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Masters Degrees (Ballistics)

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This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive insight of the field of firearms, ammunition and ballistic investigations. Read more

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive insight of the field of firearms, ammunition and ballistic investigations. The course is highly practical and hands-on, aiming to produce a clear understanding of how firearms and ammunition function, the science of ballistics, the role of the forensic firearms examiner and how the forensic evidence produced in gun crime can be used to help resolve issues in relation to criminal and civil law.

The course aims to equip students with the necessary understanding of science and technology, law, courtroom skills and research methods in order to thoroughly prepare them for professional development as an expert witness in forensic science.

The Forensic Ballistics MSc is part of the Forensic MSc Programme which is formally accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

Course overview

The course consists of a one-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study. Students are required to take four core modules, four role specific modules and choose three elective modules based on their particular background, future requirements or interests. This is followed by a four-month research project and either a thesis or literature review and paper.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Individual Project

The individual project takes four months from April to July. The student selects from a range of titles, or may propose their own topic. Most are practically or experimentally based using Cranfield’s unique facilities.

Assessment

By written and practical examinations, continuous assessment, project presentation and viva voce.

Career opportunities

Takes you on to opportunities to practice as a professional expert witness in forensic ballistics, within forensic laboratories, police departments, government bodies and non-governmental organisations. It is also a necessary introduction that could lead into conducting research at PhD level in the subject.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/forensic-ballistics.html

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This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

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This course provides education and training in military vehicle systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in military vehicle systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of military vehicles.

It will provide students with the technical knowledge and understanding of weapon systems and military vehicles to make them effective in their specification, design, development and assessment.

The course is accredited by the Institute of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Course overview

This course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two week duration).

In addition to the taught part of the course, students undertake an individual project . The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Earning the appropriate credits can lead to the following academic awards:

- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) – any combination of modules (building a total of 60 credits).
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) – all modules (120 credits).
- Master of Science (MSc) – all modules (120 credits) plus project (80 credits).

The Military Vehicle Technology MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of military vehicle systems. Both armoured and support vehicles are covered within the course.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course also offers a critical depth to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students undertake an individual project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of current titles are given below:

- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of UGV Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Optimisation of the suspension system for a vehicle.
- Analysis of the off-road performance of a wheeled or tracked vehicle.

Modules

Core -

Introductory Studies
Solid Modelling CAD
Finite Element Methods in Engineering
Modelling, Simulation and Control
Weapon System Technology
Survivability
Vehicle Systems Integration
Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
Military Vehicle Dynamics
Military Vehicle Propulsion

Optional -

Fundamentals of Ballistics
Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
Gun System Design
Element Design
Guided Weapons
Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems
Reliability and System Effectiveness
Light Weapon Design
Rocket Motors and Propellants

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Funding

For more information on funding please contact

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take-up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

Further Information

For further information on this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/military-vehicle-technology.html

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The technology and applications of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) are wide-ranging and constantly evolving. Major fields of application include the aerospace industry, oil, gas and energy generation, chemical industries, space technology, rail transport, shipping and manufacturing. Read more
The technology and applications of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) are wide-ranging and constantly evolving. Major fields of application include the aerospace industry, oil, gas and energy generation, chemical industries, space technology, rail transport, shipping and manufacturing.

Other applications are constantly emerging and there are strong links with medical technology. New NDT techniques need to be developed to meet the changing needs of nano-technologies.

Course Overview

Careers in NDT often offer opportunities to travel and to work in new, high technology industries. The series of taught modules that form part one of the course will develop your in-depth knowledge and understanding of non-destructive testing technologies. The University has access to a range of state-of-the-art equipment and technologies including: Infrared Thermography; Ultrasonics; Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer; a ballistics testing cell and, DeltaVision computer software for the measurement of photoelasticity. Practical tasks undertaken with these facilities will enable you to develop your skills in applying a variety of testing and measurement techniques and critically examining the results.

Upon the successful completion of 120 credits in part one, you will be required to undertake an independent research project worth 60 credits. Your dissertation supervisor will be available to you to help guide you through the independent research phase.

Collaboration and Knowledge Transfer
Non Destructive Testing (NDT) and evaluation is a key area of research for UWTSD Swansea, where we are the lead academic partner in the NDT Validation Centre in Port Talbot (just outside Swansea), operated by TWI, a global leader in technology engineering and one of the UK's largest research organisations, with an international reputation. This partnership offers excellent opportunities to our students, providing industrial links relevant to the Part 2 project. Furthermore, funding from the Welsh Government and from the EPSRC has facilitated the acquisition of state-of-the-art equipment. Other links with industry include: Knauf Insulation; Silverwing UK Ltd; Oceaneering Inspection Services; Team Precision Pipeline Assembllies; Cyden; and, Rikoset.

UWTSD Swansea is the lead academic partner in the NDT Validation Centre, just outside Swansea, and through this partnership has strong links with TWI, one of the UK's largest research organisations, with an international reputation. The Institute has received significant funding for equipment and has an active research group in NDT,

Modules

The programme is structured in two parts. Part I (120 Credits) comprises the following taught modules:
-Research Methods
-NDT Systems, Standards and Applications
-Materials
-Ultrasonic Methods
-Radiographic Methods
-Electromagnetic Methods
-Thermal and Optical Methods

Part II (60 Credits)
-Major Project

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This course is delivered in Detroit, MI, US. Although open to non-US students it is the responsibility of the student to arrange suitable visas and cover travel costs. Read more

Course Description

This course is delivered in Detroit, MI, US. Although open to non-US students it is the responsibility of the student to arrange suitable visas and cover travel costs. The course provides education and training at postgraduate level for those who expect to fill technically demanding appointments concerned with the design, development, procurement and operation of vehicles.

