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The course is a two-year world-class integrated programme aimed at qualifying graduates to deal with the huge challenges facing temperate forestry, agriculture and sustainable land use. Read more
The course is a two-year world-class integrated programme aimed at qualifying graduates to deal with the huge challenges facing temperate forestry, agriculture and sustainable land use. The teaching staff are research active and the students will benefit from our wide range of research activities and contacts in the UK and overseas.

By joining the teaching and research experiences of five European leading educational institutions, this unique course will constitute an in-depth educational programme with inherent impetus to stay at the forefront of research-based teaching strongly linked to realities in many European and non-European countries.

The SUFONAMA course is offered by a consortium consisting of five institutions:

Danish Centre for Forest, Landscape and Planning,
Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
School of the Environment and Natural Resources, Bangor University, Bangor, Wales, UK,
of Forest Sciences and Ecology, University of Goettingen, Faculty Goettingen, Germany,
Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden, and
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
Detailed information on the SUFONAMA Masters course is available at: http://www.sufonama.eu/

ICF logoThis course is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters and gives partial fulfilment of Professional Membership Entry.

This web-page describes the Sustainable Forest and Nature Management course as structured in the current academic session. While the aims of the programme and the broad structure of the degree are similar from year to year, details may change over time to meet the requirements of the profession and of academic audits, and to ensure that the programme remains effective and up-to-date.

First Year

The Course consists of a first study year at one of three institutions (Bangor, Copenhagen, Goettingen) and a specialising second study year with different topics offered by each of the five institutions. The students are required to spend the second year at another university than the first one. The aim of the first study year is to provide a thorough and broad introduction to sustainable forest and nature management. The learning outcomes are similar for the three first year institutions and allow students to choose freely among the five specialisation options in the second year. The first study year ends with a Joint Summer Module, run as a two-week excursion to a Consortium country.

Second Year

You can specialise in the second year within the following topics:

Conservation and Land Management (Bangor)
Management of Forest and Nature for Society Copenhagen)
Forest and Nature Management in Changing Climate (Göttingen)
Forest Management in Scandinavia and the Baltic Region (Alnarp)
Mountain Forestry and Watershed Management (Padova).
The specialisation includes a master thesis based on research and fieldwork inside or outside the EU. When students have acquired 120 ECTS by studying at two Consortium institutions (at least 60 ECTS at each) they will obtain a SUFONAMA double degree and the Diploma Supplement. All SUFONAMA modular activities can be completed in English. The following degrees are awarded: MSc in Forestry in Copenhagen, MSc in Environmental Forestry and MSc in Conservation and Land Management in Bangor, MSc in Forestry in Goettingen, MSc in Forestry in Alnarp, and MSc in Forestry and Environmental Sciences in Padova.

Bangor Compulsory Modules:

Forest Resource Assessment: This module provides an introduction to world forest resources and policy
Silviculture: this module provides an understanding of temperate silviculture and forest management. It also highlights the interaction of management systems with the physical environment
Natural Resource Management: This module provides students a theoretical & practical understanding of the systems approach to managing natural resources to provide various ecosystem services.
Location Specific Knowledge and fieldwork in temperate forest and nature management: This module is essentially designed to allow for in-depth preparation for field work in temperate forest and nature management.
Contemporary temperate forest and nature management: climate change and management strategies: This module deals with a current hot topic and can take in students globally through its e-learning format
Preparing Field Work in the Temperate: This module develops in-depth factual location specific knowledge relevant to temperate forestry issues
Sustainable Temperate Forestry Management Summer School – this module applies data collection and evaluation methods in the field.

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The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Read more
The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Research skills taught during the first semester will enable students to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary approaches and sources, ranging from theoretical, historical and cultural aspects of the Arthurian myth.

Background
Arthurian Literature is an established area of expertise in the School of English at Bangor University and has been taught here for over three decades. A long-standing record of teaching, research and publication attests to its vitality; the main specialists in the field are Dr Raluca Radulescu, whose work has focused on Malory, Arthurian romances and chronicles, especially through a cultural approach, and Professor PJC Field, currently President of the International Arthurian Society, and world-renowned for his work on the Arthurian legend through the centuries. However the course also draws upon the expertise available in other periods of literature within the School of English and other schools in the College of Arts and Humanities, ranging from post-medieval approaches in the School of English, or medieval Welsh, History and Archaeology, and Music. Staff in these areas contribute regularly to the teaching of Arthurian topics ranging from the medieval period to the present, including music and modern film adaptations.

