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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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The West Chester Master's Program in Communication Studies focuses on building better leaders by improving their communication skills. Read more
The West Chester Master's Program in Communication Studies focuses on building better leaders by improving their communication skills. Effective leaders must be effective communicators, and effective communicators need to develop a broad array of communication skills. In addition, the M.A. program is designed to provide a broad spectrum of knowledge in communication theory and methodology of the social scientific approach. Our program is intended for students in one of three vocational areas:

• New Careers
As a result of their Masters in Communication Studies, students have launched new careers in Internet Web Design, Training and Development, Community Organization, Consultation, Marketing, Association Management, Public Relations, and Teaching at the secondary, community college, small college, or university level.

• Career Development
Many students pursue their degrees while maintaining positions in the Delaware Valley's major corporations. They seek vocational advances as they acquire the conceptual foundations and professional skills for becoming a leader in their organization's communicative competence.

• Continuous Learning
Some students have used their West Chester M.A. to launch a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and now teach in Universities throughout the United States or work as researchers in the private sector.

Course Structure

• Non-Thesis/Applied Curriculum Option (36 credits)

1. Required Core (21 credits)

COM 501: Theoretical Perspectives on Human Communication (3)
COM 502: Communication Research Methods (3)
15 additional credits selected from departmental offerings

2. Applied Courses (15 credits)

These courses are to be selected from other departments or from communication studies courses. A three-credit or six-credit graduate internship (COM 598) may be selected upon successful completion of the required core but requires graduate coordinator approval.

3. Comprehensive Examinations

Non-thesis students may schedule their comprehensive written examinations in three areas during the semester that, upon completion, they are within six credit hours of completing the program. B

• Thesis option (36 credits)

1. Required Core (27 credits)

COM 501: Theoretical Perspectives on Human Communication (3)
COM 502: Communication Research Methods (3)
COM 601: Communication Studies Thesis 1 (3)
COM 602: Communication Studies Thesis 2 (3)
15 additional credits selected from departmental offerings

2. Applied Courses (9 credits)

These courses are to be selected from other departments or from communication studies courses.

3. Comprehensive Examinations

Thesis students may schedule their comprehensive written examinations in three areas during the semester that, upon completion, they are within six credit hours of completing the program. Thesis students also will defend their theses orally.

Note: students are not required to take summer classes, and students may attend as full-time or part-time student

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This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-making/. Read more
This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-making/

In over 3 decades there has been a creative surge in hybrid live performance worldwide. This has been the work of solo artists, ensembles, auteurs and performer-directors across creative fields, who have redefined boundaries and stretched the artistic and social imagination into new spaces, both literally and figuratively.

Within the vibrant environment of Goldsmiths, and with all the stimulus that London offers culturally, practising or emerging practitioners develop compositional, critical, technical and management skills and strategies for forging independent and self-motivated careers. Our graduates work as practitioners, teachers and cultural leaders worldwide.

On the programme you will conceive, research, construct and deliver your ideas and articulate what motivates these. Teaching is rigorous and interdisciplinary. You study with distinguished international artists as well as scholars within a praxis ethos where theory informs creativity and vice versa. The emphasis throughout is on encouraging collaboration across disciplines and cultures, and on contextualising practice within its social, political and architectural environment.

Physical training, scenographic/environmental exploration and hands-on introduction to technologies (lighting, video and sound) support composition and artistic experimentation. You identify your own practice within the historical and contemporary field, and write critically and creatively. You archive your practice digitally, and on graduation will have developed a portfolio of projects. You are guided on professional development by the Live Art Development Agency (LADA) and the Institute for Cultural and Creative Entrepreneurship (ICCE) at Goldsmiths.

The programme enjoys a wide international professional network of organisations, commissions, venues and festivals of benefit to students. You study both at Goldsmiths and ArtsAdmin. Click here for a full list of artists associated with the programme as permanent and guest tutors.

"The MA in Performance Making at Goldsmiths attracts artists from all over the world seeking to develop their skills, creativity, pragmatics and independence. Taught by distinguished professionals, it encourages original, collaborative research into new forms, new imperatives and new contexts for live performance. As such it makes an invaluable contribution to the culture of performance."

Lois Keidan, Director: Live Art Development Agency, London

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Office.

Modules & Structure

This is a praxis programme on which you gain 180 CATS (credits).

Practical Study- 30 credits
Performance Making A and B- 60 credits
MA in Performance Making Dissertation- 60 credits
Contextual Theory- 30 credits

Skills

You will become conversant, confident and skilled in a range of methodological practices as well as compositional strategies for independent theatrical, dance theatre and live art creation.

Your critical and analytical skills in interpreting artistic practice will be tested in a range of verbal, written and oral ways. Your study of your own body as a creative instrument will be complemented by learning the principles of scenography and film narrative.

You will research intellectually and produce theoretically informed writing. You will learn to contextualise your own practice and interests in the contemporary field of performance both in the UK and internationally, and to articulate such practice.

Overall you will learn how to research, construct and deliver your ideas performatively and how to advocate your own projects to producers, venues, funders and other agencies.

Careers

Graduates work in a wide variety of professional contexts globally as commissioned performance makers, directors, project leaders, programmers, teachers and academic researchers.

