• Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
"baroque"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Baroque)

  • "baroque" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 36
Order by 
Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The Hispanic Studies division was rated 5A in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise.

Supervision is provided in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies. Members of staff have research interests in the following fields: Medieval: modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts; mythology and fantasy; oral literature; questions of transmission and textual criticism; Golden Age: Cervantes and the development of fiction; political and social thought; theatre; European Baroque culture; Modern Peninsular: Generation of 98; modern and contemporary fiction; narrative forms; Spanish American and Brazilian: Argentinian culture; women writers; gender, sexuality and representation; and theory.

Training and support

We offer supervision in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish-American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies, with particular research strengths in the 19th century, theatre of all periods, and the visual arts.

Thanks to the breadth of language research undertaken within the graduate school here at Edinburgh, we can also accommodate an interest in cross-cultural research with a programme of joint supervision.

Our staff pursue a diversity of research interests, offering you a wide choice of areas for study. Research staff have interests in the following fields:

Cervantes and the development of fiction
European Baroque culture
gender, sexuality and representation
Golden Age
medieval (modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts)
modern and contemporary fiction
modern peninsular: generation of ’98
mythology and fantasy
narrative forms
oral literature
political and social thought
questions of transmission and textual criticism
Spanish American, Brazilian and Argentinian culture
the essay and newspaper columns
theatre
women writers

Facilities

You will have access to the impressive collections of the University’s Main Library, in addition to the nearby National Library of Scotland and its outstanding collection of early modern Spanish material.

Read less
Do you want to be well prepared for a career in the world of the Visual Arts? The Master Program in Art History offers all the knowledge and expertise that you need. Read more
Do you want to be well prepared for a career in the world of the Visual Arts? The Master Program in Art History offers all the knowledge and expertise that you need.

The one-year Master Program in Art History offers courses in Western art from the late Middle Ages to the present. The program is committed to historical as well as theoretical depth. Students are also trained with an eye to their post-graduate career prospects. We offer internships in major museums throughout the Netherlands and abroad, as well as an excursion to a major European metropolis.

Why Groningen?

Combination of historical and theoretical depth. Faculty specialized in the fields of Italian Renaissance and Baroque art, Northern Renaissance and Baroque art, including pre-modern globalization, the art of the Enlightenment, twentieth-century art, art criticism, new media, and materials and techniques.

Read less
This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis of the usual length allowed for Buckingham Master’s degree dissertations, aspects of Western Architectural History from the medieval period to the mid-twentieth century. Read more

Course outline

This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis of the usual length allowed for Buckingham Master’s degree dissertations, aspects of Western Architectural History from the medieval period to the mid-twentieth century. Students will be encouraged to consider the interrelation of architectural history, art history and social history.

The seminar programme, which serves to complement the student’s individual research, will explore these themes in a series of twelve meetings, which will be addressed by some of the United Kingdom’s most distinguished architectural historians. These will be prefaced by a general introductory class led by the Course Director, offering an introduction to research techniques, relevant library resources available in London and through the University of Buckingham’s online subscriptions, to relevant museum collections and to the most recent academic approaches to the subject.

Each seminar will take place in central London in the early evening, followed by a 40-minute question-and-answer session with the seminar speakers, all recognised experts in their fields, and a dinner at which there will be further discussion with the speaker and a general conversation about the topic in hand. Six seminars will be scheduled for the period between October and December, and a further six in the period between the New Year and March.

After the course leader’s general introduction, there will be a series of twelve seminar papers which explore the architecture of the Western world: the medieval castle, the Gothic cathedral, Italian renaissance architecture, French and English baroque palace and country house architecture, European baroque church architecture, the inspiration of the Classical world, the Gothic Revival and historicism, Ruskin and Morris and the birth of conservation philosophy, industrialisation and the transformation of urban architecture, colonial architecture, Beaux-Arts architecture in America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, and the meaning of Modern architecture. Reading lists will be made available before each lecture to allow for background reading and discussion with the expert speakers.

Location for seminars: The Reform Club (104 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5EW) and the University of Buckingham’s London premises at 51 Gower Street (Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 6HJ)

Course director

Jeremy Musson has a distinguished reputation as an architectural and social historian. A former National Trust assistant curator, he was Architectural Editor of Country Life magazine in 1998-2007, and presented the BBC 2 series The Curious House Guest, 2006-2007. He is an author and historic buildings consultant, working with a range of clients including the National Trust and St Paul’s Cathedral.

