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The term creative director originated in advertising agencies, but in the last few years has also become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries. Read more

Overview

The term creative director originated in advertising agencies, but in the last few years has also become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries. The role of creative director within fashion and beauty is multi-faceted and varied. Generally speaking, creative directors find themselves responsible for the creative direction and visual identity of a brand, publication, website or event.

- Students study a curriculum with a unique focus on the increasingly in-demand role of art director.
- Students learn how to strategically guide imagery, style and brand to align with overarching creative and corporate directions.
- This course is specifically geared towards those who wish to pursue art direction within the fashion and beauty industry.
- After graduation, students will be able to apply their knowledge to a range of areas within fashion and beauty including magazine publication, event production, e-commerce and advertising.
- The professional practice unit gives students the chance to delve deep into their chosen industry, researching potential next steps and exploring career opportunities.
- Students benefit from the course’s strong focus on employability and are expected to carry out one month of work experience during their studies.
- Course staff hold a wealth of experience within fashion, beauty and the wider creative industries, opening up opportunities for industry engagement and guest speakers.

The industry -

Creative directors specialise in reading, interpreting and making use of complex visual language; using their unique vision of fashion and beauty to sell products and support brands across a range of different visual mediums. Southampton Solent’s MA Creative Direction for Fashion and Beauty programme offers students a unique opportunity to build the image-making, creative thinking and project management skills required to thrive in this prominent role.

The course examines a wide range of processes and practices found in high-level creative leadership, helping students to develop an expert understanding of fashion and beauty imagery within the contexts of culture, ethics and sustainability.

The programme -

Solent’s fashion and beauty programmes have strong links with industry, giving students the chance to work with experienced academics and industry professionals. Students can leverage these industry links when they are looking for work placements as part of the essential work-based learning unit.

Students also benefit from a programme of guest lectures throughout the course, with representatives from fashion, beauty, media, retail and other creative industries coming to campus and sharing their experiences. Recent events have included a guest lecture from professional makeup artist Laura Mercier, as well as visits from representatives of MAC, Illamasqua, Trendstop and Charles Fox.

The course culminates in a final major project, where students can either write a thesis or produce a major practical outcome. Students will have access to a wide range of industry-standard facilities in support of this project. Available facilities include photography studios; film studios; make-up studios; cameras; location lighting kits; ‘infinity cove’ studios and Mac suites with the latest industry software.

Course Content

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course will be taught through a combination of seminars, technical workshops, small group sessions and 1:1 tutorials.

Work Experience -

The professional practice unit has been specifically designed to equip master’s students with an in-depth knowledge of their chosen industry and to give them the insights required to plan their long-term career. Students will be supported as they produce reflective professional development plans.

Work-based learning is essential to student development development. Students will be required to secure a work placement, freelance assignment or relevant work related experience in order to strengthen their knowledge and refine practical skills.

Assessment -

Assessment is through projects, reports and a dissertation.

Our facilities -

Available facilities include photography studios; film studios; make-up studios; camera loans; location lighting kits; an ‘infinity cove’ facility; and Mac suites with the latest industry software.

Web-based learning -

The course will be supported by a dedicated set of online resources. The course’s virtual learning environment will contain the unit descriptor, reading list, week by-week teaching and learning schemes, tutors’ contact details and availability, assessment briefs, grading criteria and details of assessment submission.

Students will also be expected to engage with social and web based media as a part of their professional development. This may include Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr, Snapchat, Twitter and blogging platforms.

Students will also benefit from access to online journals and subscription based websites including Berg Fashion Library, WGSN, WWD and Mintel.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

The role of creative director has become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries in recent years. Generally speaking, creative directors find themselves responsible for the creative direction and visual identity of a brand, publication, website or event. As such, graduates may find themselves working with fashion and beauty brands, magazines, retail businesses, media production companies or communications agencies.

Links with industry -

Industry professionals share their knowledge and experiences with students through guest presentations, lectures, one-to-one tutorials and portfolio-viewing workshops.
Recent visiting lecturers have included: Caryn Franklin, Perry Curties, Iain R Webb, Wayne Johns, Bruce Smith, Ellen Rogers, Hannah Al-Shemmeri, Elaine Waldron, Maria Bonet and Richard Billingham.

Transferable skills -

The programme area and its staff have strong links with the industry, recently hosting a guest lecture from professional makeup artist Laura Mercier, as well as visits from representatives of MAC, Illamasqua, Trendstop and Charles Fox.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695 per year

International full-time fees: £11,260 per year

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Other costs -

Compulsory costs: Hard drive, hosting, domain name

Optional costs: Creative software packages.