The programme has launched international production companies and collaborations whilst the many organisations employing them include:

Dreamthinkspeak
Station House Opera
Marie Gabrielle Rotie Productions
The Clod Ensemble
Corridor
Lift
The Royal Court Theatre
The Gate Theatre
The Globe Theatre
Goossun Art-Illery
Northern Stage
The Royal National Theatre
The Beijing Academy
BAC
Bernie Grant Arts Centre
Artsadmin
Shunt
Hackney Empire
Greenwich Dance Agency
The Convenor’s Company
Athletes of the Heart

And a range of international commissions and festivals including Edinburgh Festival and Brighton Fringe.

What some of our alumni are doing now

http://www.taniaelkhoury.com
http://www.niabarge.com
http://www.liveartgardeninitiative.org.uk/mariallanderas.html
http://www.2divide.weebly.com
http://www.palimpsest.weebly.com
hekayet.com/chirin.htm
http://www.zoukak.org

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCY TRIP WITH A PEDAGOGICAL OBJECTIVE. USA 2016 - http://en.grenoble-em.com/msc-ise-residency-trip-silicon-valley. Read more

Objectives

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCY TRIP WITH A PEDAGOGICAL OBJECTIVE

USA 2016 - http://en.grenoble-em.com/msc-ise-residency-trip-silicon-valley

The aim of the MSc Innovation, Strategy and Entrepreneurship's master degree is to provide a framework and a toolkit for future managers and entrepreneurs to identify, assess and manage business opportunities in either their own companies or in existing organizations.

The program reflects the realities of the global environment and provides general management courses together with highly specialized modules in the areas of Innovation, Strategy and Entrepreneurship.

A word from the Program Director

"Innovation and Entrepreneurship are everywhere in our daily lives: smart cities, internet society, the digital economy, big data and design thinking, to name only a few. The consequences are huge: we will no longer buy – we will use! We will no longer manufacture - we will print with 3D printing!

After the Internet of People with mobile internet technology and applications, the next wave will be the Internet of Things called : IoT with news applications, new behaviors, and above all new business models. You have to discover and learn the causes and impacts of IoT in the next decade.

The MSc in Innovation, Strategy and Entrepreneurship is a convergent Master-level program designed for students who want to prepare themselves for the tectonic shift in the way we live and work. Companies and organizations, already responding to the challenges of tomorrow, project hiring graduates who have learned to navigate through the new landscape of innovation and strategy. See the opportunities got by the graduates in Employability section - http://en.grenoble-em.com/msc-innovation-strategy-and-entrepreneurship#Entreprise

If you want to broaden your theoretical knowledge while gaining practical experience in the working world, network with today's leading industry experts and tomorrow's game-changers, create your own business or help companies face tomorrow's challenges head-on, this program was designed for you! You will be challenged by an intensive, rigorous curriculum, taught by acclaimed academics and professional experts, and learn from your fellow students – a truly international group – through teamwork and intensive real-life case studies.

If you are ready to embark on this adventure and be part of this unique experience in Grenoble, heart of the French Alps and France's capital of innovation and entrepreneurship, come and join us!"

Marie-France Derderian, MSc Innovation, Strategy and Entrpreneurship Program Director

Program

In addition to its proximity to research-intensive, international companies (STMicroelectronics, Hewlett-Packard) and scientific organizations (the micro and nanotechnology innovation center GIANT Minatec (http://www.minatec.org/) - the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (http://english.cea.fr/english-portal) and LETI (http://www-leti.cea.fr/en/Discover-Leti/Innovation-platforms)), this program also comes from a top quality international teaching team made up of academics and professionals, thus creating an atmosphere supportive of teaching, learning, creative thinking and research.

The program’s main objective is to provide a multidisciplinary approach to the field of Innovation, Strategy and Entrepreneurship

The program corresponds to the realities of the global management environment by offering highly-specialized courses in the fields as well as courses relating to general management and business, thus extending the intellectual understanding of Innovation, Strategy, and Entrepreneurship as a discipline.

PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

Students will be required to attend the program full-time for one academic year from September to June the following year.

Following the classroom portion of the program, students will complete a Final Management Project on a topic of their choice related to the program content. Students may complete the project while participating in an internship or full-time employment.

1) General Management and the Corporate Environments

- Finance for Managers
- Cross Cultural Communication and Negotiation
- Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethical Issues in Business
- Managing IT for Success
- Leadership, Team Building and Managerial Creativity
- Project Management
- Legal Environment of International Business
- Economics
- Accounting for Managers

2) Innovation Management

- Introduction to Innovation
- Creativity and Innovation
- Innovation Through Design
- Marketing High Tech and Innovation
- Managing Business and Innovation Networks

3) Strategy

- Strategic Management
- Microeconomics of Competitiveness (Harvard)
- Mergers, New Acquisitions and Restructuring
- Strategic Marketing and Marketing Planning

4) Entrepreneurship

- Introduction to Entrepreneurship
- New Venture Business Planning
- Entrepreneurship and Business Opportunities
- Small and Family Business
- Digital Marketing for Entrepreneurs

*Content subject to change.

At the end of the classroom portion of the program, each student will be required to complete a Final Management Project of approximately 20,000 words in length under the guidance of a GGSB professor.

In order to successfully complete the Final Management Project, students are required to address a particular research question or knowledge gap in their field of study.

This research should be business-oriented and coherent with the program’s objectives. A student may choose to write the Final Management Project on a topic grounded in his or her internship experience.

