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The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere. Read more
The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere.

Course Overview

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David's long-established expertise within this field as part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The degree offers modules which encompass a range of aspects on bilingualism and language planning in Wales and internationally. Different pathways are offered to meet the professional demands of a variety of careers in the field of bilingualism. It consists of five modules in Part One and a dissertation of 15,000 words in Part Two.

In Part One students may choose from a range of modules according to their personal professional or vocational needs, including:
-Introduction to Bilingualism
-Societal Bilingualism (political aspects of language vitality)
-Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-Models of Bilingual Teaching
-Language Planning Essentials
-Research Methodology

Students will choose their own research subjects for the dissertation in Part Two based on aspects of the modules studied previously in Part One and agreed in advance with the Programme Director. It is intended that students will be given the opportunity to conduct in-depth research in a field of study which will promote their professional development.

Although the modular structure of the postgraduate degree allows students to study a single module, on the successful completion of three modules students will be eligible to exit the course with a Postgraduate Certificate in Bilingualism and Multilingualism, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Bilingualism and Multilingualism on the completion of five modules. Students wishing to progress to the MA in Bilingualism and Multilingualism would undertake an additional dissertation.

Modules

A summary of the aims of individual modules:
-CYAD-7015: Introduction to Bilingualism
-CYAD-7002: Societal Bilingualism
-CYAD-7007: Research Methodology
-CYAD-7008: Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-CYAD-7009: Development of Bilingual Education in Wales
-CYAD-7010: Models of Bilingual Teaching
-CYAD-7012: Language Planning Essentials

Key Features

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s long-established expertise within this field. The University is part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The programme aims to:
-Provide students with various aspects of bilingualism and multilingualism, both in Wales and in international contexts
-Develop students’ ability to critically analyse the various factors involved in the study of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to relate those factors to national and international contexts
-Equip students for various vocations involved with bilingualism/ multilingualism and enable them to apply basic principles, together with knowledge, understanding and subject-based skills, to their daily vocational needs
-Introduce students to the most relevant research and thinking in the field which forms the basis for the most recent theories and learning
-Develop students’ transferable skills and enable them to research, interpret and critically evaluate
-Develop students’ cognitive skills including their ability to reason, to critically analyse, as well as to think creatively in appraising any current policies in the field of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to propose improvements

The programme will focus on various aspects of bilingualism and language planning relevant to a range of professional and vocational posts in order to extend and deepen knowledge, understanding and skills in specific fields. The professional / vocational skills related to this programme will enable students to:
-Rise to the challenge which faces individuals in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning
-Undertake projects concerned with various aspects in the field
-Undertake individual and team research to promote linguistic plans and strategies
-Analyse and interpret data concerned with various developments
-Exhibit proficiency in the use of ICT in presentations and in communication

Students are given an opportunity to undertake field studies occasionally (eg in Scotland and Ireland) in order to study language revitalization projects and, when geographically convenient, to attend national and international conferences on bilingualism and language planning.

The advantage of the MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism to students is the flexibility which allows them to gain the necessary knowledge and skills through distance learning, by studying part-time or full-time and with the assistance of technology and the reading materials provided.

One can study as few as two modules per year and spread the cost over the period of study. By now, the course is studied by students in Wales and in various parts of the world including, for example, Italy, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia, Cyprus, Greece and Mongolia.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are adopted in order to enable students to illustrate their knowledge and skills in relation to learning outcomes, including:
-Written assignments
-Presentations (adapted for distance learning purposes)
-Extended essays

Assessment methods are adopted on the basis of their appropriateness for ensuring that students can show that they have achieved the learning outcomes which are explicit in every module and on which the assessment criteria are based.

At the start of every module students are provided with:
-The assignment(s) for the assessment of the module and the weighting for each assignment
-A list of the criteria used to mark an assignment or presentation
-Further guidance in relation to the requirements of the set tasks and dates for presentation

Following the completion of an assignment, each student will receive:
-A formal report containing an assessment of the individual criteria on which the final mark was based, and feedback containing comments on how to improve as part of a formative process
-An opportunity to discuss the assignment with a tutor if necessary

Every assignment is assessed internally by a second-marker and by an external examiner.