He is a regular lecturer and supervisor on the Master’s in Building History course at the University of Cambridge, a second supervisor to the Buckingham Master’s in the English Country House, regular speaker and tutor on the Attingham Summer School and has been a course director for the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. He has also lectured The Royal Oak in the USA and at various US museums.

His books include The Country Houses of Sir John Vanbrugh, English Ruins, Up and Down Stairs: The History of the Country House Servant, English Country House Interiors and Robert Adam: Country House Design, Decoration and the Art of Elegance (2017). He recently contributed a chapter to the new monograph King’s College Chapel 1515-2015: Art, Music and Religion in Cambridge, 2014, and another to Fin de siècle Rediscovered. A Mosaic of the Turn of the Century, proceedings of a conference at the National Museum in Warsaw. He is co-editor with Sir David Cannadine of the forthcoming collection of essays The British Country House Revisited.

Associate students

For those wishing to attend the evening research seminar programme, but unable to devote the time to the coursework or to register for the MA degree, there is the option of becoming an Associate Student. This status will enable the student to attend the twelve research seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, in the first six months of the programme, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

Read less
On the Medieval and Renaissance Studies pathway you’ll study the myriad ways in which power was understood, communicated and exercised during the Middle Ages and Renaissance period (c.300-c.1700 CE). Read more
On the Medieval and Renaissance Studies pathway you’ll study the myriad ways in which power was understood, communicated and exercised during the Middle Ages and Renaissance period (c.300-c.1700 CE).

The programme draws on our considerable medieval and early modern expertise across history, literature, languages, and archaeology (see here for our academics and their research interests: http://www.liv.ac.uk/cmrs/staff. We examine issues such as:-

the notions and exercise of secular and spiritual authority
the operation of power in medieval and early modern societies
the development of conceptions of and attitudes to gender
the construction of identities
You’ll become skilled in the advanced research methods and techniques needed to read and interpret original sources. There’ll also be training in languages and palaeography: vital attributes if you want to continue into doctoral research.

You will also have the opportunity to participate fully in the activities of Liverpool’s Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies http://www.liv.ac.uk/cmrs.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60- credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
This absorbing MA gives you the opportunity to study and reflect on major 20th century events, such as total war, the rise and fall of communism, the collapse of the European empires, the changing place of women in western society and the decline of traditional religious belief. Read more
This absorbing MA gives you the opportunity to study and reflect on major 20th century events, such as total war, the rise and fall of communism, the collapse of the European empires, the changing place of women in western society and the decline of traditional religious belief.

You’ll be able to:-

explore the features that made the twentieth century unique
study social and political developments that most defined the character of the twentieth century
focus in-depth on particular countries or themes that interest you
develop the research skills needed to complete your 15,000 word dissertation on the topic of your choice
This programme will appeal to a wide range of students, including those who’ve recently or have decided to return to university later in life.

The structure of the course provides a good grounding for those intending to proceed to doctoral research.



Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60- credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity. Read more
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity.

On this absorbing MA programme you’ll study one of the most exciting fields of historical inquiry; cultural history examines the culture of the time in order to understand how people made sense of the world they inhabited.

It will introduce you to the specialist research methods used by cultural historians, to ongoing historiographical and theoretical debates and to related disciplines such as cultural studies, literary studies, history of art and sociology. You will also get the opportunity to explore the area of cultural history that interests you most in your dissertation.

The MA draws together case studies from across Britain and continental Europe, the European Empires and North America from the 18th century to the present day. Taking the Cultural History MA will:

- Deepen your understanding of the cultural history of Britain and its Empire, continental Europe and North America since the 18th century
- Encourage you to think about a broad range of questions and debates in cultural history
- Allow you to engage with current debates on such themes as gender, modernity, national identity, sexuality and the politics of culture
- Give you the chance to work closely with a dynamic group of young historians and established scholars who themselves research and write about the cultural history of Britain, continental Europe and North America.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
Are you fascinated by visual culture and history relating to a specific artist, period or movement?. Do you want to learn about the methods of art history and how to apply them to particular historical problems?. Read more
Are you fascinated by visual culture and history relating to a specific artist, period or movement?