Live Business Cases

LIVE BUSINESS CASES 2015-2016 - http://en.grenoble-em.com/live-business-cases-msc-innovation

During this program, participants will have the opportunity to become real-life business developers by exploring a Live Business Case provided by companies working in partnerships with the MSc Innovation, Strategy, and Entrepreneurship program. Students will work in groups and delve deeply into their cases during the seven months from October to June under the supervision of a GGSB coach.The Live Business Cases are launched by a briefing given by the company.

LIVE BUSINESS CASES WILL COVER:

- Innovation, entrepreneurship, and management issues from an integrated, holistic perspective.
- A capstone opportunity for students to apply theoretical principles from coursework and lectures.

AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE LIVE BUSINESS CASE, STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

- Build a company analysis
- Select and apply a methodology, and make useful and efficient recommendations.
- Understand the Business Development process
- Provide critical analysis
- Make strategic decisions
- Work in a small multicultural group under time constraints
- Produce compelling written and oral presentations
- Demonstrate communication, negotiation and leadership skills

At the end of the seven-month Live Business Case, each group will produce a written report and make an oral presentation to the Jury and other groups from the program. The Jury consists of the company coach, the school coach, and the program director.

MANAGERIAL CREATIVITY : A METHOD OF SELF MANAGEMENT BY THE STUDENTS

This course/workshop is an introduction to all group assignments to be carried out all through the year. In order to help you to be efficient when working in small groups, you need to know not only your personal strengths and improvement points but also those of your class.

By discovering them during this course, you will be able to imagine together how to leverage the strengths of your class and how to manage your improvement points. You have to manage the classroom as a company, so we will appoint different representatives in charge of the main aspects of the construction of the class as a performing team: event manager, class representative, timekeeper, project leader, MSc community leader, and Alumni communication and coordination manager. These representatives and their teams will draft an action plan for the coming year.

Foreign Languages

Foreign language skills are essential in business today and the program is taught in English but provides the possibility to learn a foreign language at the same time. No prior knowledge of French is required to attend the program. Non-French speakers may study French. Native and fluent French speakers will have the possibility to choose from Spanish or Chinese. The language component is not compulsory.

Careers

The students following the MSc Innovation, Strategy and Entrepreneurship generally wish to prepare for careers as:

- R&D Managers
- Project Managers
- B to B Product Managers
- Business Engineers
- Business Developers

Or in the following fields:

- Biotech
- High Tech IT
- Start-ups

CAREERS

Graduates of the MSc Innovation, Strategy and Entrepreneurship program hold positions in a variety of sectors all over the world:

- Guillermo, Venezuela: Product Manager - Organizacion Palo Alto
- Huwein, China: Project Manager, Reverse Innovation - Biomerieux
- Amit, UK: EMEIA Product Marketing - Apple
- Alexandre, France: Business Analyst and Pricing Expert - Schneider
- Nikolay, Russia: Analyst - International Innovation Nanotechnology Center
- Nikos, Greece: Business Developer - Intralot
- Agostino, Canada: Associate - Kachan and Co.
- Mayur, Singapore: Executive Business Development - Adnai Mining
- Khodor, France: Digital Marketing Manager - Eurocopter

Admission

This program is designed for recent graduates from any background as well as managers or entrepreneurs willing to develop and manage technological and business opportunities.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

- Bachelor-level undergraduate degree in any subject with a good grade average
- No past work experience necessary
- Fluency in English - see test requirements below.
- The GMAT is not required for this program.

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Study petroleum geophysics in Thailand and benefit from modern training by leading international researchers and industry specialists at Chiang Mai University in a newly renovated and equipped facility. Read more
Study petroleum geophysics in Thailand and benefit from modern training by leading international researchers and industry specialists at Chiang Mai University in a newly renovated and equipped facility. The courses will be taught in English.

The Department of Geological Sciences, sponsored by Thailand's major oil company PTT Exploration and Production provides a one year four months full time Petroleum Geophysics MSc. for international students.

The course is designed for students with English as a second language, and provides instruction for improving English, and as well as extra time from the usual 1 year course to help accommodate the difficulties of learning in a second language. Few scholarships are available.
The course runs from 14th August through to December (16 month period), and is offered annually. There is 1 year of class work given in 4 week modules, a geological fieldtrip, and a 4 months research project.
http://www.petroleumgeophysicscmu.com/

Scholarships

We would also be willing to help students meeting the Program and SEAPEX requirements to apply for a Dick Murphy Scholarship. Please find more details from the following link:
http://www.seapex.org/dick-murphy-scholarship

Further Information

The course is offered annually. It benefits from close links with the petroleum industry, including donation of software, data examples for coursework, and the provision of scholarships.
Open to international students.
Teaching medium – English

Deadline for application: 31st March 2017

Application

Application forms and details on how to apply can be obtained online at:
http://www.petroleumgeophysicscmu.com/
Or by contacting Dr. Christopher K. Morley at

