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Our Language Pathology MSc is designed for those wanting to develop a career as a Speech and Language Therapist in the National Health Service. Read more
Our Language Pathology MSc is designed for those wanting to develop a career as a Speech and Language Therapist in the National Health Service. This practical course is accredited by the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) and approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.

In year one you will cover modules in psychology, linguistics and anatomy/physiology that underpin the discipline. You will also begin to work on speech and language therapy (SLT) cases and have your first experiences of working clinically under supervision.

Year two is more specialised with a focus on motor, head and neck and cognitive impairments. With academic and clinical supervision, you will carry out and write up a clinically-based research project (an extended case report), based on a therapy programme that you will deliver to one client.

You need to be able to identify with NHS values as stated in the NHS constitution.

Teaching is delivered through case-based problem solving which means you will be participating in guided self-directed learning and collaborating with peers in group work.

Our staff have an immense amount of experience of delivering SLT courses and many are qualified and experienced speech and language therapists. All are involved in research in this area and our teaching is supported by research findings.

We take a student-centred approach to your development of knowledge, thinking and professional identity. We offer an individual approach to clinical supervision in our clinics, which involves micro-analysis of video material and focuses on positive aspects of interaction. We also aim to provide transparent assessment procedures and a clear and specific marking criteria for coursework, helping you to prepare your coursework.

We have very high student satisfaction scores for our programmes in the 2016 Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (92% satisfaction). We are ranked in the top 10 in the UK for Aural and Oral Sciences in The Complete University Guide 2017. We also rank 4th in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey, with a score of 93% (in the Aural and Oral Science category).

[Delivery

The course is taught at Newcastle city campus and in a variety of external clinical placements. The course runs from 9am to 6pm during weekdays from September to July in both years. This is an intense course with approximately 25-30 contact hours per week with the possibility of additional contact hours during clinical placements. There are also block clinical placements in the summer months in both years.

You will complete compulsory modules followed by a six-week clinical placement in both years. Assessment is through course work, written examinations, in-course assessment of the clinical practicum, case presentations and in-course class tests. An important element of year two is the extended case report, where you manage a clinical case, provide intensive input, and write up your findings in dissertation format.

Placements

You will complete two, 11-week on-site placements either in the Aphasia Centre or the Child Speech and Language Therapy Clinic. You will also complete two, six-week placements in a range of NHS and educational settings.

Your clinically-based research project (extended case report) will be the basis of a third six-week placement.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists and approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). On successful completion of the course you can apply to register with the HCPC and RCSLT as a speech and language therapist.

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The Audiological Science with Clinical Practice MSc is designed to train students from other disciplines as audiologists. This unique two-year programme includes a 12-month clinical placement and provides the core knowledge, skills and clinical competencies necessary for employment as an audiologist. Read more
The Audiological Science with Clinical Practice MSc is designed to train students from other disciplines as audiologists. This unique two-year programme includes a 12-month clinical placement and provides the core knowledge, skills and clinical competencies necessary for employment as an audiologist.

Degree information

The programme provides a detailed study of the hearing and balance mechanisms, their structure, function, pathology and assessment.

The successful student will become competent in a wide range of adult hearing assessments and adult hearing amplification and aural rehabilitation. In addition students will acquire skills that will allow them to assist in specialist areas, specifically balance and paediatric hearing assessments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 300 credits.

The full-time two-year programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits) in the first year, and four core clinical modules (120 credits) in the second year.

A Postgraduate Diploma, ten core modules (150 credits), two core clinical modules (90 credits), full-time 2 years, flexible 3-5 years is also offered.

Year One core modules - please note: only first-year modules can be taken in flexible mode. The in-service clinical placement modules need to be completed in one year - equivalent to year two of the full-time programme.
-Signals and Systems for Audiology
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
-Balance
-Clinical and Professional Practice
-Diagnostic Audiology
-Introduction to Amplification and Aural Rehabilitation
-Paediatric Audiology
-Research Methods and Statistics

Year Two core modules
-Clinical Adult Audiovestibular Assessment and Paediatric Hearing Assessment (30 credits)
-Clinical Adult Diagnostics and Auditory Rehabilitation (60 credits)
-Integrative Audiology
-Living with Hearing Loss

Research project/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10–12,000 words. This is submitted at the end of year one.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, case presentations, tutorials, enquiry-based learning, practical demonstrations and in-service clinical placements within accredited audiology departments in the NHS or private sector.

Assessment (formative and summative) is by essays, case presentations, mini -tests, final written and practical examinations, and dissertation.

Careers

It is anticipated that the majority of students will seek employment as audiologists within the UK, in both the NHS and private sector. The main area of activity is adult hearing assessment and rehabilitation. As experience is acquired, audiologists might develop an interest and expertise in balance assessment and rehabilitation, paediatric audiology, tinnitus, cochlear implants, middle ear implants, and bone-anchored hearing aids.

With further experience it is anticipated that graduates might also move towards management, research or teaching.