Career Opportunities

The University has excellent resources, thus enabling us to offer a range of modules available to suit professional developmental needs and personal interests. The degree has a broad focus which is suitable for a range of professional fields and aims to equip students with the information and skills to work confidently in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning. The course offers a range of experiences and would appeal to anyone involved in the development of the use of language in modern society, including:
-Language Officers
-Policy Makers & Government Officers
-Language Planners
-Teachers & Trainers
-Translators
-Youth/ Community Workers
-Those currently working in adult education in various countries
-Those developing learning opportunities in both youth and adult contexts

The MA degree offers opportunities to progress to undertake subsequent research for a PhD.

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The course provides a programme of graduate-level study in the broad field of bilingualism as well as research training in this area. Read more
The course provides a programme of graduate-level study in the broad field of bilingualism as well as research training in this area. It consists of a taught component including a combination of core and optional modules, and a research dissertation of 20,000 words.

The course provides a comprehensive, varied and flexible programme of training in multi-disciplinary topics associated with the study of bilingualism, including issues relating to language, education, and cognition.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with the necessary theoretical, analytical and methodological tools and skills to undertake advanced research in an area of bilingualism.

Students must take at least 180 Credits.

Modules
The modules for this degree vary each year, but a selection will be offered including:

Bilingual Research and Methods
Language Acquisition
Language Contact and Bilinguals
Current Issues in Bilingualism
L2 Speech Learning
Agweddau ar Ddwyeithrwydd
The Bilingual Mind

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This MSc in Psychological Research Methods (Bilingual Research) is a course for students who already have an honours degree in Psychology, Linguistics or a closely related subject and provides solid research training for those students interested in pursuing a PhD in cognitive neuroscience at a later stage. Read more

Introduction

This MSc in Psychological Research Methods (Bilingual Research) is a course for students who already have an honours degree in Psychology, Linguistics or a closely related subject and provides solid research training for those students interested in pursuing a PhD in cognitive neuroscience at a later stage. The specialist module will provide a thorough theoretical background in bilingualism and bring students up to date with the state of the art in bilingualism research and methods. Students will be able to undertake advanced research in an area of bilingualism and advice on bilingualism matters (e.g., second language provision in schools).

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Jan Kuipers

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Why Stirling?

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

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This award provides an opportunity for practitioners in a range of educational and social settings to engage in substantial continuing professional development at Masters level, and in relation to complex and changing practice environments. Read more
This award provides an opportunity for practitioners in a range of educational and social settings to engage in substantial continuing professional development at Masters level, and in relation to complex and changing practice environments. In a context of significant shifts in education, health and welfare services, professional enquiry is based on the idea that questions about direction and purpose ‘come with the territory’ of practice. Developing knowledge and understanding, using judgement in reflective, responsive and responsible ways, and an orientation to values of social justice, are all part of being an engaged and active(ist) professional at a time of great change and as we all, in different ways, think about how best we might proceed.

MA Bilingualism, Education and Society challenges students to think deeply about their own professional contexts and settings, their place and role within this, and the possibilities for development, change, and generating practice knowledge and innovations.

We encourage applications from practitioners, professionals and leaders who might be working (or volunteering) in a diverse range of roles in education, health, social welfare/care, community, and other settings, and in the public, private, and voluntary or social enterprise sectors and who are interested in how bilingualism and multilingualism relate to their professional context.

This award is part of the Manchester Met Faculty of Education postgraduate Professional Development Programme.

About the Course

MA Bilingualism, Education and Society is for a wide range of education professionals, and those in inter and multi-professional settings; the course encourages and facilitates students to identify, explore and develop thinking salient for their own practice and (academic and) professional development.

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Students with recent (within five years) PGCE normally enter the MA Bilingualism, Education and Society with advanced standing, that is, with 60 credits. This means you will complete two taught units (including Research and Practice) before progressing to Dissertation.

Other relevant and certificated level 7 (recent) qualifications may also allow advanced standing via accreditation of prior learning procedures and you should indicate on your application form if this might apply to you.

In addition, it is possible with the agreement of your Award Tutor to incorporate recognition of prior experiential learning, that is, via relevant work experience that you may have. Further advice and guidance on this will be given by your Award Tutor after enrolment.