About living in Chiang Mai and northern Thailand

‌•Well known tourist destination, (24th on Trip advisors 25 world best destinations).
‌•Old Medieval city walls.
‌•Relatively small but cosmopolitan city.
‌•Beautiful hills – many outdoor activities.
‌•Cool climate in winter.
‌•Many shopping malls, including two large new malls completed in the vicinity of the University.
‌•Very diverse range of food available in supermarkets and restaurants,
‌•Including all kinds of regional Thai food, halal food, Vietnamese, Western, Chinese, Indian, Myanmar, Mexican.
‌•Low cost of living.
‌•Lodging ~ 3,000-6,000 baht month, (100-200 USD)
‌•University international students building ~6,000 baht month (possibility to split cost by sharing room).
‌•Electric vehicles run by the university, and covered pick-ups (Song Taews) provide cheap transport around the university and off campus, ‌•Uber taxi service, private transport such as Tuk Tuks is also available. Much of the private accommodation offered for university students is within about 15 min walk of Department of Geological Sciences.
Please find more information from the following link:
http://www.petroleumgeophysicscmu.com/life-in-chaing-mai.html

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The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a flexible focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in many fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

Program goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

- pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available throughout the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in areas such as but not limited to: video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives offered in the college is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and completed and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

Accreditation

The MFA program in imaging arts and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in imaging arts, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university,

- Submit a portfolio containing a focused body of artwork that demonstrates visual sophistication, aesthetic awareness, skill, and craft, as well as a commitment to a purpose and idea.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.

- Submit three letters of recommendation.

- Submit a Letter of Intent, which should include a candidate's interest in obtaing an MFA, the selection of RIT for the MFA degree, and professional goals to be achieved.

- Submit an Artist Statement explaining the intention behind the portfolio submitted.

- Complete a graduate application through the Graduate Admission Website.

- Participate in an interview (optional).

Applicants who are capable of graduate level academic work, as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences will be recommended.

- Portfolio

The portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides understanding into the applicant’s performance to date, ability to create advanced, self-directed work and his/her aesthetic development and maturity.

Applicants should submit a portfolio of 20 images representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work. Images must be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website. Through Slideroom, applicants will submit their Letter of Intent and an Artist’s Statement.

The application deadline is Jan 15. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications received. Acceptance occurs only once a year for a fall admission.

Portfolio instructions to SlideRoom:

- Submit a portfolio of no more than 20 images to the college's portfolio website: rit.slideroom.com. (Size restrictions can be found through SlideRoom.) SlideRoom supplies space for titling and additional information about each image, such as: title of the work, date, size, and medium.
- Number images 1 to 20 in the order the applicant wishes them to be viewed.
- Include a numbered page detailing portfolio image information.
- Include a one-page Artist's Statement discussing submitted work and applicant’s creative process.
- Include a one-page Letter of Intert explaining why the applicant is interested in obtaining an MFA and specifically why RIT would be a successful fit for pursuit of a professional study degree.

Additional information

- Faculty

Thirteen full-time faculty members, all critically regarded for their artistic work in exhibition and publication, contribute to the MFA program. The faculty brings individual expertise and dedication to their work with graduate students, encouraging intellectual inquiry of contemporary art-making practices and aesthetics. The MFA program is supported by a staff of 30 full-time faculty members from the schools of Art and Photographic Arts and Sciences, faculty from the art history department, adjunct faculty members from George Eastman Museum, as well as noted regional, national, and international practitioners, critics, and historians. To learn about the MFA faculty, facilities, equipment cage, MFA events and curriculum, please visit the school's website at https://photography.rit.edu.

- Scholarships and graduate assistantships

All accepted applicants are awarded a university scholarship. Level of scholarship support is based on merit of application materials. Concurrently, the MFA program faculty grants graduate assistantships to all accepted applicants. Assistantships include a variety of positions, including team teaching, faculty assistant in the classroom and with research projects, gallery management, and working in an archive among opportunities. Upon acceptance into the MFA program, applicants are notified by the MFA director as to level of support for both the university scholarship and the graduate assistantship. Both scholarship and assistantship are renewable in the second year of graduate study.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work completed prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester hours of graduate work with a minimum grade of a B (3.0) or higher is transferable toward the degree, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

- Grades and maximum time limit

The average of all grades for graduate credit taken at the university must be at least a B (3.0) to qualify for the degree. University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program.

- Policy regarding student work

The School of Photographic Arts and Sciences reserves the right to retain at least one original piece of work from a student’s MFA thesis show for inclusion in the MFA Collection, to be used for educational, promotional, and exhibition purposes. Graduates must also submit a copy of the thesis publication to the School's MFA archive.

- William Harris Gallery

William Harris Gallery (http://cias.rit.edu/spas-gallery/) supports the exhibition of graduate thesis work, student work, and the works of contemporary image-makers. It maintains a calendar of exhibitions, public lectures, and receptions. Importantly, it also provides real world experience for interested graduate students, where they learn firsthand about gallery operations, installation, and communications as a gallery manager or staff member.

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This stimulating and demanding 36-week training programme will provide you with the skills and experience you need to teach Physics across the full 11-18 secondary age range, with complementary courses in Chemistry and Biology. Read more
This stimulating and demanding 36-week training programme will provide you with the skills and experience you need to teach Physics across the full 11-18 secondary age range, with complementary courses in Chemistry and Biology.

You will learn to make your knowledge accessible and interesting to students by implementing a range of teaching approaches and techniques for managing activities in the classroom.

The PGCE Secondary programme refreshes and extends students’ subject knowledge and provides them with the opportunity to achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and make a difference to young people’s lives and ambitions.