Employability
Although the programme is vocational and career-specific (audiology) some of our graduates have pursued academic careers, completing PhDs and taught doctorates. International students have used the knowledge and skills gained to promote and develop audiological services in their home countries. Graduates will also acquire many transferable skills, for example, excellent communication skills, the ability to work under pressure, the ability to work independently and in teams, and excellent interpersonal and research skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Ear Institute is a recognised international centre of excellence for research and training with strong links to the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital and other specialised audiology departments in London.

Our programme aims to ensure that graduates are scientifically literate at postgraduate level and clinically competent within an audiology setting, and that graduates from a relevant discipline acquire the knowledge and skills to practise as an audiologist and/or hearing aid dispenser or pursue a research career.

Our programme allows students the opportunity to network with a variety of different professionals, particularly audiologists, and doctors with specialist interests in ENT or audiovestibular medicine.

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This MSc is structured to provide the theoretical, scientific, clinical, research and vocational skills necessary to practice enhanced otology, audiovestibular medicine and audiology. Read more
This MSc is structured to provide the theoretical, scientific, clinical, research and vocational skills necessary to practice enhanced otology, audiovestibular medicine and audiology. The programme is designed for ENT surgeons, audiovestibular physicians, paediatricians, GPs, neurologists and other trainees and physicians with an interest in the medical aspects of audiology who wish to develop or enhance their careers or specialise in otology.

Degree information

Students will learn about the anatomy and physiology of the vestibulocochlear system and facial nerve, related disorders and pathologies, diagnostic techniques and management strategies in both children and adults. Clinical and surgical placements provide an opportunity to develop specialist skills and competencies in evidence-based medicine, multidisciplinary practice - including facial reanimation and skull base clinics - and translational research and ethics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), full-time one year, flexible two to five years is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System for Physicians
-Imaging
-Research Methods and Statistics

Optional modules
-Advanced Amplification and Aural Rehabilitation
-Advanced Management of Tinnitus and Hyperacusis
-Advances in Auditory Implants
-Audiovestibular Physics
-Auditory Processing Disorders
-Balance
-Clinical Diagnostics for Audiovestibular Medicine
-Diagnostic Audiology for ENT Practice
-Introduction to Amplification and Aural Rehabilitation
-Lateral Skull Base and Facial Nerve
-Medical and Surgical Treatment of Hearing and Balance Disorders

Please note not all optional modules will be available in any given academic year. Please contact the department for more information.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and observation at accredited clinical placements. Assessment is through a combination of methods including unseen examinations, written assignments (essays and a dissertation), case presentations, clinical portfolios and vivas.

Careers

This MSc provides a firm foundation in the practice of audiovestibular techniques and their clinical applications for physicians who wish to enhance their careers or develop a research career in this field. This programme at UCL has a highly acclaimed track record in catering for a broad range of training needs of physicians both from the UK and abroad. Alumni include high-profile audiovestibular and ENT physicians, practising within the UK and internationally, with highly successful clinical, research or public health career trajectories after completing the programme. The Postgraduate Certificate option provides key theoretical foundations to inform evidence-based practice and translational research and is recognised for specialty training in the UK by the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board (JRCPTB) for Audiovestibular Medicine. It also represents part of the General Medical Council approved theoretical assessment component.

Employability
Globally and in the UK the requirements for career progression and development are even more sharply focused. On successful completion of this MSc graduates will have acquired wide-ranging skills which will enhance professional practice and future employability. Research skills gained will include data management and analysis, critical literature evaluation and an enhanced understanding of how evidence informs healthcare provision. For ENT surgeons at a foundation/core training level, the programme adds a substantial clinical and research dimension to an application for core/higher training. For those already in higher training, completing this MSc demonstrates a commitment to acquiring advanced research skills and the opportunity to develop an academic clinical career as a practising surgeon. For individuals in specialties allied to otology, the programme offers enhanced clinical and research skills relevant to careers in clinical research and service development.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Ear Institute provides a unique environment for graduate study and is the largest and most broad-based academic unit for research into hearing, auditory processing, deafness and vestibular research in the UK.

Students benefit from an interdisciplinary range of clinical and research expertise. Collaboration between disciplines provides integrated research projects utilising a wide range of clinical and laboratory techniques.

The associated University College London Hospitals (UCLH) house the largest clinical audiology and dedicated vestibular service in the country, and the first Cochlear Implant team in the UK. All students benefit from placements in UCLH and UCL Partners hospitals and excellent networking opportunities.

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context. Read more
The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree looking to become journalists with an international perspective rooted in the UK’s journalistic traditions. Students with degrees in all disciplines are welcome. Law, Business, Agriculture, and Science are among the first degree subjects that are in demand by many publishers and broadcasters. Overseas applicants are especially welcome. Prospective students need excellent general knowledge based on a worldview and a thorough briefing of what is in the news each day.

Students who successfully complete this MA in International Journalism are very employable in the media.

