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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Professional Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Professional Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting
Advanced Translation
Translation Tools
Translation Technologies
Translation Work Experience for MA Students
Terminology Management
Beginners' Language
Intermediate Language
Extended Translations
Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Translation and Interpreting (MATI) is a specialised variant, with special emphasis on interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation. It is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Translation and Interpreting

At the core of the MA in Translation and Interpreting lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, interpreting (in one or two of the following environments: local government, health, police and court), and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Translation and Interpreting degree also includes opportunities to develop further specialised skills in interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Translation and Interpreting Course Structure

Part One – Full-time Translation and Interpreting students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are four compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above, and one of the three Interpreting modules. Translation and Interpreting students then choose two optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, a second module in Interpreting, History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Translation and Interpreting student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or
Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation or Interpreting Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting
Advanced Translation
Translation Tools
Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)
Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)
Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)
Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)
Translation Technologies
Translation Work Experience for MA Students
Terminology Management
Beginners' Language
Intermediate Language
Extended Translations
Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“My experience so far of the programme I have studied has been very useful and constructive. Above all, I have been able to practice interpreting at an advanced level with professional and real life criteria. The Translation and Interpreting programme, on the whole, offers a wide variety of both theoretical and practical modules which have reinforced my knowledge on the related fields (i.e. translation and interpreting). Teaching meticulously planned (especially the interpreting modules), good interaction and supplementary opportunities to put language knowledge into good use (extra sessions and lectures). I expect my course to be of great value and hope it will help me achieve my professional goals for, I consider, it has provided me with the necessary skills to help me build a future career.”

Maria Chaikali, Translation and Interpreting, MA

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Professional Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Professional Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Professional Translation is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs
- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

Specialisation options:

Interpreting, further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

Language pairs (subject to demand):

- From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh
- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation typically include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting
Advanced Translation
Translation Tools
Translation Technologies
Translation Work Experience for MA Students
Terminology Management
Beginners' Language
Intermediate Language
Extended Translations
Translation/Interpreting Internship

Part One – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1).
Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), History and Theory of Translation, Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;
- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);
- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Student Quote

‘After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme in Professional Translation gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green, Professional Translation, MA

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Translation and Interpreting is a specialised variant, emphasising interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation.

Key Features of MA Translation and Interpreting (Extended)

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs
- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools
- Public Service Interpreting (Local Government, Health, Police and Court).

Specialisation options: Further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

- Language pairs (subject to demand): From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Welsh.
- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh.

Translation and Interpreting (Extended) Course Structure

Part One of Translation and Interpreting – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1), Interpreting (1).
Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), Interpreting (2), History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two of Translation and Interpreting – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;
- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);
- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting
Advanced Translation
Translation Tools
Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)
Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)
Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)
Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)
Translation Technologies
Translation Work Experience for MA Students
Terminology Management
Beginners' Language
Intermediate Language
Extended Translations
Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

"After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green

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This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in audiovisual translation and accessibility to the media. Read more
This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in audiovisual translation and accessibility to the media. The programme offers you the opportunity to develop your translation and language skills, to deepen your understanding of the workings of language as an essential tool of communication and to gain vital experience in the rapidly developing areas of audiovisual translation and translation technology.

Degree information

By focusing on the translation of audiovisual programmes, you'll be equipped with the skills needed for professional work in the translation industry and for research in translation studies. You'll practice translation in specific language pairs and will become conversant with industry standard subtitling software and computer-based translation technology which have been transforming the way in which professional audiovisual translators work.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Language & Translation
-Translation Technology
-Accessibility to the Media
-Translating for Voiceover & Dubbing
-Subtitling

Optional modules - students choose two optional modules from the list below:
-Language & Automation
-Localisation
-Professional Skills for Translators
-Scientific & Technical Translation
-Medical Translation

Part-time students take optional modules in year two.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words consisting of either an annotated translation or a critical discussion of a theoretical aspect of translation.

Teaching and learning
The degree programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, interactive practical seminars, practical translation assignments and hands-on experience with a wide range of translation tools and technology. Assessment is carried out through essays, project work, take-home translation assessments and in-class tests.