Assessment details

Assessment is by coursework for each unit and a full assignment brief is available for each unit. Assessment tasks always allow you to pursue your own thinking and interests within the parameters of the unit and award. Formative feedback is available and built in for every unit.

For taught units (30 credits) the assessment is 5000 words equivalent. The final (60 credit) dissertation is 12-14,000 words.

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The Bilingualism in Education is a part-time distance learning programme, aimed at teachers and educational practitioners working with multilingual children and young people in multicultural schools. Read more
The Bilingualism in Education is a part-time distance learning programme, aimed at teachers and educational practitioners working with multilingual children and young people in multicultural schools. Delivered in partnership with The Northern Association of Support Services for Equality and Achievement (NASSEA), our programme will help you to work more effectively in your role with children and young people learning English as an additional or second language.

Please note that this programme is currently only open to home/EU students

Our Bilingualism in Education programme is aimed at teachers and educational practitioners working with multilingual children and young people in multicultural schools. You will study the programme on a part-time distance learning basis.

Delivered in partnership with The Northern Association of Support Services for Equality and Achievement (NASSEA), the programme will help you to work more effectively in your role with children and young people learning English as an additional or second language.

The programme aims to:

Increase knowledge and understanding of the language and learning needs of bilingual learners who are learning English as an additional language
Increase knowledge and practices of working across a diversity of cultures
Improve classroom practice in planning, implementing and evaluating the curriculum, taking into account the needs of bilingual learners
Enable students to develop more effective practices with bilingual learners with alleged special educational needs
Enable students to participate in, and evaluate interpersonal intervention with bilingual children with language learning and learning needs

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan. Read more

Programme description

This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan.

It is designed primarily for graduates with a background related to linguistics and/or psychology who wish to develop their knowledge of current research on language acquisition (first, second, bilingual, and impaired) and language change from a cognitive perspective and from the point of view of current linguistic theories.

Joining a vibrant research community of developmental linguists, you will have the opportunity to carry out advanced research to try to answer questions related to the area of language development and bilingualism, such as ‘how do children learn language?’ or ‘what happens when we forget a language?’

You will benefit from the programme's strengths in:

scope (with equal emphasis on first and second language acquisition and bilingualism)
interdisciplinary teaching (staff drawn from linguistics, psychology and informatics)
skill-oriented training (through methodology courses, lab sessions and project work)

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
Introduction to Syntax
First Language Acquisition
Second Language Acquisition
Psychology of Language Learning
Univariate Statistics and Methodology Using R

Option courses may include:

Sentence Comprehension
Discourse Comprehension
Language Production
Origins and Evolution of Language
Simulating Language
Child Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Data and Theories
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Principles and Approaches
Experimental Pragmatics
Developmental Language Disorders
Research Methods in Developmental Linguistics
Language Evolution in the Lab
Computational Phonology
Advanced Topics in Phonetics: Speech Production and Perception

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the specialised skills you need to perform research in language learning and development. It will also serve as a solid basis for doctoral study.

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Programme description. This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan. Read more

Programme description

This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan.

It is designed primarily for graduates with a background related to linguistics and/or psychology who wish to develop their knowledge of current research on language acquisition (first, second, bilingual, and impaired) and language change from a cognitive perspective and from the point of view of current linguistic theories.

Joining a vibrant research community of developmental linguists, you will have the opportunity to carry out advanced research to try to answer questions related to the area of language development and bilingualism, such as ‘how do children learn language?’ or ‘what happens when we forget a language?’

You will benefit from the programme's strengths in:

  • scope (with equal emphasis on first and second language acquisition and bilingualism)
  • interdisciplinary teaching (staff drawn from linguistics, psychology and informatics)
  • skill-oriented training (through methodology courses, lab sessions and project work)

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses

  • Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • First Language Acquisition
  • Second Language Acquisition
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Univariate Statistics and Methodology Using R

Option courses may include:

  • Sentence Comprehension
  • Discourse Comprehension
  • Language Production
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Simulating Language
  • Child Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
  • Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Data and Theories
  • Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Principles and Approaches
  • Experimental Pragmatics
  • Developmental Language Disorders
  • Research Methods in Developmental Linguistics
  • Language Evolution in the Lab
  • Computational Phonology
  • Advanced Topics in Phonetics: Speech Production and Perception

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the specialised skills you need to perform research in language learning and development. It will also serve as a solid basis for doctoral study.