Objectives

The MA in International Journalism is a keystone course at City and has built up a worldwide reputation. This course has been running since 1982 and has more than 1,000 alumni working in journalism around the world.

During the course, you will become adept at print, broadcast and online journalism in a global context by:
-Studying news in all its forms
-Obtaining a profound understanding of international journalism from a UK perspective
-Practising all platforms of journalism (print, broadcast and online) Exploring theory as well as reflect on your practice

You will learn how to gather and report in various styles and modes for a range of media (print, broadcast, online). You will also explore the contemporary global domain of journalism.

The course attracts students from all over the world, who will become your future professional network. You will benefit from being in one of the world’s most significant media cities with access to thousands of international journalists and sources.

On this course you will gain from using both traditional and contemporary journalism tools, and acquire comprehensive skills,which you can take back to your own country or move on with to anywhere in the world.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all MA Journalism courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry.

They are also a way you can build up evidence of what you can do to a potential employer (cuttings, video and audio clips).

You are encouraged to undertake work experience during the breaks in the terms.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

The International Journalism MA is a professional/practice course with an emphasis on developing practical skills in journalism. The teaching staff are all professional journalists in print, broadcast or online. We focus on "learning by doing" - you cover real stories and produce newspapers, run a radio station, broadcast on the internet, and produce television news programmes and multimedia websites.

During the course, you have opportunities to meet, listen to and question journalists and other people from the media. You are encouraged to reflect on your own experiences as journalists and the ways in which practicing journalists do their jobs by developing an understanding of ethical issues in journalism, the media and international reporting.

You will be treated as a professional journalist throughout the practice-based elements of the course. Learning is intensive and at times teaching hours will resemble those of a full-time job.

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Global Journalism and Society and Ethics, Rules and Standards, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Industry visitors
The MA International Journalism course prides itself on its close connections with journalism practitioners. Here are some of the high-level industry figures who have contributed to the course in recent years:
-David Schlesinger, Global Managing Editor, Reuters
-Lindsey Hilsum, International Editor, Channel 4 News
-Phil Harding, Director English Networks & News, BBC World Service (as External Examiner)
-Yosri Fouda, London bureau chief and host "Top Secret", Al Jazeera
-Salim Amin, ceo A-24 African network and head Camera Pix
-Mark Brayne, Director, Dart Europe
-Waleed Ibrahim, Reuters Iraq Bureau
-Tim Lambon, Deputy Foreign Editor, Channel 4 News
-Gavin McFaydean, Director, Centre of Investigative Journalism
-David Leigh, Investigations Editor, The Guardian
-Sandy McIntyre, head of APTN.

Assessment
Assessment is part of learning, and course assessments vary to reflect the learning being
achieved. They include workshop exercises, studio work, oral presentations, essays, reflections
and production (making journalism products), and different forms (written, oral, visual, aural), as
well as being individual and team-based.

Modules

All students on the International Journalism MA take modules in storytelling and online journalism before specialising in either print, broadcast or online journalism. This choice informs your studies for the rest of the course through to the completion of a final project.

There is a dissertation option for students who prefer a more academic route through the course.

You are encouraged to complete an internship, either in the UK or overseas. This must be arranged by you.

Core modules
-Global Journalism (20 credits)
-Journalistic Storytelling (20 credits)
-International News (15 credits)
-Production (30 credits)
-International Online Journalism (10 credits)
-Journalism Ethics (15 credits)
-Professional Project or Dissertation (30 credits)
-Specialism Journalism or Journalism and Conflict (20 credits)

Elective modules - choose from:
-Print Journalism (20 credits)
-Broadcast Journalism (20 credits)

Career prospects

92.6 per cent of graduates from this course are in employment six months after completing the course (95 per cent in work or further study) (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2014-15). Graduates work in both global and national media and in allied occupations around the world.

Most recently, these have included roles from researchers to editors in broadcasting such as:
-BBC Radio and TV (including BBC World Service)
-ITN
-Channel 4
-Al Jazeera
-Deutsche Welle
-CNN
-France24
-Bloomberg,
-Sky News
-Fox News
-NHK (Japan)
-Thomson Reuters
-Associated Press
-Dow Jones

And major newspapers and magazines including:
-The New York Times
-Financial Times
-The Hindu
-Politiken
-GQ
-Fairfax Media (New Zealand)

In the heart of London’s huge and diverse media district,students have unrivalled access to industry internships and contacts.

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Choral Conducting is offered as an MMus or a Postgraduate Diploma programme. - Weekly choral conducting class working with singers. Read more
Choral Conducting is offered as an MMus or a Postgraduate Diploma programme.

