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Masters Degrees (Behaviour And Welfare)

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The MRes in Animal Behaviour and Welfare offers an opportunity to expand your knowledge of animal behaviour and animal welfare science. Read more
The MRes in Animal Behaviour and Welfare offers an opportunity to expand your knowledge of animal behaviour and animal welfare science. You will explore advances in animal behaviour within animal cognition, animal personality, animal communication and language, sexual selection and sexual conflict, and social behaviour. You will also look at contemporary issues in animal welfare science such as methods of animal welfare assessment, animal welfare legislation, welfare implications of keeping animals in captivity and issues related to improving and assessing animal welfare.

This postgraduate programme will allow you to advance the knowledge you gained from your animal related degree and provide you with the required knowledge and skills to develop practical solutions for existing and emerging problems in animal behaviour and animal welfare science. The knowledge and skills that you gain from the programme will enhance your career prospects and can be applied in future scientific research and in practical areas such as conservation, animal welfare organisations, research centres and zoos.

The Masters by Research in Animal Behaviour and Welfare includes 60 credits of taught modules, including core modules of advances in animal behaviour, contemporary issues in animal welfare, and research methods and optional modules such as wildlife conflict, postgraduate independent study and reflection on practice. These modules tend to be taught in two day blocks. This means that the teaching is condensed to allow the Masters study to occur round other commitments in our students' lives.

These modules will give you the opportunity to expand your knowledge of animal behaviour and welfare science, advance your skills in critically evaluating current research, and develop your abilities in research design and statistical analysis. These skills, along with one to one support, will allow you to understand and apply current scientific thinking, develop new ideas and evaluate current processes and practices. This will allow you to effectively design and carry out your dissertation research project. This will be original research that will make a valuable contribution to the field of animal behaviour or animal welfare. The dissertation is highly flexible and provides you with the freedom to develop a research project of your own choosing in order to fit in with your specific interests and career aspirations.

The programme can be completed full time in one year; part time routes are available and should be planned with your Programme Manager.

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Recognition of the importance of equine welfare has never been higher, both with industry lead bodies and the general public. Equine welfare underpins safe management of the horse and facilitates a longer and more successful career in every area of their use. Read more
Recognition of the importance of equine welfare has never been higher, both with industry lead bodies and the general public. Equine welfare underpins safe management of the horse and facilitates a longer and more successful career in every area of their use. To achieve a high standard of welfare understanding the principles of the study of equine behaviour is essential. With a large number of horses on site, and many links with industry stakeholders we believe that UWE Hartpury is well placed to support postgraduate level study in this fundamental area. At postgraduate level it is expected that you can engage and inform with developments and innovations in this fast moving subject area. This programme develops an applied understanding of the principles of equine behaviour and welfare, and supports the students in gaining and applying the research techniques necessary to evaluate and contribute to current understanding.

Postgraduate study in Equine Science at Hartpury can be the start of many exciting opportunities. The programme consists of taught modules delivered via weekend study blocks to facilitate study alongside your career. As a postgraduate student of Equine Science, you will have a personal academic tutor to help support you to achieve your individual goals and interests. Study skills module weekends are also held during the induction period and combine with formative assessment opportunities to help support your academic development. This is combined with staff who are engaged with advancing equine science on the international stage yet remain accessible and committed to promoting your achievement. Students are encouraged throughout their programme to attend conferences, present their research and become a member of the wider academic community including at our own annual Alltech-Hartpury Equine Performance conference.

The friendly, supportive and personal atmosphere here at Hartpury combines with the flexible modular programme to offer a unique, inspirational, engaging and enjoyable postgraduate experience.