The programme is divided into university and school/college-based sections. The 12-week university-based section is taught by highly respected staff with extensive experience of secondary school provision.

Our tutors will introduce students to various aspects of teaching, including lesson planning, resource preparation and selection, teaching approaches for examination courses, class management and control, and assessment of attainment.

Trainees will spend the other 24 weeks gaining Professional Teaching Experience (PTE) on two placements at our established partner schools/colleges located across the South Wales region from Pembrokeshire to Monmouthshire. On both these placements, an experienced teacher will act as mentor and will keep in close contact with university tutors to ensure the smooth development of the trainee’s teaching competences. Placements will be available in either English or Welsh-medium secondary schools.

The programme involves four written assignments, while the PTE will be assessed through teaching observations by both experienced placement mentors and university tutors against the QTS.

Entry Criteria

You will be expected to hold a good honours degree (2:2minimum) and be a graduat of a university, polytechnic or college of higher education approved by the University of Wales. If you wish to teach in Secondary schools then your degree should be closely linked to the subject that you wish to teach.

For the September 2015 entry all PGCE applicants in Wales will need a B grade at GCSE in English and Mathematics and if you intend to follow your course through the medium of Welsh, a C grade in Welsh.

If you hold a C grade in GCSE English Language or Mathematics and are successful in other aspects of the selection process you will be given the opportunity to sit an equivalency test. If you are successful and you accept your place to study with us then you can start your programme as planned. Attendance at the workshops prior to the test is a compulsory part of the equivalency testing programme.

What are GCSE Equivalency Tests?

Successful completion of a GCSE equivalency test will enable you to proceed on to a PGCE course if you do not hold a GCSE B grade in English or Maths, the test is only available to students that have gained a grade C at GCSE level.

If you hold a C grade in GCSE English Language or Mathematics and are successful in other aspects of the selection process you will be given the opportunity to sit an equivalency test. If you successfully complete your equivalency test and you accept your place to study with SWWCTE then you can start your PGCE programme as planned.

Will I get any support before the test?

Yes. You are required to attend a one day workshop which is designed to help prepare you for the test with face-to-face support. On the day of your test you will also attend a half day workshop in the morning. In addition to our face-to-face workshops, we recommend that you consult one or more of the following revision resources:
Mathematics:

BBC Bitesize (Welsh)

BBC Bitesize (English)

http://www.conquermaths.com

GCSE Mathematics Revision Video (Welsh) by Gareth Evans, Ysgol y Creuddyn available on http://www.hwb.wales.gov.uk

GCSE Mathematics Revision booklets (available in Welsh and English) from bookshops, Amazon and WJEC (http://www.wjec.co.uk)

English:

BBC Bitesize (English)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise

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A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. Read more
A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. The course is taught by experienced TESOL Education staff within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

TESOL Quarter Scholarships - new from 2016/17
We are offering four “Quarter Scholarships” to overseas applicants for any TESOL degree for the academic year 2016-17. These are 25% tuition fee reductions – a saving of almost £3,500! All students paying overseas tuition fees and not in receipt of other funding are eligible.

Key information

-Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, MSc.
-Study methods: Part time, full time. Campus based.
-Duration: 1 year full time, 2 years part time.
-Start date: September.
-Course Director: Anne Lawrie.
-Location: Stirling Campus.

Course objectives

The TESOL Masters at the University of Stirling provides an advanced training and professional qualification for people presently engaged in any area of the teaching of English as a foreign or second language. It also offers professional development to people new to TESOL who are seeking a career change. On completion, you should possess the knowledge and practical classroom skills to be a confident, critically reflective and enterprising teacher.

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work. We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice. The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree.

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing.
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B.
-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening.
-IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening.

For more information go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

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Domus Academy has always had a wide and multidisciplinary approach to design research and teaching, which makes it possible to have a wide vision on design. Read more

Overview

Domus Academy has always had a wide and multidisciplinary approach to design research and teaching, which makes it possible to have a wide vision on design. The Master in Interior and Living Design intends to focus on the need to explore all aspects that concern design: from the most technical to the most intuitive ones, and to combine them in order to contemplate the various nuances of meaning in the words to live, to dwell, to use.

Milan offers a wide range of historical and contemporary stimulating examples; its long tradition in experimenting and finding practical solutions to the problems of living and dwelling makes it unique.

In this perspective, the department has created a training project of excellence able to reflect on the changes and transformations of the built space, promoting a permanent research activity for design models and solutions that are appropriate and innovative.

The program includes an internship in a company working in the disciplinary field.

Audience

Candidates holding a first-level academic diploma or BA degree, or about to graduate and with a knowledge of the English language
(IELTS 5.0 academic or equivalent certificate).
The program is addressed to candidates with a curriculum in interior design, design, architecture, engineering, visual arts or other disciplines related to the field of study who are interested in pursuing a course of advanced specialization and looking to expand and improve their skills using new technical and cultural tools in the field of interiors.

Job Opportunities

The Master in Interior & Living Design is meant to form a new professional who is able to combine technique and design knowledge with cultural sensibility and strategic thinking. A new professional aware of the attachment and the bond that space creates in our minds, someone attentive to the processes and to the timing of project management.

Companies

A network of professionals and leaders of different areas of interest are in constant and proficient interaction and collaboration with the Master in Interior & Living Design at Domus Academy, actively participating in educational programming, workshops and international competitions organized by the department.

