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Masters Degrees (Bioelectronics)

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (individual course pages). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)
Plus: Dissertation (60 credit)

Optional Modules

60 credit to be selected from the following optional modules:
Design of Mechatronic Systems (15 credit)
Biomedical Imaging (15 credit)
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credit)
Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications (15 credit)
Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control (30 credit)

Module Descriptions

Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control

Main topics:

Sensors and instrumentation – Sensor characteristics and the principles of sensing; electronic interfacing with sensors; sensor technologies – physical, chemical and biosensors; sensor examples – position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, strain, pressure, temperature; distributed sensor networks; instrumentation for imaging, spectroscopy and ionising radiation detection; 'lab-on-a-chip'.

Control – Control theory and matrix/vector operations; state-space systems, multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, nonlinear systems and linearization. Recurrence relations, discrete time state-space representation, controllability and observability, pole-placement for both continuous and discrete time systems, Luenberger observer. Optimal control systems, Stochastic systems: random variable theory; recursive estimation; introduction to Kalman filtering (KF); brief look at KF for non-linear systems and new results in KF theory.

Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications

Main topics include: audiology and cochlear implants; prostheses; artificial limbs and rehabilitation engineering; life support systems; robotic surgical assistance; telemedicine; nanotechnology.

Biofluid Mechanics

Main topics include: review of the cardiovascular system; the cardiac cycle and cardiac performance, models of the cardiac system, respiratory system and respiratory performance, lung models, physiological effects of exercise, trauma and disease; blood structure and composition, blood gases. oxygenation, effect of implants and prostheses, blood damage and repair, viscometry of blood, measurement of blood pressure and flow; urinary system: anatomy and physiology, fluid and waste transfer mechanisms, urinary performance and control, effects of trauma, ageing and disease; modelling of biofluid systems, review of mass, momentum and energy transfers related to biological flow systems, fluid mechanics in selected topics relating to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; measurements in biomedical flows.

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Biomedical Imaging

Principle and applications of medical image processing – Basic image processing operations, Advanced edge-detection techniques and image segmentation, Flexible shape extraction, Image restoration, 3D image reconstruction, image guided surgery

Introduction of modern medical imaging techniques – Computerized tomography imaging (principle, image reconstruction with nondiffracting sources, artifacts, clinical applications)

Magnetic resonance imaging (principle, image contrast and measurement of MR related phenomena, examples of contrast changes with changes of instrumental parameters and medical applications)

Ultrasound imaging (description of ultrasound radiation, transducers, basic imaging techniques: A-scan, B-scan and Doppler technique; clinical application)

Positron emission tomography (PET imaging) (principle, radioactive substance, major clinical applications)

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Design of Mechatronic Systems

Microcontroller technologies. Data acquisition. Interfacing to power devices. Sensors (Infrared, Ultrasonic, etc.). Optoelectronic devices and signal conditioning circuits. Pulse and timing-control circuits. Drive circuits. Electrical motor types: Stepper, Servo. Electronic Circuits. Power devices. Power conversion and power electronics. Line filters and protective devices. Industrial applications of digital devices.

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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This programme offers distinct specialisation areas in electronics. analogue VLSI design, bioelectronics and analogue and digital systems. Read more

Programme description

This programme offers distinct specialisation areas in electronics: analogue VLSI design, bioelectronics and analogue and digital systems.

In analogue VLSI design, our facilities include a unique custom designed analogue integrated circuit specifically designed to support laboratory based teaching. Our advanced design and prototyping laboratories, advanced micro and nano fabrication facilities and state-of-the-art digital system laboratories use the latest industry standard software tools.

Alternatively, students may specialise in the emergent discipline of bioelectronics where our research and teaching interests include access to the fabrication facilities at the Scottish Microelectronics Centre. For students who wish to study a more general electronics course including digital systems, a prescribed course selection is available.

Programme structure

This programme is run over 12 months, with two semesters of taught courses, with a number of options, followed by a research project, leading to a masters thesis.

Semester 1 courses:
Analogue IC Design
Analogue VLSI A
Discrete-Time Signal Analysis
Power Electronics
Principles of Microelectronic Devices
Digital Systems Laboratory A
Introduction to Bioelectronics
Biosensors

Semester 2 courses:
Digital System Design
Digital Systems Laboratory
Research Project Preparation
Electronic/Electrical Engineering System Design
Analogue VLSI B
Sigma Delta Converters
Analogue Circuit Design
Microfabrication Techniques
Biosensors and Instrumentation
Lab-on-Chip Technologies
Biomedical Imaging Techniques
Embedded Mobile and Wireless Systems
Modern Economic Issues in Industry
Technology and Innovation Management

Career opportunities

You will gain significant practical experience in analogue and digital laboratories and become familiar with the latest industry standard design software and environments. Having been exposed to concepts such as design re-use and systems on chip technology, you will be able to cooperate with others in electronic system design.

