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Masters Degrees (Basic Skills)

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The MA Policy and Practice in Basic Skills Education (Numeracy) is for teachers, trainers, team leaders and heads of department/section who work in the field of basic skills education. Read more
The MA Policy and Practice in Basic Skills Education (Numeracy) is for teachers, trainers, team leaders and heads of department/section who work in the field of basic skills education.

This flexible course will support your professional development and enhance your career prospects by adding to your existing knowledge in the field. It includes the study of government policies and initiatives on adult numeracy, key theoretical issues that have an impact on adult numeracy provision, the history of adult numeracy provision and approaches to numeracy.

In addition, studying on a masters course at the University of Bolton will help you to further develop career-enhancing skills including research, oral and written presentations, independent working and time and project management skills.

What you will learn

The course will enhance your existing knowledge of the field of numeracy and mathematics education by critical analysis of government policy in this area.

You will have the opportunity to share your experiences and observations as basic skills practitioners and will research, critique and analyse UK and international policy in numeracy and mathematics education.

You will also increase your knowledge of the historical development of numeracy provision and the impact of policy decisions on standards and achievement. The course will give you the opportunity to debate and analyse cultural origins in order to establish what impact these have on achievement and enjoyment of numeracy and mathematics.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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The MA Policy and Practice in Basic Skills Education (Literacy) is for teachers, trainers, team leaders and heads of department/section who work in the field of basic skills education. Read more
The MA Policy and Practice in Basic Skills Education (Literacy) is for teachers, trainers, team leaders and heads of department/section who work in the field of basic skills education.

The course will support your professional development and enhance your career prospects by extending your existing knowledge in the field. It includes the study of issues that impact on adult literacy provision, an examination of literacy practices, a study of the history of adult literacy provision, and considers literacy in under-represented groups within the post-compulsory sector.

You will have the opportunity to carry out research into an area of literacy provision that is relevant to your practice and examine how theoretical principles inform and enhance this practice. All aspects of your research and study will be underpinned by ethical principles.

What you will learn

The course will enhance your existing knowledge of the field of literacy education and examine ways in which practice can be developed and improved in the light of literacy education theories.

You will have the opportunity to share your experiences and observations as basic skills practitioners and will research, critique and analyse UK and international practices and principles.

You will also increase your knowledge of the historical development of literacy teaching and the impact of policies on standards and achievement. The course will give you the opportunity to debate and analyse theories and their potential impact on practice.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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The MA Policy and Practice in Basic Skills Education (ESOL) is for teachers, trainers, team leaders and heads of department/section who work in the field of ESOL teaching. Read more
The MA Policy and Practice in Basic Skills Education (ESOL) is for teachers, trainers, team leaders and heads of department/section who work in the field of ESOL teaching.

You will consider the different contexts in which English language teaching and learning takes place and learn about the latest research in the field. You will also explore the development of ESOL provision and the impact of external factors, such as political and historical events, and how they have affected the teaching of English as a second language.

You will learn about theories and principles of ESOL provision and relate these to your personal practice.

What you will learn

You will examine the relationship between theories and practice of teaching English as a second language. You will learn about the latest developments in curriculum design and issues of sociolinguistics, ethnographic and social-physiological approaches to ESOL teaching and learning.

You will consider the wider issues that may have an impact on the teaching of ESOL, for example, the place of English in a changing global context; the effects of international political events; national trends; immigration policies and attitudes to integration, multiculturalism and cultural identification. You will also look at issues relating to policies on further and adult education.

You will have the opportunity to share your experiences and observations with your fellow students as basic skills practitioners and will research, critique and analyse principles and practice in ESOL learning.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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The Graduate Certificate in Professional Development (Education) provides you with Continuing Professional Development (CPD) which will enable you to meet the NQT standards it is designed to provide professional development for practising teachers. Read more
The Graduate Certificate in Professional Development (Education) provides you with Continuing Professional Development (CPD) which will enable you to meet the NQT standards it is designed to provide professional development for practising teachers.

Both programmes aim to link theory with course participants’ own practice so that real benefits will be felt by both Newly Qualified Teachers and their schools.

Key Course Features

-Wrexham Glyndŵr University works in partnership with employers, related organisations and agencies. It works closely with schools, FE colleges and local education authorities to offer comprehensive CPD opportunities for teachers. These partnerships are central in ensuring that all programmes are fit for purpose and provide the highest possibility of employment and career progression.
-This course is designed in partnership with local education authorities, professional agencies and leading consultants.
-These courses will enhance your practice and strengthen your link between teaching and research.

