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This multi-faceted course examines the structure and history of the cultural and creative industries and explores practical and theoretical issues facing cultural entrepreneurs, professionals and policy-makers. Read more

This multi-faceted course examines the structure and history of the cultural and creative industries and explores practical and theoretical issues facing cultural entrepreneurs, professionals and policy-makers. It uses a range of analytical tools from sociology, history and cultural studies, and draws on teaching, research and professional expertise from both King’s academics and professionals working in the field.

Key benefits

  • Located at the heart of London’s arts and media industries.
  • Guest lectures from industry professionals and researchers provide up-to-date knowledge of current debates and trends.

Description

Cultural & Creative Industries is a unique interdisciplinary course that draws on cultural theories, cultural history, digital culture, management, geography, cultural policy, gender and fashion. This exciting and contemporary course also makes use of our links with and proximity to Tate Modern, Southbank Centre and the British Film Institute. 

If you are seeking a career in the arts or creative industries, or if you are a professional looking to enhance your existing knowledge and career prospects, then this course is ideally suited for you. You can also use the training and skills we will give you to prepare for doctoral research in culture, media and creative industries. However, you should bear in mind that this is not a traditional media, communications or journalism studies course. If you want to follow a career in these areas, this course will only be relevant in so far as your interests relate specifically to the cultural and creative industries, such as performing and visual arts, cultural heritage, film, games and music.

Course purpose

Provides a critical understanding of the cultural and creative industries for graduates seeking a career in the arts or creative industries or for professionals wishing to enhance their existing knowledge and career prospects. Can also prepare students for doctoral research in the culture, media and creative industries. 

Whilst the course doesn't specifically cover media, communications or journalism studies it could be relevant in so far as your interests relate specifically to the cultural and creative industries (e.g. performing and visual arts, cultural heritage, film and music).

 Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 140 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year, and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We assess our modules through a combination of essays and coursework. Your dissertation will account for a third of your final grade.



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The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. Read more

The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area.

This two-part programme is designed to develop professional and academic excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. It's aimed at curators and those with related academic and practical experience who wish to achieve professional excellence in their practice, to innovate in the expanding field of curatorial practice.

MFA Curating at Goldsmiths focuses in-depth on aesthetic, social, political and philosophical questions that are brought to bear in any place or at any event in which contemporary art is situated.

The programme is designed to provide a practice-led research context for students at any stage of their professional practice. 

It also enables you to experiment and innovate in the expanded field of curatorial pedagogy, to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis and extend your and other students' knowledge through this process.

Goldsmiths' MFA Curating programme is recognised worldwide for producing highly qualified curators and other arts professionals.

Our graduates find employment in top international museums, commercial galleries, auction houses, magazines, alternative spaces and not-for-profit organisations. Others choose employment as artist’s studio managers; arts education programmers; museum public talks and events organisers; gallery archivists and registrars.

Work experience

The Tate Modern annually offers two hands-on internships to Goldsmiths MFA Curating students, who are given the opportunity to work directly on an exhibition matched to the students' interests. Accepted Goldsmiths curating students are given details on how to apply for a Tate Modern internship prior to starting the school year.

Other institutions with which the Goldsmiths MFA Curating programme has collaborated on real-life curatorial projects include 176/Zabludowicz Collection, London; Form/Content, London; ICA/Fourth Plinth Project, London, and more.

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Modules & structure

In Year One, you're introduced to a series of curatorial concepts and practices through group analysis and guided research. There are also group seminars that look into significant ideas in philosophy and cultural theory to help you think broadly about your own practice

In Year Two, intensive workshops look in depth at a set of artistic and cultural themes chosen by the students. In Year Two you further develop independent curatorial research and practice, working either on your own ideas or with a London-based gallery or institution. The summer term of Year One acts as a transition to Year Two.

Government Art Collection

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Year one

Year two

Skills

Independent research and practice; public presentation; oral and written communication; project development; exhibition administration; concept development; collaboration; intellectual analysis; catalogue, essay and review writing; research organisation and presentation.

Careers

Graudates from the MFA in Curating go on to work in galleries and museums; as managers and directors in commercial galleries; independent curators; cultural policy makers, teachers and academics; writers and critics.