Do you want to learn about the methods of art history and how to apply them to particular historical problems?

This programme provides you with the opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of specific areas in the History of Art. The programme comprises of a series of taught 20-credit 'Special Subject' modules and a dissertation in the research area of your choice. Your dissertation is supported by a supervisor and is 15,000 words in length.

Your studies will be supported by two core modules in critical theory and research methodologies. The taught module options offered each year on the MA will allow you to either choose from a range of subject areas and historical periods in the History of Art, or to specialise in early modern or modern and contemporary artistic periods.

You will study two core modules:

Criticism and Methods in the History of Art and Visual Culture
Postgraduate Research Training and Methods
The specialised research skills module prepares you for writing your dissertation.

You will also study three Special Subject modules and one further 20-credit module.

The programme culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation in a research area that you choose with the guidance of academic staff.

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Composition pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed to develop your individual compositional style and technique through tutorial guidance and opportunities for performances, workshops and recordings.

Various stylistic and generic strands can be pursued individually or in combination, including jazz, music for screen and multimedia, contemporary music for the concert hall and computer sound design.

You will take two compulsory research training modules followed by a combination of composition-related options. Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the programme, you will progress to Masters stage and submit a composition folio.

The programme provides ideal preparation for future research work at PhD level.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Training for Practitioners A
-Research Training for Practitioners B
-Composition A
-Composition B
-Composition Folio
-Studio Techniques
-Performance A
-Conducting A
-Orchestral Management 1
-Creative Practice A
-Rock Track Poetics
-African American Music
-Historical Performance Practice
-Compositional Techniques
-Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries
-English Music from Elgar to Britten
-Synthesis and Music Programming
-Screen Music Studies
-Performance A
-Performance B
-Conducting B
-Orchestral Management 2
-Digital Music Improvisation 2
-Anglo Celtic Song Traditions
-Jazz Studies 2
-Opera Studies
-Baroque Fugue in Practice
-Applied Music 2
-Musical Theatre

RESEARCH

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA).

School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres. The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in-progress.

Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MMus (Composition) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music composition and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
-Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
-The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Frame research questions
-Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
-Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills
-Produce stylistically original and technically professional compositions

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate subject knowledge clearly
-Self-direction and autonomy
-Originality in problem solving
-Work in and manage groups
-Efficient time management

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The Wales International Academy of Voice (WIAV) is established to address a perceived change in vocal and musical standards in current-day performance, particularly in opera. Read more
The Wales International Academy of Voice (WIAV) is established to address a perceived change in vocal and musical standards in current-day performance, particularly in opera. WIAV concentrates heavily on issues of vocal technique and style in operatic repertoire from the baroque onwards, as well as in art song repertoire.

Course Overview

The course is based on individual, bespoke tuition provided by a team of distinguished coaches, including Dennis O’Neill, the Academy Director, Nuccia Focile, Jane Samuel, and a number of visiting consultants, such as Dame Kiri te Kanawa (WIAV’s honorary president), Ryland Davies, Anne Murray, Richard Bonynge, Joseph Rouleau, and so on. There are also master classes, group teaching classes and participation in public events and professional placement.

Key Features

The programme provides the highest possible level of tuition for singers, either already in the profession or about to enter it. WIAV targets those students who have normally completed a postgraduate course (or equivalent) at a conservatoire. The programme is inherently vocational, essentially practical and designed to enhance already established abilities.

Assessment

Part 1
-80% Recital
-20% Academic Interview (Vivas)
-One Portfolio Module

Part 2
-70% Recital
-20% Process portfolio
-10% Action Plan

Career Opportunities

Graduates from the programme will have significantly enhanced employment prospects. This is demonstrated by the destinations of graduates from pre-cursor progress and WIAV alumni.

Read less
Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit. www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday. Read more
Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit: http://www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday

The Eighteenth-Century Worlds pathw will take you on an investigative journey through the history, literature and visual and material culture of Europe and its interactions with the wider world, from the Atlantic to Asia.

This highly original interdisciplinary postgraduate course gives you the opportunity to study in one of Britain’s leading Atlantic ports; a city rich in eighteenth-century history, architecture and culture.