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The MA in Psycholinguistics will provide you with a general background in psycholinguistics while giving you a practical training in the techniques and methodologies associated with the field of study. Read more
The MA in Psycholinguistics will provide you with a general background in psycholinguistics while giving you a practical training in the techniques and methodologies associated with the field of study. You will have the opportunity to develop your interest in areas such as bilingualism, syntactic processing in special populations and early phonetic and phonological development.

Overview

The MA in Psycholinguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in psycholinguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in psycholinguistics, including statistical methods
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in psycholinguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in psycholinguistics

Course structure

Autumn Term
There are two different routes in the Autumn Term, depending on your prior background. Students with no prior background in Linguistics or Psycholinguistics take the modules in Route A, below. Students who already have some background in these subjects take Route B. We will help you to determine which route you should take, when you apply.

Route A
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
-Language acquisition (10 credits)
-Psycholinguistics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits) OR Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Route B
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
AND 30 further credits from among the modules below and the modules in Route A:
-Advanced comparative syntactic or semantic typology (20 credits)
-Advanced phonology (10 credits)
-Advanced phonetics (10 credits)
-Emergence of structure from use (10 credits)
-Phonological development (20 credits)
-Directed readings in phonological development (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules from a range of options. Options may include:
-Topics in phonological development (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Learning mechanisms (20 credits)
-Second language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Psycholinguistic approaches to second language acquisition (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

Spring and Summer Terms
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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Applied linguistics aims to investigate real-world phenomena in which language plays a central role. Read more
Applied linguistics aims to investigate real-world phenomena in which language plays a central role. At MPhil/PhD level, we aim for you to make the transition into a fully fledged, independent academic researcher, with the skills necessary to present your research orally as well as in writing, in addition to pushing back the frontiers of knowledge. Such independence is achieved on the basis of a full appreciation of the hallmarks of good scholarship, such as original thought, the proper use of references and background material, appropriate use of methodology and accountable reporting procedures, and it is these priorities that we aim to impart to our students.

Once equipped with the generic and discipline-specific tools for carrying out research, you will pursue your particular research interests, supported by regular meetings with your supervisor and presentations and attendance at MPhil/PhD seminars.

Current research centres around: bilingualism and multilingualism; child language development; second language acquisition; psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics; sociolinguistics; cross-cultural pragmatics; discourse and conversation analysis; intercultural communication; language teaching; and translation theory.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- The Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication was established in 1965, making it the first department in England to focus on the study of applied linguistics. It has contributed greatly to the field over the years and remains the only department of applied linguistics in the University of London.
- The department is an Institutional Member of the British Association of Applied Linguistics and an affiliated member of the International Association of Applied Linguistics (AILA).
- It houses the Centre for Multilingual and Multicultural Research, and the International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism (Taylor and Francis).
- The department has developed a distinctive academic identity and helped to redefine the field as a social science. It is not a department of conventional descriptive or theoretical linguistics, and does not engage in research and teaching of syntax, morphology, phonology, phonetics or linguistics of a particular language. Rather, it is concerned with real-life issues in which language and communication play a central role.

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Our School of Education is the principal and longest-established provider of Gaelic-medium education (GME) initial teacher education in Scotland. Read more

Why this course?

Our School of Education is the principal and longest-established provider of Gaelic-medium education (GME) initial teacher education in Scotland.

This is a full-time, one-year course. It’s designed to help qualified teachers with intermediate-level Gaelic transfer to Gaelic-medium classrooms.

The course is unique in Scotland. It combines language training with a focus on pedagogical requirements for working in GME including:
- understanding approaches to language learning and teaching ‘immersion’ classrooms
- current policy, provision & practice relating to GME
- bilingualism in education

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/gaelicimmersionforteachers/

You’ll study

You’ll study six core modules and complete three placements in Gaelic-speaking classrooms and organisations.

These will focus on the development of advanced Gaelic language skills relevant to GME. The language and pedagogy modules are taught in tandem. This maximises your opportunity to develop professional competences in the spoken and written language.

