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The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Read more

Course outline

The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Since then, in response to student demand, the available options have been extended to include postgraduate research degrees at three levels: MA by Research, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Course structure

For their first year of study students on all these courses attend the same weekly seminars as students taking the Taught MA in Biography. These provide the critical awareness of the subject which is an essential prerequisite for dissertation work and they are one of the most distinctive and valuable elements of the MA. They take place as follows:

- Autobiography (September to December)
- Special Paper in Biography (January to June)
- Research Methods (January to June)

The modules on Biography and Autobiography are designed to combine the study of classic biographies and memoirs with contemporary writing. In addition, the Research Methods module provides an invaluable and innovative training, especially devised for biographers.

Guest seminars on the course are led by leading biographers, critics, publishers and agents. Teachers and speakers on the course have included Andrew Motion, Kathryn Hughes, Frances Wilson, Frances Spalding, Jeremy Lewis, Rupert Shortt, Caroline Dawnay, Andrew Lownie and Miranda Seymour.

Research students are expected to produce, as a valuable preliminary to their own research project, written coursework for the Research Methods module (an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format), and one other piece of written work, but the full amount of termly written work required for the taught course is not compulsory. During the early part of the course, research students refine their research proposal under the individual supervision of the course director for eventual discussion with the Research Officer. Once the research proposal has been accepted students concentrate on individual research and the preparation of a dissertation, under the supervision of the course director.

Teaching methods

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995) and The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a biography of Edward VII, for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust.

Location

Teaching takes place in London. See the University's website for more information.

Timescale

The normal periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MA Res– 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Administrative arrangements

A system of preliminary registration for all research degrees is in operation to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during the early part of their course. Admission to research degrees is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met. Students for the MA degree in Biography by Research are registered initially for the taught MA until the research proposal has been accepted. Postgraduate students wishing to register for the DPhil programme in Biography must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. Registration is upgraded to DPhil, normally between 12 and 18 months from first registration, once the student has demonstrated through the submission of draft written work that he or she has the ability to conduct research at the advanced level required for the award of the degree. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Changing the level of the research degree after the start of the course, although not impossible, can produce complications. Prospective students uncertain about the level or length of course best suited to them are strongly advised to discuss this with the course director before applying.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mres/biography.

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This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. Read more

Course outline

This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. The varied mix of backgrounds and interests that students bring to the course, the experience and commitment of the programme director and the friendly small-group setting allow a lively, enjoyable and intellectually rigorous exchange of ideas. Graduates have gone on to publish their own books, and to win prizes. Some have embarked on further research for the MPhil or the DPhil in Biography.

When it was founded in 1996, the Biography MA was the first of its kind. Since then Life Writing has become part of the postgraduate menu, but the Buckingham course has kept its distinctive edge. Unlike most Life Writing degrees, it is not linked to Creative Writing, and there is a strong emphasis on research and historical biography. The programme is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Location

Teaching takes place in central London, usually at a venue close to Marylebone station.

Timetable

The course offers entry points in September and January and runs for a calendar year if taken full-time. Teaching takes place on one day a week over three terms running from September to December, January to March and April to June; the term from July to September is devoted to independent research. The programme may be followed part-time over 2 years. In the first year part-time students follow the taught courses and the second year is normally devoted to the dissertation. A detailed programme is shown here. Suitably qualified students with a major research topic in mind may be accepted for the higher degrees of MPhil (two years full-time/four years part-time) or DPhil (three years full-time/six years part-time).

Course structure

Students have a choice between following the taught MA, or opting for the MA by Research. The taught MA gives an opportunity to produce written term papers on a variety of topics as well as a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Students accepted for the MA by Research are required to produce written work which includes an extended dissertation of up to 40,000 words. All students produce coursework for the Research Methods module: an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format.

Research support

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995); The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize; and Bertie: A Life of Edward VII (2012), for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/biography.

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The MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction is for anyone seeking to develop their writing in the increasingly diverse and exciting genre of non-fiction. Read more
The MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction is for anyone seeking to develop their writing in the increasingly diverse and exciting genre of non-fiction.

UEA is the country's leading university for the teaching of Creative Writing. The course, which runs for one year (full-time) or two years (part-time), is taught by Kathryn Hughes, Ian Thomson and Helen Smith, all of whom have won major literary awards.