It will provide students with the technical knowledge and understanding of weapon systems and military vehicles to make them effective in their specification, design, development and assessment. Special attention will be given to recent advances in defence technology; and to educating students in the analysis and evaluation of systems against changes and developments in the threat.

Course overview

The taught element consists of 14 modules covering major aspects of defence technology, providing a balanced and broad coverage of key aspects, issues and constraints associated with the design, development, performance and integration of weapon and vehicle systems.

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Earning the appropriate credits can lead to the following academic awards:

- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) – any combination of modules (building a total of 60 credits).
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) – all modules (120 credits).
- Master of Science (MSc) – all modules (120 credits) plus project (80 credits).

The programme is delivered in Detroit by delivering one or two modules per visit. There are three visits in a year (April, June and Nov/Dec). Each standard module consists of a one-week course of lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Students are required to pass an assessment which includes a written exam (50%) on the last day of the course and course work (50%) to be submitted within eight weeks from the last day of the course.

Modules are taught three times a year in Detroit, USA. This allows 60 credits to be attained in two years and 120 credits over three years.

Core modules (10 Credits)

- Fighting Vehicle Design or Finite Element in Engineering
- Modelling, Simulation and Control in Defence Engineering or Systems Engineering and Assured Performance

Compulsory Module (10 Credits) for MSc and Elective for PGCert

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study

Elective Modules (100 Credits)

- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Weapon System Technology
- Vehicle Systems Integration
- Electric Drive Technologies
- Military Autonomous Vehicles
- Light Weapon Design
- Gun Systems Design (Gun Systems Stream)
- Military Vehicle Dynamics (Vehicle Stream)
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics (Gun Systems Stream)
- Military Vehicle Propulsion (Vehicle Stream)
- Military Vehicle Propulsion
- Solid Modelling CAD (optional)

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of current titles are given below:

- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of UGV Power Usage
- Power and Mobility Enhanced Robotic Platform (PMERP)
- Conceptual Design of a Behind Armour Battery Pack
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Investigation of New Compact Suspension Concepts for the Light Armoured Vehicle III
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only).

Funding

For more information on funding please contact the Programme Director, Dr Amer Hameed, email

Career opportunities

Takes you on to employment within the armed forces or defence research establishments.

Further Information

For further information on this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/vehicle-and-weapon-engineering.html

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Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques. Read more
Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques.

-Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
-Masters course developed and delivered by leading researchers in the field
-Excavation and bioarchaeological analysis of real human remains
-Gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory techniques using specialised bioarchaeological labs and facilities
-Substantial bone selection for research and for experience as teaching toolstools


Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing science that combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences. Study focuses on the key topics pertaining to human remains from archaeological sites.

Bioarchaeology includes areas of scientific investigation including palaeodemography, past behaviour, biological affinity, subsistence strategy, and health and well-being in the past.

The MSc in Bioarchaeology will help you to develop a broad understanding of these issues, through the excavation and analysis of human and animal remains. Analytical techniques will cover dental and osteological analyses, archaeological field methods, and ancient genetics.

The programme aims to develop your advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department’s well-equipped specialist laboratories and reference collections.

A particular strength of our provision and Faculty expertise is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of many world areas and time periods. When you complete the course, you will have all the skills necessary to continue into an academic career or gain employment in research, museums, education or commercial organisations.

During the year you will be given a personal tutor that will support you throughout your time at LJMU and be following both your academic and professional development.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Semester 1 (three core modules)

Advanced Osteology and Skeletal Pathology
Provides students with an advanced knowledge of the human skeleton and the ability to identify animal bones, methods of curation of skeletal collections and understanding of pathological modifications.
Research Design and Quantitative Methods
Provides extensive training in generic research knowledge and statistical techniques for the Natural Sciences. Students design a research project and are assessed via the preparation of a full grant application for the project.
Dental Anthropology
Provides students with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience required by bioarchaeologists to identify and examine human teeth.
Semester 2 (two core modules and one option)

Bioarchaeology: Bones, Teeth and Genes
Focuses on the different methods used to study human remains in archaeological and anthropological contexts. Delivery is through a combination of lectures, practicals, workshops and seminar sessions by experts in different fields, followed by reading and in-class discussion of recent literature.
Excavation
Covers field survey, site management, excavation and related data analysis. In addition to practicals and lectures, the course includes a non-residential field experience.
Dissertation
Comprises an independent, in-depth scientific research study on a chosen relevant topic. The following options are typically offered:
Ballistics and Arson Investigation
Teaches the fundamental principles of fire science, fire dynamics and material science, enabling students to demonstrate their application of fire investigation.
Taphonomy Trauma Analysis
Provides students with an extensive understanding of the biomechanics of human bones and the reaction of bones to the environment for a taphonomic history of the remains. Students gain a broad appreciation of different types of weapons to reconstruct a traumatic event using skeletal evidence.
Human Identification and Forensic DNA
Analyses the issues related to the identification of an unknown subject from both skeletal and genetic features. The module also introduces students to the use of a DNA typing approach for the identification of human remains.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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