Why Bangor for Arthurian Studies?
The attractiveness of the MA in Arthurian Literature at Bangor lies in its flexible, though comprehensive, approach to the study of this area. Students may choose to specialise in either the medieval or the post-medieval period but they will be required to take both modules with these titles in order to benefit from the wide coverage of the Arthurian legend they provide. At the same time they can enjoy all the benefits of one-to-one supervision in the Open Essay options, while also developing their research skills in the Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research Module (shared with the MA in English). Moreover, in-depth introductions to the study of medieval palaeography and codicology are available by collaboration with other relevant schools and disciplines, as a preparation to PhD level (see collaborative doctoral training scheme in palaeography and codicology organised by Dr Raluca Radulescu).

Students usually participate in the activities of the Centre for Medieval Studies, including the annual international postgraduate conference, ‘Medievalism Transformed’, the bi-weekly Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies seminar series (http://www.imems.ac.uk/) and the online postgraduate journal.

Structure
The MA in Arthurian Literature consists of two parts. Part One must be successfully completed before proceeding to the second part, the dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Compulsory Modules:

Part One

Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (30 credits), which develops knowledge of literary theory and research methods.
Medieval Arthur (30 credits), exploring the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to examining its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture.
Post-Medieval Arthur (30 credits), addressing the Arthurian myth and legends from the early modern period onwards, paying attention to the way the story was shaped in different centuries
Optional Modules:

Open Essay (30 credits): Supervised essays on topics of the student’s own choice.
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)
Manuscript and Printed Books (30 credits): An introduction to the study of medieval and early modern palaeography and codicology, in co-operation with the Bangor University Archives and Special Collections, which include the library of Bangor Cathedral
Subject to availability, students may choose relevant modules in medieval Welsh literature/Welsh Arthurian literature offered in the School of Welsh.
Part Two

Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece (20,000 words) of scholarly research, on a subject of your own choice and discussed in detail with a chosen supervisor. It will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.
Research Links with Industry
A collaboration with the tourist attraction ’King Arthur’s Labyrinth’ at Corris has led to fully funded Access to Masters MA places on this degree programme. The course also maintains links with people and organisations beyond Bangor: these might include guest speakers and visits to sites of literary interest.

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Description. In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
Description

In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the Bangor Business School and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas. An important objective is to provide relevant analytical training in the latest strategic, managerial, legal and commercial developments in both public and private sectors. In this specifically tailored MBA programme, Bangor Business School and the Bangor School of Law offer candidates an innovative suite of key Management and Law subjects.

Part 1 is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. Part is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of around 10,000 words, contributing 60 credits. The dissertation provides you with the opportunity to critically review, and possibly (but not necessarily) produce an original contribution to, the literature in any part of the taught syllabus. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from June to September. You are expected to submit you dissertation by the end of September in the calendar year following your initial registration for you MSc or MA degree programme.

Continuous assessment is an integral part of all our taught modules. The weightings attaching to coursework and other forms of continuous assessment vary from module to module, from a minimum of 25% to 100%.

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Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. Read more
Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. In Neuroscience it is being increasingly used to study the physiological correlates of mental processes. In Clinical practice it plays a prominent role in the detection and diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in the evaluation of new treatments. The techniques are getting increasingly sophisticated and as a result there is a high demand for well-trained professionals.

Our Neuroimaging MSc is one of only a few programmes dealing with modern neuroimaging in the UK. It is exceptional in its focus on practical and biomedical aspects of Neuroimaging. The success of the program is reflected in the success of our students with 60% either in further higher education, or fully employed in the first year after degree completion. This figure rises to 100% within 3 years of the degree.

The Neuroimaging MSc is designed to provide students with the background knowledge and technical skills to design, analyze and evaluate imaging data. The Neuroimaging MSc focuses on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based techniques, including functional MRI, anatomical imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, and Spectroscopy. Imaging techniques will be discussed with reference to relevant applications. The programme puts a strong emphasis on practical skills. In a dedicated computer lab, the students will learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Under supervision of our world-class academic staff, students will design their own imaging based studies, which will be run using the in-house 3T MRI scanner. Additional classes will provide students with a broad scope of professional skills.