Key Features

- Weekly choral conducting class working with singers
- Individual and small group specialist vocal tuition including language classes
- Observation and participation in RWCMD choral rehearsals including College Chorus and Chamber Choir
- Choral repertoire, score preparation and aural skills class
- Observation of conductors within a professional context
- Opportunities to direct RWCMD ensembles, rehearsals and productions
- Opportunities to conduct self-promoted student performances
- Masterclasses with internationally renowned choral directors

Key Features of all Postgraduate Programmes

- Training in career development, self-promotion, event management and sustainable technique
- International masterclass series
- Fully integrated performance programme by international artists
- Performance Practice training supported by seminars, tutorials and symposia
- Training in performance analysis and presentation (MMus only)
- Advanced research and specialist performance analysis training (MMus only)
- Established work placement schemes
- Optional training in advanced teaching skills and arts management
- Opportunities to study abroad at a partner conservatoire

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This course provides a fast-track route to an audiology qualification for individuals who hold a degree (or equivalent) in a related discipline (linguistics, psychology, physics, behavioural science, biomedical science, speech and language therapy or some combination of these). Read more
This course provides a fast-track route to an audiology qualification for individuals who hold a degree (or equivalent) in a related discipline (linguistics, psychology, physics, behavioural science, biomedical science, speech and language therapy or some combination of these).

Audiologists work with patients to identify and assess hearing and/or balance disorders, recommending and providing appropriate rehabilitation and management. An audiologist will assist in the promotion of normal communication as well as the prevention, identification, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management of the following: hearing and/or balance disorders that arise in the peripheral and/or central auditory and/or vestibular systems; functional hearing disorders; and central auditory processing disorders.

An audiologist should also be able to identify developmental or acquired disorders of speech, language and language processing caused by a hearing loss, and make referrals to an appropriate professional.

The course is organised in three broad strands. You will study supporting subjects such as linguistics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, neurology and research methods. You will learn theoretical audiology knowledge relating to hearing and balance, and you will carry out an element of professional practice through placement-based and university-based learning of practical clinical skills, clinical decision-making, reflection and professional issues. Knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the theoretical modules are integrated and applied to clinical practice throughout the course.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The course is taught using a variety of interactive learning methods including lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops, laboratories, group work, role-play and interactive computer sessions. The development of interpersonal skills and professional skills and attitudes is also a major focus of the learning and teaching programme. Learning activities are guided using web-based programmes. A variety of assessments are used for example essays, individual presentations, electronic portfolios, group discussions, case studies, practical skills as well as a final dissertation. Class sizes are normally 10 - 15 students.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your attendance at QMU will depend on which module you are studying. In most instances, the taught elements of this course occur over three consecutive days. It is suggested that students use the other days for independent study.

Links with industry/professional bodies

The course provides graduates with eligibility to register with the Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists (RCCP) in the United Kingdom/ Academy of Health Care Scientists.

Modules

15 credits: Neurology for Speech Therapy and Audiology/ Linguistics and Culture in Signed and Spoken Languages/ Advanced Audiological Assessment/ Multidisciplinary Working

30 credits: Audiological Assessment/ Aural Habilitation and Rehabilitation/ Technology for Hearing Impairment/ Vestibular Assessment and Rehabilitation/ Research Methods

Level 10 credits

20 credits: Audiological Clinical Skills/ Professional Practice for Audiology

40 credits: Clinical Audiology 1,2 & 3 (placement modules)

If studying for the MSc you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates may work within the National Health Service and private sector. A further assessment is required in order to work as a registered Hearing Aid Dispenser. There are also career opportunities for research in universities and research institutes.

Quick Facts

- This course includes 34 weeks of structured placements throughout Scotland, Northern Ireland and the North of England.
- It draws on scientific principles to inform clinical practice.
- Practical skills are taught on campus and students have access to a wide range of equipment.

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Learn essential skills, produce print and online magazines, and complete at least seven weeks' work experience. This course is suitable for anyone with a first degree in any subject who wants to be a firstclass magazine journalist. Read more
Learn essential skills, produce print and online magazines, and complete at least seven weeks' work experience.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for anyone with a first degree in any subject who wants to be a firstclass magazine journalist. Students must have excellent general knowledge and be prepared to work across print and digital platforms with a variety of content. Students will have passion for communicating in words and pictures - and an appetite for fun and hard work is essential.

Magazine Journalism students write, design and produce the department’s showcase magazine XCity and its website Xcityplus.com. Read the latest digital edition and check out the listings at the back to find out where our graduates are working now.

Objectives

This hugely successful, well-established course will prepare you for a broad range of magazine scenarios, from writing for a glossy men’s magazine; to researching a story for an online business-to-business publication; to reviewing a play for a national newspaper supplement and much in between.

You'll learn the essential skills of reporting, feature writing, subbing, interviewing, researching, and design and layout. You'll produce print and online magazines, and complete at least seven weeks' work experience.

The course will give you a thorough grounding in print and multimedia journalism. You will develop professional skills in reporting, interviewing, research, feature writing and production (print and online), benefitting from the experience of leading magazine and specialist journalists and around 30 visiting editors, commissioning editors and editorial directors from the UK’s leading publishing houses.

Graduates from the course have won the Professional Publishers Association’s ‘Most Promising Postgraduate Student of the Year’ for the last nine years.