Teaching is by 3 hour seminar during which you may discuss a set text, present a paper on a recent work of non-fiction or workshop your own writing. You will take two modules in the first semester and two in the second (one each semester for part-timers). You will submit a 15,000 word dissertation at the end of the summer.

During the year you will meet agents and publishers, hear talks by distinguished non-fiction writers and write a piece to be published in the annual student anthology.

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This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. Read more
This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. It is unique in combining creative and life writing in a stimulating and enriching programme- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-creative-life-writing/

We examine relevant literary and cultural theory as well as the politics and practicalities of language and writing from the point of view of the writer.

Practitioner-led, the programme offers you the opportunity to work with a range of published writers who visit the College to give readings and lead workshops.

Visiting writers have included William Fiennes, Jackie Kay and Aminatta Forna.

Poetry Masterclasses have been led by Sharon Olds, Les Murray, Derek Walcott and C K Williams

We also expect to draw fully upon London’s rich tradition as a converging point for culturally diverse literary practices.

Our graduates have gone on to have successful careers as writers and have won awards including the Guardian First Book Award, the Eric Gregory Award, the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, and the Dylan Thomas Prize. Two of our graduates (Ross Raisin and Evie Wyld) were recognised in Granta's Best of Young British Novelists 2013 list.

Explore the work of students currently enrolled on the programme in the Goldfish online journal.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

There are three main components of the Masters:

Creative and life writing workshops
Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing
One-to-one tutorials
There will be two core modules: a two-term workshop in creative and life writing, and a one-term Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing seminar module.

Workshop in Creative and Life Writing

All students attend this two and-a-half-hour compulsory workshop – part-time students attend in their first year. In the first term you will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of genres in creative and life writing, and then in the second term to develop your individual interests in poetry, fiction, autobiography and biography, or perhaps a fusion of those genres.

Each term you submit a piece of your own writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed it. Presentations of your work to other students with an account of your aims and approaches form an additional important element.

Some workshops will be taken by visiting writers, introducing you to a range of practices, concerns and techniques. The workshop also enables you to debate issues raised in the Contemporary Contexts module in relation to your own practice.

Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing

This is a two-hour seminar module, made up of informal talks by visiting speakers, followed by a seminar. These talks might be by practising writers, biographers, critics or philosophers (from both outside and inside Goldsmiths).

Our notable visitors have included Ali Smith, A L Kennedy, Daljit Nagra and Jon McGregor. Wide-ranging topics have included: the role of the writer and politics; writing the self; the relationship between contemporary fiction and biography; the relationship between fictional and non-fictional autobiography; writers and their readers; the publishing world; contemporary ideas about language; gender and writing.

In both the Contemporary Contexts module and the workshops you will be asked to consider works by significant contemporary writers in relation to your own writing practice. Assessment is by a critical essay on a writer or literary issue. Full-time students take the Contemporary Contexts module in their first term and part-time students in their second year.

Tutorials will be offered at regular intervals during the year (12 in all).

Options

You also choose an option module lasting one term. Full-time students take the module in the second term, while part-time students take it in the second year (second term). You can choose from a specialist workshop in fiction, poetry or life writing, or an option from the list of MA options offered by ECL including topics such as European Avant-Garde, Postmodernist Fiction or Re-writing Sexualities.

Assessment

Assessment is by the submission of four pieces of writing of 5,000 words each – either an essay, or, for workshops, a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing – plus a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. You will also be assessed on a portfolio (maximum of 20,000 words) containing a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. In all cases, the number of words applies to prose.

Careers

Graduates of this programme include Tom Lee, Lucy Caldwell, Ross Raisin, Amy Sackville, Rohan Kriwaczek, Evie Wyld, Sara Grant, Naomi Foyle, Bronia Kita, Lijia Zhang, Ashley Dartnell and Suzanne Joinson and the poets Emily Berry, Andy Spragg, Kate Potts, Jack Underwood, Abigail Parry, Anthony Joseph, Katrina Naomi and Matthew Gregory.

Among them they've won or been shortlisted for awards including The Sunday Times/EFG Private Bank Short Story Award 2012, the Rooney Prize for Literature 2011, the 2008 and 2011 Dylan Thomas Prize, several Eric Gregory Awards, The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award 2009, the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize 2009 and 2010, the Guardian First Book Award, the New Writing Ventures Prize, and several Betty Trask Awards.

Other graduates have gone on to work in publishing (for example, as senior commissioning editors), journalism, public relations, teaching, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, and the media.