What Will You Study?

The course is designed to provide professional development for practising teachers and is accredited by the University of Wales. Participants are required to study and achieve 60 credits in order to gain the Graduate Certificate in Professional Development (Education). The Graduate Diploma in Professional Development (Education) is made up of a number of different modules which may be grouped together.

Graduate Certificate in Professional Development (Education)
-The Reflective Practitioner
-Learning from Teaching
-Positive Behaviour Management

Graduate Diploma in Professional Development (Education)
-Accountability, Evaluation and School Improvement
-Strategic and Developmental Planning for School Improvement
-Leading and Managing Staff
-Classroom Observation
-Mentoring in Practice
-Action Research for School Improvement
-Working together for School Effectiveness
-Pedagogy for Wales in the 21st Century
-Developing thinking and assessment for learning
-Transition
-Y Curriculum Cymreig
-Inclusion/SEN
-Education, Citizenship and Critical Thinking
-Techniquest – Numeracy and Problem Solving
-Techniquest – The Development of Thinking Skills
-Techniquest – Sustainability, Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship
-Physical Development and Physical Education – putting theory into practice
-Developing Health and Emotional Wellbeing
-Working in Partnership
-An Introduction to Teaching Basic Skills Through the Curriculum
-Basic Skills in Transition - Numeracy
-Basic Skills in Transition - Literacy
-Assessment for Learning Strategies

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

You will undertake practical-based assignments throughout the course. The course team is responsive to creative use of assessment strategies that facilitate and support learners’ styles of learning.

There are variable assessment methods including written work, portfolios, and presentations. In particular, the assessment will enable theory to inform practice and enable participants to reflect critically on and, wherepossible, improve the quality of leadership, management, learning and teaching within their schools.

Career Prospects

The courses offer continuing professional development for teachers which will give them the edge in a competitive employment market.

The Careers & Zone at Wrexham Glyndŵr University is there to help you make decisions and plan the next steps towards a bright future. From finding work or further study to working out your interests, skills and aspirations, they can provide you with the expert information, advice and guidance you need.

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This programme provides training for individuals in outcomes-based CBT interventions to promote psychological wellbeing in children and young people. Read more

This programme provides training for individuals in outcomes-based CBT interventions to promote psychological wellbeing in children and young people. This Master's programme is aimed at professionals already working in the field of children's services, including social care, education and health, who hope to gain skills they can practise in the workplace.

About this degree

The programme will develop participants’ knowledge and skills in cognitive behavioural based interventions with children and young people experiencing a range of difficulties in social and emotional aspects of their development. Participants will also develop skills in evaluating the impact of their own work, in order to be able to reflect on and modify practice in future.

All candidates should initially enrol for the Postgraduate Certificate (modules 1-4, 60 credits).

On completion they should make a decision to terminate their studies at that point or apply to progress to Diploma (modules 5–8, 60 credits) and MSc (dissertation module, 60 credits).

Core modules

Certificate

  • Introduction to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Context
  • Assessment and Engagement for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Context
  • Basic Skills (Developing Understanding)
  • Basic Skills (Methods of Change)

Diploma

  • Introduction to Disorder Specific Approaches
  • Disorder Specific Approaches
  • Complex Problems
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Context

MSc

  • Research Dissertation

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, and taught by leading practitioners in the field. Teaching is a combination of lectures, workshops and seminars. A core component of the programme is videoing of students' CBT practice which is discussed in small practice tutor groups during each teaching day.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Children and Young People MSc

Careers

The programme is aimed at applicants in relevant employment and supports career progression.

Employability

CBT for children and young people is one of a number of evidence-based interventions for common childhood problems and disorders. The demand for professionals with skills in this area in known to be high and is likely to grow. Students will have a (Certificate/Diploma/Master's) UCL qualification in CBT with children and this will be much valued by employers looking to develop this type of intervention within their service. Several of our students have been funded by employers who want to increase their supervisory capacity in CBT and this is likely to be a trend that will continue.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme is based and taught at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, the leading national charity supporting young minds through innovative therapeutic practice, training and research. The vision of the centre is a world in which children, young people and their families are effectively supported to build on their own strengths to achieve their goals in life. 

Students benefit from the centre's collaboration with UCL; they gain the advantages of studying within the intimate and vibrant environment of the centre, together with access to the facilities and resources of UCL - an internationally renowned university.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Ofsted rated Grade 2. Good in 2010, this nationally-recognised award is endorsed by Standards Verification UK (SVUK), and provides teacher education geared towards the post-compulsory sector (16+). Read more
Ofsted rated Grade 2: Good in 2010, this nationally-recognised award is endorsed by Standards Verification UK (SVUK), and provides teacher education geared towards the post-compulsory sector (16+).