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We start with a semester of formal lectures (2 x 5 week blocks) and assocaiated assignments covering. Read more
We start with a semester of formal lectures (2 x 5 week blocks) and assocaiated assignments covering: Behavioural development; Motivation and sensory systems; Evolution and behaviour; Pain, stress and welfare; Navigation; Cognition; Endocrines and pheromones; Communication and Welfare of farm, companion and zoo animals; Behaviour and conservation; Fear and sterotypies and Practical measures for enhancing welfare. We also have visits to Belfast Zoological Gardens, Castle Espie Wildfowl Centre and Farms. In semester two we cover practical topics that include defining and recording behaviour, experimental design and analyses, presentation of results in various formats and getting to grips with primary literature. That is a period in which students also focus on preparing for the project and they give a seminar onhow they intend to approach the research project. The latter is a 5-month, fully-supervised Research Project that can involve field work abroad, field work on UK farms, exerimental work in the labortaory or field. It can involve welfare or fundamental animal behaviour. We have a team of ten that currently offer diverse projects for this course and nine of these are involved in the delivery of lectures (check our web site). Project supervisors will also supervise a literature review in the broad area of the project. Knowledge gained form the course can be applied to fundamental scientific research and to practical areas such as conservation, animal husbandry and zoo environments. Formal teaching is on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, one year full time two years part time.

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■ Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees. ■ Excellent completion rates for higher degrees. Read more
■ Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees
■ Excellent completion rates for higher degrees
■ Good job prospects for PhD candidates in industry, government organisations and academia
■ Accessible academic staff
■ Rural location and collegiate atmosphere
■ Unique facilities
■ Fortnightly research seminar programme

PhD and MPhil research at the University has been developed over the last 20 years to its current position of national and international recognition in a number of areas. There are strong links with agri-business which give postgraduates the chance to develop close contacts with industry and this has led to more than 90 per cent of our PhD graduates getting jobs in their areas of interest.

The MRes is a new, shorter research degree, developed in response to increasing demand.

All MPhil/PhD research students have their own office space and a dedicated personal computer. You will be encouraged to participate in seminars and conferences appropriate to your research

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Please contact Hartpury College directly for more information. Website. http://www.hartpury.ac.uk/. Telephone. +44(0)1452 702345;. Read more
Please contact Hartpury College directly for more information:

Website: http://www.hartpury.ac.uk/
Telephone: +44(0)1452 702345;
email:

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Please contact Hartpury College directly for more information. Website. http://www.hartpury.ac.uk/. Telephone. +44(0)1452 702345;. Read more
Please contact Hartpury College directly for more information:

Website: http://www.hartpury.ac.uk/
Telephone: +44(0)1452 702345;
email:

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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During this course you will approach the issues of equine behaviour and welfare from a variety of different perspectives, including exploring the motivations… Read more
During this course you will approach the issues of equine behaviour and welfare from a variety of different perspectives, including exploring the motivations and physiological control behind behaviour, investigating the range of potential welfare and behavioural concerns within industry and practical ways to assess and tackle them, looking at how different people’s perspectives can influence their approaches to welfare. You will also explore the process of conducting effective research in your own area of interest.

The modules covered in this programme are:
• Principles of Animal Welfare (20 credits)
Provides a bridge for those students who have not previously studied animal welfare. The concepts of animal welfare and the cause of changes in animal welfare status will be covered, as well as relevant UK and EU legislation.

• Attitudes to Animals (20 credits)
Develops an appreciation of current and historical attitudes towards animals and how these impact on animal welfare and on society.

• Physiology of Animal Welfare (20 credits)
Investigates the structure and function of animal brains and the link between brain physiology and behaviour patterns. Explores in depth the role of physiological control systems in the stress response.

• Equine Health & Welfare (20 credits)
Advances knowledge and understanding of the theoretical aspects of horse management, behaviour and welfare. Common health problems affecting horses and the implications of modern management techniques will be explored.

• Analysis of Equine Behaviour (20 credits)
Promotes understanding of equine behaviour, assesses the consequences and methods of assessing and influencing behaviour. This unit also provides students with the opportunity to analyse behaviour.

• Equine Industry & Research (20 credits)
Develops knowledge of the breadth of organisations which contribute to the equine industry. Published studies relating to recent advances within equine management, behaviour and welfare will be discussed and critically evaluated.