Core modules:
- Gaelic 1: Gràmar, fuaimneachadh agus cainnte làitheil
- Gaelic 2: Leasachadh conaltraidh
- Gaelic 3: Comasan conaltraidh adhartach
- Pedagogy 1: Language learning and teaching
- Pedagogy 2: Gaelic medium education: policy, provision, practice
- Pedagogy 2: Understanding, supporting and promoting bilingualism

Work placement

You’ll complete three placements over the course of the year. Two of the three will be in Gaelic-medium classrooms, relevant to your existing experience and plans for future work. You’ll spend one week in November observing practice and four weeks in the spring teaching classes in Gaelic.

The third placement will be in a Gaelic-speaking organisation. You’ll complete 70 hours of voluntary work over the course of the year. You’ll use the Gaelic language and develop links for future school activities.

Project

Over the course of the year, you'll complete a project. There is flexibility in your choice of project but you’re encouraged to consult your local sponsoring authority. It may involve the school or organisation where you have taken your placements. Or it may reflect other aspects of the course, for example:
- exploring the role of education in Gaelic revitalisation
- the development of new resources
- the implementation of national or local Gaelic language plans

Entry requirements

According to the Council of Europe Framework of Reference for Languages Level B1, intermediate level is defined as:
- can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc
- can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken
- can produce simple connected text on topics, which are familiar, or of personal interest
- can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans

This is broadly equivalent to Higher Gaelic or Gàidhlig, but we recognise that Gaelic learners have very diverse language learning histories. The course team is happy to discuss and assess prospective participants’ Gaelic competence in order to determine whether the course is suitable.

Learning & teaching

You're expected to attend classes four days a week with one day a week allocated to independent study. This is due to the focus on language training and because most of the content is delivered in Gaelic.

Language learning teaching includes a focus on:
- grammar
- pronunciation
- oral presentation
- listening comprehension
- literacy

You're encouraged to put your language skills to use in a variety of contexts including:
- social and professional encounters
- development of teaching resources
- blogs
- webpages
- use of social media
- networking events etc

Pedagogical learning and teaching includes:
- lectures
- seminars
- workshops,
- opportunities for microteaching
- participation in professional development events for GME

You'll develop professional networks which you'll maintain after you have completed the course.

Guest lectures

There are lectures from experts in GME and related areas scheduled throughout the year. The majority of these are in Gaelic. You’ll get perspectives on policy, provision and practice in this sector and hear a range of Gaelic voices.

Assessment

Assessment includes formal language tests, assessment of oral and written presentations in Gaelic concerning a range of professionally relevant tasks, and evaluation of the major project.

Careers

Demand for Gaelic teachers is high.
The National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-2017 has set targets for a significant rise in the numbers of children enrolled in Gaelic-medium education.
This means an increase in the number of teachers qualified to teach through the medium of Gaelic.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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We offer research supervision relating to education and welcome enquiries about possible research topics, both theoretical and empirical. Read more
We offer research supervision relating to education and welcome enquiries about possible research topics, both theoretical and empirical. Many of our research students are also practising professionals carrying out research related to their work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-education/

The The Department of Educational Studies has over 50 research students from the United Kingdom, Europe and many other countries overseas.

We are particularly interested to hear from those who would like to work within areas such as:

action research in education
art in education
bilingualism in education
children and popular culture
comparative education and international work
comprehensive education
creativity
curriculum policy and practice
development of literacy
digital technologies and education
drama in education
early childhood education and cultural diversity
early literacy and bilingualism
English in education
equity and social justice
family learning in multilingual contexts
gender studies
history of education
identities, cultures and the curriculum
non-formal education
out-of-school learning
policy and its contestation
race and education
science in education
sexuality and education
social class and education
spatial aspects of education
teaching of reading
visual cultures and education

Research students in Education typically use a range of qualitative methods including ethnographic approaches, observation, narrative methods, discourse analysis, video analysis, and life histories.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Martha Giles.

Programme aims

To help you:

Identify appropriate issues of educational significance for your enquiry
Select appropriate methods and methodologies by which to investigate these
Appreciate the epistemological and technical assumptions that underpin this choice
Design and execute a well-founded enquiry
Analyse and interpret findings with accuracy, rigour and originality
Identify the practical and professional implications of educational enquiry

Structure

We ensure that you are supported by highly qualified supervisors with whom you work to a mutually agreed timetable and maintain regular tutorial contact throughout your research. An induction and research training programme is provided and you are normally expected to follow this. There is an annual appraisal of your progress, and every effort is made to ensure good communication between yourself, your supervisor and other relevant members of staff.