It helps you develop the knowledge, skills and attributes identified within the LLUK Standards for Teaching and Supporting Learning.

This is a full-time pathway for graduates or applicants with an equivalent professional qualification. It is designed for applicants who wish to teach Adult Basic Skills, Numeracy. We expect you to have a relevant Level 3 qualification, e.g. ‘A’ level Maths. Some experience of Basic Skills teaching in further education, normally gained by visiting your local FE college and a relevant degree would also be ideal.

It offers initial teacher education for those who wish to be employed in a variety of post-16 educational and training establishments and will eventually enable the holder to submit evidence for Professional Formation and QTLS status once registered with the Institute For Learning (IfL). It is not therefore an appropriate training course for applicants who wish to teach in primary or secondary schools. It does not confer qualified teacher status (QTS) and does not provide the participant with a DFES number.

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This new Postgraduate Diploma, a Department of Health initiative, provides specialist post-qualification training for Child and Adolescent (CAMHS) workers within the CYP IAPT model, focusing on the clinical areas of child mental health. Read more

This new Postgraduate Diploma, a Department of Health initiative, provides specialist post-qualification training for Child and Adolescent (CAMHS) workers within the CYP IAPT model, focusing on the clinical areas of child mental health: anxiety, depression and conduct disorder.

About this degree

Students will gain a critical understanding of the CYP IAPT model of service change, outcome monitoring, and fundamentals of evidence-based psychological therapies to common mental health problems in childhood and adolescence (anxiety, depression, and conduct problems). They will develop skills in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) Parent training, Systemic Family Practice or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents depending on their option choices.

Students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits.

The programme consists of a core module (60 credits) and optional modules (total value 60 credits).

Core modules

  • CYP IAPT: Model and Basic Skills

Optional modules

  • Select either CYP IAPT: CBT for Anxiety Disorders andCYP IAPT: CBT for Depression
  • Or CYP IAPT: Parent Training for Conduct Problems
  • Or CYP IAPT: SFP Basic Skills and SFP Eating Disorders
  • Or SFP for Depression and Self-harm and SFP for Conduct Disorder
  • Or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents

Dissertation/report

Not applicable.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered at the Anna Freud Centre and King's College London, and is taught by leading practitioners in the field. Teaching is a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, clinical practice with on-going cases, and clinical supervision groups. Assessment is through essays, log book, case studies, oral presentations and reflective analysis.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Child and Young Person IAPT Therapy PG Dip

Careers

CAMHS professionals will be well placed to become skilled and creative independent practitioners of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for internalising disorders, parent training for conduct problems, SFP for Eating Disorders or SFP for conduct and depression disorders or IPT-A Practitioners.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Clinical Physiologist, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust
  • Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist, Brandon Centre
  • Community Mental Health Nurse, North East London NHS Foundation Trust
  • Family and Adolescent Psychotherapist, Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme is based and taught at the Anna Freud Centre, a national charity with a worldwide reputation.

It is a centre of practice, research and learning, which offers treatment for distressed children and support and advice for parents, trains mental health professionals to understand children's emotional development, and carries out pioneering research into effective ways to help young people suffering emotional distress.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The study of how history is engaged with outside academia is a major growth area of research. The MA History and Heritage at Aberystwyth has been developed both for those who are interested in the academic study of this interplay and those who are interested in pursuing careers in the heritage industry itself. Read more

About the course

The study of how history is engaged with outside academia is a major growth area of research. The MA History and Heritage at Aberystwyth has been developed both for those who are interested in the academic study of this interplay and those who are interested in pursuing careers in the heritage industry itself. It offers you the opportunity to explore key concepts and debates in heritage studies, to acquire some heritage business related skills, and to participate for academic credit in a work placement with a leading heritage organisation.

Our Masters programme in History and Heritage draws on expertise from across the university to provide a wide-ranging engagement with the concept of ‘heritage’ and ‘public history’.

In Semester 1 you’ll follow a core module that addresses the theory and practice behind heritage studies. This is followed in Semester 2 either by a module on heritage organisations and the presentation of the past, or by one of the option modules offered on our other schemes, where you will be encouraged to focus in particular on the uses of the past in the countries and eras in question.