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The Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems brings together researchers from integrated-circuit design, system-on-chip design, image-sensor design, bioelectronics, micro/nano-fabrication, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micromachining, neural computation and reconfigurable and adaptive computing. Read more

Research profile

The Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems brings together researchers from integrated-circuit design, system-on-chip design, image-sensor design, bioelectronics, micro/nano-fabrication, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micromachining, neural computation and reconfigurable and adaptive computing.

Research interests include:

low-level analogue, low-power, adaptive and bio-inspired approaches
system-on-chip computing
applications from telecommunications to finance and astronomy
In addition we have a strong and growing interest in applications relating to life sciences and medicine, with particular focus on bioelectronics, biophotonics and bio-MEMS.

Training and support

The development of transferable skills is a vital part of postgraduate training and a vibrant, interdisciplinary training programme is offered to all research students by the University’s Institute for Academic Development (IAD). The programme concentrates on the professional development of postgraduates, providing courses directly linked to postgraduate study.

Courses run by the IAD are free and have been designed to be as flexible as possible so that you can tailor the content and timing to your own requirements.

Our researchers are strongly encouraged to present their research at conferences and in journal during the course of their PhD.

Every year, the Graduate School organises a Postgraduate Research Conference to showcase the research carried out by students across the Research Institutes

Our researchers are also encouraged and supported to attend transferable skills courses provided by organisations such as the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Facilities

The Institute has laboratory facilities that are unique within the UK, including a comprehensive silicon and MEMS micro-fabrication capability coupled with substantial design and test resources.

The Institute has an excellent reputation for commercialising technology.

Research opportunities

We offer a comprehensive range of exciting research opportunities through a choice of postgraduate research degrees: MSc by Research, MPhil and PhD.

Masters by Research

An MSc by Research is based on a research project tailored to a candidate’s interests. It lasts one year full time or two years part time. The project can be a shorter alternative to an MPhil or PhD, or a precursor to either – including the option of an MSc project expanding into MPhil or doctorate work as it evolves. It can also be a mechanism for industry to collaborate with the School.

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The huge growth of processing power, now available in small power-efficient packages, has fuelled the digital revolution, which has touched all sectors of the economy. Read more
The huge growth of processing power, now available in small power-efficient packages, has fuelled the digital revolution, which has touched all sectors of the economy. This practically orientated, advanced course in the area of electronics design and applications provides a strong digital technology core backed with applications-led modules.

You’ll study applications as diverse as medical and electronics, e-health, intelligent building design, automotive electronics, retail and commerce to prepare you for a range of careers in industry, where the skills you gain will be in high demand. A substantial element of practical work will give you confidence with software and digital hardware implementations using microcontrollers, FPGA, DSP devices and general system-on-chip methodology.

You’ll be taught by experts informed by their own world-leading research, and you’ll have access to world-class facilities to prepare for a career in a fast-changing industry.

Our School is an exciting and stimulating environment where you’ll learn from leading researchers in specialist facilities . These include our Keysight Technologies wireless communications lab, as well as labs for embedded systems, power electronics and drives, ultrasound and bioelectronics.

There’s also a Terahertz photonics lab, class 100 semiconductor cleanroom, traffic generators and analysers, FPGA development tools, sensor network test beds. We have facilities for electron-beam lithography and ceramic circuit fabrication – and a III-V semiconductor molecular beam epitaxy facility.

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Electronic engineering defines the very fabric of today’s modern technologically advanced society. A myriad of consumer electronic products - televisions, CD and DVD players - are in daily use by practically everyone on the planet. Read more
Electronic engineering defines the very fabric of today’s modern technologically advanced society. A myriad of consumer electronic products - televisions, CD and DVD players - are in daily use by practically everyone on the planet. Mobile phones and computers enable global communications on a scale unimaginable even a few decades ago. Yet electronic engineering continues to develop new capabilities which will shape the lives of future generations.