Careers

Most students find challenging and rewarding work within the translation industry on completion of the degree. Some are working as in-house and freelance translators, while others are active as project managers and translation tools experts in companies such as SDL International, Expedia, Hogarth, TransPerfect, SDI-Media, VSI and Deluxe to name but a few. In addition, the MSc is designed to serve as a basis for a Translation Studies PhD.

Employability
Audiovisual translation is a dynamic and rapidly developing profession, which calls for linguistically talented people with a clear understanding of the issues involved in cross-cultural transcoding and who are able to utilise the latest computer-based tools.
On completion of this MSc, you will be well placed for a fast-track progression in your chosen career. We aim to make you highly attractive to employers within the translation industry and the world of audiovisual communications. In addition, the skills acquired through taking this MSc will be highly relevant if your aim is to establish yourself as a freelance translator.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of London, UCL is excellently placed to offer opportunities for networking and to establish professional contacts. At UCL we prepare you for the professional world by performing different roles within the translation workflow, by translating a wide variety of audiovisual programmes, and by specialising in areas such as subtitling, subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing, audio description for the blind and the visually impaired, dubbing and voiceover.

We organise a wide range of activities which offer you a unique opportunity for informal contact with professional translators, translation agencies and leading academics. We also work closely with industry partners to ensure that the programme possesses the maximum professional relevance.

You will enjoy working with a team of renowned academics and professional translators, which has gained an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research.

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The MA in Audiovisual Translation is an internationally leading course in its field, recognised by the European Commission as a European Masters in Translation. Read more

Summary

The MA in Audiovisual Translation is an internationally leading course in its field, recognised by the European Commission as a European Masters in Translation.

This international leading programme addresses the growing demand for translators with skills in translating audiovisual texts. It covers a range of areas, including subtitling, accessibility (subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing, audio description and live subtitling), multimedia localisation, dubbing and voice-over for films. The programme is open to bilingual students wishing to work between different languages, but it also welcomes monolingual English-speaking students.

This programme places significant emphasis on accessibility in the media and offers a grounding in translation theory and research methods. Through your work with dedicated software and high-tech industry-standard equipment, you will equip yourself with the skills necessary to enter the professional market and the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

You will be taught by staff who are experts in their field and influence the policies of organisations such as OFCOM. They will bring their professional experience into the classroom, meaning you will always be benefiting from the most up-to -date research and practice.

Roehampton’s location in London means you are ideally situated, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world. Work placements opportunities are also available on the course; in addition to putting the skills you have learnt on the course into practice, you'll also learn valuable new ones, build a strong CV and make vital industry contacts.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of audiovisual translation. During the course you will address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation. You will also explore the broad range of approaches to translation, including, but not limited to: linguistic, socio-linguistic, cultural, cognitive, descriptive, gender and postcolonial. You will also gain the practical skills of translation you will require for a career fit for the 21st century. You will learn how to subtitle, to translate for dubbing and voiceover, and/or to provide captioning for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing.

IT skills are central to a translator's work, so we offer a module on ‘Translation Tools’ that will familiarise you with some of the tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer assisted translation systems.

Other optional modules currently include ‘The Localisation of Video Games’, where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. You will gain the practical experience of working with the various types of materials that make up the localisation process, including in-game, user interface, interactive subtitles, online help, voice-over, manuals, packaging, graphics files and official websites.

You will complete your MA with a dissertation, which allows you to apply your understanding, knowledge, analytical, conceptual and personal skills to an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic.

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Taking the science of musical sound as your focus, you’ll work in a cross-disciplinary environment, using theoretical and experimental work to explore the musical, technical and multimedia applications of acoustics and audio technology. Read more

Programme description

Taking the science of musical sound as your focus, you’ll work in a cross-disciplinary environment, using theoretical and experimental work to explore the musical, technical and multimedia applications of acoustics and audio technology.

