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Masters Degrees (Belief)

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Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline. Read more
Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline.

The programme explores the impact and influence religion and belief has on social structures, community, politics, economics, policy (education), citizenship, culture & identity, sexuality, pluralism, spirituality, and national & international relationships. The MA also introduces critical analysis of ethics, systems of belief, human rights and social justice issues and the application of these concepts within lived environments from diverse religious perspectives.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture & Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector.

INDUSTRY LINKS

The RCS team at UCLan have a wide variety of links with local, national and international faith and intercultural forums, faith schools and academic institutions, all of which provide valuable contacts for students wishing to enter professions related to Teaching, Ministry, inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue and relations. RCS also work with charity organisations both home and abroad and global outreach programmes. Further details and contacts are available from members of the RCS teaching team.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students may study the MA full time over one year or part time over two or three years. In either case students will be required to successfully complete six MA modules and one MA dissertation (the dissertation is equivalent to 3 x modules). Each module requires an estimated 2 hours class contact per week plus extensive reading and dedicated personal study.

We strive to give our students key employability and transferable skills which will serve them in the world of work. Our assessment practices illustrate a move away from exams and essays per se and incorporate a move towards a more inclusive assessment which benefits our diverse student body. Assessment strategies include coursework, individual and group presentations, individual and/or group projects, reviews and ICT interaction.

OPPORTUNITIES

Religion, Culture & Society (RCS) also includes field trips to national and international places of interest such as; Rome, Istanbul, Auschwitz, Liverpool Cathedrals, Ladywelle Pilgrimage and Shrine, the Hindu Temple etc. Although these trips are optional to MA students, they aim to draw attention to shared values, beliefs and practices, and supports students in achieving a mutual appreciation of different faiths and traditions. The international trips in particular aim to develop an experienced awareness of cultural heritage, traditions and practices of different faiths, and widen students’ appreciation of how those faiths and belief systems interact within lived environments, communities and in different social settings. Thus enhancing not only MA provision but also the learning experience and the environment where that learning experience takes place.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture and Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector, including local government, race relations officers, ministry, equality/diversity training officers, social services, social welfare, community development, youth work, research, education and communication support workers, lecturing in further or higher education. Practitioners may wish to update their knowledge or gain a higher qualification for personal or professional development. The programme will also appeal to working individuals who are interested in the range of topics offered and do not wish to specialise in a rigidly defined Theology based MA programme. In addition, many students are currently seeking Masters’ programmes as a way of weathering the economic recession.

RCS offers progression routes onto PGCE courses for graduates wishing to develop a career in teaching. There are also opportunities to further study for PhD or professional doctorate.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Religion, Culture & Society brings together disciplines of Theology, Philosophy, Sociology and International Relations – a very innovative, exciting and challenging post-graduate degree award.

The whole philosophy of the Religion, Culture and Society MA is to promote inclusively, encourage reflection on interfaith dialogue and highlight the important contribution religion and belief can make to community cohesion and the combating of religious prejudice and discrimination (QCA & DfES, 2004). The MA evaluates how and why the role of religion and culture has changed within society, and explores the impact and influence of religion and belief within economical, political and social constructs. Religion and faith is critically analysed within the framework of theistic and atheistic approaches to sexuality, spirituality, human rights, territory and space and cultural relationships. The application of classical and contemporary theological and philosophical concepts and theories of faith are examined in relation to lived environments.

The MA in Religion, Culture and Society embodies and supports the objectives outlined in the AHSS 2007-2012 strategy, is aligned to Theology and Religious Studies benchmarks, HEQ (2008) descriptors and is situated specifically within a social science framework. The course supports a pluralistic perspective on and within religion and belief traditions, and engages with a range of methods of study, explores a number of interesting and challenging modules and includes and a diversified range of assessment practices.

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The postgraduate Outdoor Education programme has been developed to meet the needs of practitioners and graduates working in outdoor education. Read more
The postgraduate Outdoor Education programme has been developed to meet the needs of practitioners and graduates working in outdoor education. It brings together in depth theoretical study and professional practice to develop a higher level understanding of outdoor education as a distinctively alternative form of learning. Central to the course is a belief in outdoor education as a process of experiential and holistic learning that can help individuals to better understand their personal values, relationships with others and the natural world.

Course Overview

The postgraduate Outdoor Education programme has been developed to meet the needs of practitioners and graduates working in outdoor education. It brings together in-depth theoretical study and professional practice to develop a higher level understanding of outdoor education as a distinctively alternative form of learning. Central to the course is a belief in outdoor education as a process of experiential and holistic learning that can help individuals to better understand their personal values, relationships with others and the natural world. The course explores Outdoor Education from a socio-educational perspective and addresses key issues linking individual practice to national and international concerns such as sustainability, the nature of adventure, formalising the informal, professionalism, facilitating experiential learning, relationships with nature and healthy outdoor communities.

Modules

Part One
-Philosophical and Cultural Perspectives on Outdoor Education
-Facilitating Learning through Experience
-Debates in Outdoor Education
-Research Methods OR Outdoor Education Internship (subject to approval of Programme Director)

Part Two
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Key Features

-Part time and full time modes of study
-Blended learning approach combining use of eplatforms, course materials and weekend workshops
-All workshop weekends are located at Carmarthen Campus and make use of the surrounding hills, forests, rivers and coastline.
-Supportive community of postgraduate scholars
-Taught modules to support student’s professional practice
-Assessment tasks linked to individual’s professional interests
-Optional exit awards – PG Certificate (60 credits), PG Diploma (120 credits) and Master of Arts (180 credits)

Assessment

The programme uses a range of assessment techniques designed to develop postgraduate level knowledge, skills and competencies. These include: seminar and lead lecture presentations, research proposals, research reports, essays, reflective journals, academic interviews and blogs.

