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Masters Degrees (Biological Effect)

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Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines. genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few. Read more
Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines: genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few.

In 2014 the school relocated to a new £54 million, state-of-the-art Life Sciences building. Our new laboratory facilities are among the best in the world, with critical '-omics' technologies and associated computing capacity (bioinformatics) a core component. The new building is designed to foster our already strong collaborative and convivial environment, and includes a world-leading centre for evolutionary biology research in collaboration with key researchers from earth sciences, biochemistry, social medicine, chemistry and computer sciences. The school has strong links with local industry, including BBC Bristol, Bristol Zoo and the Botanic Gardens. We have a lively, international postgraduate community of about 150 research students. Our stimulating environment and excellent graduate school training and support provide excellent opportunities to develop future careers.

Research groups

The underlying theme of our research is the search for an understanding of the function, evolution, development and regulation of complex systems, pursued using the latest technologies, from '-omics' to nanoscience, and mathematical modelling tools. Our research is organised around four main themes that reflect our strengths and interests: evolutionary biology; animal behaviour and sensory biology; plant and agricultural sciences; and ecology and environmental change.

Evolutionary Biology
The theme of evolutionary biology runs through all our research in the School of Biological Sciences. Research in this theme seeks to understand organismal evolution and biodiversity using a range of approaches and study systems. We have particular strengths in evolutionary genomics, phylogenetics and phylogenomics, population genetics, and evolutionary theory and computer modelling.

Animal Behaviour and Sensory Biology
Research is aimed at understanding the adaptive significance of behaviour, from underlying neural mechanisms ('how', or proximate, questions) to evolutionary explanations of function ('why', or ultimate, questions). The approach is strongly interdisciplinary, using diverse physiological and biomechanical techniques, behavioural experiments, computer modelling and molecular biology to link from the genetic foundations through to the evolution of behaviour and sensory systems.

Plant and Agricultural Sciences
The global issue of food security unifies research in this theme, which ranges from molecular-based analysis of plant development, signal transduction and disease, to ecological studies of agricultural and livestock production systems. We have particular strengths in functional genomics, bioinformatics, plant developmental biology, plant pathology and parasite biology, livestock parasitology and agricultural systems biology. Our research is helped by the LESARS endowment, which funds research of agricultural relevance.

Ecology and Environmental Change
Research seeks to understand ecological relations between organisms (plant, animal or microbe) at individual, population and community levels, as well as between organisms and their environments. Assessing the effect of climate change on these ecological processes is also fundamental to our research. Key research areas within this theme include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation, evolutionary responses to climate change and freshwater ecology. Our research has many applied angles, such as ecosystem management, wildlife conservation, environmental and biological control, agricultural practice and informing policy.

Careers

Many postgraduate students choose a higher degree because they enjoy their subject and subsequently go on to work in a related area. An Office of Science and Technology survey found that around three-quarters of BBSRC- and NERC-funded postgraduates went on to a job related to their study subject.

Postgraduate study is often a requirement for becoming a researcher, scientist, academic journal editor and for work in some public bodies or private companies. Around 60 per cent of biological sciences doctoral graduates continue in research. Academic research tends to be contract-based with few permanent posts, but the school has a strong track record in supporting the careers of young researchers by helping them to find postdoctoral positions or develop fellowship applications.

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The two year MSc Biology concerns understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. Read more

MSc Biology

The two year MSc Biology concerns understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. The biosciences aim to understand living systems and to help preserve biodiversity and our environment and simultaneously produce sufficient healthy and safe food.

Programme summary

Biological issues are at the forefront of the technological progress of modern society. They are central to global concerns about how we effect and are affected by our environment. Understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. The MSc Biology allows students to get a broad overview of the latest developments in biology, ranging from genes to ecosystems. They learn to critically discuss the newest scientific developments in the biological sciences. Within their area of specialisation, students deepen their knowledge and skills in a certain subject. To prepare for a successful international career, we strongly encourage our students to complete part of their programme requirements abroad.

Specialisations

The MSc Biology offers nine specialisations:

Animal Adaptation and Behavioural Biology
This specialisation focuses mainly on subjects as adaptation, mechanisms involved in these adaptations and behaviour of animals.

Bio-interactions
In this specialisation, you obtain knowledge about interactions between organisms. You learn to understand and interpret interactions on different levels, from molecular to ecosystem level.

Molecular Ecology
In this specialisation, you learn to use molecular techniques to solve ecological questions. You will use, for example, molecular techniques to study the interaction between a virus and a plant.

Conservation and Systems Ecology
This specialisation focuses initially on fundamental processes that play a key role in ecology. You learn to interpret different relations, for example, the relation between chemical (or physical processes) and bioprocesses. Furthermore, you learn to analyse different ecosystems. You can use this knowledge to manage and conserve these ecological systems.

Evolution and Biodiversity
The systematics of biodiversity in an evolutionary perspective is the central focus of this specialisation. Subjects that will be addressed in this specialisation are: evolution, genetics, biosystematic research and taxonomic analysis.

Health and Disease
This specialisation focuses on regulatory mechanisms that have a central role in human and animal health.

Marine Biology
Choosing this specialisation means studying the complexity of the marine ecosystem. Moreover, you learn about the impacts of, for instance, fishery and recreation on this ecosystem or the interaction between different species in this system.

Molecular Development and Gene Regulation
This specialisation focuses on gene regulations and the different developmental mechanisms of organisms.

Plant Adaptation
This specialisation focuses on the adaptations that different plants gained in order to adjust to various conditions. You learn to understand the regulation processes in plants that underlie these adaptations.