• Research Project (60 credits)
Under the guidance of their project supervisor, each student will design and undertake a major research project on an aspect of equine behaviour or animal welfare.

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Drawing expertise from across a wide range of animal categories the course will extend your understanding and analysis of the scientific background underpinning the study of animals. Read more
Drawing expertise from across a wide range of animal categories the course will extend your understanding and analysis of the scientific background underpinning the study of animals. The course lecturers have all published widely and their research interests include farm animal behaviour, physiology and welfare, the welfare of exotic animals, ruminant nutrition and behavioural neurobiology.

The programme is divided into three stages, to complete the Master's level qualification, you must complete six modules as well as an independent research thesis. Interim qualifications are available for those who do not wish to complete a Master's programme. Those who complete 60 credits are able to gain a PgCert award and those who gain 120 credits gain a PgDip qualification.
Our Masters programme in Animal Welfare runs over one year full-time and is aimed at students who have completed a first degree in a biological sciences-related subject and who wish to further their career in animal welfare. Individual modules may also be taken as part of a continuing professional development programme.

The modules covered in this programme are:
• Principles of Animal Welfare (20 credits)
Provides a bridge for those students who have not previously studied animal welfare. The concepts of animal welfare and the cause of changes in animal welfare status will be covered as well as the role of economics in the field.

• Attitudes to Animals (20 credits)
Develops an appreciation of current and historical attitudes towards animals and how these impact on animal welfare and on society.

• Physiology of Animal Welfare (20 credits)
Investigates the structure and function of animal brains and the link between brain physiology and behaviour patterns. Explores in depth the role of physiological control systems in the stress response.

• Animal Behaviour & Cognition (20 credits)
Promotes understanding of the cognitive abilities of animals and assesses the consequences of these on animal welfare status in captivity.

• Animal Welfare in Industry & Law (40 credits)
Equips students with the skills and knowledge necessary to evaluate the welfare of animals and develop solutions to welfare problems, as well as exploring the role of legislation in animal industries both in the UK and abroad.

• Research Project (60 credits)
Under the guidance of their project supervisor, each student will design and undertake a major research project on an aspect of animal welfare.

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In the absence of subsidy, the EU poultry sector relies on highly efficient production systems, with successful companies often using sophisticated technologies. Read more
In the absence of subsidy, the EU poultry sector relies on highly efficient production systems, with successful companies often using sophisticated technologies. This is reflected in the integrated structure of most poultry companies and the number of graduates and postgraduates employed by them.

Many companies have responded to the pressure on financial margins by setting up operations world wide. There continues to be a good demand for suitably trained graduate and postgraduate level entrants into the sector.

The skills and knowledge delivered by the Applied Poultry Science programme are highly relevant to companies using intensive methods of production and those responding to retailer demand for extensive systems. This enables both new entrants and existing employees wishing to build on their expertise and aspirations, to enhance their career opportunities within the poultry sector.

The Applied Poultry Science course is offered on a part-time distance learning basis.

It is designed to suit those in continuing employment or with other commitments. Participants come from a wide range of backgrounds, including nutritionists, breeders, vets and other poultry sector workers, all of whom wish to develop their career and businesses.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- A sound knowledge of the underlying science of poultry production.
- A good understanding of the issues underpinning poultry production systems.
- A wide range of specialist skills appropriate to poultry science professionals.
- The ability to critically evaluate developments in poultry science, including nutritional, genetic,
- Welfare, quality assurance and environmental issues.
- The ability to produce professional level recommendations and reports.
- Research skills.

The MSc Applied Poultry Science degree is awarded by the University of Glasgow.

Course Content

The programme is a mix of technical, scientific, environmental and management skills development modules. It is taught largely by staff from the SRUC Avian Science Research Centre who are involved in poultry research studies on a daily basis and who aim to provide up to the minute, highly relevant knowledge transfer into the Applied Poultry Science programme.