All assessments link theory with practice and require students to undertake empirical research as the basis for further developing their critical skills and an evidence-based personal philosophy of Outdoor Education.

Career Opportunities

The degree would be of particular interest to outdoor professionals who are:
-Seeking career advancement as teachers, centre managers, youth workers, community development officers, environmental education officers, adventure guides, outdoor instructors and graduate students.
-Wishing to undertake Continuing Professional development
-Considering further study at PhD level

It will be of particular interest to outdoor professionals who are:
-Inquisitive & critical in their outlook
-Inspired by the potential of Outdoor Education to offer an alternative approach to learning & teaching
-Motivated to challenge their own beliefs and learn from other cultures

Professional Accreditations

-Demonstrate effective communication and presentation skills
-Work effectively, both independently and with others
-Demonstrate responsibility for their learning and continuing personal and professional development
-Self-appraise and reflect on their practice
-Use information and communication technology (ICT), including word processing, databases, internet communication, information retrieval and online searches
-Interpret and present relevant numerical information
-Develop an adaptable and flexible approach to study and work

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Providing meaning to fundamental questions and ideas that feature in science, culture and faith. The contemporary world is characterised by rapid innovations in science and technology. Read more

Providing meaning to fundamental questions and ideas that feature in science, culture and faith.

The contemporary world is characterised by rapid innovations in science and technology. These developments contribute to economic growth and prosperity, but simultaneously require positioning, and specifically people who can provide meaning and direction. Theologians are those people, as they are trained in systematic reflection of fundamental questions and ideas that feature in science, culture and faith. They can contribute to the dialogue between believing and knowing.

Radboud University aims to train such theologians. The central focus in the three-year Master's programme in Theology is on the tension between universal truth claims within belief systems and the diverse cultural contexts in which they are expressed. We are concerned with how the Christian faith addresses matters in society at large and with the public relevance of Christian beliefs and doctrines. Christian engagement requires an intellectual as well as a practical basis. We therefore seek to provide academic rigor to the conception of theology. It's about contributing to the welfare of society by drawing on the insights, resources and compassionate values of the Christian faith.

Graduates of the Master’s programme in Theology are employed in various leadership positions in dioceses, religious congregations, universities and colleges. In a globalising world more and more institutions require skills in theological communication and hermeneutics.

From broad to specialisation

Master’s students can choose to specialise in one of four disciplines of theology or to take a general theology programme in which all four disciplines are studied.

Specialisations:

History of Church and Theology

Analysing historical developments of Christian traditions and discipline, to better understand Christian belief in contemporary society. (Church History, Historical Theology, Canon Law)

Biblical Exegesis

Words, texts and meaning: Investigating the Old Testament and the New Testament in their historical contexts.

Practical Theology

Searching for traces of meaning in everyday practices, and looking beyond traditional shapes of religiosity. (Pastoral Theology, Missiology, Liturgical Studies, Intercultural Theology)

Systematic Theology

Drawing on the compassionate values and insights of the Christian faith to contribute to the welfare of society. (Fundamental Theology, Dogmatic Theology, Theological Ethics, Spirituality, Philosophy of Religion, Feminist Theology)

Graduates of the Master’s programme in Theology can specifically train to become researchers, policy makers, educators, pastoral care workers or spiritual counsellors. Other professions upon graduation include pastoral worker, journalist, curator and archivist.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/theology

Why study Theology at Radboud University?

- Students can choose a broad programme or choose to specialise in one of the four disciplines of Theology (Literary, Systematic or Practical Theology or Church History).

- With electives, students have plenty of room to choose a direction that meets their professional and academic interests. Taking a few seminars from the other theology disciplines of choice (Church History, Literary Theology or Practical Theology) is mandatory to broaden students general knowledge on Theology.

- The third year is aimed at training students for a specific profession. Students can choose research (English), education (Dutch), religion and policy (Dutch) or spiritual care (Dutch).

- Theology at Radboud University is a truly international Master's programme; many of our staff, students and alumni come from outside the Netherlands. We also cooperate with universities abroad in Kenya, Tanzania, India and Indonesia.

- The majority (88%) of our students graduate. This is because our staff knows how to motivate through excellent education and intensive supervision. As a Master's student you will have a personal tutor and you will work in an inspiring environment with excellent researchers.

- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups, allowing ample opportunity for questions and discussion.

- Radboud University and its Theology department are Roman Catholic in origin, but its Master’s programme in Theology is open to all students. Our students have very diverse religious and cultural backgrounds.

Career prospects

In a globalising world, more and more institutions require skills in theological communication and hermeneutics. Theologians know how to formulate critical theological perspectives on questions of meaning of life and a viable civil society in our contemporary situation. Our graduates have an analytical attitude and the skills to make sounds judgements which will help them participate in debates in the public arena using arguments based on the Christian faith and can convey their faith in society. In addition, the programme teaches you how to think independently and critically about the way the Christian doctrine can give meaning to contemporary issues.