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The MSc in International Relations, the largest Masters stream offered by the Department of Politics and International Relations, allows you the opportunity to engage critically with broad issues in various regions around the globe. Read more
The MSc in International Relations, the largest Masters stream offered by the Department of Politics and International Relations, allows you the opportunity to engage critically with broad issues in various regions around the globe. The core of the programme introduces key themes and approaches to the study of international politics, and then allows you to bring these to bear on social, economic, and political interactions of key actors in world politics.

You will study a mixture of core units and elective options, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Option courses for the programme do vary from year to year, but normally include courses on US foreign policy, south Asian politics, EU foreign and security policy, media and war, and international law. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipinternationalrelations.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in international relations while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.

- The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, focusing on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to international relations

- sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena
- associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- aadvanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations
a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
White
Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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The UWE EdD (Professional Doctorate in Education) has been running since 2005 and has recently undergone a re-validation in order to ensure it continues to provide the most up to date teaching methods and content. Read more
The UWE EdD (Professional Doctorate in Education) has been running since 2005 and has recently undergone a re-validation in order to ensure it continues to provide the most up to date teaching methods and content.

It is aimed at professionals from many areas of action - teachers from all sectors, educational administrators, policy officers, professionals involved in education in their specialist field such as nurses, paramedics, social workers, occupational therapists, community workers and others. Our goal is to better understand and improve programmes of training and education and, through this, to improve professional services and their role in a democracy.

Key benefits

The EdD is a Professional Doctorate in Education, equivalent in status and challenge to a PhD.

Course detail

The teaching on the EdD programme is highly interactive. It is seminar and workshop-based, and has a supportive supervision framework. The taught element (Years 1 and 2) is driven by practical research tasks. Assessment throughout is designed to put professional learning to the forefront, and to derive from this the academic standards which will allow us, eventually, to confer the award of a Doctorate. This is, in all senses, a professional doctorate.

Enquiry-based work at doctoral level is expected to lead to the generation of original knowledge, and this implies a greater intolerance of closure and resolution of issues and controversies; and a correspondingly higher level of tolerance for complexity.

We would expect, for example, compared to work at Master's level, a keener and more critical reading of research literature with the ability to differentiate between competing schools of thought. The capacity to bring to bear multiple contexts for understanding an educational issue (political, ethical, personal, historical, methodological).

Structure

- Part 1 -

Four taught modules of 30 credits each, giving a total of 120 credits:

• Action Research and Evaluation in Education - This module explores the methods and challenges involved when professionals engage in researching their own practice and/or context. Issues of reflexivity and ethics are particularly focused upon.

• Theoretical Perspectives on Teaching and Learning - A range of theoretical perspectives available to researchers in educational settings are discussed in this module including, as an example sociocultural theory.

• Researching Educational Policies and Professional Identities - Methodologies and methods for studying education policies and professional identities are the focus for this module.

• Advanced Preparation for Research - This module allows students to develop their skills and understanding in developing their own research proposal

- Part 2 -

Supervised study with a Director of Studies and one or more supervisors supporting you as you engage in a piece of research resulting in a written thesis of 60,000 words.

Format

We can offer supervision across a wide range of substantive and methodological fields, some examples of which include: case study; statistical procedures; quasi-experimental design; grounded theory; discourse analysis; social theory (eg. Bourdieu); action research; interpretative sociology; life history research; feminist approaches; questionnaire design; narrative research; focus group work.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Master’s Programme in International Affairs and Governance (MIA) is designed for students who seek a professional career in business, government, non-profit organisations and international agencies. Read more
The Master’s Programme in International Affairs and Governance (MIA) is designed for students who seek a professional career in business, government, non-profit organisations and international agencies. MIA graduates are trained as generalists and know how to integrate the specialist knowledge required to address today’s pressing political, economic and social problems. Combining interdisciplinary study with a result-oriented approach, the MIA programme prepares graduates for a world in which leaders and professionals must increasingly be able to work across borders, disciplines and sectors.

Curriculum

The MIA programme is based on a rigorous interdisciplinary curriculum that integrates the diverse perspectives constitutive of Economics, Political Science, Business Administration, and Law. Compulsory courses provide the conceptual foundations, Research methods, and knowledge indispensable for a thorough understanding of the complexity of international problems. Specific courses and practical projects enable you to choose and refine your areas of specialisation, and develop your own personal profile. The programme includes an attractive array of independent electives and contextual studies. Writing a Master’s thesis enables you to concentrate on a research question of your own choice. The MIA is particularly strong in the fields of trade and development, peace and security, as well as democracy and governance. The curriculum skilfully merges St. Gallen’s renowned expertise in economics and business with the analytical study of practical issues pertaining to politics and society as a whole. Linking theory to practice is a top priority in the MIA programme. There are several ways of bringing theoretical analysis to bear on the solution of distinctly practical problems. Our students participate in projects with experts from international organisations such as the European Central Bank or the World Trade Organization (WTO). They may earn credits towards their final degree through internships in companies and in public institutions. The University of St. Gallen has a long-standing commitment to provide its students with a rigorous practical training so as to facilitate their smooth transition from university to professional life as much as possible.