Skills

The MA will enable you to develop transferable skills, including: enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a 30 to 90 minute performance accompanied by performance notes and a biography
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• five performances, each between 30 and 90 minutes long, accompanied by programme notes and a biography, of which the first performance can be your work from the MPhil requirement
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words can be from your MPhil requirement.

As with the MPhil, your DMus portfolio performances may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. You may wish to explore a range of roles and repertoire, or stick with just one concerto performance. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of, and instrumentation for, each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal the current musical and extra-musical influences on your work, and how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

Full-time and part-time candidates - you may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you ‘exit’ with the MPhil qualification.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Combining a thorough grounding in philosophy at postgraduate level with an exceptional range of options, the MA Philosophy offers a unique opportunity for advanced work in the subject. Read more

Summary

Combining a thorough grounding in philosophy at postgraduate level with an exceptional range of options, the MA Philosophy offers a unique opportunity for advanced work in the subject.

Students can follow a pathway in aesthetics or 19th-century German philosophy, or choose a pick-and-mix approach to their studies.

Modules

Classic texts in philosophy (CT) 1 (mind, epistemology and metaphysics) and 2 (ethics and value); research skills 1 and 2; dissertation; plus specialised modules from: art and emotion; artificial intelligence; Frege; Heidegger; Kierkegaard; medieval philosophy; Nietzsche; philosophy and biography; philosophy of language; philosophy of music; philosophy of religion; Schopenhauer; Schopenhauer and Nietzsche on art; the nature of art; the nature of reasons; the theory of action; topics in contemporary aesthetics; topics in moral and political philosophy; topics in the history of aesthetics; Wittgenstein.

Visit our website for further information...



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The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. Read more
The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. It is grounded in current interdisciplinary methodologies informed by cultural and critical theory, and draws on the course team’s specific areas of expertise within social, cultural and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies and the history of ideas. The programme develops a connection between critical understanding and analysis of the past, with a practical, ‘hands-on’ emphasis upon the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. The programme incorporates interests and expertise spanning a wide range of cultural forms and practices, including oral history, life-story work and auto/biography, drama and performance, material artefacts, monuments, exhibitions, museums, written histories, imaginative literature, archival documents and records, painting, graphic design, photography, film, television, video, digital media, commemoration, and heritage.

These concerns are developed in relation to three pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus: Cultural Memory; Making Histories; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity. MA students enrol on one of these pathways; not all run every year. [For further details of the three pathways, see separate entries under these titles on this website.]

Each pathway comprises four component elements:

1: A compulsory core course unit that runs throughout the year and establishes the themes, issues and questions that characterize the field of enquiry, the theories and methods of its investigation and applies these to particular case studies:

For Cultural Memory the core course comprises: Cultural Memory: Concepts, Theories and Methods; Holocaust Memory; and Cultural Memory in Ireland.

For Making Histories the core course comprises: Public History, Heritage and the Representation of Brighton & Hove; Making the History of Slavery in the Atlantic World; and Making the History of the Second World War

For ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity the core course comprises: Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities; The Making of the Black Atlantic; and Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures.

2: Two optional units of 20 credits each, or one optional unit of 40 credits. These are usually taken from within the MA Humanities Programme, or from MA Programmes running elsewhere in the School of Humanities.

NB: these units may vary, and not all will be available in any one year. For up-to-date information, contact the Course Leader.

3. A Research Methods unit introducing relevant methods in cultural studies, historical inquiry, literary (textual) analysis, and cultural and critical theory; and guiding the formulation of a research topic with clear aims, methodology, sources, and a rationale for the intended treatment of the topic.


4: The Research Project enables students to investigate in depth a topic of their choice - a critical debate, or a body of cultural material, or an historical context - relevant to the broad concerns of the MA. Research normally leads to the production of a 20,000-word dissertation. The use of alternative modes of presentation - for example, the production of a video, an exhibition or a CD-Rom - may also be negotiated
.

Full-time students usually take two elements per term, part-time students usually take one. The pattern of study is flexible in order to allow all students to take advantage of the full range of options. Potential applicants are advised to discuss their particular interests with the Course Leader to explore how these might be accommodated. In cases where students’ preferred pathways or units are not available, there is usually scope to pursue these interests elsewhere on the programme, whether in relation to other units or through the Research Project.