The Master has worked with:

Agape, Alessi, B&B Italia, Boffi, Camper, Club Med, Coin, Deborah Milano, Fiorucci, Flos, Fnac, Haworth, Kvadrat, La Triennale di Milano, Moleskine, Mondadori, Moroso, Mutina, , Park Hyatt Milano, Pitti, Rossana Orlandi, Tucano, Veuve Clicquot.

For more information please visit http://www.domusacademy.com/

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Available across six in-demand language pairings. English and one of French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian. A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies with TESOL is of the highest value. Read more

Introduction

Available across six in-demand language pairings: English and one of French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian.
A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies with TESOL is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an entry-level teaching qualification with which you can embark on a career in English Language Teaching.
Here in the UK, recent research has shown that the fall in the number of language learners over the past decade has come at a big cost to the economy.

Accreditation

We are proud members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI). The ITI is the UK's only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. Our membership of the ITI allows us to help you to keep abreast of the full range of exciting developments and opportunities in the languages services industry.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time MSc: 12 months Diploma: 9 months Certificate: 9 months Part-time MSc: 27 months Diploma: 21 months Certificate: 9 months
- Start date: September entry
- Course Director: Dr Saihong Li

Course objectives

The objectives of the MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL are twofold. On the one hand, the course has a strong focus on practical translation and on specific situations in which people communicate with another across cultures. We offer the following language pairings: English and French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish andRussian. On the other hand, you will benefit from a sustained focus on contemporary theory and practice in the field of TESOL, with teaching provided by staff who have extensive personal experience of TESOL teaching.
In the Translation part of the course, you will undertake extensive practical translation work and you will have considerable flexibility in choosing what areas of translation you wish to specialise in, as you build up a portfolio of translations under the guidance of your tutor. Students on the course also examine some major debates surrounding the opportunities and problems that arise when people from different cultures communicate and translate, through seminars led by experts in the field of intercultural communication. And there will also be some opportunity for work-based study and exercises, including a work-based dissertation, as well as a chance to develop your skills using translation software packages. You may also choose to undertake extended translation as part of your final dissertation and will be given an opportunity to examine some of the key topics in contemporary Translation Studies throughout the course.
The TESOL segment of the course comprises a module in TESOL methodologies and another in Applied Linguistics, These, in turn, will underpin the development of your own teaching practice through the third TESOL module, which is devoted to classroom observation and peer assessment of your lesson planning and teaching.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. Each semester will also include a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), and the portfolio of translation.

Career opportunities

Our MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL opens up a range of opportunities across diverse sectors where linguistic fluency and language teaching are key. It offers a fantastic gateway into a career in Translation, whether you want to work freelance or in-house, specialising in business or tourism or literary translation, and there’s much more that you could end up doing with a qualification in Translation.
In a world of globalisation, criss-crossing travel and trade routes, and multi-lingual, multi-platform media, your high-level Translation skills, your close attention to detail and your ability to work to client deadlines will set you apart from the crowd. Whether you’re interested in developing a career in Europe, or working for one of the many international companies with offices in Scotland and the UK, this is the course for you.
At the same time, the course prepares you for a dynamic career teaching English to speakers of other languages, in the UK or beyond. You will be fully-equipped with an in-depth understanding of the challenges of the language classroom, and will be able to build on your own combined experience as a student of languages and of language teaching to provide a supportive and productive language learning environment for your own students.
In short, our course will enable you to play an active role in the development of a global community, putting your language skills to excellent use in fostering international dialogue, exchange and cooperation.

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This 39-week route is a development of the successful PGCE Primary Education course. The specialist route in Modern Languages is focused on Key Stage 1 (5-7 years) and Key Stage 2 (7-11 years). Read more
This 39-week route is a development of the successful PGCE Primary Education course. The specialist route in Modern Languages is focused on Key Stage 1 (5-7 years) and Key Stage 2 (7-11 years). This route addresses the national requirement for primary children to be taught a Modern Language and will be ideal for those graduates who wish to teach primary age children while retaining a focus on languages.

Visit the website: http://www.chi.ac.uk/pgce-primary-modern-languages

Indicative Course Content

• Professional Studies
• Core Curriculum Studies (English, Mathematics, Science)
• Foundation Curriculum Studies (e.g. History, PE, ICT, MFL etc.)
• Specialist Module: Teaching and Learning in Modern Languages
• School Experience

School Experience

For MFL students, there is the option of spending four weeks of the overall school experience in a placement abroad teaching in their chosen language.

We currently offer placements for speakers of French (teaching in French-speaking Belgium) and Spanish (teaching in Tenerife).

A typical pattern of school experience would be:

Autumn term - Eight weeks paired school experience (school A)
Spring term - Four weeks school experience abroad plus a two week enhanced placement focusing on the teaching of English
Summer term - Ten week school experience (school B)

Students will teach their foreign language for a minimum of one hour per week in school B.

Assessment

The course is assessed through observation during teaching placements and written assignments. To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) students need to complete portfolio assignments at Level M (Postgraduate) and all blocks of School Experience.

How to apply:

https://dotmailer-surveys.com/f31ueg1e-c011re4a

Funding for postgraduate students:

For information on funding and scholarships, please visit: http://www.chi.ac.uk/study-us/fees-finance/funding-and-money-advice-0/funding-postgraduate-students

Our facilities

Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

At Bognor Regis campus there is an integrated approach to the provision of learning resources and support. We offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research.