Our research in this field

Among the Theology staff there is a large variety of expertise; research is being conducted in all four disciplines of Theology. Staff members apply their latest research and those of their colleagues to their seminars.

- Church History

The research group Church History and the History of Christianity studies the history of Christians on the basis of historical methods and in critical deliberation with the other disciplines within theology and religious studies. They are primarily concerned with the historical questions of discipline and repression.

- Literary Theology

The research group Textual Sources of Judaism and Christianity focuses on the foundational texts of Judaism and Christianity: the Bible and texts that originated in the Jewish and Christian traditions of the first centuries of our calendar.

- Practical Theology

The research of the chair Empirical and Practical Religious Studies is conducted along two lines. The first is the transformation of life stories, discourse and transmission of religious and spiritual identity. The second line investigates the transformation of religion in processes of migration and conflict. Migration results in interaction between individuals with different religious identities and spiritualities.

- Systematic Theology

The research group Systematic Religious Studies also carries out research in the theological field and is concerned with issues relating to public theology. Accordingly, the research covers questions as, for example, whether the public sphere can be a locus of theology or whether theology can seriously contribute to cultural, political, or economic debates.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/theology

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Goldsmiths is an exciting space for postgraduates, with numerous international speakers passing through, a huge range of interdisciplinary seminars and reading groups and a very open and warm environment for the exchange of ideas. Read more

Goldsmiths is an exciting space for postgraduates, with numerous international speakers passing through, a huge range of interdisciplinary seminars and reading groups and a very open and warm environment for the exchange of ideas.

The MPhil/PhD programme in Religious Studies is part of the internationally renowned Faiths & Civil Society Unit, where an annual series of public seminars attracts speakers and delegates from all over the world, and a permanent group of 12 Fellows resources the Unit with ideas and connections straight in to the worlds of policy and practice.

Supervision is available for studies with a focus on any aspect of religion, belief and spirituality in the contemporary world, especially as studied interdisciplinarily, though including a focus on theology and/or religious studies, and/or the study of religion sociologically. A particular specialism which is distinctive to Goldsmiths is the connection between religion and belief and social and public policy. Engagement between faith and the public professions (social work, teaching, youth work, health, community work) is another distinctive area of expertise and applications in these areas are particularly welcome.

Much of the work of a PhD is organised through one-to-one supervisory sessions. You will also be able to participate in a range of methods training courses in both quantitative and qualitative methods, which will introduce you to the tools of the trade as well as innovative advanced methods.

These methods training courses are designed to help you with your MPhil/PhD study but also to help you become a full and capable social researcher equipped with the range of advanced methods skills that we are able to offer.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce. 

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths



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Develop a variety of teaching approaches to become an effective and confident teacher of physical education in primary schools. Read more

Course Summary

Develop a variety of teaching approaches to become an effective and confident teacher of physical education in primary schools.

Partnerships with local schools give you opportunities to put theory into practice on placements, supported by experienced teachers and academic staff as you develop the knowledge and skills to meet the national requirements for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Intermediate qualifications available:

- Professional Graduate Certificate in Education

This course is accredited by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (a department of the Department for Education) to deliver Initial Teacher Training

Choose Primary Physical Education PGCE at Bedfordshire and:

- Study on a course designed to enable you to join a challenging and rewarding profession – becoming an inspiring teacher of young children, able to draw on secure understanding of theories about Primary teaching and learning - with the knowledge and skills to lead learning and initiate change in educational settings
- Explore your understanding of teaching and learning, supported by experienced Primary teachers, as you apply your subject knowledge and expertise to planning teaching and developing curricula; honing your skills of critical self-evaluation and improvement planning
- Develop your creativity and team-working skills, preparing you to influence and lead in educational settings and enhancing your own sense of independence
- Gain confidence in analysing the evidence of your own practical experience during placements in schools, informing your future actions as you evaluate the impact of applying theory to your teaching practice
- Benefit from a qualification that gives you recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), enabling you to gain employment in a Primary Education setting, with opportunities for continuous development through further study at MA/MSc, MPhil, PhD and EdD levels.

Why choose this course?

Develop as a highly qualified teacher with the knowledge and skills to lead learning and initiate change in educational settings.

Entry requirements

Primary subjects

- You must possess a minimum 2:2 honours degree or equivalent
- All applicants must have GCSE grade C (or equivalent) in English, mathematics and science
- Applicants whose first language is not English and who do not have GCSE grade C in English need to have IELTS with an average score of at least 6.0
- All applicants should have recent and relevant experience of working with children in a mainstream UK school in the phases for which they are applying, a minimum of 10 days is expected (e.g 5 days in KS1 and 5 days in KS2 OR 5 days in KS1 and 5 days in EY)
- All students will undergo a Disclosure and Barring Services (DBS) check
- All entrants must have passed the professional skills tests prior to entry

Career Management Skills

The course is framed by a commitment to help you to develop the characteristics of a University of Bedfordshire graduate teacher. You will be challenged to explore theories of teaching and learning and to examine the implications of such theories for your own development. In doing this you will refine, form and reform your own principles, perspectives and values in relation to professional teaching practice. On completion of the course you will have the appropriate attitude, knowledge, skills and understanding to meet the needs of the childrens and schools workforce agenda.