Alongside this study you will also have the opportunity to develop your practical skills and experiences through a range of skills and research training modules, including courses in basic accountancy and marketing, and through a work placement module where you get to take a full part in the work of one of the major heritage agencies based here in Aberystwyth.

There are also classes to help you research and write your MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken by you and written over the course of the year under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work, and you will benefit from being taught the latest historical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

This degree will suit you:

• If you wish to interrogate historical and heritage practises at an advanced level;
• If you desire a strengthen your critical and scholarly abilities through engagement with historical sources;
• If you wish develop practical skills and gain hands-on experience in Heritage issues;
• If you aim to foster transferable skills and engage in professional and personal development for entering employment.

Course content

Core modules:

Concepts and Sources in Heritage Studies
Dissertation *
Research Methods and Professional Skills in History
Working with History

Optional modules:

Financial Analysis and Decision Making
Heritage Organisations and the Presentation of the Past
Information and Society
Landownership and Society in Wales
People and Organisations
Post Medieval Palaeography and Diplomatic
Rare Books and Special Collections
Science, Place and Victorian Culture
Sources for Postgraduate Research in the Modern Humanities and Social Sciences
The Georgian Spa and Seaside Resort

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 6 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The course is assessed through a diverse range of assignments, including the 15,000 word MA dissertation.

Careers

Many of our Masters graduates go on to PhD study and academic careers. Others apply their skills directly within the heritage industry, in tourism, museums and archives, or related branches of public administration, the civil service and local government, or go on to careers in related fields such as teaching, journalism or the broadcast media.

Work placements in collaboration with the National Library of Wales, the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments in Wales, or another of the heritage agencies based in and around Aberystwyth, are an integral feature of this MA scheme and give you the experience of applying your skills in a workplace environment.

Employability

Every element of the Aberystwyth Masters in Heritage and History enhances your employability in both vocational and more generic work situations. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. As an emerging Master historian and heritage expert, your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

The inclusion of an optional work placement within this course is highly significant. It balances the best of theory and practice, giving you subject-specific and practical expertise, which will set you above your competitors upon entering the jobs market where experience is at a premium. The study skills, technical knowledge and hands-on experience of heritage and historical processes will give you a tremendous advantage in employment within the discipline.

Beyond Heritage and History-related work contexts, employers in any industry value creativity, research, analysis and discursive skills that you will gain in this course. You will develop highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into the general jobs market. The organisational skills you will learn on this course will help you direct and therefore make the most of your individual flair, bringing a balance of skills that prospective employers will find attractive.

Advanced Skills in Research, Writing and Reporting

Upon completion of this degree, you will have mastered the diverse skills needed in many employment situations which require thoroughness, flair and clarity in your work disciplines. As the assessment for this Masters course is done through essay-writing, tutorial and seminar presentation, culminating in the dissertation of up to 20,000 words, you will receive much practise in writing and reporting, as well as rigorous feedback on your submissions. This will develop in you a thorough knowledge of the structure, conventions and development of written communications, which will, in turn, make your writing clear, accurate and authoritative.

A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

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This new Master's degree will deliver an in-depth understanding of clinical ophthalmology, disease pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Read more

This new Master's degree will deliver an in-depth understanding of clinical ophthalmology, disease pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. The programme combines lectures and seminars at UCL Institute of Ophthalmology in Year 1 with direct exposure to clinical practice in the ophthalmology clinics at the world-leading Moorfields Eye Hospital in Year 2.

About this degree

The programme provides knowledge of the theory and practical skills of clinical ophthalmology including ocular pathology diagnosis and management, an understanding of clinical disease processes in the eye, the assessment of patients and the different imaging modalities and treatments available, as well as their limitations and side-effects.

Students undertake modules to the value of 360 credits.

The programme consists of 16 mandatory modules (240 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) and a case-based portfolio (60 credits).

Year one core modules

  • Basic Understanding of the Eye
  • Common Ocular Diseases and Treatment
  • Systemic Disease and the Eye
  • Surgery and the Eye
  • Disorders Affecting Retinal Function
  • Retinal Imaging
  • Ocular Therapeutics I
  • Ocular Therapeutics II
  • Dissertation

Year two core modules

  • Clinical Practice: Cataract
  • Clinical Practice: Cornea
  • Clinical Practice: Glaucoma
  • Clinical Practice: Medical Retina 1
  • Clinical Practice: Medical Retina 2
  • Clinical Practice: Paediatrics and Neuro-ophthalmology
  • Clinical Practice: Uveitis
  • Clinical Practice: Vitreo Retinal Surgery
  • Case-based Portfolio

Dissertation/report

In year one all students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words. In year two students will construct a portfolio, examined by a viva.