A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. We use an electronic learning environment with an expanding portfolio of online library resources from anywhere at any time.

Our award winning Learning Resource Centre is at the heart of the campus. It hosts a modern library service with areas for quiet and silent study on both floors.

Also situated in the LRC is the Support and Information Zone, Costa Coffee and over 80 open access work stations. An equipment loans centre offers laptops, tablets and other electronic devices for short and long term loans.

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The MSc in Management and English Language Teaching (MELT) is one of only a few such degrees in the UK and is distinguished by the fact that Management skills are taught in the Stirling Management School. Read more
The MSc in Management and English Language Teaching (MELT) is one of only a few such degrees in the UK and is distinguished by the fact that Management skills are taught in the Stirling Management School. The course is designed around a recognition that well-trained, professional teachers can progress into management positions within a few years of graduation, but they often lack management training. Management of ELT involves multi-cultural workforces where success depends more on management skill and cultural sensitivity than on teaching ability.

At Stirling, we focus on training both novice and experienced teachers, balancing theory and practice, and taking an innovative approach to teaching which includes special support for non-native speakers of English. Novice teachers on the MELT programme will get a thorough grounding in the theory and research underlying English language teaching and also in teaching methodology, while experienced teachers will benefit from a range of module choices. This is combined with input on management skills relevant to the multicultural working environments that are commonly experienced in language teaching today. The content of your course will vary to suit your experience, so whatever your starting point, you are challenged to acquire knowledge and skills that you can apply in teaching and managing in 21st century ELT.

Key information

-Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate.
-Study methods: Campus based. Full time, part time.
-Duration: 1 year full time, 2 years part time.
-Start date: September.
-Course Director: Dr Edward Moran.
-Location: Stirling Campus.

Course objectives

The programme aims to provide students with a strong foundation in TESOL and a focus on management issues within the discipline.

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work. We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice. The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree.

If English is not your first language, you should usually have one of the following minimum qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 (6.0 in speaking and listening; 6.5 in reading and writing).
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 (56 in speaking and listening; 60 in reading and writing).
-IBT TOEFL: 90 (20 in each of the four skills).

For more information, go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the official entry required score, you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register, you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation. The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation

The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Students can create live-action production, screens, 2D, 3D or stop motion animation that is unique. The program is housed in a School of Film and Animation with full production facilities, as well as the additional support of highly specialized faculty in photography, imaging science, computer science, information technology, and printing.

Goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use animation, filmmaking, and other imaging arts as a means to:

- pursue a career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- encourage a sense of community, creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

The MFA in film and animation offers four options:

1. 2D animation concentrates on traditional forms drawn by hand, a mixture of both traditional and digital, or all digital origination. Students may concentrate their studies on stop motion puppet animation.

2. 3D animation courses focus on advanced 3D modeling, lighting, texturing, and animating in a 3D space.

3. Production allows students to develop and refine their creative approach to fictional narrative, documentary, and experimental work.

4. Screenwriting is an opportunity for students to complete short films with a concentration in creating feature length screenplays.

All four options require two years of course work and a thesis project. A complete film is required of all the first year students, a complete film or script is required in the second year, and a more ambitious thesis film or feature length script is required in the third year, which is a part-time student status focused only on the thesis film.

A minimum of 63 semester credit hours of graduate work is outlined below.

Electives

SOFA elective courses are available in animation, film, video, multimedia, screenwriting, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, museum studies, crafts, bookmaking, typography, color photography, new media, studio photography, advertising photography, perception, sensitometry, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. There are also opportunities for independent studies, internships, and concentrations.

Thesis

Specific instructions pertaining to the thesis are available in the “MFA Guide for Students and Faculty: Policy Regarding Student Work.” The School of Film and Animation reserves the right to retain copies of student-produced films to be used for educational purposes, to show to prospective students, and as examples of student productions.

Admission requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) are not required for admission. International students are required to submit English language test scores such as TOEFL. Applicants who are capable of good academic work as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences, will be favored. The graduate faculty makes recommendations based on the above interlocking criteria.

Students who are evaluated to have MFA potential but need additional study in preparation for graduate courses will be advised to take such courses either prior to entrance or during their first year of study.

All correspondence concerning applications or catalogs should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services. Students interested in the program should have their application process completed by January 15. Applications received later than January 15 are considered on a space-available basis.

- Portfolio

The review committee is looking for work that is original in concept and content. It does not need to necessarily be motion media, but should be visual or aural. Examples include films/videos, photos, drawings, paintings, sculpture, stop motion puppets, scripts, storyboards, and original music.

Applicants must present what they consider to be the best of their work, not all of their work. Films or videos should total 12-minutes or less. A short, complete piece of work is preferable to a demo reel. If there are no short works then a 12-minute excerpt of a longer piece is acceptable.

Applicants must place their portfolios on a Web or FTP site, such as Vimeo or YouTube, which can be easily accessed by RIT faculty for review. Your application should include a URL Web or FTP address to your online portfolio. If your portfolio is placed on a shared Web or FTP site that contains other files, be sure the file name contains your full name (which must match the name used on your application materials). When applicable, please include any usernames and/or passwords necessary for access to your portfolio. Please provide an inventory sheet or table of contents with your portfolio, and if it is not obvious, clearly indicate what your combination was to group and collaborative pieces. This can be a separate description or can be included in the portfolio presentation.