The programme aims to:

provide a broadly based, scientifically oriented foundation in the area of music, acoustics and audio technology
develop skills in research, computation, design and analytical problem-solving
create a multidisciplinary learning environment that will prepare the student for careers in which a strong understanding of music/audio technology is required
develop an ability to appreciate, understand and develop the creative potential of sound design

The emphasis of this programme is on science and technology in the context of musical and multimedia applications.

Programme structure

The MSc is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical work. Courses are assessed through a combination of report submissions and written examinations. In the final three months, you will carry out an individual project, which is assessed by submission of a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this cross-disciplinary programme will develop skills in the area of music, acoustics and audio technology.

Graduates will have a thorough understanding of the appropriate technologies and the science underlying them, as well as an understanding of their role in a wider creative arts environment.

Career opportunities

A knowledge of the science behind music and music production can prove a great asset in your career. Qualified technicians and producers are in demand in all areas of music, as are acoustic scientists. The programme will provide you with the perfect foundation for further study if you’d prefer to continue on an academic path. The highly transferable skills you’ll gain in communication and project management will also take you further up whichever career ladder you choose to climb.

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Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom. - 12 Month Course. - Full-time. - Course runs Jan-Dec. Read more
Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom.

Quick Facts

- 12 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- Unique 12 month course,
- Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom
- Prepares you to work in a multicamera studio environment
- Work as a Vision Mixer, or a Camera/ Lighting or Sound specialist.
- Includes a six-week internship with Sky and some of the modules are taught at Sky Studios.
- Sky also guarantees to employ at least one graduate of the course each year.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.
- Broadcast Production Course Promo 2014 (http://screeningroom.nfts.co.uk/video/broadcast-production-promo-2014?current-channel=showreels-promos)

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 07 JUL 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/broadcast-production

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This intensely practical and pioneering course aims to prepare students for a successful future in multi-camera studio entertainment production. Students are taught by NFTS staff and visiting Industry Professionals and have hands-on experience of a variety of studio roles as well as in their specialisation.

Students will apply for, and be accepted onto the course in one of three craft specialisations:

I. Cameras and Lighting
Practise the core skills of TV studio camera operators, positioning the camera, framing and focus. Learn to use broadcast cameras in a multi-camera studio, repositioning and changing shot as the director demands while the vision mixer cuts and mixes the show. Learn to develop shots, moving with artists or in sympathy with music to create dynamic and exciting television. Begin to light simple interviews and more complex multi-camera lighting techniques. You’ll need a passion for pictures, quick reactions, clear and proactive thinking with excellent co-ordination and a good sense of musical rhythm.

II. Vision Mixing
Train on sophisticated broadcast vision mixing consoles, build and realise complex live visual effects to the director’s brief. Using these high-end production tools, Vision Mixing is like editing - but in real time! Cut, mix and wipe between cameras, pre-edited clips and other video sources live. Learn how to mix a variety of genres from situation comedy to fast paced entertainment and music shows adding digital effects and captioning in real time. You’ll need to be logical, quick thinking, calm under pressure and have an excellent feel for timing and rhythm, both dramatic and musical.

III. Sound (in a broadcast studio environment)
Sound carries the story, sets the mood and the tempo. It provides the enabling structure against which TV pictures can shine. Good sound is essential to a TV programme. Learn how to choose and place microphones for the best results for a variety of shows including live music. Train to use ‘Fisher booms’ - in great demand for sitcoms and soaps - to pick up drama dialogue. Mix studio sound in real time using sophisticated broadcast desks. Enhance the show with spot effects, music cues and audio processing to create atmosphere and energy. Learn how to manage TV comms including studio talkback systems allowing key production team members to communicate and collaborate effectively. You’ll need to be a quick, logical thinker, have a ‘good ear’ and a passion for high quality sound.

These are the core disciplines of multi camera studio operations and people trained at a high level in these craft areas are hotly in demand.

CURRICULUM

Students will be exposed to the creative challenge of working across a range of entertainment programming, including: Situation Comedy, Magazine Shows, Talent Shows, Panel Shows, Game Shows etc.