This programme aims to provide a broad based Electronic Engineering MSc which will enable students to contribute to the future development of electronic products and services. The course reflects the School’s highly regarded research activity at the leading edge of electronic engineering. The MSc will provide relevant, up-to-date skills that enhance the engineering competency of its graduates and allows a broader knowledge of electronic engineering to be acquired by studying important emerging technologies, such as, optoelectronics, bioelectronics, polymer electronics and micromachining. The course is intended for graduates in a related discipline, who wish to enhance and specialise their skills in several emerging technologies.

Course Structure
This course runs from 29 September 2014 to 30 September 2015.

The course structure consists of a core set of taught and laboratory based modules that introduce advanced nanoscale and microscale device fabrication processes and techniques. In addition, device simulation and design is addressed with an emphasis placed on the use of advanced CAD based device and system based modelling. Transferable skills such as project planning and management, as well as, presentational skills are also further developed in the course.

Taught Modules:

Introduction to Nanotechnology & Microsystems*: focuses on the device fabrication techniques at the nano and micro scale, as well as introducing some of the diagnostic tools available to test the quality and characteristics of devices.

Modelling and Design: Focuses on the simulation and design of electronic devices using an advanced software package – COMSOL. This powerful commercial software package is extremely adaptable and can be used to simulate and design a very wide range of physical systems.



Advanced Sensor Systems: Provides students with an understanding of more complex sensor systems and a view of current developments in specific areas of sensor development. Applications of these systems and their main producers and users are also discussed.

Masters Mini Project: focuses on applying the skills and techniques already studied to a mini project, the theme of which will form the basis of the research project later in the year.

RF and Optical MEMs*: Introduces the use and benefits of miniaturisation in RF and optical technologies. The module will investigate improvements in component characteristics, and manufacturing processes. Applications of RF and optical nano and microsystems will be discussed using examples.

Microengineering*: Provides an introduction to the rapidly expanding subject of microengineering. Starting with a discussion of the benefits and market demand for microengineered systems, the module investigates clean room-based lithographic and related methods of microfabrication. Micro manufacturing issues for a range of materials such as silicon, polymers and metals will be discussed along with routes to larger scale manufacture. A range of example devices and applications will be used to illustrate manufacturing parameters.

Further Microengineering*: This module builds on the knowledge of microengineering and microfabrication gained in the Microengineering module. The module examines a broad range of advanced manufacturing process including techniques suitable for larger scale production, particularly of polymer devices. This module also examines specialist fabrication methods using laser systems and their flexibility in fabricating macroscopic and sub micron structures.

Mobile Communication Systems*: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of current and emerging mobile communication systems, with a particular emphasis on the common aspects of all such systems.

Broadband Communication Systems: This module provides students with an in-depth understanding of current and emerging broadband communications techniques employed in local, access and backbone networks. Particular emphasis will be focussed on the following aspects: 1) fundamental concepts, 2) operating principles and practice of widely implemented communications systems; 3) hot research and development topics, and 4) opportunities and challenges for future deployment of broadband communications systems.

Data Networks and Communications*: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of how real communication networks are structured and the protocols that make them work. It will give the students an ability to explain in detail the process followed to provide end to end connections and end-user services at required QoS.

Masters Project Preparation: To place computing and engineering within a business context so that students relate the technical aspects of their work to its commercial and social dimensions and are able to prepare project plans which take into account the constraints and limitations imposed by non-technical factors.

*optional modules

Research Project
After the successful completion of the taught component of the MSc programme, the major individual project will be undertaken within the world-leading optoelectronics or optical communications research groups of the School. Students will then produce an MSc Dissertation.

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This Masters in Electronics & Electrical Engineering is designed for both new graduates and more established engineers. It covers a broad spectrum of specialist topics with immediate application to industrial problems, from electrical supply through systems control to high-speed electronics. Read more
This Masters in Electronics & Electrical Engineering is designed for both new graduates and more established engineers. It covers a broad spectrum of specialist topics with immediate application to industrial problems, from electrical supply through systems control to high-speed electronics.

Why this programme

◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾If you are an electronics and electrical engineering graduate wanting to improve your skills and knowledge; a graduate of another engineering discipline or physical science and you want to change field; looking for a well rounded postgraduate qualification in electronics and electrical engineering to enhance your career prospects, this programme is designed for you.
◾The MSc in Electronics and Electrical Engineering includes lectures on "Nanofabrication", "Micro- and Nanotechnology", "Optical Communications" and "Microwave and Millimetre Wave Circuit Design", "Analogue CMOS circuit design", VLSI Design and CAD", all research areas undertaken in the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Electronics and Electrical Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

You will undertake a project where you will apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting-edge projects relevant to the industry.