Trips offered to undergraduate students include New York and Paris - costs vary according to current prices. It is anticipated that these trips will also be offered to postgraduate students.

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Solent’s MA Creative Direction for Fashion and Beauty programme encourages students to develop high level research and critical thinking skills. For those who wish to pursue PhD study after graduation, this represents the perfect opportunity to identify potential research areas.

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“The persuasive power of an odor cannot be fended off, it enters into us like breath into our lungs, it fills up, imbues us totally. Read more
“The persuasive power of an odor cannot be fended off, it enters into us like breath into our lungs, it fills up, imbues us totally. There is no remedy for it”

Patrick Suskind, Le Parfum

The inescapability of a scent’s inebriation is very much akin to the power of attraction of a beautifully designed dress. It is with this idea in mind that newest postgraduate course of IFA Paris was built: offering an innovative approach to Perfume and Cosmetics management through the integration of its 20 years expertise in fashion.

The philosophy of the MBA in Perfume and Cosmetics Management revolves around 3 pillars:

Discovery:
Students are being immersed in a workshop environment allowing them to get an intensive and practical training fostering creativity while at the same time allowing them to discover each strategic components and stakeholders of the beauty industry

Experimentation:
While travelling between IFA’s campus locations in Paris and Shanghai our students are able to experience first-hand the intrinsic characteristics of emerging and mature markets thanks to IFA Paris learning by doing pedagogy.

Self-affirmation:
The overarching Capstone thesis reflects the students’ commitment to the development of a unique and individual project.

The MBA in Perfume and Cosmetics Management also takes advantage of the unique heritage and bi-cultural affiliation of IFA Paris as it “sits” perfectly at the confluence of a geographical dichotomy:

The West as the upholder of traditional luxury values:
Participants will spend 2 terms in Paris in order to have access to what the rest of the world considers as the birth place of luxury.

The East as the catalyst transforming the “Luxe DNA”:
Thanks to IFA Paris unique combination of campus rotation system and synergetic curriculum, participants will be able to explore the latest market and technological evolutions in the beauty industry in an area of the world (North Asia) considered as the most important source of growth.

The development of 7 special seminars provides participants with “windows” into unique activities or phenomenon of the beauty industry. They are organized across our campuses of Paris and Shanghai according to the market specificities of those 2 locations. While in France students will be exposed to the traditional art of perfume making through an immersive experience thanks to our Olfactory Lab and our seminar titled “Parfums a la Francaise”. During their rotation in Shanghai participants will discover the booming segment of skin care for men and explore the different invasive and non-invasive plastic surgery techniques. The ultimate goal is to offer participants the opportunity to improve their professional portfolio with experiences that will ultimately render their profile more sophisticated and attractive to potential employers.

Finally, from inception to graduation, and regardless of their location, Postgraduate students of IFA Paris will benefit from the support of a unique department called the “Career and Alumni Center”. The industry relation arm of IFA Paris’ academic courses is in charge of organizing bi-weekly guest lectures and field trips to attune our students with the latest trends in the beauty industry.

Capitalizing on strong collaborations with groups such as LVMH, Richemont or Kering, the Career and Alumni Center will give access to exclusive brand launch events, fashion shows, art exhibitions or professional trade-shows in order to build the students’ own professional network.

Our MBA Courses are structured with the ECTS framework in mind as set by the Bologna Convention. Upon completion of their studies participants will gather a total of 120 ECTS that they will be able to transfer if they wish to further their studies. The Course is also accredited by IDEL/IDEART* and is certified as “International Master”.
*For more information feel free to visit http://www.idel-labels.eu

Course structure

Our Perfume and Cosmetics Management course covers a wide range of modules clustered into five main module groupings:

Marketing and Management:

This grouping encompasses a series of modules that will be sequentially planned based on the structure of a marketing plan. The overall body of knowledge acquired by the students will prepare them to:

Analyse complex marketing challenges based on practical case studies
Allocate resources strategically to achieve pre-determined objectives
Craft brand DNAs allowing for the achievement of a sustainable competitive advantage

Business Issues:

The capacity to listen and interpret markets’ signals is a key component of today’s managers. It needs to be continuously cultivated. Within this module grouping students will discover the idiosyncrasies of the fashion industry from an economic and financial view point.

Distribution and Retail:

New technologies are shaping the cosmetics and perfume offering of the 21st century in ways that do not always relate to product innovation. A large part of the most recent innovations concern the distribution and retail sector, with interesting cross-overs between the Fashion and the Cosmetics and Perfume industries.