Researching the subject is a real pleasure in Liverpool. The city is home to more national museums and galleries than any other English city outside of London.

The expertise of our research-active tutors and the combination of modules makes this a unique course, following the trajectory to a global world during the eighteenth century.

ERASMUS Exchange with Paris Diderot

There is an opportunity for students to spend semester 2 studying at the University of Paris-Diderot, taking modules there while preparing their feasibility study. Further details will be available in due course. For students who do not choose to go abroad, the course is enhanced by the presence of a visiting lecturer from Paris in each academic year.

Eighteenth-Century Worlds Research Centre

All MA students are encouraged to take part in the activities of the Centre. These include research seminars with invited speakers and workshops and conferences, some designed specifically for postgraduates. Watch this space!

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MA programme has as its core one interdisciplinary module in each semester . These modules are team-taught by staff with expertise in British and Continental European literary, cultural and historical studies (including colonial and postcolonial studies) and in Classics. They are designed to introduce postgraduates to the range of disciplines covered by the MA, while raising awareness of methodological and theoretical concerns and some of the key themes in eighteenth-century studies. The other compulsory elements are a module on research methods, the Feasibility Study and the Dissertation. The choice of dissertation topic is up to the student, and the Feasibility Study and Dissertation can be supervised by staff from any of the participating Departments (History; English; Cultures, Languages and Area Studies; Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology).

All studies are co-ordinated by the Eighteenth-Century Worlds Centre at the University of Liverpool. The two core modules are worth 30 credits each, while the research methods module and Feasibility Study are both worth 15 credits. I. In addition to the compulsory modules, students select one 15-credit option in each semester from modules in English literature and the reception of classical antiquity. Over the summer students complete the 15,000-word dissertation which constitutes the final 60 credits of the MA programme.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in History. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in History. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
Our MA in International Slavery Studies is one of the few programmes in the world to offer students the chance to study forced labour and slavery in a wide variety of past and present contexts. Read more
Our MA in International Slavery Studies is one of the few programmes in the world to offer students the chance to study forced labour and slavery in a wide variety of past and present contexts. Your seminars, research and tutorials will range broadly, challenging you to analyse historical forms of slavery, to critique modern responses to human trafficking, to evaluate the legacies and memorialisation of slavery in contemporary society, and to apply critical and literary theories to surviving representations of slavery.

Drawing expertise from researchers across the University of Liverpool, students will benefit from our unique relationship with the International Slavery Museum. You will work with the Museum’s staff to study the commemoration and memorialisation of slavery, while the broader MA programme is a flagship activity for the Centre for the Study of International Slavery – a successful venture between the Museum and the University. As members of the Centre, students will meet the international cast of visitors who speak in our seminar series, presenting cutting edge research for criticism and debate.

Probing “slavery” as a category of cultural, legal, political and social analysis, students will confront the realities of un-free labour and asserted human ownership in ancient, modern and contemporary societies. However, there is plenty of potential to specialise in the areas and approaches that grab your interest. Besides the four modules concerning slavery, students will select their disciplinary training modules from a wide variety offered by historians, political scientists, literary scholars and other specialists, enabling you to select the right training for your own interests and aspirations.

All teaching takes place in small-group workshops, seminars and tutorials. Assessment tests students’ abilities through research essays, oral presentations and a 15,000 word dissertation, which is intended to be an original work of scholarship and research.

The course will appeal to you whether you want to develop the skills to work in a range of research careers, within the NGO, public and private sectors, to develop your experience in museum, political or campaigning work, or prepare for further academic research with a PhD. The distinctive choice of disciplinary training modules from across those offered in University departments provides the ideal opportunity for students to change direction from their undergraduate specialism or further their existing strengths. In approaching the topic of slavery and forced labour through a comparative, multidisciplinary perspective, this programme provides both variety and the opportunity to specialise in students’ chosen areas.

Why study International Slavery at Liverpool?

Our regular research seminars offer unparalleled opportunities to debate fresh approaches with a programme of renowned international speakers.

The unique partnership between the University and the International Slavery Museum offers students the opportunity to work with the curators of the Museum as they consider how to develop its galleries in the future.

Our library boasts a wide range of resources, many available online, with a particularly strong collection for the study of slavery, abolition and resistance.