The Neuroimaging MSc is especially suited for:
students interested in pursuing an Academic career in the field of Neuroimaging;
students looking to find a job as research staff in industry or academic labs involved in translational research;
medical professional, looking to develop skills in a new emergent technology and research field;
students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science who want to move into cognitive or clinical neuroscience;
students with a background in psychology or biology who want to improve your technical skills for a neuroscience career.

Content
The core of the Neuroimaging MSc consists of two modules on Neuroimaging. The first module concentrates on methodological aspects. It includes an introduction to the physics of MR imaging, the physiological basis of functional signals, processing and analysis of imaging data and the design of research studies. The second module provides an in-depth introduction to a number of specialized imaging techniques used to understand the biology of brain function in health and disease. The latter module aims to illustrate the use of imaging in the context of translational and clinical studies of disease processes affecting the human brain.

Both modules combine formal lectures, and computer-based laboratories, in which students learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Weekly practical labs and programming classes are held in a dedicated computer laboratory available to all students. The work done in the lab sections constitute 50% of the grade in first module, and 30% of the grade in the second module. The latter also includes student-led discussion of published scientific and clinical research.

In the weekly Bangor Imaging Group (BIG) meeting, academic staffs, postdocs and students discuss current research. All MSc and PhD students propose their research here.

Additional optional modules provide an in-depth view of several content areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience (see below). Students are also welcome to attend weekly review of clinical scans performed at the local hospital for the purpose of patient recruitment and a monthly neuroradiology conference where cases of clinical interest are discussed. Journal-clubs and research meetings concerning fMRI, EEG, and TMS methodologies are open to all students.

Students are also required to take at least one additional module in advanced statistics or advanced computing. The module Communicating Research completes the curriculum by training students in a broad scope of professional skills.

The Bangor Imaging Unit houses a state-of-the-art 3T MRI machine, available for student projects. Setups for the measurement of eye-movement, arm and hand movement, and physiological parameters are also available.

In the beginning of the year you will choose your academic supervisor. The supervisor will be responsible for helping you plan, design and draft your research thesis. From your project proposal you will review the relevant literature, and formally outline your study. In the weekly Bangor-Imaging Group meeting we learn about and discuss proposed, ongoing and completed studies and important new publications in the field. Moreover, all MSc and PhD students present their proposed plan of research in this forum. Thus, you are tightly integrated into the research environment at the Bangor Imaging Unit, and profit from interactions with older PhD students, post-docs, and other supervisors. Your final research project is conducted over the summer months, most likely using the in-house, research-dedicated 3T MRI scanner. The course ends with the successful submission of your research thesis.

Structure
The Neuroimaging MSc consists of two parts. Part one comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take the two core modules in Neuroimaging, which include a large component of laboratory work. You will also choose two 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of neuroscience. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to hone your research skills. In addition, you will partner with one of the academic faculty in order to jointly develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester), when you will carry out your research study and write your thesis.

Research Thesis
The thesis is the 'crown' of the Neuroimaging MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.
Career Prospects

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)

English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits): This module explores the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to exploring its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture (manuscript and printed editions, artefacts). Focusing on a number of texts in different genres and languages (read in English translation when necessary), the module will offer postgraduates an insight into the origins and development of Arthurian themes in medieval literature (Convener: Dr Raluca Radulescu.)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)
English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits) (English: HPW-4000; Welsh: HPC-4000)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Major (40 credits) and Minor (20 credits) Submissions are different in scope.

The choice of Early Music a s Principal Subject entails that students make their Part II submission in the area of Early Music as well.