Cosmetics and Perfume Environment:

Is perfume still a luxury? Are socially responsible brands more impactful? How is the impact of the fashion industry in the development of the cosmetics and perfume industry?... This module grouping will challenge students and develop their critical thinking approach in regards with the industry.

Cosmetics and Perfume Lifestyle:

While our MBA Program does not aim at creating technicians we believe it is important for our students to be totally immersed within the environment of cosmetics and perfumes. This is why we have devised a series of groundbreaking seminars and workshops: to allow our students to experience the specificities of the future industry they’ll be working for. From a week in an olfactory lab to test and create perfumes to a foray into the crafting of perfumes “A La Francaise”, everything has been devised to provide a groundbreaking experiential learning.

The Foundation workshop will be taught over 2 full weeks (75 Hours) and comprise the following modules:

Principles of Marketing – 15 Hours
Quantitative Research Approaches – 15 Hours
Accounting Principles – 15 Hours
Working Methodology – 15 Hours
Project Management – 15 Hours
Student Workload:

522 Hours of Face-to-Face lectures
783 Hours of Self-Study
840 Hours of capstone project
200 Hours of industry contact and collaboration

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Christianity and the Arts is taught in association with the National Gallery in London. The course investigates how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in art over 2,000 years; traces the idea of beauty in Western theological tradition; makes use of examples in London. Read more
Christianity and the Arts is taught in association with the National Gallery in London.

The course investigates how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in art over 2,000 years; traces the idea of beauty in Western theological tradition; makes use of examples in London.

Key benefits

- The MA will enable students to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore simultaneously the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.

- The MA will use rich cultural resources beyond the College – and specifically the artistic, human and web-based resources of the National Gallery.

- The MA will provide opportunities for students to learn outside the College, in the context of an art museum, with likely additional visits/links to institutions with related collections, like the Courtauld Gallery, and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

- The MA will enhance the experience of international students at the College by giving them a stimulating and privileged understanding of one of London’s (and the world’s) greatest treasuries of art.

View the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/christianity-and-the-arts-ma.aspx

- Description -

Our MA in Christianity and the Arts will investigate how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in the arts over 2000 years. The course features a required module on the Idea of Beauty in Western Theology and a wide range of optional modules looking at different forms of artistic expression, different artistic periods and focusing on specific elements of the Christian narrative. You will also have the opportunity to explore a topic in detail through your dissertation.

Wherever possible the course draws on examples and case studies here in London, particularly the collections at The National Gallery, The Courtauld Institute and The Victoria and Albert Museum. We will help you to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore both the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.
Modules include:

- The Idea of Beauty in Western Theology (core)
- Dissertation (core)
- The Devotional Use of Art in Christianity (optional)
- Art as a Theological Medium (optional)
- Christianity and Literature (optional)
- The Christian Text (optional)

And many more. Please see our website.

- Course purpose -

To enable students to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore simultaneously the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework plus a dissertation.

Career prospects

We would expect graduates to go into research in the Department of Theology; the media; museum work; teaching; journalism; careers in the church.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This course offers students the opportunity to explore the major theories and debates which dominate the study and practice of the beauty and cosmetics industries. Read more

Summary

This course offers students the opportunity to explore the major theories and debates which dominate the study and practice of the beauty and cosmetics industries. Students will be involved in blogging, social media, website development, entrepreneurship and brand development on this postgraduate degree.

The course encourages students to actively participate in debates about the professional, educational, political and cultural implications of beauty and cosmetics in modern societies around the world.

Students will also explore and use different research methods to investigate the branding and promotion of beauty services and cosmetics through marketing, advertising, events management, publicity or public relations.

This course will equip students with the latest knowledge, skills and resources to help them investigate areas of personal and work-based interest.

Students will develop their studies around personal career ambitions and enjoy visits to leading cosmetics and fashion events.

Graduates of the course will be able to apply their knowledge and practical skills to cosmetics branding and promotion, as well as sophisticated marketing and advertising concepts.

This course is divided into three trimesters to allow students to work towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or a Master's qualification. Each award is normally achieved within a 15 week study period (30 weeks for part-time students).

Modules

Stage 1 PgCert: Portfolio: Concepts and Treatments; Lecture and Seminar programme.

Stage 2 PgDip: Research Strategy; Portfolio: Short Projects.

Stage 3 Master's: Portfolio: Major project or dissertation.