The award focuses on developing students’ specific capabilities, in the following areas:

- the language of entertainment television so that they can work effectively within production teams
- a high level technical understanding of their chosen specialist area
- a critical awareness of the production workflow and the impact of multiplatform on production

Modules include:

- The Grammar of Television Entertainment
- Media Technology
- Music and Magazine Programming
- Chat Shows and Panel Shows
- Comedy

The six week internship at Sky is constituted of two distinct elements. Firstly the student will shadow a Sky Production Services member of staff working in their specialisation (Vision Mixer, Sound, Camera/Lighting). This will cement the students understanding of the wide range of professional practices and competencies associated with each role. Secondly, students will undertake a range of simulated exercises (designed by the NFTS with Sky involvement) to hone their craft and understanding on the Sky equipment.

At the end of the course, students will be well placed to work professionally in their chosen job role within broadcast production. They will also have a thorough understanding of the television production process encompassing everything from the creative to the technical and the business aspects.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

The course is led by Ian Stubbs who has many years experience as a camera operator, director and producer at the BBC. Tutors include David G Croft (Shooting Stars, Live Aid, Crystal Maze), who is also Head of Television. Primary tutors are Ian Ridley (ex-BBC cameras), Richard Merrick (Sound Supervisor) and Kathryn Edmonds (Vision Mixer - National Lottery, Mock the Week). Other tutors who often teach at the school on television courses include Richard Boden (IT Crowd) Geoff Posner (Little Britain) and Steve Pinhay (SMTV, CD:UK)

In addition the course is supported by Production Services at Sky.

APPLY WITH

All applicants must provide:

- A description of a television production. Please tell us about a television production that you have been involved with or that you have observed. Please detail some of the technical production challenges which were faced in realising the project and in what ways you may have done things differently or enhanced the production. Include information on what preparation the production team would have needed to undertake. No more than one page (A4 paper).

Additionally for those who are applying for the Camera/Lighting specialisation we will need to see:

- A portfolio of photos. It should contain still photographs that you have taken. You may supply prints, digital media or a URL to a collection of your photographs. Please do not supply videos or stills taken from video files.

Or for those who are applying for the Sound specialisation please provide:

- Samples of your audio recording and/or mixing work. They should demonstrate your own, clearly identified sound work. You may supply a CD, audio files on other digital media or URLs.

Or for those who are applying for the Vision Mixing specialisation, please provide:

- A DVD, video file or URL (web link) to a YouTube or Vimeo clip that you have mixed or edited yourself or which includes vision mixing or editing which you consider to be good. If you are referencing somebody else’s work please explain why you have chosen that piece.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR BROADCAST PRODUCTION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=376

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Why you should choose this course. -You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics
-You want to learn in state-of-the-art facilities, including our £2.5 million electroacoustic studio complex
-You want to pursue a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, or a PhD in electroacoustic composition

Course description

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics in creative work that intersects with technology and other artistic or scientific forms. It serves as excellent preparation for a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, and it provides all the training necessary for embarking on and envisioning novel strands for a PhD in electroacoustic composition, including those informed by other scientific and arts form.

All teaching, research and compositional work is carried out in the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound Art with its state-of-the-art £2.5 million electroacoustic studios. Opportunities for the performance of new works are offered using the 55-loudspeaker sound diffusion system of MANTIS (Manchester Theatre in Sound) and through events such as the Locativeaudio Festival (locativeaudio.org) and Sines and Squares Festival for Analogue Electronics and Modular Synthesis (sines-squares.org). Acousmatic, mixed, live electronic and multimedia works are all possible, with composers able to incorporate the spatialisation of sound and interactive new game-audio media into the presentation of their work.