Distinctive features of this course, through which you will develop these characteristics, include:

- Partnership provision
- Enhancements which improve personalisation and employability
- Reflective practice
- Frequent formative feedback
- Integration of performance and learning outcomes
- Webfolio
- Differentiated achievement outcomes

These features are outlined below:

Partnership provision -

The course has been developed, and is taught, by a team consisting of practising teachers, senior teachers, school leaders and university tutors. As a result, the course design satisfies the expectations and requirements of your future employers and you will benefit from the current and recent experience which they bring. Authentic partnership with schools underpins the success of the course, as confirmed by Ofsted 2011. Innovative developments include working with clusters of schools to provide a common ITE experience and professional development programme across the cluster. This is an emergent model of partnership which enables the University to engage directly in shaping the teacher education course and to provide employment opportunities for newly qualified teachers.

Enhancements which improve personalisation and employability -

The first aim of the Subject Specialist unit is to develop your subject knowledge and pedagogy with a specific focus on the phase and/or specialist subject curriculum. However, in order to support you in achieving your personal aspirations, and to enhance your record of knowledge and experience, the programme offers a range of additional opportunities such as: working with learners for whom English is an Additional Language; using the interactive white board to enhance learning; etc.

Reflective practice -

The course aims to develop you as an effective reflective practitioner. Reflective thinking is a multifaceted process that requires you to analyse classroom events and circumstances. By virtue of its complexity teaching requires constant and continual classroom observation, evaluation and subsequent action. However, to be an effective practitioner it is imperative to understand `Why?, `How? and

`What if.? in addition to the analysis of the observed events. This understanding comes through the consistent practice of reflective thinking and writing which is supported by the webfolio, assignments and profile review process. In essence, the continuous development of your skills of reflective analysis provides you with key learning tools through which to evaluate your progress as a developing professional.

Reflective thinking is a learned process that requires time. The course encourages you to develop the skill of critical self-evaluation and to discover meaningful and creative problem-solving strategies to support your classroom practice. In doing so you are expected to synthesise the knowledge and understanding gained from your reading, learning experiences and teaching practice.

Frequent formative feedback -

The course team members share a pedagogic belief that all aspects of the course should present you with models of best teaching practice from which you are able to form your own pedagogic principles. One key feature of that model of practice is the emphasis placed on the role of formative assessment. That is, a belief that assessment tasks should be used as one of the tools by which to promote learning, rather than simply to measure what learning has taken place. In all units, therefore, support is provided in the form of frequent feedback about your progress against the assessment criteria, in order to recognise, respond to, and enhance the learning that has taken place. Support includes scheduled tutorial meetings, to allow you to assess your progress and identify specific targets for continual improvement, with opportunities to improve your work prior to final submission.

Integration of performance and learning outcomes -

All teacher education courses are required to provide support to achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) by meeting the requirements of the professional standards (currently the Teachers Standards 2012.) A defining principle of this course is the commitment to intellectual engagement with the standards, rather than superficial claims of performance against them. To support this, the qualitative descriptors are used to show how satisfactory, good and outstanding student teachers might present themselves. Your professional development record will be organised within the framework of Teachers Standards and the assessment strategy, described in detail later in this document, ensures that your critical analysis of experiences from the course forms the basis of your evidence against those standards. In this way, your intellectual and performance development are intrinsically linked.

Webfolio -

The webfolio is the medium through which your reflective writing, other assessments and documentary evidence are managed. As such, it forms the central spine of the course, drawing the range of experiences and activities together in a coherent structure. The webfolio is a required element of the course and most of your assignments will be submitted by making the webfolio available to your tutor.

The webfolio is designed to help you allocate time and space to engage in critical self-reflection and self-evaluation of your practice, which could then be shared with others, helping you to identify areas of strength and areas for future development. The webfolio will also provide you with a flexible means by which you can gather and store information about your understanding, knowledge, values and beliefs. Its portability ensures that you will be able to continue to use it as a gateway for your professional development beyond the award of QTS.

You will share your webfolio with your mentor to aid professional dialogue and as part of the Profile Review process. It will also be used as an instrument to identify opportunities for deeper personalisation throughout the course.

Differentiated achievement outcomes -

The course is designed to support all students in developing the knowledge and skills which satisfy the requirements of level 7 (Masters level) qualifications. It is acknowledged, however, that some students will choose, or need, to direct their attention and effort towards other aspects of their professional development. For this reason, level 6 and level 7 assessment criteria are organised as a continuum.

There are two units which each offer 30 credits at either level 6 or level 7.

If you pass both the assignments for these units at level 7 you will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Education with recommendation for QTS

If you pass both the assignments for these units at level 6 or either one of these assignments at level 6 and one at level 7, you will be awarded a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education with recommendation for QTS

Career/Further study opportunities

Local and national demand for University of Bedfordshire graduate teachers is high. Annual destinations surveys show that 90% of graduate teachers will have secured full-time teaching posts to begin in the year of graduation, with a further 9% working in part-time teaching positions.

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This course is the only one in the UK that offers Psychology of Religion by distance learning. It attracts student from both the UK and Europe. Read more
This course is the only one in the UK that offers Psychology of Religion by distance learning. It attracts student from both the UK and Europe.

Students are encouraged to go out and undertake their own unique research projects within different areas of the discipline including: individual differences; Mental health religion and culture; Social psychology of religious experience, belief and behaviour; Positive psychology of religion.

This course encourages you to ask questions about religious belief and practice and how this impacts individuals and society.

Key Course Features

-Online course – fit study around your schedule.
-Flexible learning.
-Unique course in an exciting area of psychology.
-Active team of researchers in this area.
-Coursework includes, essays, book reviews, research reports and a dissertation.