A part-time student should expect to dedicate some 20 hours a week to their studies and a full-time student some 40 hours, mostly taken up by independent reading and writing. Teaching for all Core Courses normally takes place on weekday evenings and lasts 2 - 3 hours. Research Methods timetabling is negotiated with each group. The Research Project involves individual tuition at times agreed between student and supervisor.

The interdisciplinary course team are active researchers and leaders in their respective research fields. Please see their individual staff pages for further details of areas of research expertise and interest.
Visit Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA page on the University of Brighton website for more details!

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Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Read more

Course Overview

Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Our staff have received national and international recognition for their work. You will work with them to prepare creative work for submission and publication.

Our courses provide a unique opportunity to develop and hone your creative writing skills. We teach creative writing in four strands: prose writing, poetry, scriptwriting, with a unique emphasis on writing for radio, creative non-fiction, with a unique emphasis on memoir writing, essay writing and biography.

The courses will introduce you to a wide range of subjects and areas in which writers are working professionally. You will build your awareness and broaden your knowledge of writing opportunities. You will also consider ways of matching your skills to jobs.

You will explore the many ways in which writing is produced, distributed and promoted to audiences. Our guest speakers are practitioners and/or associated with the world of publishing and performance. Working with them, you will explore the roles and importance of: agents, editors, reviewers, social media, new technology in contemporary publishing.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-writing-ma-pgcert/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-writing-ma-pgcert/#howtoapply

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin language
• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources
• Reading Academic German
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland

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The Drama by Practice as Research programme is for practitioners who want time to develop and reflect on their work in a supportive and challenging environment. Read more
The Drama by Practice as Research programme is for practitioners who want time to develop and reflect on their work in a supportive and challenging environment.

It is also for recent graduates who want either to develop a body of practice or to conduct practice-based research at a higher level.

The programme leads through supervision to project planning with practice-based presentations, which are then written up for the final dissertation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/280/drama-practice-as-research

About the Department of Drama and Theatre

Postgraduate Drama and Theatre studies at Kent has a very strong reputation for research and supervision in contemporary theatre and performance. We are the home of two renowned international research centres, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) and the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (CKP).

The wide-ranging interests of our international team of leading and emerging researchers (from the UK, Australia, Italy, Greece, Germany, France and other countries) include research strengths in contemporary performance, applied theatre, Shakespeare, 18th-century theatre, multimedia performance, popular performance, directing and dramaturgy, and physical performer training.

Our distinctive focus at Kent is on theatre as practice, whatever the topic, area, mode and methodology of research, and we encourage postgraduate students to make use of our close links and contacts with local, national and international (especially European) theatre companies, venues, schools and artists, both for research and to encourage professional postgraduate development.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School of Arts’ award-winning Jarman Building offers professional standard drama facilities, along with social spaces and a dedicated centre for postgraduate students.

Additional facilities across the Canterbury campus include two theatres: the 113-seat Aphra Theatre (a courtyard-type gallery theatre space); and the Lumley Theatre, which is a flexible and adaptable white room space. Drama students also benefit from an additional rehearsal studio, a sound studio, a theatre design suite and an extensively equipped construction workshop.

The University’s Templeman Library is well resourced in our subject area and houses special collections of 19th-century manuscripts – playbills, programmes, prints and other theatre ephemera – theatrical biography and the history of the stage in the 19th and 20th centuries. It also has particular strengths as a research resource in English Renaissance drama, Russian and French theatre, and British theatre since 1900. We also house the Jacques Copeau Archive and the British Grotowski collection.

- Conferences and seminars

We have strong links with organisations such as the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR) and the Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA), and encourage postgraduates to present work within national and international conferences. Also, we run regular research seminars, workshops, and performance-related events led by members of staff, students, and invited experts and practitioners.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: New Theatre Quarterly; Contemporary Theatre Review; TDR: The Drama Review; Performance Research; Shakespeare Survey.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

- European Theatre

At Kent, the UK’s European university, we have set up the European Theatre Research Network to facilitate and foster the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on the near European continent and also in the new European states. We invite postgraduate research students to contribute to and play a part in this expanding network. For further information, please see http://www.europeantheatre.org.uk

- Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme gives students the opportunity to closely explore a topic in an area of drama, theatre and contemporary performance at the highest level of academic study. Read more
This programme gives students the opportunity to closely explore a topic in an area of drama, theatre and contemporary performance at the highest level of academic study.