Assessment

The course includes a mixture of practical projects and written work. Students will develop a portfolio of work that showcases their abilities and ideas and is executed and managed in a professional manner. At each stage, students will also write reflective reports that encourages development of a critical and contextual framework within which to understand individual practice and future career choices. Students are assessed using a mixture of tutorial reviews, project work submissions and oral exams.

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Society is increasingly sensitive to anthropogenic effects on the natural environment and the public perception is that we do not always weigh the benefits of activities against the associated environmental cost. Read more
Society is increasingly sensitive to anthropogenic effects on the natural environment and the public perception is that we do not always weigh the benefits of activities against the associated environmental cost. Such themes are significant with environmental management; the disciplines here help deal with many challenges facing our planet and locality.

Course Overview

Managing our environments in a sustainable way will help balance these concerns with our social and economic problems. Environmental conservationists have the knowledge and skills that is required to meet the many challenges our environment faces; this helps enhance societies by assisting decision makers in various disciplines. This postgraduate programme addresses environmental conservation in both a practical and holistic way, which is supported by geographical and governance academic knowledge, while also delivering a platform from which this knowledge can be disseminated to interested parties.

Candidates are welcomed from all social and educational backgrounds. Applicants will normally be expected to have a good degree in an associated subject. Students will be considered if vocational experience, relevant to the course, has been acquired and academic credibility demonstrated.

The School of the Built and Natural Environment has delivered this Environmental Conservation and Management programme since 1998.

Modules

PART 1
Compulsory Modules
-Environmental Planning and Policy
-Strategic Management for Environmental Conservat
-Sustainable Development
-Research Methodology
-Environmental Law

Elective Modules
-Energy: Issues and Concerns
-Waste and Resource Management
-Geographical Information Systems
-Coastal Zone Management
-Habitat Management
-The Workplace Environment

Electives Outside Programme
-Facilities Management and Sustainability
-Work Based Critical Reflection

PART 2
-Dissertation

Key Features

The School of Built and Natural Environment prides itself on providing a supportive learning environment, with personal attention afforded to all students. Delivering a successful and enjoyable learning experience is at the very core of our vision to produce first class professionals with high employability skills.

We are situated in an urban / maritime environment very close to Britain’s first designated ‘Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’ and with many interesting buildings and cultural assets nearby. We are in close proximity to magnificent natural and physical resources of south, mid and west Wales and the University and its staff play a major role within the conservation and heritage management of these and other similar national assets.

As class sizes are generally less than 15, this engenders a culture and environment that listens to and supports individual student needs. Our teaching is informed by research in subjects that extend right across our portfolio, suitably supplemented by external experts from around the world. We believe in engaging with employers to develop, deliver and review courses that enhance our graduate’s employability credentials in a manner that is central to our vision for students, the city and region. This is further reflected by recent postgraduate success stories that include employment in international organisations, entrepreneurship and community engagement. Our commitment is demonstrated by recent investment in facilities, staff and engagement, which means the future for our alumni, is stronger than ever. We truly look forward to meeting you in person and helping you achieve your personal goals and ambitions.

Assessment

Assessments used within these Programmes are normally formative or summative. In the former assessment is designed to ensure students become aware of their strengths and weaknesses. Typically, such assessment will take the form of ‘life projects’ where a more hands-on approach shows student’s ability on a range of activities and includes engagement with employers.

Furthermore, much of the coursework requires that the student and lecturer negotiate the topic for assessment on an individual basis, allowing the student to develop skills appropriate to their employment goals. Some modules where the assessment is research-based require students to verbally/visually present the research results to the lecturer and peers, followed by a question and answer session. Such assessment strategies are in accord with the learning and teaching strategies employed by the team, that is, where the aim is to generate work that is mainly student-driven, individual, reflective and where appropriate, vocationally-orientated. Feedback to students will occur early in the study period and continue over the whole study session thereby allowing for greater value added to the student’s learning. The dissertation topic is developed and proposed by the student to help them refine their expertise in their chosen area.

Career Opportunities

This programme combines academic study with the application of professional skills and competencies. The student will acquire the highest transferable employment skills, which include: oral and visual presentations, environmental assessments, information dissemination, data analysis, and the ability to write reports. Students are particularly well suited to the increasingly important skills associated with environmental management, awareness raising and public participation forums. The Go Wales programme provides quality work experience for undergraduates to make students more attractive to potential employers. There is an optional ten week paid placement with local companies and a short term ‘work taster’ to help clarify student career choices. The scheme also provides a job shop for students seeking to work part-time to financially support their studies. A recent student survey showed that 53% of students worked part-time. Organisations contributing to the Industrial Liaison Committee that helped design the course content include: Natural Resources Wales (Environment Agency, Countryside Council for Wales and Forestry Commission), various local authorities, waste management companies, the renewable energy industry, RSPB etc.