International cooperation

The four double degree programmes with the Institut d’Études Politiques (Sciences Po) in Paris, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University in Boston, Yonsei Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul and Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá provide selected students with the opportunity to obtain Master’s degrees from two renowned institutions within two academic years. MIA students can also apply for the one-year CEMS Master’s in International Management. In addition to the more than approx. 200 partner institutions of the HSG, there are also special exchange agreements for MIA students. The University of St. Gallen is a member of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA), which unites 36 leading schools in the United States, Europe and Asia.

Career perspectives

The MIA programme opens the door to a great variety of careers in the public, private and non-profit sectors. Our graduates now work in banking and financial institutions, insurance companies, consulting firms and other multinational corporations, federal, state and local governments, development agencies, international organisations and diplomacy, the media, political parties, NGOs, non-profit organisations, as well as universities and research centres. Moreover, the MIA prepares you for St. Gallen’s Ph.D. Programme in International Affairs and Political Economy.

Language

Courses in the MIA programme are taught in German or English. Since autumn 2008, students have had the option of pursuing the MIA entirely in English.

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If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. Read more
If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. It takes you through the academic stage required to become a barrister or solicitor, before you then go on to either the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

The GDL at UWE Bristol is highly regarded by both branches of the profession, and many solicitors and barristers choose this route into law, building on the knowledge they have obtained in another academic field to establish a successful legal career.

Key benefits

The GDL satisfies the requirements of Bar Standards Board (BSB) and the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA,) showing that you have successfully completed the academic stage of your legal training.

Course detail

As the first stage of your legal learning, the GDL takes you through the basics of law in England and Wales and introduces you to legal reasoning, methods and research. As well as this, you will learn how to apply your legal knowledge to the real world, giving you practical insights and skills to take into your vocational training.

The GDL is taught by a dedicated team of solicitors and barristers, who have all practised for many years, and bring their experience to bear on the course with plenty of examples, practical advice and face-to-face support.

You will also have access to an impressive range of facilities in our Professional Law Centre as well as the chance to hear from expert legal speakers and take part in our placement scheme. Our aim is to provide as much realism as possible and to equip you with the skills and knowledge you need to move confidently along the path towards becoming qualified.

Pre-course preparation

• English Legal System - provides you with a basic understanding of the legal system in England and Wales and covers the legal terminology, reasoning and methods that you will practise and develop throughout the course.

Teaching block one (September-January):

• Public Law - introduces you to the constitution of England and Wales and the theoretical principles that underlie it, as well as the judicial review process and how we use the law to protect human rights.
• Obligations I (Contract Law) - takes you through the area of contract law and what is involved in forming and enforcing contracts.
• Obligations II (Law of Tort) - introduces you to tortious liability, in other words how we can enforce obligations to avoid harm being caused to our neighbours.
• Criminal Law - provides an introduction to criminal law, particularly the underlying policy issues and the difference between theory and practice.

Teaching block two (January-June):

• Equity and Trusts - introduces you to equity and trust law, including defining what a trust is and looking at the relevance of trusts today.
• Property Law - explores land as an area of law, the rights and obligations associated with it, and how to transfer land from one party to another.
• European Union Law - provides you with an understanding of what constitutes European Union law, how it works and how we take account of EU law within domestic law in England and Wales.
• Independent Research Project - you will also study a research topic of your choice in depth (out of a range of subjects of current topical interest) and write a 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation.

Format

Highly experienced and supportive tutors, drawn from legal practice, as well as the academic side of law, will enable you to develop your knowledge quickly.

Each topic will be based on an introductory lecture, followed by a workshop in a large group and then a smaller-group seminar. Both the workshops and seminars are highly interactive, and are designed to give you a deeper understanding of the material covered, and how it can be applied to practical contexts.