Applicants are also required to produce a 2 to 3 minute video self-portrait to accompany the online portfolio. This should include information about the applicant such as why you want to attend the School of Film and Animation, which concentration you wish to pursue, and why. Please include information about one significant accomplishment you have made. Sound and picture quality should be clear. The online portfolio and self-portrait must be mounted on Slideroom.com once a Slideroom account is established.

For more information about portfolio guidelines as well as assistance in uploading an online portfolio, contact Graduate Enrollment Services.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work taken prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester credit hours of graduate work with a grade of B or better is transferable and may be counted toward the MFA degree, with the approval of the graduate faculty.

- Grades

Students must maintain a B (3.0) average GPA to meet graduation requirements for the MFA. Thesis hours are usually completed over several semesters. Acceptance or rejection of the thesis is made by the candidate’s thesis board and the graduate faculty.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

- Screenings

Screenings are required for all student-produced films and are coordinated through the professor or the thesis chair.

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In­te­gra­ting pu­blic and pri­va­te eco­no­mic law, the pro­gram­me brings to­ge­ther two are­as of law that are of­ten co­ve­r­ed in­de­pen­dent­ly in le­gal li­te­ra­tu­re as well as in teaching. Read more
In­te­gra­ting pu­blic and pri­va­te eco­no­mic law, the pro­gram­me brings to­ge­ther two are­as of law that are of­ten co­ve­r­ed in­de­pen­dent­ly in le­gal li­te­ra­tu­re as well as in teaching. This di­vi­si­on will be over­co­me wi­t­hin the frame­work of this pro­gram­me to pro­vi­de stu­dents with a ho­lis­tic ap­proach on in­ter­na­tio­nal eco­no­mic law that cha­rac­te­ri­ses this area of law in prac­tice. The pro­gram­me aims to de­li­ver a broad, sci­en­ti­fic and pro­found en­ga­ge­ment with the play­ers and struc­tu­res of in­ter­na­tio­nal eco­no­mic law (first stu­dy year in Lüne­burg) and, as well as to fa­ci­li­ta­te an ad­di­tio­nal spe­cia­li­sa­ti­on in one of the core sub­jects of in­ter­na­tio­nal eco­no­mic law such as Cor­po­ra­te & Fi­nan­ci­al Law, In­ter­na­tio­nal Com­mer­ci­al Law, In­ter­na­tio­nal Com­pe­ti­ti­on Law & Po­li­cy or In­tel­lec­tu­al Pro­per­ty & the Di­gi­tal Eco­no­my (se­cond stu­dy year in Glas­gow).

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IAAC offers in Barcelona an international Master programs in Advanced Architecture (MAA01), oriented to architects, engineers and designers from all over… Read more
IAAC offers in Barcelona an international Master programs in Advanced Architecture (MAA01), oriented to architects, engineers and designers from all over the world eager to imagine the future of our cities and societies and committed to build it in the present.The Master in Advanced Architecture program emerges as an innovative open structure focusing on three select Research Lines (Intelligent Cities, Self-sufficient Buildings, Digital Matter-Intelligent Construction) all led by internationally renowned experts, and bringing together students and faculty from different disciplines and origins, towards the creation of a networked hub of excellence, the IAAC Community,  dedicated to research and innovation for the habitability of the 21st Century. The Master in Advanced Architecture is accredited by the Universidad Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) with respectively 75 ECTS and 130 ECTS. The MAA is directed by the architect and researcher Areti Markopoulou.

You can find more information on our blog: http://www.iaacblog.com/programs/courses/maa-01/

Course Structure

The Master in Advanced Architecture is articulated in three different programs: MAA01, MAA01+OTF and MAA02. During the first year (October 2017 – June 2018) the students enrolled in the programs will work together in a common educational platform, with a common organization and academic structure. After the completion of MAA01, students enrolled in MAA01+OTF or MAA02 will follow two different organizations and academic structures. MAA02 combines the first year Master with a second year of investigation to develop a thesis project. During this second year students are required to deal with a project counting on the possibility to develop it with international faculty and enterprises, highly specialized in different fields. MAA+OTF combines MAA01 with a postgraduate program called Open Thesis Fabrication (OTF), which is an intensive applied research program that combines Academy and Industry. Nowadays its focus is on pylos projects and self sufficiency. There is also the possibility to extend the master in two years, during this second year the aim is to focus on your own thesis project. You can find more information on the IAAC blog: http://www.iaacblog.com/programs/courses/maa-01/

Student Profile

Candidates for the Master in Advanced Architecture are architects, engineers and designers from all over the World curious about how the world is changing and committed to drive this change.Therefore the program is oriented at graduates who wish to commit and develop their design research skills in the context of new forms of practice within architecture and urbanism, ranging from large-scale environments to tectonic details and material properties.Once successfully finished the master, IAAC students will join the IAAC Alumni Community. This is today is an active and dynamic network of visionary professionals distributed around the world, promoting principles and applications of Advanced Architecture, exploring new academic and research initiatives, leading award winning practices or working for internationally acclaimed firms and institutions.

Request More Information

If you have any questions about the program, or would like to request more information please get in touch here: https://iaac.net/iaac/contact/

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