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The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process. Read more
The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process.

The course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, is multidisciplinary and develops knowledge and skills in historic conservation and independent study and research capabilities.

The teaching programme covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/historic-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- The course draws on the expertise of built environment teaching staff at Brookes and from the University of Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

- Most modules include site visits and/or fieldwork, which give you direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

- The Historic Conservation team has an excellent record of research for organisations such as the EU, English Heritage and the government Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

- Visiting speakers from central and local government, conservation agencies, business and industry, consultancies, research bodies and other university departments provide further input bringing that real-world experience to the course.

- The Department of Planning is renowned internationally for its research. In REF 2014 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent.

- Oxford is internationally renowned for its cultural heritage and for the beauty and variety of its historical architecture, presenting many valuable learning opportunities for Historic Conservation students.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the variety of topics and techniques associated with historic conservation. These include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work.

Most modules also include site visits and/or fieldwork, which provide students with direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework based.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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Our challenging, practice-based course offers you a unique approach to the practice of writing, emphasising innovation and experimentation in your work. Read more
Our challenging, practice-based course offers you a unique approach to the practice of writing, emphasising innovation and experimentation in your work.

On our MA Creative Writing, you deepen your knowledge of literary tradition, exploring different modes and genres in order to develop your own creative and expressive written skills. You expand your use of creative writing techniques and improve your critical judgement of your own work.

Our course encourages you to develop your writing by stepping outside your comfort zone and discovering the different approaches to verbal art that are possible today. This will invigorate your own practice, whether you are writing psychogeography, plays, novels, stories or something else. You will choose from a variety of modules, covering topics such as:
-Development of a novel plan, from research and concept-development, to plotting, character, and structure
-Experimental language play of the Oulipo group across the short story, autobiography, cartoons, cookery and theatre
-Relating magic to writing and creativity, both in theory and in practice
-Psychogeography, writing about walking, place, landscape, history and the psychic environment
-Poetic practice across experimental writing in poetry from the performative to the visual

To help you hone your craft, we also host two Royal Literary Fund Fellows, professional writers on-hand to help you develop your writing on a one-to-one basis, and regularly host talks and readings by visiting writers.

Essex has nurtured a long tradition of distinguished authors whose work has shaped literature as we know it today, from past giants such as the American poets Robert Lowell and Ted Berrigan, to contemporary writers such as mythographer and novelist Dame Marina Warner, and Booker Prize winner Ben Okri.

We are ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015, and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our teaching staff are experienced and established writers who have a breadth of experience across literary genres, from novels, prose and plays, to poetry and song.

Our creative writing teaching team has a breadth of experience in the literatures of different cultures and different forms. Our current teaching staff include poet and short story writer Philip Terry, lyric writer and essayist Adrian May, novelist and camper Matthew de Abaitua, poet and performance-writer Holly Pester, poet, fisherman and memoirist Chris McCully, and award-winning playwrights Elizabeth Kuti and Jonathan Lichtenstein.

Our Centre for Creative Writing is part of a unique literary conservatoire that offers students the skills, support and confidence to respond artistically and critically to the study of writing with the guidance of experts.

Specialist facilities

-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Hear writers talk about their craft and learn from leading literature specialists at regular talks and readings
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting skills at our Lakeside Theatre Writers workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

Many of our students have gone on to successfully publish their work, notable recent alumni including:
-Ida Løkås, who won a literary prize in Norway for The Beauty That Flows Past, securing a book deal
-Alexia Casale, whose novel Bone Dragon was published by Faber & Faber and subsequently featured on both the Young Adult Books of the Year 2013 list for The Financial Times, and The Independent’s Books of the year 2013: Children
-Elaine Ewert, recent graduate from our MA Wild Writing, placed second in the New Welsh Writing Awards 2015
-Patricia Borlenghi, the founder of Patrician Press, which has published works by a number of our alumni
-Petra Mcqueen, who has written for The Guardian and runs creative writing courses

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/. Read more
MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/

The 21st century is when everything about the moving image changes.

MA Film and Screen Studies will equip you with skills and knowledge to address current transformations of moving image media in a globalised world, from the media in your pocket to architectural screens.