WMM4044: Principal Subject: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4046: Major Open Submission: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4047 and WMM4048: Minor Open Submission: Early Music (20 credits)
WMM4050: Preparing for the Part II project (20 credits)
Students may also select relevant modules also on offer by the Graduate School of the College of Arts and Humanities which include:

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
QXE4033: Postgraduate Portfolio
Further information about the above modules is available directly from the Directors of Graduate Studies in each contributing schools. Module availability depends on yearly internal arrangements in each contributing school. For further details, contact the School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, the School of Music, and School of Welsh.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Changes in customer requirements, technology, competitive conditions and regulation create the need for managers, traders and analysts to make rapid and often far-reaching decisions about their short term operations and long term strategies. The MSc and MA in Banking and Finance degree courses at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial services, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MA/MSc Banking and Finance degree programme include:

Why are the banking systems in different countries (such as the UK, Germany, Japan and the US) so diverse?
What determines the structure, performance and efficiency of banking and financial markets?
Why do banks and financial intermediaries exist?
What are the main theories of the banking firm?
How relevant are financial intermediaries in a world of increasing securitization and with the evolution of virtual banking?
How do banks optimally allocate capital?
Does bank regulation increase or decrease risks?
How do we measure the risks undertaken by banks?
Can regulators reduce the likelihood of systemic (system-wide) risk?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately? Can credit risk be priced accurately?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How do banks use futures, options, derivatives and swaps to manage their balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How do banks manage their business so as to maintain customer relationships, improve operational efficiency and add shareholder value?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Banking and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to banking, finance and capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Banking and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Banking and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business.

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Description. Study for an MBA Banking and Finance Master's Degree at one of Europe's foremost Banking and Finance Schools. At Bangor, we offer a range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes in the areas of banking and finance. Read more
Description

Study for an MBA Banking and Finance Master's Degree at one of Europe's foremost Banking and Finance Schools. At Bangor, we offer a range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes in the areas of banking and finance. The MBA Banking and Finance is designed for candidates with degrees or relevant business backgrounds, who wish to develop their expertise and further their professional careers. The MBA programme provides a more practical postgraduate course to complement our long established MA course in Banking and Finance and our distance-learning MBA with Manchester Business School.

A primary objective of the MBA Banking and Finance is to develop knowledgeable and capable executives to move quickly to key positions in the financial services sector. The programme will provide executive training at an advanced level covering the latest developments in the management of banks and financial services firms.

We have long held a strong international reputation in the study of banking and finance. Our long established and highly successful MA programme has run since 1973 and over this period we have also had a strong PhD programme where research typically focuses on banking and financial sector issues. Postgraduates have enjoyed a mix of both theoretical and practical elements covering contemporary developments in the banking and financial field. The MBA aims to extend and develop advanced training relating to the practical managerial issues faced by modern financial service firms.

The main aim of our full-time MBA is to introduce a much stronger practical emphasis focussing on the strategies and financial management of financial firms. Your MBA will give you practical insight and skills in a range of strategic and management areas in financial services. We invite practitioners to share their views and experiences. Case studies and contemporary issues figure highly in the programme.

The School has a lively group of staff, who are always willing to share their knowledge and expertise. Your teaching staff at Bangor are active researchers, combining high levels of expertise with a desire to extend their subject area, and, most importantly from a postgraduate viewpoint, an enthusiasm to encourage others to develop their academic, financial and business skills.

We are pleased that you are considering joining the MBA Banking and Finance programme. If you decide to do so, we are confident that we can offer you the guidance, stimulation and support that will make the next year a happy and productive time for you. I wish you every success in your MBA career.

Professor Philip Molyneux
Postgraduate Director

Why study the MBA Banking and Finance?

Financial systems and financial services firms' strategies are now involved in a fundamental, far reaching process of realignment and change. The strategic priority of banks and other financial institutions has shifted away from growth and size alone towards a greater emphasis on profitability, performance and shareholder value creation. The growing economic importance of financial sectors has also re-emphasised that bankers, fund managers, multinational companies, securities firms, regulators and financial advisers must have a clear understanding of the theory and practice relating to banking and finance.

Aims of the course

The Bangor Business School aims to build on our long-established expertise in the area of postgraduate training in banking and finance by offering a one-year modular MBA Banking and Finance, which aims to develop participants' academic and managerial skills in these areas. An important objective is to provide relevant analytical training to familiarise participants with the latest strategic, managerial and industrial developments in the financial services industry.

The MBA Banking and Finance course provides a coherent analytical framework for the study of banking and financial developments from a management perspective. The emphasis throughout the programme is on the application of contemporary, financial, managerial and strategic developments that affect real-world decision-making in the global financial industry.