What Will You Study?

There are two core modules. An introduction to the psychology of religion which gives you a broad introduction to the field and research methods which provides you with the tools to enable you to undertake your own research in the area.

Learning is flexible. For each module you are expected to post to the forum and engage with the debates on the forum at least twice a week. There is reading to do each week and to consider and relate to the forum posts. Modules run over 12 weeks and with the exception of the two core modules you can decide in discussion with your module tutor the question you wish to ask for each module.

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

The programme will be assessed in a number of different ways including essay, portfolio, research reports, book/article reviews, dissertation.

Career Prospects

Some of or students have gone onto study for their PhD. Others have used the course as CPD for their current employment – for example pastoral workers.

The Careers & Zone at Wrexham Glyndŵr University is there to help you make decisions and plan the next steps towards a bright future. From finding work or further study to working out your interests, skills and aspirations, they can provide you with the expert information, advice and guidance you need.

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The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. Read more
The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. The course is based upon the concept of a learning community, whereby learners come together to share experiences and best practice. It works on the belief that within the context of community leadership, individuals learn best from a peer led programme.

The course is grounded in the educational philosophy of Paulo Freire, and uses action reflection praxis as a basis for learning, allowing students to take new theoretical concepts and critically challenge them within their own communities. It also utilises and explores the management concepts of the community educator Mary Parker Follett (1868 to 1933); a woman recognised as ahead of her time in management science and whose ideas are hugely pertinent to the community sector today. The staff engaged in the delivery of the programme are all practitioners and internationally recognised in their fields. Their role is to share their knowledge on a peer to peer basis and support learners in developing new and innovative solutions to current issues.

INDUSTRY LINKS

An academic qualification in community leadership provides an excellent and recognised foundation for a career in the field. The course is designed to prepare the student for senior positions of community leadership within the third sector, the public sector, governance and politics, and also to play a leading role on the international stage. The course provides excellent opportunities for international, national, regional, and local networking and the development of personal social capital which will serve to effectively enhance employability prospects.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The course is available part time and includes a flexible teaching pattern. Some modules are taught in short intensive blocks of five days. Other modules adopt a blended teaching approach where lectures are delivered once per month.

This makes it possible for students that are working or live at a distance to be able to take individual modules without regular weekly attendance at the University. However, the ethos of a strong peer learning community is central to all modes of learning, regardless of being either classroom or web based.

A range of assessment methods will be used during your course. Your skills, knowledge and understanding will be formally and informally assessed through written assignments, oral presentations and through practical tasks. The requirements and the marking criteria for all course assessments are clearly set out for you in this handbook and module handbooks. Tutors may provide additional supportive material to you.

Opportunities will also be provided throughout the course for informal, formative assessment of your skills, knowledge and understanding. You will be invited to present seminar papers, contribute to class and online discussions, apply your learning informally in the workplace and take part in tutorials.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. The course is based upon the concept of a learning community, whereby learners come together to share experiences and best practice. It works on the belief that within the context of community leadership, individuals learn best from a peer led programme.

The course can be taken at either MA, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate level. Students who successfully complete three taught modules are eligible for the award of PG Certificate.

The course focuses on core themes relating to politics and governance, faith, gender, global society, and community resilience. In addition to the MA, students will also be eligible for an optional exit award in Strategic Leadership at Level 7 from the Institute of Leadership and Management. Through the Interfaith Dialogue route, he course offers an annual field visit to an international destination, usually Cordoba in Spain, but this varies according to availability. Further international visits and collaborations are available at the discretion of the course tutor and subject to numbers.

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Newman’s MA in Contemporary Christian Theology will enable you to develop your interest in theology through an engagement with with some of the issues brought to light by our contemporary culture. Read more
Newman’s MA in Contemporary Christian Theology will enable you to develop your interest in theology through an engagement with with some of the issues brought to light by our contemporary culture. You will have the choice of focusing your MA on Christian Theology, Christian Theology and Education, or Christian Theology and Ministry. The part-time programme is ideally suited to professionals working within the field of Theology, Religious Education or Christian Ministry and for those who want to deepen their understanding of the issues facing contemporary theology. Participation in this programme can help advance a career in leading Church schools, teaching Religious Education, or development in pastoral ministry and adult education.

The programme aims to open up new insights building from historical schools of thought to contemporary Christian theologies through an exploration of current issues, such as those surrounding the new bio-technologies, the relationship between science and theology, and eco-feminism. The programme is delivered through a blend of on-line learning and taught sessions. There are four weekend schools a year and ongoing on-line support.

Modules on the programme include

• Constructing Theologies: Past and Future
• Theology and Contemporary Ethics
• Metaphysics and Postmodernity: Belief and the Future
• Method and Hermeneutics in Theology
• Theology and Education.

Pathways

All students take the same modules and attend core lectures but where appropriate, seminars and tutorials allow you to focus your studies on one of the following areas:

Christian Theology

Students pursuing their studies in Christian Theology have the opportunity to engage in considerable depth with contemporary movements in philosophical and systematic theology. The course will allow for detailed study of key texts and ideas, while addressing questions about the possibility and nature of theology.

Theology and Education

The taught modules aim to open up new insights into the study of theology through an exploration of the issues that impact on Religious Studies and the leadership of Church schools. These include theologies underpinning education, ethical issues such as designer babies and environmental ethics, and philosophies of education.