It explores both the old and the new, philosophy and history, theory and practice, to help you understand the challenges of the 21st century's culture of moving images, changing artistic and political contexts as well as ever developing technologies.

Innovative approach

What distinguishes the MA in Film and Screen Studies is its innovative approach to learning and research. It takes you well beyond the borders of traditional film studies. It encourages you to think critically and imaginatively, across media forms, disciplinary boundaries as well as conceptual and creative work.

You'll have the option of two pathways:

-Moving Image Studies Pathway
-Media Arts Pathway

Students taking the Media Arts pathway will have the opportunity to submit some work in non-traditional forms.

Globally renowned academics

Teaching and supervision draw on the diverse research strengths of the globally renowned academics at one of the world's leading media and communications departments, which also has strong traditions in audiovisual practice.

You'll be taught by scholars of international standing who have expertise in the interface between film criticism and creation; new screen technologies; in early cinema and the media archaeology of modernity; in artist’s film; and in non-fiction film (eg documentary and avant-garde).

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rachel Moore.

Pathways

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway:
The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway:
The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
option modules to the value of 60 credits
a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Core modules

The core modules will give you a foundation to the subject. The shared core module in Archaeology of the Moving Image introduces current debates in film and screen studies through the key notion of media history.

Pathway-specific cores develop new ways of conceptualising the cinematic today, focusing respectively on the political aspects of media forms and styles in Politics of the Audiovisual (the Moving Image Studies pathway) and on artists' use of various screen media in Experimental Media (the Media Arts pathway).

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Media and Communications department.

Intercollegiate options

Students on the MA in Film and Screen Studies can also take one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other University of London colleges. Please consult the Screen Studies Group website for further details of other programmes and the Film and Screen Studies Convenor at Goldsmiths for more details on how to take part in options at other colleges. Options taken under this scheme are deemed to count for 30 credits at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

You will develop skills enabling you to analyse, contextualise, historicise and theorise current and future developments in screen-based media and to communicate your ideas in written and, on the Media Arts pathway, in audiovisual form.

Careers

Possible careers include film and video distribution, film exhibition, museums, film and television criticism, new media criticism, new media art, and other jobs associated with screen culture, as well as further academic study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. Read more
This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

-If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
-If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
-We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, and philosophy of mathematics.
-You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
-MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience, the Forum for Philosophy and Religion, and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
-Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:
1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):
-Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty
-Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
-Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
-Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
-Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
-Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
-Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
-Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
-Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills.

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts.

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.

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Scientific Computing, a part of the natural sciences, has experienced probably the most rapid growth of all sciences in the last decade. Read more
Scientific Computing, a part of the natural sciences, has experienced probably the most rapid growth of all sciences in the last decade. With the advent of computers, a new way of studying the properties of nature became available. One no longer has to make approximations in the analytical solutions of models to obtain closed forms and interesting but intractable terms no longer have to be omitted from models right from the beginning of the modeling phase. Now, by employing methods of scientific computing, complicated equations can be solved numerically, simulations allow the solution of hitherto intractable problems, and visualization techniques reveal the beauty of complex as well as simple models.

At the CSC, we offer training in scientific computing by research. Project opportunities exist for entry every academic year. Applications are welcomed for Research Council funded projects and from self-funding students.

You will work with an academic on a subject of current research associated with scientific computing.

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The MA degree can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years. Read more
The MA degree can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years. In addition to the four compulsory modules (Difference, Diversity & Change; Interdisciplinary Methods in Women's Studies; Gender, Violence & Justice; Women, Citizenship & Conflict) and the 60 credit dissertation, students taking the MA Women Violence and Conflict will select a programme of research training modules to make up the remaining 40 credits, or opt to take Work, Politics & Culture and a further 20 credits of research training methods from the available selction. This programme should be agreed with the supervisor and submitted to Chair of Board of Studies. You will be allocated a supervisor for your dissertation which must be submitted towards the end of your final year.

Natalie, an MA Women, Violence and Conflict student writes:
'Welcome! I'd encourage students to take advantage of all the resources available to them - don't be shy! Everyone is the department is wonderful and more than willing to help. I'd encourage you to get to know your classmates - the beauty of this department is how amazingly interesting and diverse the students and professors are. I've learned more from my classmates than I ever anticipated. I'd say, frankly, READ. Read as much as you can on as many topics as you can - it's not often that you'll have the opportunity to engage these topics in depth in such a supportive environment with some of the greatest resources right in the department! Don't be afraid to not know, or to ask questions. Everyone is here to support you both academically and otherwise. Challenge yourself and appreciate the opportunity to feel uncomfortable sometimes! I'm sad my time here is almost over!!'