The Avian Science Research Centre has a full range of facilities for those wishing to study or carry out research with SRUC ranging from a hatchery to a processing plant and a good range of different poultry production systems.

Poultry Production Systems

This module studies the poultry meat and poultry egg industry in terms of its structure and sectors including intensive and non-intensive systems. It includes global export and import markets for the major poultry meat and egg products and evaluates their quality assurance systems. It will examine the requirements for optimal performance within the various systems and investigate factors affecting performance.

Poultry Nutrition and Growth

Poultry nutrition and growth examines the principles of poultry nutrition, particularly the importance of different nutrients in terms of growth and production and how they are processed in the avian body. It includes a study of the major anatomical and physiological systems in poultry and describes the role of nutrition in poultry health in different production environments, with particular regard to nutrient deficiencies. The partitioning of energy and nutrients into the growth and development of the whole body and different components of the body will also be examined, as will methods of describing different growth patterns.

Incubation and Hatchery Practice

This module develops knowledge and an understanding of the science and technology that underpins the production of day-old stock. Students study embryo-genesis in poultry and how this is exploited by the poultry sector to maximise the production of viable hatchlings. At the conclusion of the module students will be able to critically evaluate poultry hatchery practices, where appropriate, from an international prospective.

Housing and the Environment

Large scale poultry production seeks to manage the birds’ environment to optimise the competing demands of welfare, productivity, quality and environmental protection in an economically viable way. Recognising the impacts of different housing alternatives, the relationship to environmental emissions, and the sustainability of systems are therefore essential skills for those engaged in the industry that this module addresses. The approach will initially be one of directed study in order that the full range of issues are covered; but later in the module, students will be asked to do a case study on a real poultry enterprise with the coursework being centred on the completion of the IPPC application form for an intensive poultry enterprise. Even though some students may not be familiar with large scale poultry enterprises, the structured approach required to carry out the IPPC assessment process, and the wealth of information available in the relevant technical document will give a sound basis for understanding the range of housing and environmental issues involved.

Poultry Behaviour and Welfare

This module explains the general principles of poultry behaviour and welfare and studies sensory perception, motivation and learning in poultry. It evaluates the behavioural and physiological indicators that are used to assess welfare in given circumstances. It examines current practice with respect to welfare and current welfare legislation.

Poultry Health and Hygiene

A range of different infectious and non-infectious diseases will be covered in depth, mostly affecting chickens and turkeys but with specific sessions on diseases of game birds and diseases of pigeons. The importance of notifiable diseases such as Newcastle Disease and highly pathogenic avian influenza will be emphasised, and the significance of other potentially zoonotic organisms such as Salmonella, Campylobacter, Chlamydophila Psittaci and West Nile Virus will be discussed.

Advanced Poultry Nutrition

Advanced poultry nutrition builds on the poultry nutrition and growth module and examines theoretical and practical poultry nutrition in greater depth. It links current nutritional theories, (eg. amino acid balance and requirements or the anti-nutrient and toxic properties of feedstuffs) with methods of alleviation. These are integrated with classical nutrition-balance studies and proximate analyses, exposing students to all aspects of a nutritional study. It also involves a detailed study of nutrition with respect to bird growth and health and the environmental constraints imposed on the system.

Experimental Design

This module aims to develop statistical skills to aid the technical, scientific and management decisions. It explores a range of statistical processes from the collection of data and its interpretation to the production of information charts, diagrams and tables and the analysis of data looking at differences, significance and trends.

Management Skills

With the labour market becoming more competitive there is a real need for today's graduates to develop skills beyond academic knowledge in order to thrive. This module introduces various management skills which include communication, teamworking, leadership, time management, decision-making, empowerment and motivation. It aims therefore to improve the student’s knowledge and ability to manage. A range of practical methods and approaches will be used to enable the students to better organise and motivate themselves and others.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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Liverpool John Moores University offers the opportunity to study the UK's only Masters degree focusing on cutting edge developments in the use of UAVs (aka drones) for primate behaviour and conservation research. Read more
Liverpool John Moores University offers the opportunity to study the UK's only Masters degree focusing on cutting edge developments in the use of UAVs (aka drones) for primate behaviour and conservation research. You will be taught by world-leading experts and have access to excellent facilities in the UK and research sites overseas.

-Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
-Delivered by world experts in the field of primate behaviour, welfare and conservation
-Overseas field trip to practice and develop advanced skills in behavioural observation, non-invasive sampling of health and welfare indicators and conservation monitoring
-State-of-the-art teaching and laboratory facilities (including genetics, drone and GIS facilities)
-Opportunity to design and complete a primate field study abroad using the latest software packages, such as ArcGIS, R, Distance

This exciting new MSc course covers contemporary issues in primate behaviour, welfare and conservation and will equip you with the latest knowledge and skills required to succeed as a professional researcher.
You will learn about the latest primatology research from active researchers including:

Primate behaviour and social systems in the wild
Primate conservation issues and main threats to wildlife in-situ
Ex-situ conservation efforts in sanctuaries and zoos
Job opportunities for primatologists in the UK and abroad
You will also complete a hypotheses-driven research project in the second half of the programme, based on your knowledge of primate behaviour, welfare and conservation developed during the first half of the course.

Studying cutting-edge developments in the use of drones for primate conservation research, you will gain the skills to:

maintain and operate drones
obtain and analyse data
interpret results to identify primate distribution and density, threats to their habitat, and inform conservation priorities

You will learn how to convert an idea for a research study into a practical plan, including how to:

identify field sites and funding sources
write a grant proposal (from funding experts)
make a budget
think through the logistical issues of conducting research in challenging environments

Your lectures and seminars will be delivered by world experts in the field of primate behaviour and conservation. The quality of research and teaching during the course mean that you will graduate with cutting edge knowledge and access to a host of international professional networks.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Primate Behaviour and Conservation
Field Skills (overseas field trip)
Drone Technology
Research methods
Dissertation
In the 2016-17 academic year, field trip travel, accommodation and site costs are covered by LJMU. You will be required to meet other potential costs, such as field clothing, visas and potential immunisations if required. In 2015-2016 the field trip was in Tanzania.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Our Animal Behaviour MRes is a research-based course with a taught component that is equivalent to an MSc. It provides a springboard into a career that involves a working knowledge of scientific research. Read more
Our Animal Behaviour MRes is a research-based course with a taught component that is equivalent to an MSc. It provides a springboard into a career that involves a working knowledge of scientific research.

The study of animal behaviour is an exciting and theoretically rigorous area of the biological sciences with possible applications in conservation, animal welfare, biomedical science and agriculture. The Centre for Behaviour and Evolution at Newcastle University brings together world experts in Behavioural Ecology, Comparative Cognition, Neuroethology and Animal Welfare.

Experts at Newcastle have discovered, among other things, that bees learn better when exposed to caffeine; that starlings who were hungry as babies become heavier as adults; and that mice have pain faces. You too can be part of this exciting research community.

The course is designed for graduates with a BSc in the life sciences, psychology or anthropology. It can be taken either as a stand-alone qualification or as an entry route onto a PhD.

The taught component of the course includes training in research approaches relevant to the area of animal behaviour. You have the flexibility to develop your own bespoke course by selecting a set of three complementary modules. The modules Comparative Cognition (MMB8043), Applied Ethology (ACE8074) and Sensory Systems (MMB8019) in particular are recommended for this course. You will also participate in training in general research principles, and other professional and key skills.

The core module on the biological study of behaviour introduces the central questions related to animal behaviour research (adaptive consequences, proximate mechanisms, development, and evolutionary history) and the research methods associated with each. Other relevant modules focus on comparative cognition, on sensory systems (including neuroethology) and on applied ethology for animal welfare. Research-led seminars, delivered by members of the Centre for Behaviour and Evolution cover a wide range of taxa (insects to humans), topics (olfaction to cooperation), and methodologies.