The programme draws on the Drama Department and School of Arts’ longstanding international reputation in the development of practice as research and brings students into a research environment of excellence.

Key areas of focus within the department include cognition and performance, applied and socially engaged theatre, popular performance and European theatre. Practice focuses on dance, physical actor training, puppetry, live art, autobiographical and documentary performance, providing a rich context for postgraduate study.

Our two drama-based research centres actively involve postgraduate students - the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance and the European Theatre Research Network. Research students attend and support the many seminars these centres offer each term and a selection of School seminars. There are dedicated postgraduate events where students can present their research in a constructive atmosphere. Discipline-specific methodology training is provided through one-to-one supervision and/or group workshops.

The department also facilitates Work in Progress meetings to help foster the research culture, improve students’ research skills and bring together members of the postgraduate research community.

Individual staff research interests cover a wide range of both historical and contemporary aspects of the theory and practice of theatre, and supervision is available in all these areas.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/351/drama-by-thesis-practice

About the Department of Drama and Theatre

Postgraduate Drama and Theatre studies at Kent has a very strong reputation for research and supervision in contemporary theatre and performance. We are the home of two renowned international research centres, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) and the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (CKP).

The wide-ranging interests of our international team of leading and emerging researchers (from the UK, Australia, Italy, Greece, Germany, France and other countries) include research strengths in contemporary performance, applied theatre, Shakespeare, 18th-century theatre, multimedia performance, popular performance, directing and dramaturgy, and physical performer training.

Our distinctive focus at Kent is on theatre as practice, whatever the topic, area, mode and methodology of research, and we encourage postgraduate students to make use of our close links and contacts with local, national and international (especially European) theatre companies, venues, schools and artists, both for research and to encourage professional postgraduate development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The School of Arts’ award-winning Jarman Building offers professional standard drama facilities, along with social spaces and a dedicated centre for postgraduate students.

Additional facilities across the Canterbury campus include two theatres: the 113-seat Aphra Theatre (a courtyard-type gallery theatre space); and the Lumley Theatre, which is a flexible and adaptable white room space. Drama students also benefit from an additional rehearsal studio, a sound studio, a theatre design suite and an extensively equipped construction workshop.

The University’s Templeman Library is well resourced in our subject area and houses special collections of 19th-century manuscripts – playbills, programmes, prints and other theatre ephemera – theatrical biography and the history of the stage in the 19th and 20th centuries. It also has particular strengths as a research resource in English Renaissance drama, Russian and French theatre, and British theatre since 1900. We also house the Jacques Copeau Archive and the British Grotowski collection.

Conferences and seminars
We have strong links with organisations such as the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR) and the Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA), and encourage postgraduates to present work within national and international conferences. Also, we run regular research seminars, workshops, and performance-related events led by members of staff, students, and invited experts and practitioners.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: New Theatre Quarterly; Contemporary Theatre Review; TDR: The Drama Review; Performance Research; Shakespeare Survey.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

- European Theatre

At Kent, the UK’s European university, we have set up the European Theatre Research Network to facilitate and foster the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on the near European continent and also in the new European states. We invite postgraduate research students to contribute to and play a part in this expanding network. For further information, please see http://www.europeantheatre.org.uk

- Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Read more
The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing.

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, with workshops, lectures and seminars held two days a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1
-CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2
-CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6
-CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:
-Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
-Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
-Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.

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This prestigious course is for qualified nurses would want to develop their knowledge and skills in order to advance their careers in the specialism of research, education, practice or international nursing. Read more
This prestigious course is for qualified nurses would want to develop their knowledge and skills in order to advance their careers in the specialism of research, education, practice or international nursing.

The MSc Nursing will empower you to take forward your practice and patient care through critically exploring professional biography, the therapeutic relationship and embedding an evidence based and person centred approach to care.

By studying modules relevant to contemporary clinical practice, you take control of your personal, professional and academic development whilst engaging in critical debate about the issues at the forefront of nursing practice. You will gain skills in applying new knowledge to your practice and achieve mastery of nursing related to your chosen award. An innovative feature of the International pathway includes a bespoke module of observational clinical experience and simulated practice for international students.

Key benefits:

• Develop mastery of contemporary nursing knowledge and practice
• An evidence based toolkit to inform and advance nursing
• Professional credibility and personal confidence to influence nursing

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/nursing-research,-practice,-education,-international

Suitable for

Qualified, experienced nurses who wish to develop advanced knowledge and critical awareness in relation to practice, education or research.