Theology and Ministry

Choosing to focus on ministry enables you to explore and extend your understanding of how current research in theology can enrich the work of Christian ministry and mission. This focus will encourage a development of the cognitive, imaginative and critical skills required to interpret texts and doctrines and will enhance the competence of clerical and lay Christians to apply the resources of faith to everyday life and ministry.

In addition to the core modules, you may choose one professionally related module from the MA in Professional Enquiry programme or choose to reflect theologically on a specific area of personal interest. An optional negotiated module provides the opportunity to address a research area of personal interest with tutor support. The writing of a dissertation, allows a further opportunity to develop personal research and completes the final stage of the MA. Students may complete two modules of study to gain a Postgraduate Certificate (typically one year of part-time study), or four modules to gain a Postgraduate Diploma.

Attendance

The group size is small enough to allow good interaction between class members and easy access to the tutors. The course is delivered through a combination of on-line materials, and face-to-face taught sessions at Newman. University College-based sessions take place over an average of 6 days per year, timed to suit the needs of part-time students. In addition, students will make use of distance learning materials and will be encouraged to interact with each other and with tutors in on-line forums.

Research Areas

Theological research is fundamental to the mission of Newman University. The subject area welcomes applications from suitably qualified students who wish to pursue postgraduate research degrees (MPhil and PhD awarded by the University of Leicester) in the areas of Philosophy of Religion, Religious Education and Biblical Studies.

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This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural… Read more

This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural, religious and social history. The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world, offering you the opportunity to choose from a wide range of modules.

Leads to further research or careers in museums, journalism, finance and the cultural sector.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Kings is ranked in the top 6 in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016).
  • A wide set of optional modules all taught by established experts in the field
  • A rigorous core course that trains students in historical research in archives, manuscripts, print and objects
  • Central London location and staff expertise offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture of seminars, workshops and conferences in the department and at the Institute of Historical Research, in which students are encouraged to participate.

Description

Our Early Modern History MA bridges the division between British and European history that exists on many courses, focusing on ways in which cultural, political and social themes stretch across the period c.1500–1800.

The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world. Their research connects the political and the social, the cultural and the religious dimensions of the early modern world, and our course will give you interdisciplinary perspectives on early modern history.

You will write a dissertation at the end of your course, but you will begin by testing concepts such as identity, mentality, religion; by challenging models of change including modernization, state-building, the civilising process, reformation, enlightenment and revolution; and by trying out different methodologies such as cultural history, gender, thinking with material objects, global history, using digital data.

Our optional modules offer you different perspectives on religion, society, politics and culture, by examining primary sources of all kinds alongside the most recent historiographical interpretations. We will also develop your practical skills through modules such as advanced historical skills, including palaeography, Latin from beginner to advanced levels, and offer the chance to learn a European language. The flexibility of the course means that you can also take relevant modules from other departments in, for example, early modern English or French literature, the Iberian world and Digital Humanities. You can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series such as Power, Culture and Belief in Europe 1500–1800 and Early Modern Britain 1500–1750.

You will have access to an excellent range of library resources. Our long-standing expertise in the early modern period means our library has an extensive collection of journals and books in this field. You can also use the British Library, Senate House Library (University of London) and the Institute of Historical Research. We provide access to the most significant online collections of primary printed material, Early English Books Online and the Eighteenth Century Online and to JSTOR and other online resources for secondary material.

Course purpose

The MA Early Modern History course offers a rigorous introduction to the advanced study of early modern history, providing training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study, but is also designed for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

We teach our modules through small seminar groups where we will debate and discuss ideas based on extensive reading.

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six to nine hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 32 to 34 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 14 to 18 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation we will provide you with six hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 574 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess your performance through coursework and occasionally exams. The majority of the history modules are assessed by coursework essay; other optional modules may differ.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. Read more
International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. It encompasses issues relating to the creation of legal obligations, recognition of states, the role of international organisations, liability for international crimes and dispute settlement, as well as questions such as the use of force, environmental protection, human rights and regulation of international trade and investment.

This course provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, enabling students to tailor the course to their areas of particular interest to facilitate their career aspirations. It is open to both law and non-law graduates.

As well as the LLM in International Law, we offer four specialised international law LLM courses along with an LLM by Research.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-law/

Why choose this course?

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Rsearch is fundamental to the Law School and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the last REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres.

Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics who are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised.

The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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On this unique illustration course - the only one of its kind with a specific academic focus on authorial practice - you'll develop your own voice. Read more
On this unique illustration course - the only one of its kind with a specific academic focus on authorial practice - you'll develop your own voice. You'll learn to see your work as an evolving practice rather than as a response to an already defined concept or brief, as you challenge and re-evaluate your work with the help of teaching staff who are experienced practitioners.

As your authorial voice develops and you learn to identify your audience, you'll also be encouraged to take an entrepreneurial approach, thinking creatively about the outlets and options for your work. This professionalism is aided by the course's close relationship with independent publisher Atlantic Press, offering you opportunities to gain direct experience in the many aspects of producing and publishing graphic literature.

At the heart of this studio-based course is a belief that there is a need to reassert the characteristics of personal origination, ownership, storytelling and literary ideas within the medium of illustration. We'll help you gain the confidence to take ownership of your work, you'll develop new ideas and concepts driven by your desire to create a distinct, original, authorial voice.