Programme aims

-To provide a solid grounding in interdisciplinary women's studies, emphasizing gendered aspects in relation to violence and conflict in inter/national contexts
-To expose students to an interdisciplinary range of conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to and debates violence against women and in contexts of violent conflict
-To familiarize students with the epistemological and philosophical underpinnings of research methodologies, the politics and ethics of research, the principles of research design and to enable them to evaluate and apply a range of methodologies to research questions related to issues of violence against women
-To foster the development of a critical, self-reflexive and independent approach to research and scholarship, as well as the acquisition of transferable skills

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This course is delivered by the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology. It provides training in practical audiovisual skills combined with the study of visual culture and anthropological theories of observation. Read more
This course is delivered by the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology.

It provides training in practical audiovisual skills combined with the study of visual culture and anthropological theories of observation.

So that every student has good access to equipment, numbers are capped at 24. Recruitment is highly international: roughly a third of students are British, a third European and a third from beyond Europe. Teaching is by academic anthropologists who are also film-making or other media practitioners, complemented by highly qualified audiovisual staff. There are also workshops by visiting professionals, including film-makers, photographers and sound recordists. All teaching has a collective ethos. Students work in teams and develop team-working and presentational skills as well as technical and artistic abilities. Each team presents its work to the group and receives feedback both from tutors and fellow students. Students can thereby learn both from others' successes as well as their failures, generating a strong sense of camaraderie.

In Semester 1, all students undergo basic 'hands-on' training in ethnographic documentary-making. Working in teams of three, they make 3 films: on a technical process, an interview and a social event. They also take courses on the history of ethnographic film and theoretical issues in visual anthropology. In Semester 2, the Ethnographic Documentary (ED) pathway offers further film-training, whilst the Film and Sensory Media (FSM) pathway tackles a broader range of topics in media anthropology, including photography and sound recording. Both pathways involve further practical project work.

Over the summer, all students carry out a practical field project. ED pathway students research, shoot and edit a documentary film, and write a `companion text'. FSM students conduct an original piece of ethnographic research and write a text accompanied by one or more media presentations, including film, photography, sound-recordings or an art exhibition. In principle, students on both pathways can go anywhere in the world, provided they present a well thought-out proposal. Some have been to the most distant locations (e.g. Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan, Japan, Brazil), whilst others have chosen topics closer to home in Manchester (the homeless, a local beauty parlour, the gay cruising scene).

The course is supported by the well-equipped Media Centre as well as by the Granada Centre's own AV resources, including its Film Library of over 2000 titles. The 'bench fees' component of the course fee covers all equipment needed on the course, including professional digital cameras, sound recorders and edit suites.

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The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. Read more
The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. However, the MRes in Ecology is built on the strong foundation of the former MSc in Ecology which ran at Bangor for over 40 years and which has an excellent reputation in the UK and internationally, among employers and academics in the field. Many of them have been through the course at Bangor! This degree will equip you with confidence and competence in the latest research skills and allow you to apply for further research training (PhD) programmes or to directly apply for research positions in universities or research institutes. Note that this course title is subject to validation and the programme described here is currently running under the MRes in Natural Sciences degree.

Course Structure

The course is composed of a modular taught component (100 credits) and a research dissertation (80 credits). The taught component covers important generic skills such as literature searching, health and safety aspects, grant proposal writing, introduction to statistical manipulation of data (60 credits), as well as theoretical and practical skills in molecular ecology and evolutionary ecology (40 credits), including the opportunity for a tropical field course in Dominica, West Indies, or equivalent fieldwork locally.

What sort of projects would be available to me?

As a result of extensive national and international staff contacts, range of research topics and experience, students are often able to carry out their research projects in association with commercial consultancies, local councils, environmental organisations in the UK (eg the Environment Agency, Countryside Council for Wales, RSPB), government research institutes (eg Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) and abroad (past projects have involved fieldwork in the West Indies, Africa, Maldives, and various European countries). We are situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty and a rich variety of habitats are within easy reach. We also have excellent facilities for undertaking top quality research, such as the state-of-the art molecular ecology laboratories in the Environment Centre Wales (shared with the CEH Bangor), a purpose-built environmentally-friendly building that was opened by PM Gordon Brown in 2008. Topics on offer cover the whole range of ecology and include projects in both pure and applied research. Due to the extended nature of the MRes research project, a module on project planning precedes the start of their dissertation period, providing guidance and support for the development of their research project.