Students have additional support from the Goldsmiths Graduate School, where there is a lively programme of interdisciplinary seminars, as well as core research training to support your studies. The Graduate School also has its own virtual research community, running in parallel to the physical School and providing online seminars and research training programmes.

All MPhil students and academic staff are invited to research seminars run by the Department’s three Research Centres: the Centre for Language, Culture and Learning (CLCL), the Centre for the Arts and Learning and the Centre for Identities and Social Justice. In addition to academics from inside and outside the University, research students also have an opportunity to contribute to seminars on work in progress.

Facilities

In addition to the facilities available in the Graduate School the Department has good facilities for research students including a study room with networked computers, scanner and printers.

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Education at Goldsmiths is ranked 8th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

As a department we’re interested in seeing what education can tell us about the social, political and economic forces of our times. And what these forces mean for the everyday lives of individuals and groups.

We see education as a window through which to view the world, and as something with the power to define who we are and how we live.

That’s why our research delves into areas including culture and identity, gender, multilingualism, and youth cultures, and why we maintain a commitment to social justice and inclusion.

How to apply

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Do you want to gain specialised knowledge and skills in English language teaching and learning? The Master of TESOL is suitable for a wide range of professionals, educators or prospective educators working in English language teaching in international or local contexts, and leads to a postgraduate qualification in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Read more
Do you want to gain specialised knowledge and skills in English language teaching and learning? The Master of TESOL is suitable for a wide range of professionals, educators or prospective educators working in English language teaching in international or local contexts, and leads to a postgraduate qualification in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

The Master of TESOL helps you understand the connections between theory and practice, and the importance of developing strong principles of practice in English language teaching and learning. You will develop an expert understanding of the core principles of language teaching and learning.

You will engage with contemporary theory and practice for additional language acquisition and advanced understanding of, and skills associated with:

- the role of social and cultural contexts in language learning

- a range of communicative approaches to teaching, learning and assessment and planning for teaching in various TESOL contexts

- the evaluation, analysis and design of assessment tasks

- the development and maintenance of bilingualism and biliteracy in formal learning environments

- English language education in local and global contexts

- transcultural and intercultural learning, communication and mobility, including in online learning settings

- the use of digital technologies to support learning.

A flexible course delivery allows you to continue working while completing the course. You can choose to engage via a fully online offering, or to combine this with attendance at face-to-face workshops if you are able and interested.

Graduates of the Master of TESOL are prepared as language teachers of TESOL who can operate with confidence in a changing and increasingly 'internationalised' world.

Please note: this course does not provide a recognised initial teaching qualification. Students seeking an initial teaching qualification should visit the Faculty of Education website for information on the Master of Teaching (http://monash.edu/study/coursefinder/course/D6001).

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/tesol-d6005?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in four parts. Part A. Orientation to education, Part B. Key constructs in education, Part C. Enhanced professional learning and Part D. Professional inquiry. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A. and some units from other parts.

[Note: If you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit and complete one of the higher credit-point options.]

PART A. Orientation to education
These studies will introduce you to contemporary issues in the study of education. They are intended for students who come into the course without previous qualifications in education or work experience in education-related fields. You will engage with academic traditions and scholarly practices in the field of education at the postgraduate level, become acquainted with a broad range of debates across education contexts and develop an understanding of the complexities in the field.

PART B. Key constructs in education
These studies present key theoretical frames to understand ideas and research conducted across a broad theme of significance in the study of Education. The themes offered include learners and learning, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, education and work, sustainability and inclusion, from which you will choose one or two. You will engage with research that responds to the themes you choose and as a result, advance your capacity to apply scholarly concepts in Education more broadly.

PART C. Enhanced professional learning
These studies will deepen your knowledge of particular ideas and practices in TESOL, build your skills and address professional issues. They include consideration of language culture and curriculum, bilingualism, and the development of pedagogy and monitoring of learning in TESOL. Taken together these develop expertise to be applied across your learning and work contexts.