Your future career

Many graduates from the MSc Biology study programme enter careers in fundamental and applied research or go on to become PhD students. Some find a position as communication officer, manager or policymaker. Compared with other Dutch universities, many biology graduates from Wageningen University find a position abroad.

Alumna Iris de Winter.
"I work as a PhD student at Wageningen University. In my research, I aim to understand the effect of human disturbance on the parasites prevalence in lemurs. I also look at the potential risks of the transmission of diseases and parasites from lemurs to humans, but also vice versa, from humans (and their livestock and pets) to wild lemur population. I alternate my fieldwork in Madagascar with parasite identification, analyses and writing manuscripts in the Netherlands. With this research, I hope to gain more insight in the factors that increase parasite prevalence in natural systems and hereby to improve the protection of both lemurs and their natural habitat."

Related programmes:
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Plant Biotechnology
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Organic Agriculture.

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How do genes regulate the development and functioning of cells, tissues and organisms? How do molecules, cells and tissues function and communicate with each other, and how are their functions studied? These are the key issues for understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms, whose disruption can contribute to the onset and progression of various diseases. Read more
How do genes regulate the development and functioning of cells, tissues and organisms? How do molecules, cells and tissues function and communicate with each other, and how are their functions studied? These are the key issues for understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms, whose disruption can contribute to the onset and progression of various diseases. Researchers in the fields of genetics, genomics, cellular and developmental biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and biosciences of health are searching for the answers to these questions.

Upon completing the Master’s Programme in Genetics and Molecular Biosciences:
-You will have in-depth knowledge of genetics and molecular biosciences and of the experimental methods used in them.
-You will understand the characteristics and functions of genes and biomolecules at the cellular, tissue and organism levels.
-You will be able to analyse scientific knowledge critically and communicate it to different audiences.
-You will have the ability to produce new scientific information about the properties of genes, biomolecules and cells by means of experimental studies.
-You will be able to take advantage of existing research data and biological databases.
-You will have mastered good scientific practice and know how to act accordingly.
-You will have the capacity for independent project management and problem solving, as well as for maintaining and developing your own expertise.
-You will have the ability to work in multi-disciplinary and multicultural communities.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The Master's programme is based on basic scientific research. In the programme you will acquire knowledge and skills in modern genetics and molecular biosciences, which you will deepen in your chosen field of specialisation. The programme is tightly integrated with the experimental research carried out at the University of Helsinki in genetics, genomics, biochemistry, structural biology, and cellular and developmental biology. By combining course units, you will be able to acquire a broad-based understanding of biological phenomena and of the molecules that have an effect on health, including their interactions and functions at the levels of cells, tissues and organisms.

Courses include a variety of working methods: seminars, lectures, laboratory work, oral and written presentations, project work in small groups, independent studies and study circles formed by the students. The instruction will utilise digital learning environments.

These diverse teaching methods require active involvement from you. They will develop your ability to search, structure and present new information, as well as to draw conclusions. You will learn about the principles and methods of research during laboratory exercises, and about practical work in research groups and when writing your Master's thesis. In addition to academic excellence, you will acquire general working life skills such as fact-finding, problem solving, communication, project management and teamwork. You will acquire competence both for post-graduate studies in a Doctoral Programme and for expert positions immediately after gaining your Master's degree.

Programme Structure

You will need 120 credits (ECTS) for the Master’s degree, according to your personal study plan. The degree consists of:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including your Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-60 credits of other studies chosen from your own programme or from other programmes (such as Translational Medicine, Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnology or Neuroscience).

You will be able to complete the Master’s programme in two years. The degree always includes a personal study plan as well as studies in labour market orientation, career planning, and possibly also international activities. If you are aiming for qualification as a biology teacher, you will need 60 credits of teacher’s pedagogical studies in your degree (this applies only to Finnish or Swedish speaking students).

Career Prospects

After graduating from the Master’s programme in Genetics and Molecular Biosciences, you will be well-prepared to move on to a career or to continue your studies at the postgraduate level for a PhD degree (see Postgraduate study opportunities). Doctoral studies are a prerequisite if you wish to become a researcher in the academic sector, for example.

The Master of Science (MSc) is a generalist degree, giving you the ability to work in basic and applied research and to act as an expert in public administration, the private sector and biotechnology companies. Your choice of specialisation and optional courses allows you to profile your skills in the direction you aim to follow for your future career. You can also take courses from other Master’s programmes at the University of Helsinki or other universities in Finland or abroad.

The professional titles of graduates in molecular biosciences include senior researcher, entrepreneur, forensic chemist, research and development chemist, product manager, senior officer, editor and teacher, so your future profession and employment can be as unique as you are. The teaching in the Master’s programme is based on cutting-edge research, so your education will be closely related and applicable to emerging fields such as bio-economy, nanotechnology, personal health and biological drugs. Some hot development areas in biotechnology include renewable energy and environmental technology. These sectors will require new kinds of specialists, who possess a wide and comprehensive understanding of molecular life sciences. After graduation, you could act, for example, in health life sciences as a quality manager or a laboratory specialist, scientific writer, clinical research monitor, or as an expert in administration.

Internationalization

The Master's programme in Genetics and Molecular Biosciences has a multidisciplinary and international teaching staff and research environment, giving you an excellent opportunity to create interdisciplinary and international contacts which will be of great importance for your future career. The Master's programme enables you to participate in international research projects from the beginning of your studies. You will communicate in English, allowing for a smooth transition between international research and specialist environments.