We have been running Journalism courses at City since 1976. In the years since, over 5,000 students have graduated and are now working in the media in the UK and internationally.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all Journalism MA courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry. You are encouraged to seek work experience while you study on this course.

Teaching and learning

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Our students have the option of taking part in a Teeline shorthand course alongside their studies. This costs £100 (refundable if you reach 100 words per minute) and runs across two terms.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation.

Assessment is part of learning, and course assessments vary to reflect the learning being achieved. They include workshop exercises, studio work, oral presentations, essays, reflections, exams and production (making journalism products), and different forms (written, oral, visual, aural), as well as being individual and team-based.

Modules

The magazine industry has never been more exciting and challenging. This course prepares you for the exciting world of magazines which may be more varied than you imagine - whether it's writing a feature for a glossy men's magazine, podcasting an interview, or researching and crafting a story for the newsdesk of a business-to-business publication.

All of our MA Journalism students must undertake underpinning core modules in Ethics, Rules and Standards, and a Final Project.

Core modules
-Ethics, Rules and Standards (30 credits)
-Journalism Portfolio (30 credits)
-Editorial Production (30 credits)
-UK Media Law (15 credits)
-The Magazine Business (15 credits)
-Final Project (30 credits)

Elective modules - choose one of the following two modules:
-Social and Digital Journalism (15 credits)
-Political Headlines (15 credits)

Specialisms - choose one of the following specialisms:
-Lifestyle Specialism (15 credits)
-International Correspondent Specialism (15 credits)
-Arts and Culture Specialism (15 credits)
-Humanitarian Reporting Specialism (15 credits)
-Finance and Business Specialism (15 credits)
-Sports Specialism (15 credits)
-Political Reporting Specialism (15 credits)
-Entertainment Specialism (15 credits)
-Security and Crime Specialism (15 credits)
-Investigative Reporting Specialism (15 credits)

Career prospects

Alumni of City’s MA Magazine Journalism course occupy top positions in:
-Grazia
-Harper’s Bazaar
-Sunday Times Magazine
-Guardian Weekend magazine
-Marie Claire
-FHM
-Stylist
-Esquire
-The Debrief
-Radio Times
-New Statesman
-Prospect
-Pulse
-Architects’ Journal
-Estates Gazette
-Chemist & Druggist
-Travel Weekly
-IKEA Magazine
-Waitrose Kitchen
-BA High Life
-The Press Association
-Daily Mail
-The Daily Telegraph
-The Sunday Times
-Observer
-The Sun
-The Independent
-Evening Standard

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The Audiological Science MSc provides a detailed study of the hearing and balance mechanisms. their structure, function and pathology. Read more
The Audiological Science MSc provides a detailed study of the hearing and balance mechanisms: their structure, function and pathology. The relationship between laboratory research and clinical aspects forms a key element: lectures, demonstrations and tutorials will be complemented by practical experience in the clinic and laboratory.

Degree information

Students learn how people develop, or are born with, hearing and/or balance difficulties; how to test for hearing and balance problems and how to rehabilitate or habilitate patients with these problems. They learn the theory and science underpinning these practical clinical skills including acoustics and the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and vestibular systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and a research project (60 credits) There are no optional modules for this programme.. A Postgraduate Diploma, eight core modules (120 credits), full-time nine months is offered.

Core modules
-Signals, Systems, Acoustics and the Ear
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
-Diagnostic Audiology
-Introduction to Amplification and Aural Rehabilitation
-Balance
-Paediatric Audiology
-Clinical and Professional Practice
-Research Methods and Statistics

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practical demonstrations, and clinical placements. Practicals will consist of observations followed by supervised testing for rehabilitation and diagnostics in the Ear Institute’s specialist Skills Laboratory. Assessment is by essays, presentations, written examinations, clinical practical examinations and the dissertation.

Careers

Many graduates are now employed as audiologists either within the NHS or private sector or work as hearing aid dispensers.

Please note that the Audiological Science MSc does not meet the requirements of the UK regulatory bodies on its own. The programme provides the required theoretical skills and knowledge for clinical registration in the UK but does not provide the practical training required. Applicants wishing to practise as an audiologist or hearing aid dispenser in the UK will need to transfer to the Audiological Science with Clinical Practice MSc (two-year full time). This is subject to availability and there is a competitive interview process.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Audiologist, Broomfield Hospital (NHS)
-Senior Assistant Audiologist, Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
-Student Audiologist, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust
-Student Audiologist, West Middlesex University Hospital (NHS)
-Trainee Healthcare Scientist, Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and studying MSc Neurosensory Science, Aston University

Employability
As well as working as audiologists, graduates have also pursued academic careers, completing PhDs and taught doctorates. International students have used the knowledge and skills gained to promote and develop audiological services in their countries. It is suitable for audiologists who have no graduate-level qualification in audiology and wish to develop their careers, or academic researchers who have a specialist interest in audiology.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Ear Institute is the largest and most broad-based academic unit for research into hearing and deafness in the UK. Students benefit from the range of clinical and research expertise among its staff.