This programme is a pioneering opportunity to choose your disciplinary skills training to suit your interests and aspirations, permitting you to pick from a wide variety of literary, historical and social science modules.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
The Italian know-how results from a complex cultural stratification, able to integrate and renew the heritage of the classical style, renaissance, baroque and avant-garde, not only by synthesizing original design forms, but also leading them towards consistent individual and social behaviours. Read more
The Italian know-how results from a complex cultural stratification, able to integrate and renew the heritage of the classical style, renaissance, baroque and avant-garde, not only by synthesizing original design forms, but also leading them towards consistent individual and social behaviours.

The objective of the Master in Interior Design for Luxury Living is transmitting the evolution and expectations of Italian design excellence, from the house to the areas of hospitality and culture. The Italian living landscape is analysed in its narrative ability, grafting into memory the projection of a future of crafted interior dimensions, able to integrate the complexity of the environment with the needs of the client.

The pathway of study focuses on on the concept of Common Luxury Good in evolution, able to create new living environments, hospitality and entertainment areas, where the Italian style, even in comparison with other cultures, is enriched with new codes and languages without losing their identity.

The Master's programme is structured as an itinerary of research, with design experiences providing the tools to understand how to work and meditate on the meaning of their own work. To achieve these results, participants are encouraged to apply the operative knowledge acquired with an autonomous capacity to critically process and explore individual poetics with the elaboration of a personal expressive language.

The Course introduces participants to the reception and interpretation of the needs of the client. They learn to develop the ability of design direction, in order to integrate project choices that affect a space or a service in a broader vision of the planning and realization processes.

The Goal is focusing on a strategic plan including all tangible and intangible aspects (function, communication, service, identity, relationships) that perfectly meet customers’ expectations and market needs.

The theoretical lessons integrate aesthetics, anthropology, living culture, the history of interior design and design furniture.

There will be seminars of Interior Design on several themes including housing, retail, hospitality (hotels, resorts, spa) catering (bars, restaurants) for special luxury spaces (yachts, cellars, exhibition areas).

Through the project communication, participants acquire the tools for visual communication and marketing strategies, and learn about contracts and schedules for cost control.

The Master culminates with a Final Project realized on a chosen topic among seminars and presented in a personal portfolio, aimed at checking the skills acquired.

Read less
The Music Department offers promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain, with access to outstanding facilities. Read more
The Music Department offers promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain, with access to outstanding facilities.

Our staff include composers, performers and writers on music. Our wide research expertise covers the Medieval, Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods, 19th and 20th century British music, music analysis, critical theory, ethnomusicology and sound studies.

Our research expertise covers:

Western music history
British music since 1850
Italian opera and vocal music
Music analysis
Critical theory
Music and nationalism
Ethnomusicology
Popular music

The MA by Research programme leads to the submission of a thesis of not more than 40,000 words, whilst the PhD requires an 80,000 word thesis to be submitted. Both routes may require you to undertake training from courses in the Department’s taught MA programme.

For those following the MA by Research programme, it is possible to upgrade to a PhD.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
Today's world has been shaped largely by the colonial experience. states, borders, languages, cultures and the imprint which empires, European and non-European, have left over centuries. Read more
Today's world has been shaped largely by the colonial experience: states, borders, languages, cultures and the imprint which empires, European and non-European, have left over centuries.

Colonial and postcolonial studies engage with the cultural and political history and legacy of colonialism, highlighting a variety of power relations, cultural dynamics and historical processes which had been previously ignored or under-played.

This programme will take an original, interdisciplinary approach, where you will be studying material from Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and beyond. Working with World Literature, film and historical sources, you will explore major currents in cultural production and identity politics. You will be introduced to a range of authors, and have the opportunity to study works and critical texts which originated in languages other than English. Works will be taught in English translation, with the possibility to read them in the original modern languages.

The programme includes the following core modules:

World Literatures and Film I
World Literatures and Film II
Before Postcolonialism: Europe and its Empires
Postcolonial Theory
Research Methods

You will also choose an optional module chosen from a range of relevant disciplines such as History, African studies, Development or literature related to colonialism and postcolonialism.

You will complete the course with a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic which you will choose, refine and analyse with the help of your supervisor (who will be allocated to you depending upon your own research interests)

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X