We recognise that a thorough understanding of recent developments in banking and financial firm strategies, financial management, risk management, international financial markets, marketing strategies and performance evaluation are essential requirements for all those involved in financial sector activities (or those who wish to gain a deeper understanding of these important business and managerial areas).

Who should consider studying the MBA Banking and Finance?

The course will be of interest to the following people:

Graduates who have professional experience in the financial sector;
Managers and accountants in public and private organisations who wish to develop their financial management skills;
Managers employed in the financial services industry;
Graduates contemplating a career in the banking and financial services industry;
Graduates who have relevant practical experience and wish to enhance their skills in the areas of banking and finance;
Finance professionals (like corporate treasurers and accountants) who deal with the financial services industry.

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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A course may be the first step towards a writing career, or a chance for more experienced writers to develop their work from a new perspective. Read more
A course may be the first step towards a writing career, or a chance for more experienced writers to develop their work from a new perspective. The School of English at Bangor University offers a range of opportunities for postgraduate study in a dynamic critical and creative environment. One of the first institutions in the UK to offer creative writing at degree level, Bangor has significant experience in this discipline and a flourishing postgraduate community.

Specialist writing staff are closely involved in teaching and supervision, and have a range of expertise in poetry, fiction, literary editing and the interface between creative and critical writing. Staff members are published and award-winning authors, and are also involved in a variety of editing and judging activities; Zoe Skoulding is editor of Poetry Wales, Ian Gregson is editor of Salt Wales and Kachi Ozumba was a judge for the Commonwealth Short Story competition in 2010 and 2011. The school benefits from the presence of the poet Professor Carol Rumens as a visiting professor, and the frequent visits of honorary professor Philip Pullman, who offers both readings and workshops.

Our students are successful. A number of recent or existing postgraduate students have successfully published collections of poems or short stories that have arisen from their studies here at Bangor. These include John Tanner, Zoe Skoulding, and Nessa O’Mahoney. Others have published stories including Terri Lee Hackman, Zoe Perrenoud, and Lisa Blower (who won the 2009 Guardian Short Story Competition) or individual poems and other forms of writing.

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The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. Read more
The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. However, the MRes in Ecology is built on the strong foundation of the former MSc in Ecology which ran at Bangor for over 40 years and which has an excellent reputation in the UK and internationally, among employers and academics in the field. Many of them have been through the course at Bangor! This degree will equip you with confidence and competence in the latest research skills and allow you to apply for further research training (PhD) programmes or to directly apply for research positions in universities or research institutes. Note that this course title is subject to validation and the programme described here is currently running under the MRes in Natural Sciences degree.

Course Structure

The course is composed of a modular taught component (100 credits) and a research dissertation (80 credits). The taught component covers important generic skills such as literature searching, health and safety aspects, grant proposal writing, introduction to statistical manipulation of data (60 credits), as well as theoretical and practical skills in molecular ecology and evolutionary ecology (40 credits), including the opportunity for a tropical field course in Dominica, West Indies, or equivalent fieldwork locally.

What sort of projects would be available to me?

As a result of extensive national and international staff contacts, range of research topics and experience, students are often able to carry out their research projects in association with commercial consultancies, local councils, environmental organisations in the UK (eg the Environment Agency, Countryside Council for Wales, RSPB), government research institutes (eg Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) and abroad (past projects have involved fieldwork in the West Indies, Africa, Maldives, and various European countries). We are situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty and a rich variety of habitats are within easy reach. We also have excellent facilities for undertaking top quality research, such as the state-of-the art molecular ecology laboratories in the Environment Centre Wales (shared with the CEH Bangor), a purpose-built environmentally-friendly building that was opened by PM Gordon Brown in 2008. Topics on offer cover the whole range of ecology and include projects in both pure and applied research. Due to the extended nature of the MRes research project, a module on project planning precedes the start of their dissertation period, providing guidance and support for the development of their research project.

Projects offered in previous years include:

* Energetics and flight performance of homing pigeons
* Evolution, behaviour and ecology of tropical fish
* Investigating mimetic relationships in Amazonian Corydoras catfish
* Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of anacondas
* New approaches to the study of the evolution of venom genes in pitvipers
* Biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in low productivity coastal habitats
* Growth patterns and life history in migratory brown trout, Salmo trutta, in rivers around the Irish Sea
* Genetic basis of life history shifts in guppies

What sort of careers will this train me for?