The UCL Ear Institute is associated with the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, which houses the largest clinical audiology unit in the country, and works closely with NHS audiology departments to provide placement and observation opportunities for students.

The programme has close links with, healthcare providers and industry (e.g. hearing aid manufacturers) providing students with access to the latest practice and technology and excellent networking opportunities.

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Advanced Audiology is designed for practising audiologists looking to enhance their clinical skills. Graduates are eligible to apply for senior clinical roles in the NHS or private sector. Read more
Advanced Audiology is designed for practising audiologists looking to enhance their clinical skills. Graduates are eligible to apply for senior clinical roles in the NHS or private sector. A variety of specialist modules can be selected to suit students' professional needs. The programme has a strong research and evidence-based practice foundation.

Degree information

A wide range of optional modules enables students to focus on specific advanced fields of audiology relevant to their professional practice. Students will learn about the latest research in each field and how to apply this to patient care and service delivery. Students will gain proficiency in using new tools and techniques in line with advanced-level practice.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three compulsory modules (45 credits), the research project and dissertation (60 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), full-time nine months is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), part-time up to two years is offered.

Core modules:
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
-Research Methods and Statistics
-Counselling
-Research Project (see below)

Students choose five of the following optional modules:
-Central Auditory Processing
-Advanced Management of Tinnitus and Hyperacusis
-Advanced Amplification and Aural Rehabilitation
-Vestibular Rehabilitation
-Advances in Auditory Implants
-Paediatric Assessment
-Paediatric Habilitation
-Rehabilitation for Adults with Acquired Hearing Loss
-Signals and Systems
-Research Evidence and Design I
-Principles of Health Informatics
-eHealth: Patients and the Internet
-Healthcare Quality and Evidence Based Practice
-Using Information in Healthcare Management
-Research Methods in Healthcare
-Introduction to Neuroanatomy, Systems and Disease

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, practical demonstrations and workshops, structured workplace/placement observation, online tutorials and assignments. Research skills will be obtained through lectures and the completion of a scientific research paper and poster presentation. Assessments include essays, reflective journals, case studies, clinical portfolios, unseen examinations and the research dissertation.

Careers

The programme provides audiologists with the required depth, breadth and up-to-date knowledge and competence to enable them to fulfil the needs of the higher practitioner roles.

The UCL Ear Institute's links with industry and healthcare providers allows students significant networking opportunities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Audiologist, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
-Audiologist, Ministry of Health Malaysia.
-Hearing Aid Audiologist, Security Forces Hospital
-Senior Audiologist, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital

Employability
The MSc pushes the boundaries in helping clinicians develop their skills and services, and innovate and design solutions to today’s hearing healthcare challenges. UK students obtain the knowledge and skills for senior roles in the NHS (bands 6 and 7), as defined by the Knowledge and Skills Framework and National Occupational Standards.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Ear Institute is the largest and most broad-based academic unit for research into hearing and deafness in the UK, allowing students to benefit from the range of clinical and research expertise among its staff. The associated Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital houses the largest clinical audiology unit in the country.

The MSc programme is designed for practising professionals. A significant number of the optional modules are taught as Masterclasses (three- to five-day short courses) followed by tutorials and assessments. This allows students who continue to work part-time significant flexibility in how they structure their MSc programme.

The programme has close links with healthcare providers and industry (for example, hearing aid manufacturers). Modules delivered as Masterclasses provide excellent networking opportunities with these companies and international healthcare professionals.

Other admission requirements

The Ear Institute recognises that some audiology professionals may have had different (non-degree) entries into the profession. Applicants with the BAAT qualification and/or a Certificate or Diploma in Hearing Therapy who also have at least five years of relevant clinical experience and appropriate registration with the RCCP may be accepted, depending on their relevant experience, and are encouraged to contact the Ear Institute to discuss their application.

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The aim of the course is to train musicians in the art of choral conducting; to instruct them in diverse aspects of the history and practice of choral music… Read more
The aim of the course is to train musicians in the art of choral conducting; to instruct them in diverse aspects of the history and practice of choral music; to provide the technical skills required to work with historic repertoires and, for organists, to develop organ playing skills as both soloist and accompanist; to facilitate research into and performance of new or little-known choral repertoire; and to give students the experience of observing and working with the collegiate Chapel choirs.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mumummchs

Course detail

Graduates will be fully equipped to work as choral conductors, and have a good understanding of the discipline of choral training, relating both to adult and young voices. They will also have acquired a good knowledge of the way choral music works within the liturgy of the church and other historical and technical issues. Graduates will have developed their writing skills as well as their practical skills. They will also have developed specific skills by completing two of three optional tasks: the writing of an extended essay, the editing of early choral music, or a performance in the form of either an organ recital, or continuo performance on organ and harpsichord, or a choral recital conducted by the candidate.

Format

Regular choral conducting tuition in the form of small classes and workshops/masterclasses with choir; seminars; aural classes.

Written feedback is provided for all assessed work. Oral feedback is provided during and after coaching sessions and seminar presentations.