Teaching and learning

In the first year the programme is predominantly delivered through lectures, seminars and attendance at clinical teaching sessions. The second year is largely clinic based and supplemented by taught sessions. Assessment is through written examinations, oral presentations, problem-based learning, dissertation and a case-based portfolio.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Ophthalmology with Clinical Practice MSc

Funding

The Institute of Ophthalmology currently offers the following bursaries for successful applicants on our postgraduate taught Master’s degrees: two £10,000 Allergan Foundation bursaries (available for successful applicants on the Clinical Ophthalmology and Ophthalmology with Clinical Practice degrees). These bursaries are open to home and overseas students and will be received in the form of a fee reduction only.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This programme provides students with the unique opportunity to study at world-leading ophthalmology institutions, where they will be exposed to the most advanced diagnostic and treatment approaches. Students will learn directly from experienced clinicians and researchers from both Moorfields Eye Hospital and UCL, who will help them acquire the basic knowledge for further clinical advancement. Students learn basic practical ophthalmic skills (use of slit lamp, how to do tonometry, gonioscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopy) to assist them at the start of their ophthalmic career. In Year 2 students attend clinics at Moorfields Eye Hospital.

Employability

The degree programme aims to provide students with the clinical and academic skills to help them become clinical leaders in their future posts. They will acquire the basic knowledge and clinical skills to become independent clinicians who are able to lead others in modern ophthalmic practice.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology and Moorfields Eye Hospital are recognised globally and have an outstanding track record in basic biomedical research, teaching and clinical management of patients. This degree builds on the best of all of these to provide the student with an excellent knowledge of ophthalmology. The attachments in the clinics in the second year provide an unparalleled opportunity to see and examine patients with a wide range of ophthalmic diseases with experienced clinicians.

In Year 1 students will be taught diagnosis and management of common ocular diseases by experienced clinicians and researchers. Students will gain an understanding of clinical assessments and disease processes in the eye, imaging modalities, treatments and side-effects. Additional skills acquired include critical evaluation of scientific literature and research skills . A personal tutor is allocated to each student to assist this process. Basic clinical skills session teaching will be offered. In the third term the student writes a dissertation on a topic of interest to them with guidance from the senior clinicians running the programme.

In Year 2 in addition to attending clinics in all sub-specialty areas, you attend practical skill courses (microsurgical skills, basic phacoemulsification, trabeculectomy, squint) run by experienced clinicians. 

The programme will also provide unique opportunities to interact with leading clinicians from Moorfields Eye Hospital as well as from other prominent institutions. International students from countries with less well-developed ophthalmic services will especially benefit from this unique programme.



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In the UK moves to devolve government and decision-making to the regional and local levels are generating an increased requirement for well-trained professionals who are capable of providing the knowledge and analytical skills required. Read more
In the UK moves to devolve government and decision-making to the regional and local levels are generating an increased requirement for well-trained professionals who are capable of providing the knowledge and analytical skills required. Across Europe increased economic and monetary union is emphasising the need for Member States to consider how those involved in urban and regional government can tackle the spatial disparities in economic growth and development that have been such an entrenched feature of the last 20 years.

In the Far East and North America a similar level of interest is being shown in how governments can best ensure more geographical balance in development. The design and implementation of spatial policies to manage the process of growth requires professionals with a multidisciplinary skill base and an international perspective on best practice.

This course is therefore designed to equip you with the analytical skills required to:

- Understand the factors that lead to variations in regional growth and development and to understand the consequences of regional imbalance
- Assess the scope for policy intervention to manage regional growth
- Design efficient and effective policies to manage growth at the regional level
- Understand how best to implement growth and regeneration policies
- Evaluate policy achievement and monitor and assess the effectiveness of policy initiatives.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelemppgr

Course detail

The course emphasises the importance of adopting a multidisciplinary approach both to understanding the nature of growth and regeneration problems as well as creating successful policy solutions.

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory, and submit a 12,000 word dissertation.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Urban and environmental planning I
- Issues in public policy and regeneration and economic tools for spatial planning
- Urban and environmental planning II
- Real estate development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Continuing

Continuation to the PhD degree Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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In a competitive international business environment, real estate professionals need a sophisticated understanding of finance, economics and law to succeed. Read more
In a competitive international business environment, real estate professionals need a sophisticated understanding of finance, economics and law to succeed. The MPhil in Real Estate Finance has been designed to provide rigorous training in the latest concepts from these three key areas as applied to international real estate markets.