You will research and discuss real cases and legislation, based on current developments in law, giving you a valuable insight into situations you are likely to face in your legal career.

Assessment

As is required by the professional regulatory bodies, the main form of assessment for the GDL is through examinations, which are held at the end of each teaching block. Some modules also include a coursework element of 25%.

The Independent Research Project will be assessed through your 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation, which you will write in response to your allocated research task.

Mock assessments with feedback will be given to help you monitor and improve your performance, and help you deal effectively with all forms of assessment. Two past examination papers will also be available in order to prepare you for examinations.

Careers / Further study

Studying for the GDL is a stepping stone in achieving a successful career as a solicitor or barrister. Many students who complete the GDL go on to study the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) to achieve these career ambitions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. Read more
If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. It takes you through the academic stage required to become a barrister or solicitor, before you then go on to either the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

Key benefits

The GDL satisfies the requirement of the Bar Standards Board (BSB) and the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), showing that you have successfully completed the academic stage of your legal training.

Course detail

As the first stage of your legal learning, the GDL takes you through the basics of law in England and Wales and introduces you to legal reasoning, methods and research. As well as this, you will learn how to apply your legal knowledge to the real world, giving you practical insights and skills to take into your vocational training.

The GDL is taught by a dedicated team of solicitors and barristers, who have all practised for many years, and bring their experience to bear on the course with plenty of examples, practical advice and face-to-face support.

You will also have access to an impressive range of facilities in our Professional Law Centre as well as the chance to hear from expert legal speakers and take part in our placement scheme. Our aim is to provide as much realism as possible and to equip you with the skills and knowledge you need to move confidently along the path towards becoming qualified.

Structure

The part-time course is structured into two teaching blocks (each of which is studied over a year) and covers the seven foundations of legal knowledge, as identified by the professional legal bodies. An independent research project then enables you to cover another area of legal study in depth.

Pre-course preparation

English Legal System - provides you with a basic understanding of the legal system in England and Wales and covers the legal terminology, reasoning and methods that you will practise and develop throughout the course.

Year one:

• Public Law - introduces you to the constitution of England and Wales and the theoretical principles that underlie it, as well as the judicial review process and how we use the law to protect human rights.
• Obligations I (Contract Law) - takes you through the area of contract law and what is involved in forming and enforcing contracts.
• Obligations II (Law of Tort) - introduces you to tortious liability, in other words how we can enforce obligations to avoid harm being caused to our neighbours.
• Criminal Law - provides an introduction to criminal law, particularly the underlying policy issues and the difference between theory and practice.

Year two

• Equity and Trusts - introduces you to equity and trust law, including defining what a trust is and looking at the relevance of trusts today.
• Property Law - explores land as an area of law, the rights and obligations associated with it, and how to transfer land from one party to another.
• European Union Law - provides you with an understanding of what constitutes European Union law, how it works and how we take account of EU law within domestic law in England and Wales.
• Independent Research Project - you will also study a research topic of your choice in depth (out of a range of subjects of current topical interest) and write a 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation.

Format

Highly experienced and supportive tutors, drawn from legal practice, as well as the academic side of law, will enable you to develop your knowledge quickly.

Each topic will be based on an introductory large group session and then a smaller group seminar. Both the large group session and seminars are highly interactive, and are designed to give you a deeper understanding of the material covered, and how it can be applied to practical contexts.

You will research and discuss real cases and legislation, based on current developments in law, giving you a valuable insight into situations you are likely to face in your legal career.

Assessment

As is required by the professional regulatory bodies, the main form of assessment for the GDL is through examinations, which are held at the end of each year of the course. Some modules also include a coursework element of 25%.

The Independent Research Project will be assessed through your 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation, which you will write in response to your allocated research task.

Practice questions with feedback will be given to help you monitor and improve your performance, and help you deal effectively with all forms of assessment. Two past examination papers will also be available in order to prepare you for examinations.

Careers / Further study

Studying for the GDL is a stepping stone in achieving a successful career as a solicitor or barrister. Many students who complete the GDL go on to study the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) to achieve these career ambitions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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MSc Environmental Governance critically analyses some of the key environmental challenges of our time, exploring the connections between environmental governance and policies and the production, distribution and consumption of resources. Read more

MSc Environmental Governance critically analyses some of the key environmental challenges of our time, exploring the connections between environmental governance and policies and the production, distribution and consumption of resources.