Projects offered in previous years include:

* Energetics and flight performance of homing pigeons
* Evolution, behaviour and ecology of tropical fish
* Investigating mimetic relationships in Amazonian Corydoras catfish
* Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of anacondas
* New approaches to the study of the evolution of venom genes in pitvipers
* Biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in low productivity coastal habitats
* Growth patterns and life history in migratory brown trout, Salmo trutta, in rivers around the Irish Sea
* Genetic basis of life history shifts in guppies

What sort of careers will this train me for?

As well as finding specific employment based on the specialist knowledge acquired during postgraduate training, your general employability will be enhanced by evidence of your ability to work independently, think analytically and innovatively, and ability to conceptualise and question. During your studies, you will also have the chance to develop essential professional skills such as good communication, teamwork and leadership skills and enhance your practical experience. Our past graduates (in MSc Ecology) have gone on to careers in research (both in academia and research institutes) as well as in commercial environmental consultancies, DEFRA, water authorities, landscape architects and many others.

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This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. Read more

MA in Classical Studies

This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. You will investigate the different disciplinary fields of Classical Studies, bringing you into direct contact with a wide range of fragmentary evidence from classical antiquity such as surviving texts and artefacts, which you’ll examine from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives. You will also acquire and develop research skills that will enhance your knowledge of the ancient Graeco-Roman world and prepare you for independent study, culminating in a dissertation.

Key features of the course

•Explores the question of ‘how we know what we know’ about the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome
•Takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of ‘the ancient body’, including birth, death, ancient medicine, dress and beauty
•Draws on cutting-edge research by members of the Classical Studies department
•Concludes with a substantial piece of independent research on a topic of your choice.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

To gain this qualification you require 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• MA Classical Studies part 1 (A863)
• MA Classical Studies part 2 (A864)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you’ve successfully completed some relevant postgraduate study elsewhere, you might be able to count it towards this qualification, reducing the number of modules you need to study. You should apply for credit transfer as soon as possible, before you register for your first module. For more details and an application form, visit our Credit Transfer website.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in English Literature offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in English Literature

The MA in English Literature allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA in English Literature is openly structured. As a student enrolled in the English Literature programme, you define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

As a MA in English Literature student, you develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The full-time English Literature course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing in English Literature. Part-time study is available for the MA in English Literature.

Students of the MA in English Literature will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in English Literature typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advnaced Research Skills
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• Women Writing India
• The Romantic Sublime
• Gender and Culture: An Introduction
• The Modernist Novel: James Joyce
• Angela Carter
• Dylan Thomas and the Idea of Welsh Writing in English
• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives
• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic
• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Fin’Amor and Marriage in the Medieval English Secular Lyric
• Gender and Humour in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
• Lost in Europe: History, Biography, Ideology through the Short twentieth Century (1914-89)
• Neo-Victorian Mutinies: Gender & Racial Trauma in Neo-Victorian Fiction (& Film)
• Writing Poetry
• Writing the Self

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for English Literature graduates. Our Graduates enter careers in education, professional and creative writing, publishing, global marketing and advertising, media, international and national recruitment, heritage and tourism, and relief/humanitarian organisations. Some Graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Research Interests

The Department of English Language and Literature is home to three research centres and groupings:

• the Centre for the Research in the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW)
• the Centre for the Research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS)
• the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO)

All staff in the Department are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. Books published by staff in recent years include studies of medieval women’s writing, William Blake, Dylan Thomas, American fiction, Walt Whitman, narratives of the European border, Angela Carter, contemporary English language studies and many other areas. Regular research seminars
and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

"The MA in English Literature at Swansea offers students a unique opportunity to expand their intellectual horizons in an environment that brings people together from across the globe. I've had the chance to study with people from Ireland, England, America, and Germany and the differing views and experiences that each of us bring to our classroom discussions have been an invaluable part of my education here. One of the other enormous benefits of studying in Swansea is its location. In few other places can a student read a poem by Dylan Thomas or William Wordsworth and then walk through the same streets and countryside that inspired that poet. At Swansea University a student can find a learning experience that breaks free of the confines of the classroom and that may lead them out into all the beauty and history of the city and its surrounding areas. To top it off the small class sizes create an intimate and informal atmosphere where passionate professors challenge you to make the most of your love of literature. In all I'd describe my time here at Swansea as an experience that has both deepened my love of literature while allowing me to come to view it from a more global perspective."


Robert Tretin, English Literature, MA

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