The course is aimed at those who may already have some experience or interest in real estate markets, banking or investment and wish to upgrade their skills or for those who are looking to commence a career in this area. The programme offers an opportunity to study theoretical and practical finance, investment and law applied to global commercial real estate markets, while enjoying the cultural, social and recreational facilities of Cambridge. The course takes students from a wide variety of backgrounds: finance, geography, economics, law, biology, international business, mathematics. These students have in common a strong desire to work in property and investments coupled with strong academic skills.

Tuition in the programme is based around classroom lectures, case studies and field trips to ensure students can apply the theoretical concepts taught. The programme can also serve as an entry point into PhD training for those interested in pursuing research in real estate finance in greater depth.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempref

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:
i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory, and submit a 12,000 word dissertation.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Introduction to real estate finance
- Real estate securities, securitisation and investment
- Private real estate investment
- Real estate development
- Legal issues in land use and finance
- The macroeconomy and housing
- Real estate project modelling and decision methods
- Urban and environmental planning
- Spatial economics

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Continuing

Continuation to the PhD degree - Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil Examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire. Read more

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Therapy programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification. The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills and IPC intervention skills to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues.

Many roles in the workforce today require people to have enhanced their psychological and therapeutic skills. At present, our programme is the only one in the UK that offers the opportunity for individuals to undertake IPC training.

Successful completion of this year will enable individuals to undertake the Diploma in IPT, a full therapy qualification.

Programme structure

This one year programme can be undertaken on its own or as part of a flexible training of up to three years. Successful completion of all modules in this first Certificate year gives the option of progressing into year two, the Diploma in IPT, which confers a full therapy qualification which allows individuals to practice in the NHS or elsewhere. There is also the option to complete a third research year to obtain an MSc.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

Example module listing

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, Intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Teaching approaches

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching. 

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

Educational aims of the programme

This programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPC (Interpersonal counselling) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues without undertaking a full therapy qualification.

Interpersonal counselling is a brief intervention, based on the principles of Interpersonal Psychotherapy, for people suffering from stress or mild depression. It is designed to be delivered by individuals after a relatively brief training course, and does not require them to have previous mental health qualifications.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Have a basic understanding of psychiatric classification and of those conditions most frequently met in clinical practice
  • Understand the role of medication in the treatment of mental health problems
  • Understand the difference between the therapeutic alliance, the real relationship and the transference relationship and their contribution to the therapeutic relationship
  • Understand their own relationship to and work with difference and diversity
  • Understand the function of the therapeutic frame

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Critically assess different models of the underpinnings of psychological health

Professional practical skills

  • Select appropriate clients and plan an intervention
  • Undertake completed pieces of time-limited (short-term) interpersonal clinical interventions under supervision
  • Use the Interpersonal Counselling (IPC) model to deliver complete short therapeutic interventions
  • Manage challenges in the therapeutic relationship
  • Facilitate clients in developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic relationship
  • To use appropriate measures to evaluate the success of treatment
  • Understand and work within the professional context of psychological therapy, including ethical practice

Key / transferable skills

To reflect on their development as a psychological practitioner

Professional recognition

Recognition is being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science. Read more
Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science.

Furthermore, we are home to the Centre for Research in Social Simulation (CRESS) and its world-leading expertise in agent-based modelling.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Interest in simulation has grown rapidly in the social sciences. New methods have been developed to tackle this complexity. This programme will integrate traditional and new methods, to model complexity, evolution and the adaptation of social systems.

These new methods are having an increasing influence on policy research through a growing recognition that many social problems are insufficiently served by traditional policy modelling approaches.

The Masters in Social Science and Complexity will equip you to develop expertise in the methods necessary to tackle complex, policy-relevant, real-world social problems through a combination of traditional and computational social science methods, and with a particular focus on policy relevance.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analysis
-Field Methods
-Computational Modelling
-Theory Model Data
-Modelling the Complex World
-Policy Modelling
-Theory and Method
-Statistical Modelling
-Evaluation Research
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The main aims of the programme are to:
-Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for 
 students going on to employment involving the use of social science and policy research
-Provide training that fully integrates social science, policy modelling and computational methodologies to a high standard
-Provide training resulting in students with high quality analytic, methodological, computational and communication skills

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES
The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Develop skills in tackling real world policy problems with creativity and sound methodological judgment
-Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research 
questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs and models
-Introduce students to the methodological and epistemological issues surrounding research in the social sciences in general and computational modelling in particular
-Develop skills in programming in NetLogo for the implementation of agent-based models for the modelling of social phenomena
-Develop skills in the acquisition and analysis of social science data
-Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
-Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
-Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
-Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
-Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation ofresearch results and in verbal communication
-Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, stakeholders, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