In addition to the final portfolio, all electroacoustic music and interactive media composition students take the compulsory course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Fixed Media and Interactive Music . Optional course units normally include Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound, Interactive Tools and Engines, Contemporary Music Studies, Advanced Orchestration, and Historical or Contemporary Performance. There are also choices outside the MusM Composition (subject to course director approval), such as Computer Vision, Mobile Systems, Mobile Communications, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography , and Work Placement (Institute of Cultural Practices).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies, developing skills in electroacoustic composition to Master's level.
-Increase knowledge and a systematic understanding of electroacoustic music.
-Foster the particular creative talents of each individual student.
-Provide all the training necessary for embarking on a PhD in electroacoustic composition.
-Prepare students for a career as a composer and in the wider music industry where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.

Special features

The NOVARS studio complex supports a broad range of activities in the fields of electroacoustic composition and new media. The studios incorporate the newest generation of Apple computers, Genelec, PMC and ATC monitoring (up to 37-channel studios) and state-of-the art licensed software (including Pro Tools HD, Max MSP, GRM Tools, Waves, Ircam's Audiosculpt and Reaper and, for Interactive Media work, Oculus Rift, Unreal Engine 4, Unity Pro and open-source Blender3D). Location and performance work is also supported by a new 64-channel diffusion system.

Postgraduate students at the NOVARS Research Centre play an active role in the planning, organisation and execution of performance events such as the Sines & Squares Festival and MANTIS Festival (over 20 editions since 2004), and projects such as LocativeAudio and our regular Matinée presentations. Relevant training, including rigging and de-rigging the MANTIS system, health and safety, sound diffusion workshops, organisation of Calls for Works when needed, etc., is an important part of the course.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced compositional training has been directly relevant include recording studios, entrepreneurships, the creative industries, music publishing, music journalism and performance. Careers outside of music have included computer programming, theatre, accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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The MMus is designed to appeal to musicians from a variety of backgrounds, particularly those with strengths in one of three main areas. Read more
The MMus is designed to appeal to musicians from a variety of backgrounds, particularly those with strengths in one of three main areas: Performance Studies (classical, Irish traditional, jazz, rock or popular styles); Composition and Creative Audio (including the combination of acoustic and electronic sources, film music, interactive and mixed media) ; Music and Communities (including disability arts and traditional music communities)

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/mmus-music-ft-mg

Course detail

- Description -

The MMus in Creative Musicianship is a flexible postgraduate programme which aims to produce informed, skilled and insightful musical practitioners across a wide range of musical genres working in three practice-based fields: Performance, Composition & Creative Audio or Music and Communities. Whether opting to spend a short, focused period of study honing your musicianship skills as part of a PGCert or expanding your studies into a PGDip or Masters, this is the ideal programme for those who wish to develop, refine or refresh their professional expertise for work in the creative industries while also providing the perfect springboard for further postgraduate and/or PhD study.
Over the first two semesters, two complementary Specialism modules (20 credits each) familiarise students with the most important recent developments in their specialist pathway, training them in essential technical, research and communication skills while providing them with opportunities to put their expertise to practical use. The 20 credit Research Project allows students to pursue a self-directed topic of their choice, under the supervision of a single member of staff and/or undertake work outside of the University as part of an established work placement.
For those continuing their study to MMus level, the third semester Final Project (60 credits) allows the student to undertake a sustained period of self-directed, practice-based work related to their chosen specialism.


- Teaching and learning assessment -

A number of formats for teaching and learning will be offered including lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops.

The performance of candidates shall be assessed by the Board of Examiners in accordance with the Regulations Governing Examinations in Programmes of Study.

Candidates shall be assessed in the modules for which they have enrolled in each year of study. At the discretion of the Board of Examiners candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination.

Within each module candidates shall be assessed by 100% coursework.

The pass mark for the module shall be 50%.

- Work placement / study abroad -

A module in Placement is available as an option.

Career options

- Further academic or practical study
- Freelance creative work
- Community-based education and/or creative work
- Technical positions in the music industry
- Teaching

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. The MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates who are determined to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

The MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates who are determined to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology and working to real deadlines, you upload your work to the internet.

Key benefits

- fully accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists

- guaranteed work placements for all students.

- Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/108/multimedia-journalism#!overview

Course detail

- Description -

This is an academically challenging Master's qualification that teaches you the skills required to report for radio, television and the internet as well as newspapers and magazines. Students are taught by award-winning journalists in state-of-the-art newsrooms, and all have access to industry-leading equipment including Canon HD video cameras and Edirol audio recorders whenever they need them. They learn crucial newsgathering skills, as well as production skills which allow them to edit video and audio, design print pages and create complex interactive multimedia packages. They produce newspapers and magazines, news programmes for television and radio, and entire news web sites in our regular newsday exercises. The centre's unique web site, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk, provides a live publishing enviroment and a discussion forum for the industry. All of this is backed up by the rigorous academic disciplines of law, politics, history that all good journalists need.

- Format and assessment -

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Media Law and Ethics, and Principles and Practice of Convergent Journalism introduce you to the professional challenges of modern reporting and prepare you to pass the National Council for the Training of Journalists’ Diploma in Journalism (this involves passing papers in shorthand, public affairs, law and reporting). You choose academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Communication and Humanitarianism; Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Careers

This degree will prepare students for employment in broadcast, print and online media as well as enabling them to take advantage of the new opportunities the awareness of media power has created within campaign and pressure groups, online information providers and businesses.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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In this dynamic programme you’ll build on your existing musical skills and develop a greater understanding of the theories and techniques of digital composition and performance. Read more

Programme description

In this dynamic programme you’ll build on your existing musical skills and develop a greater understanding of the theories and techniques of digital composition and performance.

A focus of the programme is bridging the gap between the musical vision and its performance. With this in mind, you will be encouraged to perform your own music in live situations and take your place at the forefront of your music’s realisation.

An emphasis is also placed on the field of digital composition within a wider context, which you will address through seminar work. You’ll learn how to plan a technological project and translate your musical ideas into interactive computer music programmes and/or scores.

Programme structure

Your study will take the form of weekly lectures or seminars, as well as at least 10 hours a week on project work.

You will complete six courses.

In semester 1:

Real-Time Performance Strategies and Design
Composers’ Seminar A
a choice of Sound Design Media, Compositional Practice A, Principles of Composition for Screen or another course as agreed with the Programme Director

In semester 2:

Non Real-Time Systems
Composers’ Seminar B
a choice of Digital Media Studio Project, Compositional Practice B or another course as agreed with the Programme Director
In addition, over the spring and summer, you will prepare a final digital composition and performance project.

Learning outcomes

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of:

how to make music with computers
the combination of hardware and software systems in music performance
music programming both in real-time (e.g. Max/MSP) and non-real-time e.g. slippery chicken
audio production and post-production
how to plan, execute, realise, and document a musical-technological project
how to translate musical ideas into fully-functioning interactive music software
their own creative practice in the context of past and present cultural developments

Career opportunities

As this programme involves a wide range of disciplines both technical and artistic, you will gain a number of transferable skills ranging from the core matters of composition, audio production and music programming to more indirect but highly employable skills such as research, documentation, critical thinking, oral presentation, teamwork and software development.

Our graduates have gone on to be employed as composers, performers, researchers, Cirque du Soleil sound technicians, university lecturers, software engineers, BBC sound recordists, web designers, multimedia/ video streaming engineers, and DJs.

See our alumni webpage for details of the careers of recent graduates:

[Music Alumni] (http://www.dcp.music.ed.ac.uk/alumni.php)

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This distance learning programme, offered in partnership with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, a Skye-based college of the University of the Highlands and Islands, presents a unique and innovative opportunity to engage with the culture of Scotland through its wealth of popular and creative arts, and to contribute to international debates concerning the role of tradition and heritage in the 21st century. Read more

Programme description

This distance learning programme, offered in partnership with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, a Skye-based college of the University of the Highlands and Islands, presents a unique and innovative opportunity to engage with the culture of Scotland through its wealth of popular and creative arts, and to contribute to international debates concerning the role of tradition and heritage in the 21st century.