Placements

May be available with college choirs by agreement with the Course Director.

Assessment

- 2 essays (compulsory) - 3,500 words each
- 1 extended essay (optional) - 7,000 words
or
- editing project (optional) - typically the equivalent of a Renaissance mass, plus commentary and editorial notes of 1,000 words

- 1 choral conducting exam (compulsory) - 30 minutes
- 1 choral project, including recital (compulsory) - 25 minutes
- 1 keyboard exam; continuo or recital (optional) - 30 minutes

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Visual Sociology offers you the opportunity to combine written sociological argument with film, sound, or photographic representation- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-sociology/. Read more
The MPhil in Visual Sociology offers you the opportunity to combine written sociological argument with film, sound, or photographic representation- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-sociology/

It will allow new researchers to re-think both the conduct of social research and the forms that social research writing takes in the 21st century.

Students registered on this degree will complete all of the research training modules outlined for the MPhil programme. The MPhil will allow you to re-think the gathering, analysis and presentation of research data and consider the future of sociological representation.

Assessment will be via a thesis, visual/aural component (a video or sound feature, or a photographic project), and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Research Officer of Sociology.

Department

Sociology at Goldsmiths is ranked:
9th in the UK and 45th in the world for this subject area**
9th in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

The Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths is active, contemporary and inventive. We are interested in everything from the ‘global’ issues of poverty and injustice to the ‘micro’ issues of cultural identity and the presentation of self in a digital world.

Our staff are some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – they’re the pioneers who are pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. They’ve played a key role in developing social research methods, setting agendas in social and cultural policy, and linking theory to practice.

Through their world-leading research you’ll be at the forefront of current debates and will be encouraged to see the world differently.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. You should look at our staff research interests to see if we are the right department for you and whether there is a member if staff who may match your research interests.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 1,500-3,000-word statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources
the name of a staff member who you believe would be interested in acting as your supervisor

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA Education programme is an exciting opportunity to join with other students in discussion and collaborative learning while being taught by a team which is highly skilled in supporting your needs as a postgraduate student. Read more
The MA Education programme is an exciting opportunity to join with other students in discussion and collaborative learning while being taught by a team which is highly skilled in supporting your needs as a postgraduate student.

Course detail

The course engages you with current issues and debates in education, enabling you to gain critical awareness and understanding and to develop new insights. You will engage in research and advanced scholarship in the discipline and will develop as a self-directed, independent learner who is able to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively.

Modules

• Developing Criticality
• Methods of Enquiry
• Global Perspectives on Education
• Critical Contemporary Issues in Education in a National Context
• Local Independent Study/Project

Dissertation: Education

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research focused on a topic that is relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus and nature of the investigation will be agreed with a supervisor.

Major Project: Education

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research investigation and artefact development on a topic relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus, nature of the investigation and intended output will be negotiated and agreed with a supervisor. For example, through your second year studies you may have developed a particular interest which you wish to pursue further. Enterprise education was the example given above for illustrative purposes and so taking this example further, the student decides to focus the final study on social enterprises and new models of education between social entrepreneurs and schools. S/he chooses the major project option rather than the dissertation option as this allows scope to include artefacts in written, aural or visual form alongside the written component.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation. The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation

The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Students can create live-action production, screens, 2D, 3D or stop motion animation that is unique. The program is housed in a School of Film and Animation with full production facilities, as well as the additional support of highly specialized faculty in photography, imaging science, computer science, information technology, and printing.

Goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use animation, filmmaking, and other imaging arts as a means to:

- pursue a career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- encourage a sense of community, creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

The MFA in film and animation offers four options:

1. 2D animation concentrates on traditional forms drawn by hand, a mixture of both traditional and digital, or all digital origination. Students may concentrate their studies on stop motion puppet animation.

2. 3D animation courses focus on advanced 3D modeling, lighting, texturing, and animating in a 3D space.

3. Production allows students to develop and refine their creative approach to fictional narrative, documentary, and experimental work.

4. Screenwriting is an opportunity for students to complete short films with a concentration in creating feature length screenplays.

All four options require two years of course work and a thesis project. A complete film is required of all the first year students, a complete film or script is required in the second year, and a more ambitious thesis film or feature length script is required in the third year, which is a part-time student status focused only on the thesis film.

A minimum of 63 semester credit hours of graduate work is outlined below.

Electives

SOFA elective courses are available in animation, film, video, multimedia, screenwriting, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, museum studies, crafts, bookmaking, typography, color photography, new media, studio photography, advertising photography, perception, sensitometry, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. There are also opportunities for independent studies, internships, and concentrations.

Thesis

Specific instructions pertaining to the thesis are available in the “MFA Guide for Students and Faculty: Policy Regarding Student Work.” The School of Film and Animation reserves the right to retain copies of student-produced films to be used for educational purposes, to show to prospective students, and as examples of student productions.

