career in research. The wide range of research interests within our division allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychosocial approaches.

We offer opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in a stimulating, friendly and supportive atmosphere.

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The online Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated exploration of our current understanding of the psychological and neuroscientific basis of mental health. Read more

The online Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated exploration of our current understanding of the psychological and neuroscientific basis of mental health.

By drawing on the wealth of research, education and clinical expertise and experience across our world-renowned Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), the course will appeal to those with a personal interest in the area of psychology, neuroscience and mental health, and who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills base.

Key Benefits

  • The course is delivered 100% online and there is no need to attend the campus. Students work in small, interactive classes with academic staff, and also receive additional support and guidance.
  • Cutting edge expertise: impact of the IoPPN’s work was 100% world leading or internationally excellent, and our research environment was judged as 100% world leading (Research Excellence Framework, 2014).
  • Online access to teaching materials developed from experts across Kings College London, providing a comprehensive and multidisciplinary perspective of important mental health problems.
  • Support to develop and demonstrate research and critical appraisal skills that will permit appreciation, interpretation and reporting of research evidence, as preparation for research or further education.

This course is ideal for people who are:

  • Seeking employment as a graduate research worker
  • Wishing to progress to doctoral study
  • Already working in or planning to undertake further study to work in mental health as a practitioner or policy maker.

It will also enhance the knowledge and skills base for those with a personal interest in the area of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Description

The Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health MSc/PG Dip/PG Cert provides a comprehensive and integrated exploration of our current understanding of the psychological and neuroscientific basis of mental health. It draws upon the wealth of research, education, clinical expertise and experience across the worldrenowned Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN). The online master’s course promotes an understanding of the evidence base for comprehending the biological, psychological and socio-environmental factors important in the development and maintenance of mental health, and evidence underlining= the development and efficacy of the range of treatments of mental health problems. IoPPN teaching staff are senior scientists, clinicians, and educators. Scientists will showcase cutting edge research into the causes and treatment of mental health problems; clinicians will be presenting current best practice in treatment approaches, and students will be supported by a team of educators with vast experience of designing and delivering scientific, clinical and applied education and training.

The MSc pathway requires modules totalling 180 credits to complete the programme, 60 of which will come from a dissertation of around 10,000 words. The Research Dissertation comprises four advanced modules that will provide you with the opportunity to immerse yourself in understanding the design, development and dissemination of research evidence. These modules also draw upon the knowledge and skills you have learnt during the course.

The Postgraduate Diploma pathway requires modules with a minimum total of 120 credits to complete the course, and the Postgraduate Certificate route requires modules with a total of 60 credits to complete.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in two years, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take up to six years to finish.

  • You can expect to gain a solid foundation of concepts and theories underpinning our current understanding of mental health and the variety of methods used in research and treatment.
  • You will develop a clear understanding of the complementary relationship between psychological and neuroscientific approaches to the study and management of mental health problems.
  • You will develop an understanding of different levels of analysis of the causes and mechanisms of mental health problems from the molecular and cellular to the social and environmental in a range of important mental health problems.
  • You will develop an understanding of the ways in which current treatments work, both biological and psychological, and learn about new treatments that are emerging from cutting-edge research.
  • You will learn core research and critical appraisal skills that will permit appreciation, interpretation and reporting of research evidence, as preparation for research or further training.

The postgraduate certificate is an ideal starting point for people already working within mental health fields who wish to enhance their education in order to progress in their career. As a stand-alone qualification, the postgraduate certificate will enable nurses, social workers, community workers and other professionals to gain a deeper understanding of the biological, social, environmental and psychological foundations of mental health. It is also an ideal entry point for students who hold a second class undergraduate degree.

Teaching

The programme is delivered entirely online. There are video lectures, coursework including critical appraisal of published work, essays and abstracts and self-directed learning activities. Assessment will include discussion board participation, multiple choice question and short answer question examinations.

Assessment 

MSc | PG Dip | PG Cert - Two multiple choice examinations (40%) | Short essay examination (50%) | Discussion Board Particiaption (10%) 

Career prospects

At King’s you’ll enter into one of the world’s most competitive student bodies and join a legacy of graduates that are sought out by some of the leading employers in the field. 