Courses include

(six normally chosen)
◾Bioelectronics
◾Computer communications
◾Control
◾Digital signal processing
◾Electrical energy systems
◾Energy conversion systems
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Microwave electronic and optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and millimetre wave circuit design
◾Optical communications
◾Power electronics and drives
◾Real-time embedded programming
◾VLSI design
◾MSc project.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits.
◾The project will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Electronics and Electrical Engineering. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾This programme is aimed at training new graduates as well as more established engineers , covering a broad spectrum of specialist topics with immediate application to industrial problems.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributions in Electronics and Electrical Engineering include: Freescale.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the electronic and electrical engineering industry.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include chip design, embedded system design, telecommunications, video systems, automation and control, aerospace, software development, development of PC peripherals and FPGA programming, defence, services for the heavy industries, for example electricity generation equipment and renewables plant, etc.

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The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. Read more
The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. This multidisciplinary programme complements backgrounds in electronics, materials science, or physics.

Why this programme

-◾The University of Glasgow is a recognised pioneer in many of the most exciting aspects of nanotechnology, with an international reputation in micro and nanofabrication for applications including nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and bioelectronics.
◾You will have access to the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) cleanrooms and the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre. The JWNC holds a number of world records in nanofabrication including records for the performance of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices.
◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾This MSc caters to a growing demand for scientists and engineers who can fabricate systems of sensors, actuators, functional materials and who can integrate electronics at the micro and nano scale. As a graduate you will also possess the necessary insights in nanoscience to develop new products using these skills.
◾You will be taught by experts in the field and have access to research seminars given by our international collaborators, many of whom are world leaders in nanoscience.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Electronic devices
◾Introduction to research in nanoscience and nanotechnology
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Nanofabrication
◾Research methods and techniques
◾MSc project.

Optional courses

◾Applied optics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Microwave electronic & optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and mm wave circuit design
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Semiconductor physics.

Projects

◾The programme builds towards an extended project, which is an integral part of the MSc programme: many projects are linked to industry or related to research in the school. Our contacts with industry and our research collaborations will make this a meaningful and valuable experience, giving you the opportunity to apply your newly learnt skills.
◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits that will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers your ability to apply them in industrially relevant problems.
◾MSc projects are associated with Glasgow's James Watt Nanofabrication Centre, one of Europe's premier research cleanrooms. Projects range from basic research into nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation, to development of systems in optoelectronics, microbiology and electronic devices which require such fabrication.
◾You can choose from a list of approximately 30 projects published yearly in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾Over 250 international companies have undertaken commercial or collaborative work with the JWNC in the last 5 years and over 90 different universities from around the globe presently have collaborations with Glasgow in nanoscience and nanotechnology.
◾Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the nanofabrication industry.

Career prospects

Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.

Former Glasgow graduates in the subject area of nanoscience and nanotechnology are now working for companies including Intel, TSMC, IBM, ST Microelectronics, Freescale, Oxford Instruments Plama Technology, ASM, and Applied Materials.

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This programme for graduates in electronic engineering or similar subjects will prepare you to become a senior manager or entrepreneur in global companies, where understanding technology and managing innovation in business are key to success. Read more
This programme for graduates in electronic engineering or similar subjects will prepare you to become a senior manager or entrepreneur in global companies, where understanding technology and managing innovation in business are key to success.

Jointly delivered by the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and Leeds University Business School, the course allows you to tailor the programme of studies to your needs, selecting optional modules from three engineering themes and four business themes. A set of core modules provides the foundation of your knowledge and skills.

You’ll be taught by leading experts in technology and in business management, with practical lab classes and project work allowing you to gain hands-on experience investigating and applying topics from your lectures and tutorials to real-life engineering and business situations.

This joint programme offers a unique opportunity to enhance both your technical and managerial skills.

The School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering is an exciting and stimulating environment where you’ll learn from leading researchers in areas pertinent to emerging and developing technologies. These technologies include future wireless and optical communications systems, renewable energy systems, ultrasound and bioelectronics systems, as well as nano, terahertz, and quantum technologies.

Leeds University Business School is also a leading international business school, globally, in the top 1%. It has world ranked programmes and internationally recognised teaching. You'll leave as a graduate of one of the top ten universities targeted by key employers such as Google, HSBC, Rolls-Royce and the Civil Services.