Programme details

This course is delivered through modules using a variety of teaching methods including lectures, student-led seminars, action learning sets and high-fidelity clinical simulation.Part-time students usually study one module per semester; full-time students will undertake two modules per semester. All students must complete 90 level 7 credits before progressing on to the dissertation.

MSc Nursing

• Critically Exploring Professional Practice
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

MSc Nursing: Education

• Critically Exploring Professional Practice
• Education in Practice (Clinical)
• Education in Practice (Academic)
• Dissertation

MSc Nursing: Practice

• Critically Exploring Professional Practice
• Evidence Based Practice for Patient Care
• Research Methods
• Developing Clinical Skills for Nursing
• Dissertation

MSc Nursing: Practice (Neuroscience)

• Critically Exploring Professional Practice
• Research Methods
• Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders - Advancing Practice
• Acute Neuroscience Care - Advancing Practice
• Dissertation (with Neuroscience focus)

MSc Nursing: Research

• Critically Exploring Professional Practice
• Research Methods
• Evidence Based Practice for Patient Care
• Dissertation

MSc Nursing: International

• Critically Exploring Professional Practice
• Dissertation
• Therapeutic Relationships in Nursing
• Observational Clinical Experience and Simulated Practice
• Evidence Based Practice for Patient Care
• Research Methods
• Developing Clinical Skills
• Leading Education in Practice
• Leading Education in Academic Practice
• Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders - Advancing Practice
• Acute Neuroscience Care - Advancing Practice
• Non-medical Prescribing
• Project Management and Methods of Inquiriy
• Mentorship

Assessment

A range of formative and summative assessments will cater for your individual learning style. These include:

• Seminar presentation
• Written assignment
• Compiling a portfolio of experience
• Reflective commentary
• Clinical viva
• Research proposal
• Poster presentation
• Negotiated assessment

Career potential

On graduation, this course will enable qualified nurses to advance their practice and use their mastery to develop and enhance an evidence based, person centred culture. Qualified nurses with the MSc Nursing will be better equipped to challenge practice and influence nursing. On completion of the programme, qualified nurses will be prepared to move into education, research and nurse specialist roles.

Students who have successfully completed the course have implemented practice-based innovations, which include the pioneering of a patient-centred ward round within a mental health setting, which is being rolled out across the entire Trust and the review of pharmaceutical waste within an acute medical ward, in order to make financial savings and improve systems and processes.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
-Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
-If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
-Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
-There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
-We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered. The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Core and optional courses

Strands

Theory and Practice
-Museum Interpretation and Learning (Core)
-Museum Practice
-Heritage and Cultural Informatics
-Curating the Sciences
-American Material Culture
-Phenomenology
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Collecting and Provenance (in conjunction with History of Art)
-Cultures of Collecting (Core)
-Object Biography
-Provenance
-Collecting and Display
-Restitution
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Artefact and Material Culture (in conjunction with Archaeology)
-Material Culture in Context (Core)
-Process of Artefact Studies (Core)
-Critical Themes in the Display and Reception of Objects
-Science Based Analysis of Archaeological Material
-Early Medieval Artefacts
-Viking & Late Norse Artefacts
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist in a variety of roles within the cultural heritage sector; these include museums and galleries as well as historic houses, heritage sites and consultancy. Roles range from front of house, education and outreach to collections management, curation, marketing and management.

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Sociology at Edinburgh is one of the premier research units in the UK, as indicated by our excellent rating in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

Sociology at Edinburgh is one of the premier research units in the UK, as indicated by our excellent rating in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

We have a long-standing commitment to original empirical and theoretical work on society, and to the production of cultural and scientific knowledge.

We work closely with other colleagues in the School and supervise many cross-disciplinary projects. Applications are particularly welcome from students wishing to specialise in:

refugee and migration studies
auto/biography and narrative studies
comparative sociology
South Asian studies
Southern Africa
family and intimate relations
innovation in genomics
medical sociology
political sociology
nationalism studies
constitutional change and governance
social studies of finance and markets
social, cultural and feminist theory
gender, inequality and social stratification
work, consumption and organisations
Scottish society and politics
science and technology studies
sociology of emotions

Training and support

You will work with a supervisor on an original research dissertation and participate in advanced sociology research-training workshops, work-in-progress seminars and a writing workshop.

The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible, web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout your doctoral studies.

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