You can carry out the research and internship periods included in the Master's programme abroad. You will also have the possibility to take courses for the Master’s degree as an exchange student in foreign collaborating universities.

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Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Read more
Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Develop your skills and knowledge on our accredited course, as you collect and analyse evidence, equipping you to become a confident and effective practitioner.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

In-keeping with its industry-focus our Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences accredited course is taught by experienced forensics practitioners. We’ll immerse you in a practical environment that closely emulates a real forensics laboratory. The analytical skills and expertise you gain apply equally well in the broader scientific and technological fields as they do in forensics.

Our course combines practical skills with high-level theoretical knowledge of the wide range of forensic techniques you need to apply at all stages of an investigation. Going further still, you’ll be trained to design and execute your own research project in a relevant area, which particularly interests you. This will include guidance on research methods, good practice, presentation and the application of your research.

Full-time - January start, 15 months. September start, 12 months.
Part-time - January start, 33 months. September start, 28 months.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

This course will provide you with:
• the opportunity to acquire Masters level capabilities, knowledge and skills in diverse areas of forensic science from the crime scene to the court
• training in the design and execution of science based research in an appropriate area of forensic science
• the opportunity to undertake a formal research programme in an appropriate area of forensic science

The intention is to immerse you in an environment that is as realistically close to that of a practising forensic science laboratory as is possible in an academic institution. The experience and background of Anglia Ruskin's staff, their intimate knowledge and working relationships with the industry and the availability or new or relatively new purpose-built laboratory facilities places this course in a strong position to deliver such an experience.

This course is suitable for candidates who wish to specialise in Forensic Science as a progression from their first degree in forensic science and for candidates coming into Forensic Science with a strong background in traditional analytical science. This course is accredited by The Forensic Science Society

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:
• demonstrate deep and systematic knowledge of several major areas of forensic science, including either chemical or biological criminalistics.
• apply theoretical and experimentally based empirical knowledge to the solution of problems in forensic science
demonstrate that you are cognisant with the best ethical practices, validation and accreditation procedures relevant to forensic science.
• demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the theory and practice of advanced analytical techniques, as used and applied in forensic science.
• devise, design, implement and, if necessary, modify a programme of basic research directly related to the solution of practical problems in the broad field of forensic science.
• assimilate the known knowledge and information concerning a particular problem/issue and erect testable and viable alternative hypotheses, from theoretical and empirical/experimental view points.
• demonstrate a level of conceptual understanding that will enable information from a wide range of sources and methodologies to be comprehensively and critically appraised.
• operate competently, safely and legally in a variety of complex, possibly unpredictable contexts and be able to apply appropriate standards of established good practice in such circumstances.
• demonstrate that you are able to exercise initiative in your work tasks, but yet be able to exercise your responsibility so as not to move beyond the scope of your expertise.
• search for and obtain information from a wide range of traditional, non-traditional and digital/electronic sources and be able to synthesis it into a coherent argument.
• present the results of your work in a number of forms (reports, papers, posters and all forms of oral presentation) at a level intelligible to the target audience (highly trained/specialised professional to informed lay-person).
• organise your own time and patterns of work to maximum effect and be able to work competently either autonomously or as part of groups and teams as required.

Careers

Our course is enhanced by our excellent working relationships with most of the major employers in the forensic science industry, including the police and fire services.

This focus on theory and good laboratory practice, analytical measurement and research and management skills, together with our industry contacts will make you an attractive candidate for employment. It’ll open up career opportunities in specialist forensic science laboratories in the chemical, biological, environmental, pharmaceutical and law enforcement industries.

You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Forensic Science PhD.

Core modules

Evidence Collection and Management
Mastering Forensic Evidence
Mastering Forensic Analysis
Specialist Topics
Research Methods
Research Project

Assessment

Your progress will be assessed using a variety of methods including laboratory reports, court reports (including witness statements), presentations, exams, essays and reports.

Facilities

Wide range of advanced microscopy instruments. SEM with EDS. Full range of organic analysis (GC, GC-MS, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman spectrometers. Gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. Comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment including GRIM, VSC and MSP. Dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Specialist facilities

Our facilities include a wide range of advanced microscopy instruments – SEM with EDS, a full range of organic analysis (GC, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman Spectrometers, gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. A comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment includes GRIM, VSC and MSP and we also have a dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

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The MRes in Animal and Plant Science is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Read more
The MRes in Animal and Plant Science is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Applications will be accepted for a start date in October or January. The programme consists of (a) a major research thesis and (b) taught modules on generic and transferable skills, with an emphasis on scientific writing, oral presentations, and general research skills. Part-time study for this programme is not available.

Prospective students must talk to their proposed supervisor about possible project areas (see below) and have a project approved by interview with the supervisor and Head of Discipline prior to application via http://www.pac.ie (PAC code: CKS81).

Visit the website: https://www.ucc.ie/en/bees/courses/postgrad/

Course detail

Students undertake a total workload equivalent to 90 credits over the 12 month programme, the principal element of which is the completion of a major research thesis of approximately 25,000 words. In parallel, students must take and pass taught modules to the value of 20 credits.

Modules

Students take 20 credits from the following available modules:

BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL6012 Marine Megafauna (10 credits)
BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation (10 credits)
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)
BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL4004 Frontiers in Biology (5 credits)
BL4005 Research Skills in Biology (5 credits)
BL4006 Food Production (5 credits)
PS6001 Plant Genetic Engineering (5 credits)
PS4024 Crop Physiology and Climate Change (5 credits)
PS4021 Environmentally Protective Management of Plant Pests and Pathogens (5 credits)
ZY4021 Evolutionary Ecology (5 credits)

Students may elect to take other, relevant modules (subject to availability) that are offered by the University that are not listed above to fulfil the elective requirement with approval from the MRes coordinator, research supervisor and Head of School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science.