 The Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health MSc will:

  • Benefit those wishing to become a graduate research worker, and will optimise opportunities for PhD training. It will also provide a stepping stone towards professional training as a mental health practitioner.
  • Enhance the career profile of those already working clinically in the field of mental health by increasing understanding and knowledge of the subject area which will help to inform clinical practice.
  • Provide transferable skills and knowledge that can benefit a number of career paths.


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The new Dementia MSc is offered jointly by the UCL Division of Psychiatry and Institute of Neurology and tackles one of the biggest global health problems facing society today. Read more
The new Dementia MSc is offered jointly by the UCL Division of Psychiatry and Institute of Neurology and tackles one of the biggest global health problems facing society today. It provides research-oriented and cutting-edge training in the study of dementia and its scientific basis, led by international leaders in the science and practice of dementia. Two specialised pathways, in mental health and in neuroscience, are offered.

Degree information

The mental health pathway focuses on equipping students with advanced knowledge of the prevention, detection and management of the dementias using epidemiological, psychosocial and clinical trial approaches, and is aimed at graduates wishing to explore or begin a research career in dementia. More information about the neuroscience pathway is also available.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists five or six core modules (90 or 120 credits), one or two optional modules (if only five core modules are taken) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Current Research in Dementia (15 credits)
-Advanced Treatment and Management of Dementia (15 credits)
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (30 credits)
-Statistical Methods in Mental Health (15 credits)
-Clinical Neuroscience of Neurodegenerative Diseases (15 credits)
-Clinical Mental Health (30 credits - core for students who do not have either research or clinical experience in the field of dementia)

Optional modules - students who take five core modules will select 30 further credits of optional modules. Students who take six core modules will select 15 further credits of an optional module. Optional modules have either a neuroscience, research methods, or quality improvement in health care component and are the following:
-Practical Neuroscience of Dementia (15 credits, Institute of Neurology)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (15 credits, Institute of Neurology)
-Epidemiological and Social Methods in Mental Health (30 credits)
-Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health (15 credits)
-Quality Improvement in Health Care (15 credits, UCL Medical School)
-Other optional modules may be selected from any available in the UCL Division of Psychiatry or elsewhere at UCL, with permission from the Programme Director

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a report of up to 8,000 words, presented as a paper ready to submit to a medical, psychiatric or dementia-specialist journal.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered though a combination of lecture/seminar series and practical interactive workshops, with supportive online learning material. Assessment methods include two unseen examinations, coursework including designing questionnaires and protocols and analysing data in dementia research, writing a critical literature review, giving talks and presentations, and a final report in the format of a journal paper.

Careers

This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is therefore available. Previous MSc-level graduates of the Division have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their dementia research projects in peer reviewed journals, and have moved on to academic posts and PhD studies. For clinicians, the course will allow them to participate fully in collaborative studies and begin their research career as independent investigators in dementia research.

Employability
This unique and exciting programme will equip graduates with advanced knowledge of the prevention and treatment of dementia, and strong practical research skills in order to undertake doctoral research in the field. They will acquire in-depth understanding of the current status and direction of research for the treatment and care of people with dementia and their families, providing them with a strong foundation for doctoral studies, and applications for nationally funded fellowships. They will complete original research in their specific field of interest, learning about dementia research directly from experts working in clinical and research areas in dementia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has exceptional research strength in dementia, from laboratory to the community, including genetics, neuroscience of neurodegeneration, prevention and treatment. Students will be taught by leading international dementia researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields; more details are available at UCL Dementia Strategy. Optional modules give students access to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. the UCL Institute of Neurology, and the UCL Medical School.

The programme is strongly focused on active student participation, encouraging learning through participating in research and enquiry and developing the practical skills needed to embark on a research career in dementia. The wide range of research interests within our division and the UCL Institute of Neurology allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychological approaches of dementia.

Students will be offered opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in dementia in a stimulating, friendly and supportive environment.

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The UCL Division of Psychiatry is pleased to offer this programme focused on clinical practice in mental health and its evidence base. Read more
The UCL Division of Psychiatry is pleased to offer this programme focused on clinical practice in mental health and its evidence base. The Clinical Mental Health Sciences MSc integrates biological, psychological and social perspectives on mental health and caters both for psychology graduates and for clinicians wishing to undertake a broad-based, rigorous and flexible higher degree.