You'll explore narrative and storytelling as defined by your developing voice, working on longer-term projects across a variety of mediums that suit your interests – including children's books, graphic novels, digital work and screen-based production. The course will also engage you with current ideas and thinking related to notions of authorship, encouraging you to draw inspiration from a diverse range of influences, providing further personal insight and direction for your practice.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/illustrationma

Building professional experience

A unique feature of our MA is our relationship with Atlantic Press (http://www.atlanticpressbooks.com/). The specialist publishing house, based in Penryn, was founded 15 years ago by course leader Steve Braund. The partnership enables you to learn about the whole publishing process, from concept to realisation – as well as the practical aspects of printing, distribution and marketing. The close proximity of a publishing press also means that internships to students on the course are offered on a regular basis.

The course will give you a grounding in all aspects of professional practice related to the work of an authorial illustrator. You'll also be encouraged to consider entrepreneurial approaches to your practice. At the end of the course, you'll mount a professional presentation of work from your negotiated MA project.

How the course is taught

Teaching takes place in the form of lectures, seminars, group critiques and workshops, supported by high-profile guest speakers. The Illustration Discourses lecture series considers authorial positions, related theories and their contexts. Both lectures and seminars will help inform your negotiated practical projects, whilst recording your studio practice in a research journal will aid self-reflection.

- Typical workshops

Research Journals
Creative Writing
Screen Printing
Life Drawing
Listening to Images
Book Art
Printmaking & Collography
Etching
Composition
Professional Practice
Table Top Book Binding
Visual Thinking
InDesign I
What are Archives?
Professional Practice, Networking & Entrepreneurship
Visual Narrative
Perspective
Book Design, Layout & InDesign
Bookbinding
Graphic Design

Course outline

This is a one-year course delivered over 45 weeks and divided into three 15-week study blocks. Alternatively, you can study part-time over two years, totalling 90 weeks.

Over the course of the year you'll be required to produce a sequence of three negotiated practical projects based on personal authorial illustration work.

The lecture and seminar series Illustration Discourses supports the practical work, running concurrently with a research journal, which builds connections and the opportunity to reflect on practice. You'll be expected to demonstrate progression; indicating the research, analysis, reflection and investigation necessary for the development of a successful and distinctive authorial illustration practice.

You'll also produce two analytical essays and deliver a presentation exploring areas of personal interest within the authorial context relating to your practice. These will show a consideration of audience awareness and the processes and development of your practice. In order to develop self-reliance the course allows you a good deal of freedom to develop your projects.

Facilities

- Individual studio space
- Full IT facilities
- Print room
- Comprehensive library facilities
- Access to specialist equipment

Assessment

- Assessment takes place at the end of each module
- Combination of visual, verbal and written assignments
- Final assessment takes place in September

Careers

Potential careers include:

- Commissioned or self-published illustrator
- Art director or creative director
- Illustration residencies
- Curatorial roles
- Teaching
- Further study

Interview and selection process

When you apply to join the course, we'll ask you to send us a study proposal and either samples of work or a link to your website or blog, if you have one. At interview we'll look for authorial illustration potential or capabilities, illustration ability, graphic skills, drawing skills, creative writing/storytelling potential, ideas and concepts. We really value meeting you in person but we can hold a telephone or Skype interview if this is not possible.

Falmouth Illustration Forum

Our respected annual Falmouth Illustration Forum recently celebrated its tenth anniversary with the publication of the world's first book devoted to the subject, The Authorial Illustrator (available from atlanticpressbooks.com (http://www.atlanticpressbooks.com/)). Each annual forum explores different aspects of authorial illustration and includes internationally renowned guest speakers.

View information about our forums here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/content/ma-illustration-open-forum-2014-witness-reportage-documentary

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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This Masters programme is designed for graduates with no prior knowledge of Islam as well as those who would like to develop their understanding of this major world faith.Our programme will enable you to acquire a profound comprehension of Islam both as a religious, intellectual and cultural tradition, and as a powerful political ideology. Read more
This Masters programme is designed for graduates with no prior knowledge of Islam as well as those who would like to develop their understanding of this major world faith.Our programme will enable you to acquire a profound comprehension of Islam both as a religious, intellectual and cultural tradition, and as a powerful political ideology.

You will study materials which delineate the core values and doctrines of Islam, and those which elaborate on the diversity of practice and manifold traditions of the Islamic faith. Your ability to analyse materials, contexts and issues - and to engage in informed academic discussion on your conclusions - will be strengthened through the study of methodologies and research tools used today in Islamic Studies by historians, social scientists and cultural anthropologists.

This combination of approaches to the study of Islam will enable you to acquire the analytical tools needed for independent study and interpretation of both medieval and contemporary aspects of Islam, not only within the context of the Middle East, but throughout the world.

Research

Research in the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies (IAIS) is divided into disciplinary research clusters.

The Islamic Studies cluster(http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/iais/research/clusters/islamicstudies/) includes postgraduate students and staff brought together by a common fascination with the theological, ethical and legal traditions of Islam. They gather under the auspices of the Centre for the Study of Islam(http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/iais/research/centres/csi/), which holds regular study groups, seminars and conferences. The principal project linked to this research group is Islamic Reformulations: Belief, Governance, Violence, funded by the ESRC under the RCUK Global Uncertainties Programme. The project examines the current state and future trajectories of Muslim thought.

Our research newsletter will also give you a flavour of our research (http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/iais/research/researchnewsletter/).