Students will also undertake independent research towards completion of a research thesis to a student workload equivalent of 70 credits on a selected topic in Animal or Plant Science.

Current projects:

- The effect of lactation housing on the behaviour and welfare of pigs
- Understanding viral pathways in marine environments
- Distribution and diet of otters in a rural/urban streamscape
- Novel approaches in the use of freshwater macroinvertebrates for biomonitoring
- The ecology of Sika/Red/Fallow deer in Ireland
- Catching prey; the role of Ultraviolet radiation in attracting insects by carnivorous plants
- Birds as dispersers of plant propagules
- Does the phytotoxicity of nanoparticles depend on environmental parameters?
- The role of biochar as a sustainable soil amendment
- Effects of Eutrophication in shallow subtidal marine systems
- Use of Brachypodium sylvaticum as a model for growth regulation in perennial forage grasses
- Effect of temperature on spring growth of perennial ryegrass cultivars

Programme Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

- Carry out an independent and original research project to address an emerging question in Animal or Plant Science.
- Prepare and write a dissertation of their research project in a critical, logical and systematic manner, in keeping with the standards of postgraduate research.
- Display advanced theoretical knowledge and practical understanding within a research area of Animal or Plant Science.
- Understand the basis and application of field and laboratory methods used in Animal and Plant Science and a knowledge of their limitations
- Avail of relevant workshops or modules to increase scientific technical skills (e. g. biostatistics).
- Source, review, critically assess and evaluate relevant primary literature and summarize material for presentation to peers and for inclusion within the research dissertation.
- Design, write and defend a scientific research proposal based on their current research topic or a proposed topic.
- Evaluate their skill set and identify skills that should be acquired.
- Develop professional practice skills including team-work, negotiation, time-management, scientific writing and oral communication

How to apply

Students should consult the MRes Animal and Plant Science Brochure: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinAnimalandPlantScience.pdf

Prospective students should also consult the following guide to procedures realting to applying for the MRes Animal and Plant Science: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinANimalandplantscience-Studentguidetoproceduresbeforeandafterentrytotheprogramme24March2016.pdf

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Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Read more
Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in:
-Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data.
-Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.
-Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge.
-Reporting results in a clear and logical manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The six study lines are as follows:
Aerosol Physics
Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research.

Geophysics of the Hydrosphere
Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes.

Meteorology
Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge.

Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Remote Sensing
Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Analysis
Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research.

Programme Structure

The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses.

Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work.

Career Prospects

There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations.

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies.

Internationalization

The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad.

The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia.

Research Focus

All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics:
1. Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles.
2. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems.
3. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry.
4. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems.

In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

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The question is no longer if our climate will change, but how will it change and how will we adapt to these changes? Adaption and mitigation to global warming, the greenhouse effect and climate change all form the basis of the Master Climate Studies programme at Wageningen University. Read more

MSc Climate Studies

The question is no longer if our climate will change, but how will it change and how will we adapt to these changes? Adaption and mitigation to global warming, the greenhouse effect and climate change all form the basis of the Master Climate Studies programme at Wageningen University.

Students will gain a broad overview of climate change during this two-year programme. As changes and challenges crystallise, the demand for scientists able to understand and investigate them will rise. This master programme is specifically targeted at students who wish to focus on the scientific insights into climate change and on the social and economic implications of climate change in the broadest sense.

Programme summary

The MSc Climate Studies programme focuses on an improved understanding of climate change across the earth and its impact on ecosystems and society. The debate in science no longer revolves around whether our climate will change, but how it will change, how we can cope with the impact (adaptation), and how we can limit climate change in the long term (mitigation). These issues are important for the entire world and fuel a range of new challenges to natural and social sciences. Society needs answers to questions such as: How will climate change affect ecosystems and how will these in turn affect the climate system? What will the effect be on the availability of water and food? How will climate change issues set national and international political agendas? How will citizens, consumers, companies and other social actors respond to climate change? What will the economic costs be of the impact and measures related to climate change, and how will these costs be distributed globally? Will new social and economic opportunities emerge in the process of adaptation?

As these changes and challenges become ever more apparent, the demand for scientists who are able to understand and investigate them will rise. Wageningen University has therefore bundled expertise from several disciplines in a Master study programme specifically designed for students who wish to focus on the scientific insights into climate change and its implications for nature and society. Climate Studies does not only cover the most important geophysical and biogeochemical processes involved in climate change (the mechanisms), but it also covers the socio-economic aspects of causes and effects; as well as adaptation and mitigation as the main categories of societal response.

Specialisations

Climate Studies gives you a broad overview of climate-change related issues. You can specialise in a topic of your choice during your thesis research. We offer a wide range of thesis tracks:
• Meteorology
• Air Quality and Atmospheric Chemistry
• Hydrology and Quantitative Water Management
• Crop and Weed Ecology
• Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
• Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
• Earth System Science
• Environmental System Analysis
• Integrated Water Management
• Environmental Economics and Natural Resources
• Environmental Policy

You future career

Graduates from this programme are well-equipped with the knowledge and skills to continue their academic training as a PhD student or to start a career as a scientific professional at universities, research institutes, and environmental and governmental organisations. Applied climate change researchers and experts are sought after by banks, insurance companies, construction, power companies and government.