PART D. Professional inquiry
The focus of these studies is professional inquiry. You will address the challenges and opportunities of using and evaluating research evidence in professional practice. This will include engagement in professional practice to develop and upgrade the practical skills you needed to function as effective teachers of TESOL in a variety of contexts. This may include an independent research dimension requiring the knowledge and application of research principles.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/tesol-d6005?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Our MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a 12-month full-time taught MA programme designed for students who plan to teach English as a second/foreign language in the UK or internationally or to do research on the teaching, learning or assessment of English as a second/foreign language. Read more
Our MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a 12-month full-time taught MA programme designed for students who plan to teach English as a second/foreign language in the UK or internationally or to do research on the teaching, learning or assessment of English as a second/foreign language.

The programme is designed primarily for people with little or no prior experience of English language teaching, but who have a relevant first degree (English Language/ Linguistics or Education with a substantial English component) and who intend to be an English teacher or researcher.

The MA TESOL is an academic programme of study and not a teacher training course. Therefore, it provides a foundation in Applied Linguistics, Approaches to English Teaching and Research Methods on which later training in practical teaching can build. Theories of language acquisition and language teaching are explored, with the emphasis on how such theories may be practically applied; however, there is no teaching practicum as part of this programme.

The programme aims to:
-Provide an introduction to current issues and key trends in language learning and teaching in a global context
-Develop students' knowledge of Applied Linguistics and approaches to language teaching that will facilitate better teaching practice
-Provide basic research skills that students will need in order to (1) be able to engage critically with the language teaching and learning literature they read, and (2) carry out their own research project
-Help provide the knowledge and skills for those who want to conduct doctoral research in TESOL, Applied Linguistics or related areas

Content

Term 1
-TESOL Methods (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Language Learning and Teaching (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 options (20 credits). These may include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship Education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-English Linguistics (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 options (20 credits). These may include:
-Approaches to English language teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-The practice of English language teaching
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation based on a small-scale research study (60 credits), to be submitted by early September.

Teaching

The MA in TESOL programme is proud of its international standing and attracts high quality students and experienced academics from the UK and around the globe. With this experience, we are ideally suited for supporting our home and international students alike.

Learning is maximised through the use of a variety of teaching approaches which are student-centred and research informed, including lectures, small group seminars, tutorials, and through the use of our online virtual learning environment. The Education Department also has a vibrant guest speaker programme and students are encouraged to attend and participate in lectures and presentations from many key researchers in the field of Language Education and TESOL. Students are also able to take advantage of additional English language lessons and study skills workshops should they need them.

Students are assigned a personal supervisor who they will have on-going contact with throughout the duration of the course through face-to-face meetings and through email contact. The supervisor provides academic and pastoral support throughout the course. The Department of Education is highly regarded within the university for its teaching and supervision and has won many awards at university level to reflect this.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become English language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools, universities and other organisations requiring English language instruction.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:
-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education
-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education
-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1
-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)
-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse Analysis
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Approaches to English teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental Psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-The practice of English language teaching
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:
-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)
-An exam in Research Methods in Education
-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit
-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest. Read more
The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest.

Overview

The MA in Linguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in linguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in linguistic analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in linguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in linguistics

Course structure

The Autumn term comprises four modules in core areas of linguistics. In the Spring term you will choose two modules from a range of options, and begin a further core module on key ideas in linguistics which you will complete in the Summer term. The programme is completed with a research dissertation.

The modules in the Autumn term assume no prior knowledge and provide introductions to the core areas. The modules in the Spring term provide preparation for the research area in which you will complete your dissertation.

Autumn Term
Students take modules worth 40 credits in Autumn Term. The typical Autumn Term modules are:
-Language variation and change (10 credits)
-Semantics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits)
-Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules of your choice. Your options may include:
-Articulatory and impressionistic phonetics (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Phonological variation and change (20 credits)
-Second Language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Semantic theory (20 credits)
-Syntactic theory (20 credits)
-The phonetics of talk-in-interaction (20 credits)
-Topics in language variation and change (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

If you have covered substantial parts of the taught MA programme in your undergraduate degree, please talk to us about whether one of our specialist degree programmes may be more appropriate.

Spring and Summer Terms
In the second half of the Spring term and first half of the Summer term you will take a further core module:
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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