The course will develop your ability to apply sophisticated, critical and interdisciplinary sustainability and environmental theories at multiple scales and in different geographical contexts.

As part of the course, you'll have the unique opportunity to collaborate and engage with cutting-edge researchers and world-leading experts on environmental governance, political ecology, Marxist political economy and urban sustainability. You will learn from real-world practitioners, and liaise with external organisations on live policy problems.

This makes MSc Environmental Governance an ideal choice for:

  • future leaders interested in pursuing a career in environmental policy regulation and urban sustainable management
  • those wishing to develop further their academic career by pursuing a PhD
  • environmental professionals wishing to deepen their knowledge.

Aims

  • Interdisciplinary and sophisticated academic rigour: The course is highly interdisciplinary, exposing you to ideas and practices developed in a range of subject areas such as geography, environmental studies, politics, economics and development studies, rather than one alone. Our curriculum covers theories and interdisciplinary practices of environmental governance and offers you a comprehensive introduction to how human-use of the non-human world is organised at multiple scale and what the effects of this are.
  • Inclusive and collaborative research environment : The degree offers collaboration with the internationally renowned Society-Environment Research Group (SERG) . This group involves more than ten researchers from the School of Environment, Education and Development , with distinguished records of theoretical, empirical and applied research in a range of geographical and environmental settings. This includes work on water and energy governance in Europe, Africa and South-East Asia; social, environmental and climate justice and equity in Central and Eastern Europe, smart cities and urban sustainability in the UK - to name but a few.
  • Knowledge transfer and employability : We combine training in theory and critical thinking with more practical and applied elements. Our range of `real world' practitioners gives you the opportunity to liaise with external organisations on live policy problems and enhance your employability.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and also seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

Eight taught units comprise two-thirds of the programme. The remainder of the programme consists of a 12,000 word dissertation on an approved topic. Typical course units comprise two hours a week of seminar or small-group work. Together these units involve a range of formative and summative assessments, including individual and group work, oral presentations and long essays, project work and reports. Coursework is designed to allow you to pursue your particular areas of interest. 

In the summer semester, you work independently to undertake dissertation work based on primary and/or secondary data, or else a more philosophical/theoretical dissertation. We encourage you develop research in collaboration with members of the Society and Environment Research Group and external organisations.

Course unit details

Core course units

  • Key Debates in Environmental Governance - Introduces the main (and often competing) approaches to environmental governance in play today, ranging from `free market environmentalism', environmental modernisation and ecological economics, to the `risk society' perspective and green governmentality.
  • Issues in Environmental Policy - Links theory and practice by focusing on different types of environmental policy measures (their logic, operation and outcomes), and is taught by way of real world case studies drawn from the research literature and the work of policy practitioners locally, nationally and globally.
  • Doing Environmental Research - Provides advanced research skills and encourages you to plan and design your dissertation/research review projects. The course introduces you to a range of both research and career options appropriate to the skills acquired on the course, including planning research projects and preparing and writing a detailed proposal for dissertation/research review.

Past dissertation projects

Every year we have a range of different dissertation topics that reflect students' research interests. For illustration, this list presents some past dissertation topics:

  • The Nature of Industrial Preservation: Mapping Gentrification in New Islington, Manchester
  • Exploring the (post)political nature of urban climate change governance: a study of Manchester: A Certain Future
  • Multi-actor Partnership for Environmental Governance: An Investigation from the Perspective of Bangladesh
  • Transition Impossible? A Post-Political Analysis of the Transition Movement
  • Representation of Nature in Environmental Campaigns: The Visual Case of Greenpeace's #SavetheArctic Polar Bear
  • From government to governance in an age of austerity: an evaluation of new land management partnerships to fit a new economic era for the Peak District National Park
  • The urban commons and the scalar politics of climate activism
  • Manchester Certain Future Forum: Success of network partnerships in promoting sustainability behaviour change.

What our students say

"From the very start, I found all the staff extremely friendly and helpful. There was always someone to speak to, no matter what the problem - as someone who came into studying this subject from a very different undergraduate degree, this made my transition much easier. It also helped that the teaching staff have a real passion for the subject, which I found infectious and inspiring."

Oliver Gibbons, MSc Environmental Governance

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This course has been designed in response to contemporary international debates about the changing nature and shifting boundaries of multidisciplinary public health. Read more

Why choose this course?

This course has been designed in response to contemporary international debates about the changing nature and shifting boundaries of multidisciplinary public health.