Student Lennart Pompe.
"Climate Studies and the specialisation Integrated Water Management are the perfect combination for me where science and society come together to tackle the challenges the water sector faces. I took the opportunity to enrich my master with the label of the Climate-KIC, a European knowledge and innovation community. I joined several Climate-KIC activities, among others, the inspiring 5-week summer school ‘the Journey’ aimed at developing your own business plan. My thesis focussed on climate change and human development in the Bengal delta and the related salinisation issues. I am excited to enter the Dutch-leading water sector."

Related programmes:
MSc Environmental Sciences
MSc Earth and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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IT Tralee is currently seeking to recruit ahigh calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master by Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Read more

IT Tralee is currently seeking to recruit ahigh calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master by Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Graduates holding a relevant Level 8 Honours Degree (second class honours or higher) are invited to submit an application. The successful applicants will be awarded a stipend of €700 per month for a maximum period of 18 months and the Institute will waive full fees for this funding period. Postgraduate students are expected to complete their studies full-time at the Institute.

Biography of Principle Supervisor

Mr Quille received his Degree in Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds from University College Cork in 2007. He has since completed an M.Sc in Biotechnology in the Shannon ABC laboratories at IT Tralee on a project entitled: The preparation of an alginate with a hydrophobic moiety that retains its biocompatibility and immunosuppressive properties while remaining suitable for cellular encapsulation. He has previously worked in Astellas as a Process Technician and in Shannon ABC as a Biochemical Technician. He currently holds the role of Research Scientist with Shannon ABC. Previous projects include developing a commercial focus to the use of bioassays in the assessment of different components of seaweed and the impact of seasonality. He has worked on the FP7 funded project NatuCrop where he oversaw extensive tomato growth room, glasshouse and field trials. Results of his work have been presented at a number of conferences all over Europe and in Brazil. He is currently working on a Horizon 2020 project. 

Research Project Abstract

Crop productivity relies heavily on nitrogen fertilisation which in itself requires huge amounts of energy to produce. Also excess applications of nitrogen to the land is detrimental to the environment therefore increasing plant nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is essential in the promotion of sustainable agriculture. The use of seaweed and seaweed extracts in agriculture is well documented. The most popular and well researched type of seaweed extract commercially available is an Ascophyllum Nodosum extract (ANE). Ascophyllum is a brown seaweed that is native to the waters of Ireland as it grows best in the North Atlantic basin. Seaweed extracts have been described to enhance seed germination and establishment, improve plant growth, yield, flower set and fruit production, increase resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and improve postharvest shelf life. Previously a seaweed extract when combined with a fertiliser regime increased the productivity and oil content and accelerated maturation (colour and firmness) of the olive fruits from olive trees. Oil-Seed Rape (OSR; Brassica napus) is a member of the Brassicaceae family that is grown for its oil content. It requires extensive nitrogen fertilisation, however it has a poor N-harvest index meaning a lot of nitrogen is lost in the straw rather than transported to the pod. The aim or our study is to apply 4 commercially available ANE’s to winter and spring crops of OSR (different varieties) in a controlled growth room and glasshouse and finally in a field setting under different fertiliser regimes. Treatments will be assessed by comparing fresh weight, dry weight, and seed/oil yield and oil quality. Plant tissue will also be saved in order to assess other parameters such as flavonol accumulation, nitrate reductase, gene expression (NRT2) and photosynthetic parameters.

Research Context (Technical Merit & Impact)

600,000 Ha of OSR is planted in the UK and Ireland alone every year, recommended input of nitrogen is 200 kg (0.2 tonnes) per Ha meaning 120,000 tonnes of nitrogen every year. As OSR only has an N-harvest index of 0.6, representing 48,000 tonnes lost, which is a massive financial loss as well as potentially environmentally detrimental. In determining the effect of ANE’s on NUE current research focuses on the outcome, i.e. is yield increased, rather than investigate the method by which the yield has increased. This research is aimed a filling some void of knowledge here by linking phenotypic differences to biochemical and genetic data of treated plants in order to assign a potential mode of action.

Research Methodology

While ANE’s have been shown to increase nitrogen assimilation, extensive growth trials, especially in economically important crops (such as OSR) which investigate their role in affecting NUE are scarce and are only seemingly becoming popular in recent years. However considering the increased price of nitrogen, the additional interest in biostimulants (ANE’s in particular), the need to feed a growing population and coupled to the environmental damage of excess nitrogen this can be considered a ‘hot topic’. Plant (glasshouse and field setting) trials will be conducted and analysed for phenotypic data (photosynthetic measurements, yield). Materials from these plant trials must then be harvested, extracted and saved for biochemical and genetic determination. Lab-based techniques employed include protein extraction, western blotting and spectrophotometry, RT-PCR and HPLC. This 3 pronged approach from assessing phenotype to the biochemical level and finally to the gene level will provide evidence on mode of action of the ANE’s potential impact on NUE in OSR.



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Space Physiology & Health MSc is a unique programme providing training for biomedical scientists & physicians delivered by international experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (eg NASA). Read more
Space Physiology & Health MSc is a unique programme providing training for biomedical scientists & physicians delivered by international experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (eg NASA). Graduates will be equipped through lectures, seminars and extensive laboratory practicals and visits to RAF & Space Agency (ESA & DLR) facilities to serve future manned space expeditions.

Key benefits

- The programme is unique within Europe.

- Has input from professionals within the Space industry.