Degree information

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of current evidence regarding mental health problems and the interventions provided to address them, as well as enhancing their research skills. A wide range of options from across the School of Life and Medical Sciences at UCL allows students to tailor a programme that fully fits their needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 1–2 core double modules (30–60 credits), 4–6 optional modules (60–90 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A diploma may be awarded to students who complete the equivalent of 8 taught single modules, amounting to 120 credits. A certificate may be awarded to students who complete the equivalent of 4 taught single modules, amounting to 60 credits.

Core modules
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
-Clinical Mental Health (double module – compulsory only for those who do not have at least six months’ full-time experience, or the equivalent, of working in mental health settings).

Optional modules - students who take the Clinical Mental Health module will choose at least one option (15 credits) from the following:
-Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
-Current Research in Dementia
-Current Research in Learning Disability
-Current Research in Psychosis
-Mental Health Services – Policy, Design and Evaluation
-Culture in the Clinic
-Advanced Treatment and Management of Dementia (only to be taken if Current Research in Dementia has already been taken)

Please note: Students who do not take the Clinical Mental Health module will select at least three modules (45 credits) from the above list. Any UCL modules approved by the Programme Director can be selected to make up the remaining credit(s). Note that due to timetable clashes only one Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student. Approved options, from across UCL, include:
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health (Department of Epidemiological and Social Methods in Public Health)
-Social Determinants of Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
-Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Child Mental Health (UCL Institute of Child Health)
-Interventions in Child and Adolescent Mental Health – Psychological (UCL Institute of Child Health)
-Quality Improvements in Health (UCL CHIME)
-Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
-Treatment in Child and Adolescent Mental Health - Pharmacological (UCL Institute of Child Health)

(Note that due to timetable clashes only one UCL Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student)

NB: due to timetable clashes only one UCL Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student.

Research project/report
All students undertake a final project. This may be a research project, to be reported as a paper of 6,000-8,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk, or a clinical project of 10,000 words reporting on a clinical topic or service evaluation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars and workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include one unseen examination, coursework including designing questionnaires and protocols and analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters, and a final report in the format of a journal paper or brief for clinicians or service planners.

Placement
The programme team support students in obtaining volunteer placements in relevant mental health care and research settings, but this is not a formal part of the course and is entirely optional.

Careers

For non-clinicians, the programme will be an excellent grounding for clinical training, such as in clinical psychology, or for embarking on a research career in mental health. Many graduates go on to research assistant, clinical support worker or assistant psychologist posts as a first destination. For clinicians, this is a great opportunity to gain a higher qualification through a programme based in a leading university department which can be closely tailored to your interests across clinical, research and management fields.

Employability
Students will be taught by leading experts in their fields, will gain a strong clinical understanding of mental health, and will be able to develop their skills in research, service design and evaluation, and writing and presenting. Previous Division of Psychiatry Master’s graduates have been enthusiastic about their career enhancement, both through their programme and the connections they have made through it. A large proportion of our first cohort of graduates have gone on to paid employment in relevant areas of mental health, especially research assistant, clinical support worker, psychological wellbeing practitioner and assistant psychologist posts. Others have embarked on PhD studies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a cluster of international experts in mental health, including in genetics, epidemiology, and applied clinical research, and most are also clinicians. We are able to offer a broad programme encompassing both cutting-edge research and a clinical perspective.

The programme is strongly focused on student participation, with much use of small-group learning, and the environment in the Division of Psychiatry is stimulating, friendly and supportive.

A wide range of options at UCL allows programmes to be tailored to students’ needs and interests in clinical, research and management domains.

Read less
The new Dementia MSc is offered jointly by the UCL Division of Psychiatry and Institute of Neurology and tackles one of the biggest global health problems facing society today. Read more
The new Dementia MSc is offered jointly by the UCL Division of Psychiatry and Institute of Neurology and tackles one of the biggest global health problems facing society today. It provides research-oriented and cutting-edge training in the study of dementia and its scientific basis, led by international leaders in the science and practice of dementia. Two specialised pathways, in mental health and in neuroscience, are offered.