Taught from a social rather than a medical perspective, it focuses on the strategic and international elements of public health, environment and sustainable development that are critical to effective multidisciplinary practice in these fields reflecting leading-edge, current developments.

Graduates of this Master's course will:

- be inspired about the potential to act as change agents within multi-disciplinary public health settings
- bring an extensive knowledge of public health with a critical awareness of the philosophical, theoretical and methodological issues to bear on the discipline
- adopt an independent and reflective approach to their learning and future careers.

Modules may include:

Concepts of Health and Healing
Public Health, Sustainability and Community
Critical Philosophical Debate
Policy and Practice in Multidisciplinary Public Health
Research Methods
International Politics of Health
Dissertation.

Or in place of a Dissertation, you can opt to take two 30 credit modules instead

Professional Practice in Public Health
Research Project

For more information about the course content please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/mapublichealth

Delivery and assessment

The course is delivered through lectures, workshops, group work and one to one supervision. Students receive support throughout their studies from committed and enthusiastic teaching staff, who are also involved in research activity.

The course employs a varied assessment regime, which includes essays, reports, portfolio and presentations. The dissertation gives you the opportunity to design, implement and present a significant piece of research relevant topic of your choice.

Your future career

The course cultivates intellectual and research skills, experience and knowledge suitable for effective practice in a wide range of multidisciplinary public health sectors. You will be equipped to progress into policy, research and practice roles in the public, private or voluntary arenas in the UK or internationally. For those already employed it provides transferable skills such as independent critical thought, analysis and evaluation, partnership working skills and self-directed learning.

Scholarships

The School of Social Sciences offers a number of competitive scholarships for our full-time and part-time Masters courses. For more information please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3scholarships

Want to find out more? Come along to one of our postgraduate Open Evenings. For further details please visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3events

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Nottingham University Business School is one of the UK's leading business schools at one of the UK’s most prestigious and popular universities. Read more
Nottingham University Business School is one of the UK's leading business schools at one of the UK’s most prestigious and popular universities. With campuses in Nottingham, Malaysia, and China, the School offers all its students a global experience and opportunities to establish valuable business relationships with global peers. NUBS is accredited by both AMBA and EQUIS and the MBA is ranked by The Economist in the global top 100 MBA and the Executive MBA, where it ranks first for salary increase after graduation.

The Business School is on the attractive, modern Jubilee Campus, close to Nottingham city centre. We offer among the best facilities in the UK and Nottingham is a thriving commercial and cultural centre with excellent transport links.

Our MBA offers both a general, full-time course and the opportunity to specialise in finance, corporate social responsibility, entrepreneurship, or healthcare (Executive MBA). If you want to continue your career while studying at your own pace, we offer a very flexible, part-time Executive MBA for experienced professionals that you can spread over 24-48 months.

You can also choose to study on our Singapore MBA, run in association with the PSB Corporation; at the University’s Malaysia campus; or at a choice of leading overseas business schools. The full time MBA offers you a wide choice of electives, management projects, an interpersonal skills programme, and popular language courses in French, German, Spanish, and Japanese.

You’ll begin work immediately on a business problem with a strong emphasis on innovation and will return to this at regular intervals. This encouragement to deal with all dimensions of a business issue leads naturally into the final element of your MBA programme—the management project. We encourage you to spend three months working within an organisation on an actual business issue of their choosing. Our programme will help you plan practical projects in the UK or overseas with regional or international companies such as Rolls-Royce, Alliance Boots, Experian and Business in the Community, or with one of the many small and medium enterprises (SMEs) we work with. The emphasis is on your ability to bring all your knowledge and skills to bear, and to use your developing interpersonal skills in a real life situation.

All our programmes have common core subjects that develop your skills in essential areas of management through lectures, seminars, case studies, group work, and project work. Through your choice of elective subjects, you can tailor your studies to match your interests, which can then be developed in your management project.

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This MA programme is unique in the UK. It is based in a major centre for philosophy of education and aims to give students a comprehensive grounding in the subject. Read more

This MA programme is unique in the UK. It is based in a major centre for philosophy of education and aims to give students a comprehensive grounding in the subject.

About this degree

This programme enables students to explore further the relevance of ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of mind and epistemology to contemporary educational issues and to bring philosophical thinking to bear on their own educational concerns including professional practice. Students will gain a grounding in philosophical approaches, becoming part of a lively community of Master's and doctoral students from a wide range of backgrounds.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and the dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Philosophy of Education: Values, Aims and Society
  • What is Education?