As well as finding specific employment based on the specialist knowledge acquired during postgraduate training, your general employability will be enhanced by evidence of your ability to work independently, think analytically and innovatively, and ability to conceptualise and question. During your studies, you will also have the chance to develop essential professional skills such as good communication, teamwork and leadership skills and enhance your practical experience. Our past graduates (in MSc Ecology) have gone on to careers in research (both in academia and research institutes) as well as in commercial environmental consultancies, DEFRA, water authorities, landscape architects and many others.

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The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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The structure of the programme will be as follows. Part I. Taught Courses. The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The structure of the programme will be as follows:

Part I: Taught Courses
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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The ever-changing nature of financial markets, financial institutions and business firms, has made it increasingly important for finance experts including… Read more
The ever-changing nature of financial markets, financial institutions and business firms, has made it increasingly important for finance experts including financial managers in multinational companies, investment analysts in securities firms, lending officers in banks and other financial institutions and traders in capital markets and dealing rooms - to have a clear understanding of the theory and practice relating to financial market operations and corporate financial strategy. Familiarity with the most recent developments in risk appraisal, portfolio analysis, the engineering of synthetic products, modelling techniques, financial analysis and valuation are essential requirements for all those involved directly in financial activities or who wish to gain a deeper understanding of this important area of business management.

The MSc and MA Finance programmes at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the financial and corporate sectors, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial markets and the financial management of business firms.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MSc or MA Finance degree programme include:

What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately?
Can credit risk be priced accurately?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How are futures, options, derivatives and swaps used to manage balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How can spreadsheets be used to develop financial models, and what techniques are required to obtain computational solutions to finance problems?
What are the main features of financial engineering, and how can one asset be transformed into another?
What are the design features of synthetic assets, and how do they help us to develop strategies for hedging risks?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to corporate finance and the capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques. Provided you are registered for the correct modules for your chosen degree, it is normally possible to transfer between the MSc and MA degrees during the first few weeks following your initial registration.
ESRC Recognition

The MA Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods

International Financial Markets

Corporate Risk Management

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management

International Financial Management

Optional modules (choose 2):

Financial Modelling

Islamic Finance

Accounting Theory

Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation

Financial Institutions Strategic Management

Financial Analysis

Islamic Banking

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This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments.

Understanding these theoretical and practical issues is critical for managers who often have to make rapid and far-reaching decisions about the short term financial operations and long term strategies of firms.

The MSc in Accounting and Finance offers you a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the financial and corporate sectors, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to accounting and finance.

The aim of the programme is to provide graduates and other individuals that have practical accounting and financial training with the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a senior level professional career in accounting, financial services or related sectors of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MSc Accounting and Finance degree programme include:

How are the financial accounts of companies formulated, and how do they differ across jurisdictions?
What agency issues are important in the creation of company accounts?
How does accounting theory inform financial and management accounting practice?
How does regulation impact on the performance of firms, and how do accounting practices highlight profit and/or loss realisation?
What empirical techniques can be used to evaluate company performance?
In what ways have financial accounting requirements and auditing been influenced by recent company failures?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How are futures, options, derivatives and swaps used to manage balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc Accounting and Finance programme at Bangor is designed to develop participants’ existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to accounting and finance. The programme provides a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of accounting and financial techniques in a real-world setting.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Accounting Theory: This module critically evaluates a widespread and widely based set of theories that underpin any explanation of accounting behaviour and accounting regulatory output.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation: This module provides an advanced treatment of the main theoretical principles underlying financial reporting, and the practical implications of alternative regulatory regimes.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Management Accounting: This module provides an understanding of the uses of financial data in measuring and evaluating business performance, and in setting the strategic aims of the organisation.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Financial Econometrics: This module provides advanced coverage of econometric methods and practices that are used to model financial and business data. You will develop the independent capability to design, estimate and evaluate appropriate econometric models using econometric software.

International Financial Management: In this module, the financial management of multinational companies, and the influence of the macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

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