Degree information

The mental health pathway focuses on equipping students with advanced knowledge of the prevention, detection and management of the dementias using epidemiological, psychosocial and clinical trial approaches, and is aimed at graduates wishing to explore or begin a research career in dementia. More information about the neuroscience pathway is also available.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists five or six core modules (90 or 120 credits), one or two optional modules (if only five core modules are taken) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Current Research in Dementia (15 credits)
-Advanced Treatment and Management of Dementia (15 credits)
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (30 credits)
-Statistical Methods in Mental Health (15 credits)
-Clinical Neuroscience of Neurodegenerative Diseases (15 credits)
-Clinical Mental Health (30 credits - core for students who do not have either research or clinical experience in the field of dementia)

Optional modules - students who take five core modules will select 30 further credits of optional modules. Students who take six core modules will select 15 further credits of an optional module. Optional modules have either a neuroscience, research methods, or quality improvement in health care component and are the following:
-Practical Neuroscience of Dementia (15 credits, Institute of Neurology)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (15 credits, Institute of Neurology)
-Epidemiological and Social Methods in Mental Health (30 credits)
-Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health (15 credits)
-Quality Improvement in Health Care (15 credits, UCL Medical School)
-Other optional modules may be selected from any available in the UCL Division of Psychiatry or elsewhere at UCL, with permission from the Programme Director

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a report of up to 8,000 words, presented as a paper ready to submit to a medical, psychiatric or dementia-specialist journal.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered though a combination of lecture/seminar series and practical interactive workshops, with supportive online learning material. Assessment methods include two unseen examinations, coursework including designing questionnaires and protocols and analysing data in dementia research, writing a critical literature review, giving talks and presentations, and a final report in the format of a journal paper.

Careers

This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is therefore available. Previous MSc-level graduates of the Division have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their dementia research projects in peer reviewed journals, and have moved on to academic posts and PhD studies. For clinicians, the course will allow them to participate fully in collaborative studies and begin their research career as independent investigators in dementia research.

Employability
This unique and exciting programme will equip graduates with advanced knowledge of the prevention and treatment of dementia, and strong practical research skills in order to undertake doctoral research in the field. They will acquire in-depth understanding of the current status and direction of research for the treatment and care of people with dementia and their families, providing them with a strong foundation for doctoral studies, and applications for nationally funded fellowships. They will complete original research in their specific field of interest, learning about dementia research directly from experts working in clinical and research areas in dementia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has exceptional research strength in dementia, from laboratory to the community, including genetics, neuroscience of neurodegeneration, prevention and treatment. Students will be taught by leading international dementia researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields; more details are available at UCL Dementia Strategy. Optional modules give students access to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. the UCL Institute of Neurology, and the UCL Medical School.

The programme is strongly focused on active student participation, encouraging learning through participating in research and enquiry and developing the practical skills needed to embark on a research career in dementia. The wide range of research interests within our division and the UCL Institute of Neurology allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychological approaches of dementia.

Students will be offered opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in dementia in a stimulating, friendly and supportive environment.

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Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013. Read more
Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013.

Course overview

Do you want to contribute to the discovery and development of drugs that could potentially improve the health and well-being of millions of people? The UK has long been a leader in this complex technical area, in which each new drug requires around $1 billion of development work.

Our research-led teaching and state-of-the-art facilities make the University of Sunderland one of the UK's top locations for pharmaceutical science. Our strong links with the pharmaceutical industry ensure a flow of guest speakers and good contacts for your chosen Masters project/dissertation. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

The course covers advanced pharmaceutics, pharmaceutical analysis, drug design, pharmacology, proteomics and pharmacogenomics. You will also cover regulatory processes for medicines, in line with ICH guidelines. The course is a direct response to employers’ search for postgraduates who have a mix of theoretical and practical skills and who will push boundaries in drug development.

With a Masters course, it’s important to consider the relevance of the research interests of tutors who will supervise your dissertation. At Sunderland, our interests include pharmaceutical analysis, process chemistry, various drug discovery programmes, and drug delivery systems, including those for large biological pharmaceuticals. Our academic team have produced some ‘world-leading’ research, according to the latest Research Excellence Framework (2014).