- Provides experiences with external partners including the Crew Medical Support Office at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/space-physiology-and-health-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in the following areas:

- Detailed and in depth knowledge of the physiological effects of the space environment upon humans and of the methods employed to mitigate such effects.

- Provide practical experience in experimentation methods appropriate to investigate the physiological effects of the space environment and those employed to mitigate such effects.

- A knowledge of instrumentation, calibration, data acquisition and the analysis of results whilst applying the appropriate statistical methods.an understanding of the effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.

- An understanding of the effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.

- A detailed knowledge of the practical implications of disease and physical deconditioning in space-faring humans and the practices required to counter and manage such events.

- Knowledge of the characteristics and practices associated with medical and life science research environments in space.

- Course purpose -

The aim of this programme is to provide graduates with advanced theoretical and practical training in the physiology, psychology and operational medicine of humans exposed to or working in the Space environment.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: Approximately 20 hours of taught classes per week with some entire weeks spent at research establishments in the UK and abroad. Part-time study: Not offered. The programme will comprise lectures, tutorials and seminars with a large practical component. The latter will provide personal experience and experimental studies of a wide variety of Space relevant environments including flight, acceleration, heat and cold, noise, and spatial disorientation. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 10,000 word dissertation (with 10+5 min oral presentation) aims to facilitate student research in the labs of world renowned supervisors in space agencies, academia and industry across the globe.

Career prospects

The programme provides a range of multidisciplinary skills and will help those wishing to pursue a career in human physiology in its broadest sense, either in academic research i.e. PhD, in industry, in Ministry of Defence research laboratories or National/International Space agencies including ESA.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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There is a growing demand worldwide for highly trained graduates in the field of clinical nutrition and health for positions in the health services, local government, food industries and research and development. Read more
There is a growing demand worldwide for highly trained graduates in the field of clinical nutrition and health for positions in the health services, local government, food industries and research and development. Countries all over the world recognise the important role nutrition plays in improving health and preventing disease and have prioritised nutrition and diet within their national health plans.

Most countries worldwide have identified a need to increase the capacity of their nutrition workforce, but few have the resources to provide this in their own country beyond undergraduate level.

The MSc Clinical Nutrition and Health is designed to address this priority. It is aimed at medical doctors, graduates of life sciences (with a strong underpinning in physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, health psychology, food science) and degree level health professionals who want to improve their knowledge of clinical nutrition.

The programme will be of particular interest to overseas students for whom this specialist field of study may not be available in their country of origin. The MSc research project develops your research skills, scientific writing skills and consolidates your knowledge base in clinical nutrition and health.

Research

Examples of Research in Food, Nutrition and Dietetics underpinning the MSc programme:
-Measuring the diet quality of population groups using dietary pattern analysis and a diet quality index. The use of this to inform and to evaluate food and nutrition policy.
-Investigating the effect of gestational diabetes during pregnancy on growth outcome for infants.
-Assessing infant feeding and macronutrient intake and its effect on early growth patterns.
-Food Science Research interest include microbial metabolites, food safety and risk assessment, food borne diseases, environmental microbiology and food composition and nutrients.
-Research undertaken on Patient-centred Outcomes in Dietary Research.
-Research undertaken on Secondary Prevention of Stroke and research into optimising nutrition of older people with dementia.

Employment Opportunities

Career opportunities in this area include working in clinical nutrition, public health, local government, the food industry, food companies, university and industry research departments, as well as further study.

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An increasing number of chemicals is used by society today, which are also released into the environment. Ecotoxicology is concerned with their potential impacts on the ecosystem. Read more

About the Program

An increasing number of chemicals is used by society today, which are also released into the environment. Ecotoxicology is concerned with their potential impacts on the ecosystem. It aims to investigate and discover effects of chemicals on biological systems in order to develop methods for risk management, as well as to predict ecological consequences.

The international "Master of Science program in Ecotoxicology" integrates concepts of Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology and Ecology and includes Social Sciences and Economics as well. Due to its interdisciplinary and applied approach, the Program enables its graduates to analyze complex problems and to develop practical solutions.

As environmental problems reach far beyond national borders, an international approach is necessary and the situation in developing countries needs special solutions.

The Master in Ecotoxicology is carried out under the Institute for Environmental Sciences.

For the latest news about our Institute of Ecotoxicology you can also check our Ecotox-Blog under:
http://www.master-ecotoxicology.de/ecotox-blog

Program Structure

All students take the 9 required modules, as well as a 10-week Research Project Course and an Applied Module at External Organisations of 8 weeks to obtain a deep knowledge in the field of Ecotoxicology. Afterwards, studentes personalize the Program by choosing 2 Modules of the 5 Specialty Areas. The Master Thesis with colloquium round out the 4-semester Program.

Specialty Areas:

Applied Environmental Chemistry & Environmental Physics,
Chemistry,
Applied Ecology,
Geoecology and
Socioeconomics & Environmental Management

Applied Module at External Organizations (AMEO)

The module AMEO is an 8-week internship, which can be performed at an external university or a governmental or industrial research institute in Germany or abroad. Students become familiar with working practice, requirements of the job market and career opportunities and can establish business contacts. They apply, confirm and expand knowledge and competences achieved during their study.