Admission requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) are not required for admission. International students are required to submit English language test scores such as TOEFL. Applicants who are capable of good academic work as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences, will be favored. The graduate faculty makes recommendations based on the above interlocking criteria.

Students who are evaluated to have MFA potential but need additional study in preparation for graduate courses will be advised to take such courses either prior to entrance or during their first year of study.

All correspondence concerning applications or catalogs should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services. Students interested in the program should have their application process completed by January 15. Applications received later than January 15 are considered on a space-available basis.

- Portfolio

The review committee is looking for work that is original in concept and content. It does not need to necessarily be motion media, but should be visual or aural. Examples include films/videos, photos, drawings, paintings, sculpture, stop motion puppets, scripts, storyboards, and original music.

Applicants must present what they consider to be the best of their work, not all of their work. Films or videos should total 12-minutes or less. A short, complete piece of work is preferable to a demo reel. If there are no short works then a 12-minute excerpt of a longer piece is acceptable.

Applicants must place their portfolios on a Web or FTP site, such as Vimeo or YouTube, which can be easily accessed by RIT faculty for review. Your application should include a URL Web or FTP address to your online portfolio. If your portfolio is placed on a shared Web or FTP site that contains other files, be sure the file name contains your full name (which must match the name used on your application materials). When applicable, please include any usernames and/or passwords necessary for access to your portfolio. Please provide an inventory sheet or table of contents with your portfolio, and if it is not obvious, clearly indicate what your combination was to group and collaborative pieces. This can be a separate description or can be included in the portfolio presentation.

Applicants are also required to produce a 2 to 3 minute video self-portrait to accompany the online portfolio. This should include information about the applicant such as why you want to attend the School of Film and Animation, which concentration you wish to pursue, and why. Please include information about one significant accomplishment you have made. Sound and picture quality should be clear. The online portfolio and self-portrait must be mounted on Slideroom.com once a Slideroom account is established.

For more information about portfolio guidelines as well as assistance in uploading an online portfolio, contact Graduate Enrollment Services.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work taken prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester credit hours of graduate work with a grade of B or better is transferable and may be counted toward the MFA degree, with the approval of the graduate faculty.

- Grades

Students must maintain a B (3.0) average GPA to meet graduation requirements for the MFA. Thesis hours are usually completed over several semesters. Acceptance or rejection of the thesis is made by the candidate’s thesis board and the graduate faculty.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

- Screenings

Screenings are required for all student-produced films and are coordinated through the professor or the thesis chair.

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-The first UK professional doctorate in Hearing Therapy. -Blended learning – study predominantly undertaken on-line alongside professional practice. Read more
-The first UK professional doctorate in Hearing Therapy
-Blended learning – study predominantly undertaken on-line alongside professional practice
-Can alternatively study for an MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert as part of the same programme framework
-Combination of taught modules and supervised practice-based research makes the course highly relevant to professionals engaged in the field of rehabilitation in audiology
-Students complete an in-practice research project with support from an academic supervisor

Programme outline & modules

PGCert – all taught modules are 20 credits
-Hearing Therapy (5 days face to face delivery + online support)
-Tinnitus Management (online delivery)
-Aural Rehabilitation (online delivery)

PGDip – all taught modules are 20 credits
-Evidence Based Practice (online delivery)
-Health Behaviours (online delivery)
-Vestibular Rehabilitation (online delivery)

MSc – all taught modules are 20 credits
-Research Methods (face to face + online delivery)
-Research Project I (face to face + online delivery)
-Research Project II (face to face + online delivery)

Doctor of Hearing Therapy – all taught modules are 20 credits. Students will select one of the following two modules:
-Qualitative Research Methodology (online delivery)
-Quantitative Methods and Advanced Statistics (online delivery)
-Research project & thesis. The personal research project is the core of Doctor of Hearing Therapy programme.

All modules can also be undertaken independently as continuing professional development.

Learning, teaching & assessment

Taught modules are 20 credits each, nominally equivalent to 200 hours of student learning. Modules consist of remote access lectures with electronic formative assessments and a module coursework assignment such as reflective case records, or an essay/literature review related to the module. Module results are ratified at Examination Boards held shortly after the end of each study period.

The research project is the major component of the doctorate, supervised by members of the Applied Health Research Group (http://www.aston.ac.uk/lhs/research/centres-facilities/applied-health-research-group/). Students will develop their research proposals based upon their own clinical interests, or may opt to select a project nominated by an Aston academic. Because this is a distance-learning programme, the research is not normally carried out on the University campus, and it is essential that the student has access to the facilities and resources needed to carry out the research, usually in the student's place of work.

The research stage requires a significant long-term commitment, as it is equivalent to around 2 years of full-time work (i.e. 4 years part-time). Candidates ultimately submit a thesis which is examined in a viva voce examination.

The Doctor of Hearing Therapy programme is aimed at practising audiologists, who will complete case records where required for taught module coursework, and will undertake a practice- based research project.

Students are on campus at the start of the programme when they have the opportunity to participate in group activities.

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