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. The topic of the project / dissertation is negotiated to fit both your personal interests and the expertise of Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Essential Research and Study Skills (20 Credits)
-Fundamentals for Pharmaceutical Science (20 Credits)
-The Pharmaceutical R&D Cycle and its Regulation (20 Credits)

Choose four out of the five following modules
-Advanced Pharmacology (15 Credits)
-Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis (15 Credits)
-Advanced Drug Design (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutics (15 Credits)

Choose one Masters option
-Double Project (60 Credits)
Or
-Double Dissertation (60 Credits)
Or
-Single Project (30 Credits) and Single Dissertation (30 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, open learning, laboratory work and group work.

The Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working and problem solving. Assessment methods include laboratory reports, oral presentations, case studies, critical reviews, examinations and the Masters project.

Facilities & location

This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which boasts multi-disciplinary laboratories and cutting-edge equipment thanks to multi-million pound investments.

Facilities for Pharmaceutics
We have pharmaceutical-related equipment for wet granulation, spray drying, capsule filling, tablet making, mixing inhalation, film coating and freeze drying. As well as standard pharmacopoeial test methods, such as dissolution testing, friability and disintegration, we also offer highly sophisticated test methods. These include rheometry, thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy), tests for powder flow, laser diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, image analysis and laser confocal microscopy.

Facilities for Medicinal Chemistry
Our state-of-the-art spectroscopic facility allows us to confirm the structures of new molecules that could be potential pharmaceutical products and to investigate the structures of potential medicinal substances that have been isolated from plants. We are equipped with Liquid Chromatography-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy (LC-NMR/MS) platforms; this is an exceptional facility for a university. We also have low and high resolution mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and elemental analysis equipment. Our facilities allow you to gain hands-on experience of a wide range of analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy, which are of great importance in determining both ionic/metal content of pharmaceuticals and simple chemical structures respectively. You will also gain experience of revolutionary protein and DNA separation techniques, as well as Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (x8) and Gas Chromatography for separating all kinds of samples of pharmaceutical or biomedical interest.

Facilities for Pharmacology
Our highly technical apparatus will give you first-hand experience of the principles of drug action and the effects of drugs on pharmacological and cellular models. As a result, you gain a better understanding of the effects of drugs on specific receptors located throughout the human body and related physiological effects.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on pharmaceutical and biomedical science, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your studies include:
-Embase, which is a complex database covering drug research, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, toxicology, clinical and experimental human medicine, health policy and management, public health, occupational health, environmental health, drug dependence and abuse, psychiatry, forensic medicine and biomedical engineering/instrumentation
-PsycINF, which includes information about the psychological aspects of medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, pharmacology and physiology
-PubMed, which contains life science journals, online books and abstracts that cover fields such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and health care
-Science Direct, which offers more than 18,000 full-text journals published by Elsevier
-Web of Science, which covers a broad range of science areas

Learning Environment
Sunderland Pharmacy School has a rich heritage in scientific studies and our degree courses are extremely well respected in the industry. We are fully plugged into relevant medical and pharmaceutical industry bodies, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people. Your Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company, including working at their sites.

Employment & careers

Graduates from this course can pursue a variety of careers in the following areas; Drug Design, Pharmaceutical Analysis and Research, Pre-clinical Research in Experimental and Biological Studies, Formulation and Product Development, Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics, Clinical Research, Product Registration, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

Previous Sunderland graduates have been employed in companies such as GSK, Eisai, Reckitt Benckiser, Merck, Sharp & Dohme and Norbrook Laboratories.

Some students may apply for a PhD programme or those who already hold a Pharmacy degree can pursue MSc/PG Pharmaceutical Sciences for the Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) and go through one-year pre-registration training.

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Our Neuroscience MSc course will provide you with multidisciplinary training in a range of neuroscience topics, particularly those relevant to psychiatry and neurology. Read more

Our Neuroscience MSc course will provide you with multidisciplinary training in a range of neuroscience topics, particularly those relevant to psychiatry and neurology. It seeks to equip graduates from a wide range of backgrounds for the next stage of their career, which may be either further full-time study in a neuroscience-related academic research environment, or employment in an academic, clinical or pharmaceutical organisation. 