Please see our website for further information on this programme: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/arabislamic/islamicstudiesma

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As education becomes increasingly globalised, schools and education systems around the world are being shaped and reshaped by what are often a common set of global education policies and ideologies. Read more
As education becomes increasingly globalised, schools and education systems around the world are being shaped and reshaped by what are often a common set of global education policies and ideologies.

The aim of our MSc in Education, Policy & Society is to help you develop your ability to critically analyse these dominant educational ideologies, policies and practices; to understand the forces that are driving them, their shortcomings and likely outcomes; and most importantly, to discover and engage with alternative models of education, training, teaching and learning, at the early childhood, primary, secondary and post-secondary levels, and in non-formal and informal contexts outside the formal education system altogether.

This course is designed for all students wanting to develop their capacity to critically analyse educational practice, policy and ideology, to develop a more clear “big picture” understanding of the broader structures and forces that are affecting schools, universities and education systems today, and to find out about and deepen their understanding of alternative ways of thinking about and doing education.

This may include those who have recently completed undergraduate courses of study, as well as individuals currently working as practitioners, whether in schools, colleges or universities, youth or community groups, international development organisations, workforce and skills development programmes, or in different levels of government.

Distinctive features

This course has been designed to be of value and relevance to students both from the UK and overseas; so interested individuals from all nations are encouraged to apply.

The programme is unique in that it is one of the few Master’s level courses focusing on education in the UK, or anywhere else in the world, that is offered by an interdisciplinary School of Social Sciences. As such, the approach to education offered here is shaped by a strong belief in the value of interdisciplinary social science theory and research for enhancing our collective ability to re-think, re-imagine and enhance educational practices, policies and principles, whether at the local, national or global level.

Structure

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

You will be expected to attend lectures, seminars and tutorials as set out in the timetable for MSc students.  These sometimes sit outside the regular pattern of university attendance and may include day, evening and weekend study and on occasion may fall outside the standard semester dates.  You will also be expected to undertake independent study in preparation for lectures, seminars and assessments. 

The course is organised around a sequence of up to three 20 credit specialist modules in education, two 30 credit modules in social science theory and research methods, and one 60 credit supervised dissertation on an educational topic of your choice.

A 20 credit module comprises 200 hours of study, including about 30 hours of contact time, and the MSc as a whole, 1800 hours of study.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/education,-policy-and-society-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/education,-policy-and-society-msc-part-time

Teaching

Modules employ a diverse range of teaching including lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, and independent guided study. All modules within the programme make use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials and information on assessment.

The programme benefits from being located in an inter-disciplinary environment so that in parts of the course, you will come into contact with staff and students from other subject areas and, in other parts of the course, with staff and students in the same substantive area.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, reports, reviews and presentations.

Career Prospects

The course may appeal to those who have recently completed undergraduate courses of study, as well as individuals currently working as practitioners, whether in schools, colleges or universities, youth or community groups, international development organisations, workforce and skills development programmes, or in different levels of government.

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The subject of religion in education is internationally recognised as needing more specialist expertise at both primary and secondary levels. Read more
The subject of religion in education is internationally recognised as needing more specialist expertise at both primary and secondary levels. This flexible course is aimed at teachers of religious education and related subjects, and those working with young people in a faith or belief context.

You will have the opportunity to engage with the internationally recognised curriculum development work of the Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit, and with its qualitative and quantitative research in the field of religions and education. You’ll complete all of your learning online through a distance learning portal, using a mixture of online text extracts and journals, with email supervision from your subject tutor.

You’ll take four modules, usually over three years. These include a core module in Interpreting Religious World Views, plus other subject specific modules that include Current Issues in Religious Education and Inter Faith Dialogue for Young People. You’ll then take an Introduction to Research Methods in RE module, and complete a dissertation under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

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This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century. Read more

This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century.

A core module will allow you to sharpen your research skills, and you’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules spanning nations, continents, periods and themes to explore topics that interest you. You could study black internationalism alongside early modern Europe, the Spanish state, Stalinism, political violence in India or apartheid.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers as part of a large and diverse School of History and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, supported by active research groups and extensive library resources. Our research interests range from social history and identity to political history, nationalism and internationalism, meaning this flexible programme offers plenty of opportunities to gain important skills while focusing on issues that suit your interests.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with a wide range of resources. The world-class Brotherton Library has one of the best history collections in the UK, ranging from monographs and journals to conference papers, theses and over 100 digital databases of primary sources and other materials for fundamental research. The Brotherton also has its own special collections including the Leeds Russian Archive and the Feminist Archive North.

The Alf Mattinson Collection is full of printed works and papers related to the history of the Labour Party, and the Romany collection and Liddle Collection offer insights into Romany culture and the First World War respectively.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

You’ll study one core module in your first semester, introducing you to different research methodologies in history and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also select from a wide range of optional modules throughout the year, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you such as the history of Yorkshire, the European Enlightenment or issues surrounding global security.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ module.

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge, as well as high-level skills in research, interpretation and analysis. You’ll be able to demonstrate these when you complete your dissertation on a modern history topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Secrecy and Espionage in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Approaches to Contemporary European History 30 credits
  • 'The continuation of war by other means? : Case Studies in Wartime Diplomacy 1931-1945 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • Stalinist Terror 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • The War on Terror 30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Guns and Global Security 30 credits
  • Britain and the Slave Trade 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • The Fragility of the Spanish State: Identity, Conflict and Resistance, 1808-1939 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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