Your research project comprises the major element of the course. This project will involve 24 weeks of research in an area of animal behaviour under the supervision of an expert academic researcher in the field.

The course allows you to experience an internationally competitive research area, predominantly in academia but also potentially in industry. Graduates from our programme have gone on to competitive PhD studentships, as well as jobs in research and in zoos.

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Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. Read more
Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. This benefits you by providing a strong background in a broad cross-section of research methods used by researchers studying human and animal behaviour, a strong training in statistical methods and multidisciplinary study environment. You will learn how to formulate and test relevant research questions, and critically evaluate the research carried out by others in the field.

The programme will give you an insight into the varied means of performing animal behaviour research in a wide array of locations with wild and (semi-)captive animals – in the wild, laboratory, zoo or under human management. As part of the taught component you will be exposed to lectures and seminar discussions, research talks and discussions with speakers, boost and consolidate your knowledge and skills in statistical data analysis, participate in a one-week residential field course (during the Easter break) and in research skill training sessions. During the course you will continuously develop your abilities in critical analysis of the literature and of scientific evidence, project development, communication and scientific writing.

You will be part of the lively, internationally-recognised Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/centres/crab/) and will have the opportunity to work alongside our experienced researchers on a research apprenticeship which is a central component of the course. The apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills further and write up the research in the form of a journal article for potential publication. Apprenticeships can also be undertaken under the supervision of researchers at various institutions with whom we have developed long-term relationships.

On successful completion of the MSc you will have the skills to pursue a PhD, work as a research assistant and project manager or follow a career working in zoos, research centres, nature reserves, wildlife and other animal-related offices, education, scientific media and the expanding field of eco-tourism.

Research Apprenticeship

A distinctive feature of all our taught Masters programmes is the Research Apprenticeship. The Apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills by working alongside experienced researchers or practitioners. You will also gain experience of writing up your research in the form of a dissertation.

Many students undertake their apprenticeship with researchers in the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour in our School, both in the labs and in the field around the campus, Devon and abroad. Students work on a wide range of topics and with different animals, for example:
• Social behaviour, animal welfare and enrichment, zoo research, animal cognition, navigation, sensory ecology, behavioural ecology, ecotoxicology
• Fish (guppies, sticklebacks, killifish), mammals (primates, squirrels, whales, donkeys, dogs, meerkats, coyotes), birds (pigeons, chickens, pheasants, magpies, flamingoes, wood and sea birds), invertebrates (crabs, honeybees, bumblebees, desert ants, wood ants)

Programme structure

The programme is made up of compulsory modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Advanced Statistics; Behavioural Science Research Skills; Advances and Methods in Animal Behaviour; Research Apprenticeship; Current Research Issues in Animal Behaviour;

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The University of Lincoln’s MSc Clinical Animal Behaviour programme is headed by a team of experts and is accredited by the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Read more
The University of Lincoln’s MSc Clinical Animal Behaviour programme is headed by a team of experts and is accredited by the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

This Master’s degree follows an evidence-based approach, which aims to develop your theoretical and practical skills for the management of problem behaviour in companion animals. It is headed by an team of experts, including Europe’s first veterinary behaviour professor, European and Royal College of Veterinary Surgeon's specialist Daniel Mills, and European veterinary behaviour specialist Helen Zulch.

Teaching is informed by research and practice and you have the opportunity to gain experience of actual cases through access to the School of Life Sciences’ veterinary behaviour clinic. The curriculum is closely aligned to the research conducted in the School’s Animal Behaviour Cognition and Welfare Group. You will be encouraged to develop research skills and may have the opportunity to work alongside academics on high-profile projects, many of which are funded by research councils, charities and commercial bodies.

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The MSc in Animal Behaviour addresses the interaction between environment, experience and physiology in the development and dynamics of behaviour. Read more
The MSc in Animal Behaviour addresses the interaction between environment, experience and physiology in the development and dynamics of behaviour. There is an applied element in terms of how the principles of animal behaviour can be applied to practical problems such as animal welfare and conservation. Students can gain experience of laboratory studies (of invertebrates) and field work. The programme features a strong numerical and research-orientated approach. A range of elective units are available, including Zoo Conservation Biology which takes place at Chester Zoo. There is also a compulsory residential field course in Poland or Tanzania.