Knowledge and understanding
-Show advanced knowledge of qualitative, quantitative and computational methodologies in the social science
-Show advanced knowledge of modelling methodologies, model construction and analysis
-Show critical understanding of methodological and epistemological challenges of social science and computer modelling
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the methodological implications of a range of sociological theories and approaches
-Show understanding the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Show advanced knowledge in data collection, analysis and data driven modelling
-Show advanced knowledge of policy relevant social science research and modelling
-Show advanced understanding of the policy process and the role of social science and modelling therein
-Show advanced knowledge of statistical modelling

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Systematically formulate researchable problems; analyse and conceptualise issues; critically appreciate alternative approaches to research; report to a range of audiences
-Conceptual development of Social Science and Complexity models to creatively enhance the understanding of social phenomena
-Integration of qualitative, quantitative and computational data
-Judgement of problem-methodology match
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Develop original insights, questions, analyses and interpretations in respect of research questions
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of traditional and computational techniques employed in sociological research
-Ability to produce well founded, data driven and validated computational models
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Ability to communicate research findings models in social science and policy relevant ways
-Ability to manage independent research

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate complex ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means
-Apply computational modelling methodology to complex social issues in appropriate ways
-Creativity in approaching complex problems and a the ability of communicating and justifying problem solutions
-Apply computing skills for computational modelling, research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Work independently or as part of a team
-Demonstrate experience of a work environment

PLACEMENTS

On the MSc Social Science and Complexity, we offer the opportunity to take a research placement during the Easter vacation. This will provide you with first-hand experience of real-life policy research in action.

Organisations in which placements might be possible are a number of consultancies (e.g. Sandtable), government departments (e.g. Defra) and academic research centres (e.g. Centre for Policy Modelling at Manchester).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Computational methods and especially computer-based simulations, are becoming increasingly important in academic social science and policy making.

Graduates might find career opportunities in government departments, consultancies, government departments, consultancies, NGOs and academia.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Adult nurses help care for people over 18 who are ill, injured, or have physical disabilities. They check patients' progress and decide with doctors what care to give, as well as advising and supporting patients and their relatives. Read more
Adult nurses help care for people over 18 who are ill, injured, or have physical disabilities. They check patients' progress and decide with doctors what care to give, as well as advising and supporting patients and their relatives. Although, demanding and intense work, it can also be exceptionally rewarding.

This innovative two year course will prepare you for a career in a wide range of rewarding adult nursing opportunities across both general medical and surgical wards as well as specialist units such as Accident and Emergency or intensive care. Many of our graduates take their first posts as qualified practitioners in the NHS Trusts and hospitals in which they gained experience during their training.

Throughout the course you will have the opportunity to work with qualified practitioners both to gain experience of the differing clinical environments, and to appreciate the expertise of these specialist nurses whilst on placement.

Top-up to MSc

By adding the research element of a dissertation (an extended and independent piece of written research), you'll be able to graduate with a Masters-level qualification.

Modules

You will be taught separately from the traditional three-year undergraduate students and will study the following:

Year 1

Improving quality, change management and leadership
Biology and pharmacology for health
Person centred care
Building practice skills for adult nursing
Practice experience year 1

Year 2

Care of the adult deteriorating patient
Caring for the older adult
Enhancing practice skills for adult nursing
Research in health and social care
Practice experience year 2
Plus a dissertation (for the award of MSc only).

Placements

During the course you will spend 50% of your time involved in academic study and 50% in clinical practice. A clinical practice placement allows you to put theory into practice by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge and experience required to become a competent nurse. Although sometimes challenging, practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be a nurse.

At LSBU, you will experience a variety of clinical settings such as NHS acute Trusts, community placements, independent sector and voluntary sector organisations. If you are based at our Southwark campus you are able to experience placements at Guy's Hospital, St Thomas' Hospital, University College London Hospital, Newham University Hospital and Whipps Cross University Hospital. You will also undertake a placement in the community. If you are based at our Havering campus you are able to experience placements at Newham University Hospital, Whipps Cross University Hospital, King George Hospital and Queen's Hospital; along with a placement within the community.

Placements are spread over the two years:

Your first clinical placements are designed to introduce you to working in a professional setting and to develop essential care and basic assessment skills, infection control and learn about safeguarding vulnerable people.