Optional modules

The following option is recommended:

  • Philosophy of Education: Knowledge, Mind and Understanding
  • Further optional modules include:
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
  • Understanding Education Research
  • Rights and Education

Dissertation/report

All students are required to submit either: a dissertation of 18,000-20,000 words in philosophy of education (60 credits) or a report of about 10,000 words plus a further 30-credit optional module approved by the Programme Leader.

Teaching and learning

The taught sessions consist primarily of presentation by the tutor or another speaker, often reviewing a range of positions and arguments on a topic (on occasion students may be invited in advance to make their own presentation to the group); and discussion, both as a whole class and in small groups, which is vital both to clarifying and being able to argue for your own position, and to understanding the positions and arguments of others. 

Assessment on the Philosophy MA modules is by means of a 5,000-word written essay.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Philosophy of Education MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers and senior school leaders, while others have jobs as university lecturers and researchers. Graduates can also be found working as staff in policy think tanks and as youth workers or in adult and informal education.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • College and Adult Teacher (Business, ICT and Finance), Tower Hamlets College
  • Lecturer, Universidade Catolica de Mozambique (Catholic University of Mozambique)
  • Primary School Class Teacher (Year 2), Gulf English School
  • Assistant Vice-Principal, Bridge Academy and studying MA Philosophy of Education, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is the well-established home of an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education and international development.

The IOE has, through the decades, been in the vanguard of the development and dissemination of work in the field. Its Centre for Philosophy draws together research across the IOE as well as showcasing our extensive connections in the field.

The centre is committed to rigorous exploration of a variety of philosophical approaches, encompassing such topics as the aims of education, teaching, learning, and the curriculum, democracy, citizenship, philosophy with children, new technology, and the environment.



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The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. Read more
The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. From the outset, questions of history, theory and context are brought to bear on issues of close analysis and interpretation. Elective modules in Screenwriting, Creative Documentary Practice and Editing allow students to balance film theory with practice. At every step of the way your progress will be informed by an emphasis on independent study and critical thinking. In addition, the course aims to develop the key transferable skills required for postgraduate study. These include dissertation preparation, time management and oral and written presentation.


The course consists of six taught modules and a Dissertation module that includes Research Methodologies.

Dissertation and Research Methodologies
This module prepares students for the formal processes of research and writing at M.Phil. level. Classes will cover library use, archival skills, electronic resources, use of Endnote, research skills, note taking, writing and oral presentation and power-point techniques. Students will write a dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words on an approved topic to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff.

In addition, students choose six of the elective modules listed below:

Aesthetics of Digital Cinema
This course traces the history of the development of the digital image with specific reference to its application to filmmaking. We will look at the analogue origins of the digital image and discuss the aesthetic implications of the shift to digital film. Further we will discuss developing models of criticism and their application to the digital cinematic image. We will be drawing examples from Western (Hollywood, Danish, British) cinemas and non-Western (Iranian) cinemas as well as from other outputs, such as YouTube.

Cinema and Ireland

This course will explore the history of Irish cinema from the 1930s to the present. It will also cover such areas as state film production policies, film censorship, and the history of Irish film distribution and exhibition. In addition, it will trace how British and American cinemas have represented Ireland and the Irish, and it will examine representations of political violence, history, gender and the cinema of the Celtic Tiger years, as well as current trends in Irish film production.

Current Trends in European Cinema
This course will look at and examine the changes taking place in cinema in Europe in the latter part of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. This was a period that saw enormous transformation throughout the continent - both East and West - when the post World War II political dispensation collapsed and Cold War divisions crumbled. The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent overthrow of the remaining Stalinist regimes in Eastern and Central Europe, the emergence of the European Union as a transnational political entity in 1992, and the globalisation of the world economy all impacted on the way in which films were made and the type of themes they explored and topics they tackled.

Cult Cinema
This module will examine a number of films that have acquired 'cult status' for a variety of reasons. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which these films have circulated in popular and academic discourses and the various attempts to identify 'cult' qualities and qualifying practices.