Key benefits

  • Appeals to students from a variety of backgrounds.
  • Offers specialised graduate training in several neuroscience subject areas, both clinical and non-clinical.
  • Aims to equip all graduates for the next stage of their career, usually through further full-time study in basic neuroscience in an academic research environment or in a taught clinical programme, employment in an academic, clinical or pharmaceutical organisation. Some students have entered scientific publishing.

Please note that the two year part-time programme runs on alternate years. The next intake will be September 2018. 

Description

The Neuroscience MSc inspires the next generation of neuroscientists. The course brings together home and international Students from various academic backgrounds. Our vision is to provide Students with multidisciplinary training in a broad range of neuroscience topics, particularly those relating to psychiatry, psychology, neuroscience and neurology. We believe that our Teaching and Research goals can best be achieved through our Students, Scientists and Clinicians working together on common problems. This approach transforms Students' theoretical and practical knowledge of the neurosciences, and provides them with the applied and professional skills they need for their future careers. In short, our objective is to provide students with a good foundation for life.

The Programme provides:

  • Students with core teaching and learning in a wide range of neuroscience domains (3 fundamental modules) and a choice of a specialised pathway (optional modules).
  • Multidisciplinary training in neuroscience topics ranging from the molecular to the behavioural. Modules are taught using a variety of teaching methods ranging from didactic instruction through to student-led seminar/tutorial work.
  • Rich research experience (research module) in high quality research environments.
  • Skills, career and professional development in topics relevant to biomedical research. This is done through various exercises including presentation of original research data in both poster and scientific paper formats.
  • Clinicians with specialised supplementary training.
  • A specialised knowledge of a broad range of neuroscience topics relevant to mental illness, psychology and neurology.
  • Students with the ability to conduct high quality research and to present their findings to different audiences.

Course Objectives

Successful students should be able to demonstrate:

  • Specialised knowledge in a broad range of neuroscience topics relevant to mental illness and neurology.
  • The ability to conduct high quality research and to present their findings effectively.
  • The high level of achievement appropriate for students wishing to undertake further research and/or training.

MSc Neuroscience Students take three broad-based neuroscience modules during their first term. During the second term Students ‘specialise’ by choosing one of six taught optional modules, ‘Psychiatric Genetics’, ‘Developmental Neurobiology’, ‘Neurodegeneration’, ‘Neuroimaging’, ‘Cognitive Neuroscience’ and ‘Neural Stem Cells and Nervous System Repair’. In the third and final term, Students work together with their Scientist / Clinician Supervisors to produce original research.       

While most students applying to the course have a degree in a basic biomedical science or in Psychology, the course attracts a much wider range of applicants. These include:

  • Clinicians eager to understand current knowledge and to apply it in their own research or practice and;
  • Students with backgrounds in the physical sciences, mathematics or computing keen to develop, for example, more advanced methods of analysing data from neuroimaging and genetic studies.
  • Graduates who have a strong interest in Neuroscience are also encouraged to apply, and will be considered on an individual basis.

MSc Neuroscience in a speciality

To obtain an MSc in a speciality, students must complete the 3 compulsory taught fundamental modules (A1-A3), followed by a further taught specialised optional module (from Modules B1-B8) and a research project (from Modules C1-C8) in the same speciality.

While every effort will be made to accommodate a student's wishes, the number of research projects that can be offered on each speciality is dependent on availability.  

The degree of MSc Neuroscience will be awarded to:

  • those students who choose a research project that is in a different speciality from their optional taught module. Also included are students who choose research projects that fall outside the specialities encompassed by B1-B8, for example, a research project in eating disorders. 
  • part-time students who are not able to attend one of the specialised taught modules (B1-B8) when they are given to the full-time students but instead attend the B Neuroscience research module. 

Course format and assessment

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, field work and self-study.

You are assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations.

Career prospects

This course provides excellent training for students who wish to pursue a broad range of careers including an academic or research career, or those who wish to enter medical school, the pharmaceutical industry, or train as clinical psychologists, or work as scientific writers. 



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