You will then begin to take on more responsibility, progressing your clinical reasoning skills and begin to look small groups of patients making confident, proactive decision for their health management with little supervision.

Whilst in the clinical placement we ensure you receive continuous support and guidance from a dedicated mentor and practice learning teams made up of lecturers and practitioners.

Facilities

Adult Nursing skills laboratories
We have two adult nursing skills laboratories at our Southwark campus and three at our Havering campus. Our nursing skills labs; set up like hospital wards are used by all student nurses and midwives throughout their courses. They learn manual handling and basic life support skills and skills that are specific to their field of nursing or midwifery.

SimMan
The nursing wards have simulator mannequins: SimMan, SimBaby and SimMom. These life-size mannequins are computer controlled and can be programmed with various clinical conditions. These are operated by a computer in real-time and so respond to a student's actions. They also allow students to see the outcome of specific interventions in certain scenarios, which could make the patient better or deteriorate quite quickly.

The mannequins are used to teach students how to recognise clinical signs, and to also associate those clinical signs with the actions they are taking to care for the patient. SimMan can be male or converted to female with fully accurate anatomy and can breathe, blink, sweat, speak and groan in pain as well as have a pulse.

Employability

The course will enable you to develop a wide range of employability skills through the emphasis on a vocational approach to teaching which leads to a professional qualification leading to registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC).

This course will prepare you for a career in a wide range of rewarding adult nursing opportunities across both general medical and surgical wards as well as specialist units such as Accident and Emergency or intensive care. Many graduates take their first post as qualified practitioners in the NHS Trusts and hospitals which they gained experience during their training. Recent graduates have achieved prominent employment positions in areas such as advanced clinical practice, management of health services or as researchers or lecturers.

Successful graduates of the PgDip can top-up to MSc in one year and will be qualified to study a range of further specialist postgraduate pathways. With additional experience, advanced practice is available at Masters level with the potential to progress to doctorate studies. Once you are a registered nurse browse our online CPPD prospectus to find out what courses are on offer to help with your professional development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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What is the 'Master of Information Management' all about?. This programme offers students with a Bachelor's or Master's degree advanced non-technical training in information management, with an emphasis on the efficient and effective application and management of information technology in various business contexts (e.g. Read more

What is the 'Master of Information Management' all about?

This programme offers students with a Bachelor's or Master's degree advanced non-technical training in information management, with an emphasis on the efficient and effective application and management of information technology in various business contexts (e.g. finance, marketing, HR, production and logistics, etc.). Following basic training in technology, the programme explores specific management issues in greater depth, particularly in order to develop the skills required to analyse information needs, design and manage information systems and fine-tune an IT strategy as an integral part of an overall business strategy.

The key focus is the preliminary design needed to develop and set up an information system. In completing your Master's thesis, you can apply these skills within a specific business context. Finally, a wide range of electives enables you to either explore specific areas in greater depth or gain a broader understanding through a multidisciplinary approach.

Objectives

This programme presents a non-technical curriculum in information management. It focuses on the effective and efficient application and management of information technology in a business setting. First, a basic technological background is offered, after which the management aspects are elaborated in more detail. The programme aims at developing skills in analysing information needs, the modelling and management of information systems and the alignment of information technology strategy with business strategy. Hence, the main focus is on the early phases of the information system development cycle. By means of the master project, skills acquired throughout the programme are applied in a concrete business setting. Finally, the electives provide the opportunity to explore particular aspects in more depth or to broaden the scope by taking one or more multidisciplinary courses.

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired:

  • a broad and general knowledge of business information systems;
  • the skills to independently formulate a strategy concerning information systems management accompanying an existing company strategy (business, non-profit, government);
  • the skills to analyse and model the needs concerning information systems and to follow up on the design, implementation and management of these systems;
  • the skills to evaluate technology independently and to choose a technical solution in accordance with the company strategy;
  • the skills to independently recognise the economic aspects of a choice for a particular system;
  • the skills to judge and optimise the quality of data, processes and decisions;
  • the skills to lead and manage projects on information systems in a multidisciplinary team of analysts, designers and users;
  • a professional and scientific attitude in the field of information systems.

Career perspectives

In the business world, there is a great demand for IT specialists with highly developed management skills. Our graduates are trained to gain leverage within a company through the strategic use of technology. The analysis and management of information, knowledge, processes and systems, in line with an overall business strategy, play a bridging role between computer science and business. Qualities such as strong communication skills, teamwork and group management are therefore more essential than mere technological expertise. Our graduates pursue careers as information analysts, project leaders and information technology strategists.



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