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The Masters in Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary programme that will equip you for employment within the biomedical engineering sector. Read more
The Masters in Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary programme that will equip you for employment within the biomedical engineering sector. This programme addresses all the key aspects of biomedical engineering.

Why this programme

◾The University of Glasgow’s School of Engineering has been delivering engineering education and research for more than 150 years and is the oldest School of Engineering in the UK.
◾Biomedical Engineering is the newest division of the School, bringing together our long standing expertise. Research covers four themes, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Bionanotechnology, Rehabilitation Engineering, Biosensors and Diagnostics.
◾The course is based on in-depth modules and individual projects, which are designed to give graduates an opportunity to specialise in specific areas of Biomedical Engineering or to cover a more general Biomedical Engineering syllabus.
◾This taught MSc/PG Dip offers a wide exposure to the philosophy and practice of Biomedical Engineering whilst simultaneously enabling the students to deepen their knowledge of specific areas of biomedical engineering disciplines, which have been chosen on the basis of the research strengths of the Discipline. The choice includes Biomaterials and Biomechanics including their application in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Rehabilitation Engineering includes applied within Glasgow hospital and bioelectronics and diagnostic systems, designed to be applied from advanced hospitals to out-in-the-field situations.
◾The compulsory part provides the basic underlying knowledge need throughout biomedical engineering these core courses are taken in both semesters to allow a wide range of optional subjects to be available.
◾You will broaden and/or deepen your knowledge of biomedical engineering disciplines.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Biomedical Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, team work and study trips in the UK. You will undertake an MSc project working on a specific research area with one of the academics.

Core courses
◾Applications of biomedical engineering
◾Biological fluid mechanics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Energy in biological systems
◾Medical imaging
◾Statistics for biomedical engineering
◾MSc project.

Optional courses
◾Advanced imaging and therapy
◾Applied engineering mechanics
◾Bioinformatics and systems biology
◾Biomechanics
◾Biosensors and diagnostics
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nanofabrication
◾Rehabilitation engineering
◾Scaffolds and tissues
◾Signal processing of bio-signatures
◾Tissue and cell engineering.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits.
◾The project will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Biomedical Engineering. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.

Example projects
Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

[[Accreditation ]]
The MSc Biomedical Engineering is accredited in the “Further Learning” category accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

This means that a student with an accredited BEng undergraduate degree can take the accredited "Further Learning" MSc to top-up their academic qualifications in order to meet the full academic requirements for conferral of the title of Chartered Engineer. This is an alternative route to the 5-year undergraduate MEng route.

Industry links and employability

◾The MSc in Biomedical Engineering has been developed for students with different backgrounds in engineering who wish to enter the field of Biomedical Engineering; and it is particularly suitable if you intend to work in Biomedical Engineering industries.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in a wide range of industries.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in rehabilitation engineering, biomaterials for reconstructive surgery, biosensors, device and implant design and development, and biosignal processing.

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Students who successfully complete the course will have acquired skills that are essential to the modern biomedical and healthcare industry, together with the expertise required to enter into management, product innovation, development and research.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core (compulsory) taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (see below). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules. See individual course pages.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms; Term 1 (September – December) and Term 2 (January – April) of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)

Additional Compulsory Programme Modules
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (15 credit)
Genomic Technologies (15 credit)
Molecular Mechanisms of Human Disease (30 credit)
Dissertation (60 credit)

Module Descriptions

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Genomic Technologies

Main topics: General knowledge of genomic and proteomic technology; Microarrary technology; Transgenic technology. Drug discovery technology; Translational experiment-design and interpretation; Sequencing in microbiology research

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Molecular Mechanisms of Human Disease

Main topics: The module will focus on the following subject material with emphasis on how these processes are altered in a variety of human diseases. Where appropriate, therapeutic intervention in these processes will be highlighted. Signalling pathways resulting from activation of membrane, intracellular or nuclear receptors will be discussed. Examples include: Mammalian iron, copper and zinc metabolism, G-Protein coupled receptor signalling, Wnt signalling, JAK/STAT signalling and cytokine signalling, Steroid signalling

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Main topics: Fundamentals of tissue structure, function and pathology. Tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering substitutes. Cells, cell culture, stem cells, cell and gene therapy. Extracellular matrix, structure, scaffolds. Cell signalling, growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, receptors and other signalling molecules. Bioreactors, ex-vivo and in-vivo. Engineering host tissue responses.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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