Following an introductory discussion with the supervisors, the students perform the (research) work on their own and discuss the obtained results regularly with their supervisors. The content depends on the actual research questions in the selected research organizations. Topics or possible positions will be suggested by the staff of the Institute for Environmental Sciences or maybe suggested by the students. The topics should be directly related to applied problems relevant in these external organisations and should ideally offer the students opportunities to apply their knowledge and skills in areas, which are not the particular research areas at the Institute for Environmental Sciences in Landau. They include, but are not restricted to the following areas:

Engineering aspects (e.g. hydrology, mitigation techniques)
Multimedia modelling
Food web modelling
Fish, bird or mammal ecotoxicology and risk assessment
Agricultural sciences
Socioeconomics
Specific aspects in regulatory ecotoxicology
Risk communication, economic or societal aspects

Research Project Course (RPC)

The students work independently on a research topic of the university for a total time of about 10 weeks. The topics depend on the actual research conducted in the various research groups. However, all topics do have an interdisciplinary character covering at least two different disciplines (e.g. chemistry and ecology, or physics and risk assessment). The students submit proposals for topics selected from a list provided by the teaching staff including a time and resource planning as well as an independently conducted literature search. Following an introductory discussion with the supervisor, the students perform the research work on their own and discuss the obtained results regularly with their supervisor. Following the practical work, the students write a report including the theoretical background, the methods used, the results obtained and a discussion of the results based on the relevant scientific literature. The students present and defend the outcome of their work at an oral presentation. Following successful completion the students are able to plan a scientific work package, conduct the work, evaluate the results based on the relevant literature and present the outcomes.

The content depends on the actual research questions in the research groups associated with the Institute for Environmental Sciences. They include, but are not restricted to the following areas:

Chemical experiments in the lab
Environmental colloid chemistry
Environmental organic chemistry
Physical transport or transfer processes of environmental chemicals
Ecotoxicological lab tests
Ecotoxicological field studies
In situ or monitoring work in the field
Molecular genetics
GIS data analysis
Literature reviews
Exposure, effect or landscape modelling
Assessment or management of risks

More information on the program structure and contents can also be found under:
https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/info-prospective-students/master-of-science-ecotoxicology/aims-and-contents

Employment outlook

The Program enables the graduates to conduct independent scientific work and prepares in particular for independent and leading positions in the numerous emerging fields of Ecotoxicology. The graduates are able to take responsibility in a professional manner in: Scientific facilities and research institutes, Authorities, public offices and ministries with a regulatory role, Non-governmental organizations, Industry and consulting enterprises. The international orientation of the program qualifies graduates for a global job market. In addition, the Master program prepares for a PhD study.

“I value very much the excellent education and the close individual support from the teaching staff during my studies that allowed me to pursue own research ideas and to find my field of interest. A cooperation of the university with the German Federal Environment Agency enabled me to gain experience in the environmental risk assessment of pesticides. I qualified for a traineeship in the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and am now working in the field of pesticide risk assessment.” Klaus Swarowsky (Master Ecotoxicology, EFSA)

Internationally Networked

The Institute for Environmental Sciences is globally connected through international research projects and student exchange programs. The international nature of the Program is achieved through numerous international research and teaching staff, regular seminars from guest lecturers from abroad, and possible internships all over the world.
You will find a map which displays the locations our cooperation partners under:

https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/info-prospective-students/master-of-science-ecotoxicology/aims-and-contents#network

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The UBC Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine offers a remarkable opportunity to study with numerous world renowned faculty and research programs. Read more

General Information

The UBC Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine offers a remarkable opportunity to study with numerous world renowned faculty and research programs. We are recognized as national and international leaders in both basic and clinical research. Experimental Pathology refers to research in any area of biomedical investigation that is relevant to human disease. Since it is necessary to understand the normal working of the system to fully define the changes associated with disease, the areas represented at UBC cover a wide range of fields and approaches. Work at all levels of biological organization is involved, from protein to lipoprotein biochemistry and molecular biology through cell and tumour biology, animal models for studies on pulmonary and cardiovascular pathophysiology and viral and bacterial infection processes, to clinical studies on human population and the AIDS epidemic.

We train students with varied backgrounds in science and medicine including: biochemistry, physiology, cell biology and microbiology/immunology.

We are committed to effective, cutting-edge, ethical research. The results of which will reach beyond the academic realm to effect positive change in the lives of our families, communities and, ultimately, our world.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
- Subject: Life Sciences
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Registration options: Full-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Medicine

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Over the past decade, the impact of nutrition and exercise in optimising athletic performance and recovery from injury has become increasingly clear and there has been a growing demand for highly trained specialists in this field. Read more

Over the past decade, the impact of nutrition and exercise in optimising athletic performance and recovery from injury has become increasingly clear and there has been a growing demand for highly trained specialists in this field.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Experts in sport and exercise nutrition translate the latest scientific research into practical, evidence-based advice for competitive and recreational athletes, as well as groups and individuals wanting to improve their health, lose weight, recover from injury or become more active. 

Incorporating up-to-date research and contemporary practice, this course aims to prepare you for broad range of careers – from clinical practice assessing professional sports teams to work as a dietitian for clients with specific nutritional issues.

Based in our multimillion pound, state-of-the-art Science and Health Building, you can take full advantage of our cutting-edge facilities, including indoor running track and extensive exercise science laboratories. You’ll gain hands-on experience of some of the equipment and techniques used in professional sports and health environments. 

The course seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of the nutritional and metabolic demands of exercise and practical experience of the effect of and interactions between diet, exercise and health. We provide opportunities to work with University and local sports teams, as well as recreational athletes seeking personalised nutrition advice. 

Our teaching team has a broad range of academic and professional experience, many of whom have worked with a range of health initiatives, professional athletes and clubs. You will also learn about our own latest research findings from the Centre for Research in Applied Biological and Exercise Sciences.