The MSc is completed by a research-based project which can be carried out overseas or in the UK. There are also opportunities to work within Manchester Met research projects in Tanzania, Kenya, the Philippines, Mauritius and Madeira.

Non means-tested loans of up to a maximum of £10,000 will be available to postgraduate master’s students.

Features and benefits of the course

-We work with the College of African Wildlife Management and the Kenya Wildlife Service and are able to offer unique fieldwork experiences in Tanzania and Kenya.
-You will have the opportunity to stay for six weeks at one of our research bases in Tanzania or Kenya to collect data for your own research project.
-Course delivery is flexible and most lectures take place in the evening. Lectures, other course materials and assessment information are available via our online learning platform, Moodle.
-In the last ten years we’ve invested over £50 million in our home, John Dalton building, including high specification teaching and research facilities for biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics, microbiology, plant physiology, animal behaviour and exercise physiology and biomechanics.
-The course is taught by a vibrant community of research-active staff. Tutors are currently involved in research in Tanzania, Kenya, Mauritius, Madeira, Ethiopia, the Philippines, Indonesia as well as the UK and every year many of our MSc students work within this project.
-Students are encouraged to carry out their projects in association either with staff interests or those of external organisations such as Chester Zoo, local and national conservation bodies, water authorities, etc.
-The School of Science and the Environment has strong links with with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and close association to a number of organisations across the North West, including Blackpool Zoo, Chester Zoo and Knowsley Safari Park.

Placement options

There are optional three month placements for those taking MSc Zoo Conservation Biology and these can take place at many different zoos in the UK.

About the Course

Course delivery is flexible and most lectures take place in the evening. Lectures, other course materials and assessment information is available via our online learning platform, Moodle. You will be assessed mostly through coursework, although some units have a formal examination.

Our Masters programmes in behaviour and conservation are run by a large group of research active staff with strong links to a variety of research institutions, national organisations and non-governmental bodies in the UK and overseas.

Each term there is a research colloquium in which invited speakers talk about areas of research directly relevant to our MSc programmes.

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This postgraduate course provides a thorough understanding of Equine Health, Performance and Welfare within the context of the human use of horses. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course provides a thorough understanding of Equine Health, Performance and Welfare within the context of the human use of horses. You will benefit from first-class facilities and staff expertise in equine behaviour, ethics, nutrition, competition performance, animal biology and veterinary sciences. We are one of the few universities in the UK to offer taught multi-disciplinary modules that develop the scientific expertise and comprehensive understanding that potential employers are looking for.

Why study Equine Health and Welfare at NTU?

• These are unique courses in the UK focusing on Equine Health and Welfare at postgraduate level.
• Benefit from major investment in facilities – BHS (British Horse Society) approved Equestrian Centre, international size indoor and outdoor riding arenas, research arena, horse walker, round pen and crew yards, group housing pens, stabling for up to 60 horses, livery, solarium, weighbridge, treatment stocks, performance analysis room, laboratory facilities and a modern Veterinary Nursing Unit.
• Modules are delivered by academics qualified to PhD level, who are research active in their area of expertise. Their international research links provide opportunities and scope for a wide range of research projects in the field of Equine Health and Welfare.
• Teaching is supplemented by practical sessions and lectures from some of the most experienced consultants in the country.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• An investigation of rider position upon the ridden horse in equestrian cross country. Lauren Birkbeck.
• Determining the environmental conditions experienced by sport horses during international transportation. Cassie White.
• Visual behaviour in equestrian sport. Dr Carol Hall.
• Thermal biology of equine skin. Dr Gareth Starbuck and Dr Kelly Yarnell.
• Picture recognition in the horse. Dr Carol Hall.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

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