Melodrama
This module will consider a wide range of variations on the ‘melodramatic mode’, including examples from early cinema, classical Hollywood cinema, as well as current American and European cinema.Â

Editing
This module will introduce students to the craft of editing, giving students an understanding of the essential technical and creative skills involved: how a scene is assembled and seamlessly put together, cutting dialogue, creating tension and drama using editing, using pacing, editing to rhythm, cutting to music and beats. It will also provide students with a through knowledge of the editing software, Final Cut Pro X, covering all aspects of the software, from capture and system-settings, editing tools and shortcuts, to effects, transitions and colour correction. The overall aim is to give students the knowledge, tools and confidence to complete their own work to a professional standard.

Creative Documentary Practice
The aim of this module is expose students to the possibilities of creative documentary film making with a strong emphasis on learning thorough practical application. The module will take a critical look at current practices in the genre with an emphasis both on the techniques of documentary filmmaking and the practicalities of how films are made.

Screenwriting
This module will introduce students to the techniques and conventions of screenwriting. Class exercises will involve the analysis of screenplays and short films, and the course will cover both the conventional three-act structure and other models of screenwriting.

Please note: all modules are subject to change and/or availability. Students must take three modules in Michaelmas term and three modules in Hilary term, subject to timetabling.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and dissertation:

Each module will be assessed by a combination of written and/or practice based assignments as appropriate and class participation. Total ECTS: 60
Dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words and Research Methodologies assessment. Total ECTS: 30
Postgraduate Diploma

A Postgraduate Diploma in Film Theory and History may be awarded in certain circumstances on the basis of coursework alone (60 ECTS). Entry is the same as for the M.Phil. programme.

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The course offers graduates in English or in related disciplines (e.g. history, art history, Irish studies, a modern language) the opportunity to study a broad range of Irish writing in English from the late-sixteenth century to the present. Read more
The course offers graduates in English or in related disciplines (e.g. history, art history, Irish studies, a modern language) the opportunity to study a broad range of Irish writing in English from the late-sixteenth century to the present. It also involves close study of single authors and addresses thematic aspects of the subject. The course is designed to be complete in itself, but can also serve as preparation for those who wish to proceed to further research in the field.

The course consists of five modules:

Single Author:

This module, taught in a weekly two-hour seminar, covers the work of four major individual authors from the Irish literary tradition. In Michaelmas term we study Swift and Yeats, and in Hilary term, Joyce and Beckett.

Perspectives in Irish Writing:

This module introduces students to the socio/cultural contexts in which Irish writing in English developed from the late sixteenth century through to the twenty-first century. It investigates key terms that students will encounter in the critical literature on Irish writing and culture: Anglo-Irish, Protestant Ascendancy, the Gaelic tradition, colonialism, the Big House, romantic and cultural nationalism, the Literary Revival. In addition to covering the significant authors of the tradition, it also addresses such issues as authorship, publishing history and reception as they bear on the emergence and development of a national literature in English and explores a number of theoretical issues.

Options:

Students take one option module in each of the semesters, choosing from the variety of special subjects on offer each year. These special subjects include: Writing the Troubles, Big House Literature, Irish Poetry after Yeats, Ireland on Stage, and Creative Writing.

In place of the special subjects offered in the second term, students may enrol for a Creative Writing Workshop (an element of the M.Phil. in Creative Writing). Entry to this workshop is restricted and based on assessment of a portfolio of the student's creative writing, which must be presented before the end of the first term.

Dissertation:

A dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) is planned in consultation with a Course Director during the second (Hilary) term and is written under the guidance of a supervisor. This work is undertaken in the third term (Trinity term) and in the long vacation (April-August).

Assessment is by a combination of course papers and exercises and dissertation.

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The MRes in Sexuality and Gender Studies is an example of truly interdisciplinary collaboration, staffed by academics from a range of disciplines, each bringing their specific expertise to bear on the topics under discussion. Read more
The MRes in Sexuality and Gender Studies is an example of truly interdisciplinary collaboration, staffed by academics from a range of disciplines, each bringing their specific expertise to bear on the topics under discussion.

The programme introduces you to a range of theoretical and methodological issues and debates, which have characterised the development of sexuality and gender studies in the twentieth century. These include: feminist theory, masculinity studies, queer theory, postcolonial theory, psychoanalysis, ethnography, sexology, and criminology.

The MRes programme focuses on research and, as such, is broken down into three modules and a thesis, totalling 180 credits:

Theories, Issues and Methodologies (20 credits)
Sexuality, Gender and Representation (20 credits)
Training Needs and Research Skills (20 credits)
20,000 word thesis (120 credits)

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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