Master’s study will also give you the opportunity to gain important experience and skills in research, which will help you to understand and evaluate future developments. 

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Your main study themes are:

  • Exercise Physiology: How the body adapts and responds to exercise and strength training. We will examine exercise in different populations, using appropriate physiological assessment techniques to differentiate between acute reactions occurring during exercise and late onset adaptations that occur with training. You will then apply this understanding to critically evaluate training schedules for individuals at differing stages of fitness or competition.
  • Nutrition: The science of nutrition and the use of dietary strategies to enhance sport and exercise performance
  • Research Skills: Key aspects of scientific method will be developed. Types of information, finding appropriate information for scientific purposes, and how to use this information. Experimental design, analysis and presentation of data.

This multidisciplinary course draws together a broad range of biosciences subject matter within the areas of sport, exercise physiology, health and nutrition.

Content has been designed to develop your appreciation of the human body and its functions, together with nutrition science and its role in promoting human health so that you can apply this knowledge to develop appropriate dietary advice and exercise programmes.

We will consider the components of fitness, including nutritional requirements, energy expenditure, body mass and body composition, examining some of the common problems associated with general health and wellbeing, diet and nutrition, exercise and sport performance. These include diets, hydration and supplements, for example.

Covering how to scientifically measure nutritional requirements and dietary allowances of macronutrients, micronutrients and other metabolically active components of food such as fibre. We also consider the negative effects of things like food additives, tannins or drugs and how ethnic and culture may affect practical advice on foods, meals and menus.

As well as subject-specific knowledge, we will encourage a critical, analytical and flexible approach to problem-solving in sport and exercise nutrition. You will systematically and creatively explore complex issues, such as physical activity, nutrition and obesity, and elite physiological support through a variety of case studies, laboratory sessions and group work.

Our aim is to effectively prepare you for professional employment, so we focus on providing enhanced practical and professional skills through a combination of lectures, laboratory and field sessions and case studies. The nature of the course also enables topical aspects to be discussed, for example, the latest popular supplement for sports people or fad diet.

You are also required to complete in-depth research study in the area of sport and exercise science, so will receive training in research methods, including data analysis in both research and applied practice. 



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Applied Human Nutrition is a practical, research driven masters course detailing the science behind the nutritional requirements of humans from pre-conception to old age. Read more
Applied Human Nutrition is a practical, research driven masters course detailing the science behind the nutritional requirements of humans from pre-conception to old age.

Recently there has been a significant rise in diet-related illnesses around the globe, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and cardiovascular disease. Poor nutrition is causing increasing public health problems in all sectors and ages, especially among the young and the elderly. On the other hand, in some areas of the world deficiency diseases and malnutrition are common.

A key focus of this course is examining the provision of food and nutrients to the body to facilitate optimum physical and mental development and maintenance of health throughout a lifetime. It also emphasises the specific problems of global nutrition and the public health implications.

The course is suited to graduates with a background in the biological sciences. Applications are encouraged from UK, EU and international students with an interest in acquiring expertise in nutrition, and from graduates who wish to pursue careers as nutritionists.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/applied-human-nutrition/

Why choose this course?

- High profile speakers from the food industry, government and research bodies regularly present at our nutrition seminar series, keeping students up-to-date with current thinking on nutrition, food and policy topics.

- You have opportunities to work with our Functional Food Centre, the UK's first research centre dedicated to functional foods, in undertaking your research project - involving you in some of the cutting edge research that helps the government and food industry develop new products with specific health and nutritional benefits.

- Our Functional Food Centre has excellent links with the food industry, giving students an opportunity to undertake their research project externally or to develop contacts for career progression.

- Our course is accredited by the Association for Nutrition (AfN), the largest learned society for nutrition in Europe. There is increasing recognition among employers, in industry and in the public sectors that registration with the AfN is a sign of quality, which could enhance graduate career prospects.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, with each module involving approximately 200 hours of student input and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through three hours' teaching each week for 12 weeks. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, practical and project work. The research project will be supervised on a one-to-one basis.

Each module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, formal written examinations, in-class tests, project work, design and verbal presentations, workshops, simulations, and practical exercises.

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Sport and Health Sciences, but will include visiting speakers from business and industry, local government, consultancies, research bodies and other universities.

The Functional Food Centre is an internationally-renowned research group consisting of visiting professors, fellows, research assistants and PhD students, who are all researching nutrition and food topics.

Specialist facilities

As one of the biggest European Centres for Glycaemic Index testing, the Functional Food Centre boasts impressive facilities including a dedicated product development kitchen and fully equipped sensory booths

How this course helps you develop

There are a number of networking opportunities with people from the nutrition profession through the Functional Food Centre's links with the food industry, public health bodies and other research institutes. In addition, students will benefit from the experience of meeting and listening to high-profile speakers from food companies, government and other universities who give key-note lectures.

Careers

Graduates pursue a range of nutrition-related careers, particularly in health promotion as food and health co-ordinators: in industry with food and drink manufacturers and retailers, medical food companies, food service providers and trade associations; in government and policy to improve the health of the population; and in research in universities, food companies or research institutes.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

We have a number of research strengths and exciting projects currently underway that you can can get involved in during your research projects.Some of the areas of interest include:
- Glycaemic control and the development of low glycaemic index foods
- Female nutrition and the role of the menstrual cycle in energy regulation
- Appetite and satiety
- Childhood obesity and the factors influencing it
- Sensory testing of foods
- Weight management
- Management of type 2 diabetes with nutrition and physical activity
- Functional food ingredients and their effect on energy regulation
- Antioxidant properties of foods

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