You will engage with a newly available range of digitised archival resources, including Tobar an Dualchais – Kist o Riches, a major online collection of audio recordings relating to all aspects of Scotland’s oral heritage. You will study the principles of folklore and ethnology and take courses that open your eyes and ears to song, storytelling, custom, tradition and heritage.

Online learning

All of your learning and engagement with tutors and fellow students will take place in a high quality virtual learning environment (VLE), designed and led by top scholars from both institutions.

You will become part of a virtual community of students, accessing a full range of teaching resources and participative sessions through the VLE.

Teaching and learning takes the form of video presentations, audio podcasts, guided reading and research, discussion board threads and participation in a virtual classroom setting in real time.

Programme structure

This programme has been designed to deal with both the theory and practice of the cultural traditions and heritage of Scotland, but is set in an international comparative context.

You will take a compulsory course in Resources and Research Methods, as well as two shorter thematic courses in semester 1 and two more in semester 2:

Resources and Research Methods (taken over two semesters)
Tobar an Dualchais / Kist o Riches: Analytical Case Study
The Traditional Arts in Scotland: History and Context
Tradition and Modernity
Understanding Heritage

Career opportunities

Successful completion of this programme will prepare you for a variety of career opportunities including in broadcasting and other media, heritage and conservation organisations, publishing, arts development, tourism, local or national government, research, management or education.

Having an enhanced knowledge of Scottish culture is relevant to employers both in a national context and overseas, given Scotland’s links to many countries around the world. The ability to undertake original research through cultural fieldwork as well as professional media editing, emphasised in several of the courses on this programme, is a key skill within many modern professions.

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The NFTS trains composers in both live and electro-acoustic music for the moving image in a production context closely modelled on Industry working practices. Read more
The NFTS trains composers in both live and electro-acoustic music for the moving image in a production context closely modelled on Industry working practices.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/composing-film-television

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Training in live and electro-acoustic music
- Students compose for wide variety of films
- Creative and technical skills developed
- Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment
- Flexible curriculum adaptable to individual needs
- Individual music suites
- Professional standard post production facilities
- Recording sessions with live musicians Business, legal and professional skills taught
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

This course commences in January each year. Our emphasis on collaboration means that Composing students are informed and involved throughout the filmmaking process. In particular, composers work closely with other students in Editing and Sound Post Production, increasing their understanding of the relationship between audio and moving images.

Today’s language of screen music has shifted. While many scores still provide a musical commentary on the action, others find a way to integrate music into the fabric of the film itself, creating a seamless weave analogous to the camerawork or editing, to the assimilation of music into the sound world of the film as a whole. Sound design and music grow ever closer - in fact, the roles of sound designer and composer are becoming blurred to the extent that a close collaboration between the two processes is often essential.

The application of music to film - the choices inherent in the "when", "how" and "why" - all stem from an informed understanding of the intention of the film and the contribution music could make to it. Informed understanding, musical versatility and the fostering of an individual musical voice are the intentions of this course and these are determined by the practical and intellectual demands on composers working in the industry.

Composing graduates are qualified to take on all forms of work in film and television as well as productions in multimedia and interactive programming.

TUTORS

Acting Head of Composing is the BAFTA-nominated composer (and NFTS graduate) John Keane, whose credits include Hornblower,Mansfield Park, Tara Road, Inspector George Gently, Hideous Kinky.

ALUMNI

Recent graduate composing credits include Atonement which netted NFTS graduate Dario Marianelli an Oscar, Golden Globe and Ivor Novello in the Best Original Score category; Wallander, the television drama series, and feature film Endgame, both of which earned BAFTAs for Best Original Score for NFTS graduate Martin Phipps. Martin also received Emmy Award Nominations for his scores on Great Expectations and Sense and Sensibility. Composer Rob Lane also received Emmy nominations for his scores on Longford and HBO's John Adams, as well as winning a BAFTA for Elizabeth I (TV) and a nomination for Jane Eyre.

CURRICULUM

The Composing course is developmental and progressive. In year one, students are taught the techniques and contexts which inform writing music for the screen. The first term comprises an intensive process during which students compose to a variety of exercises, each one chosen to focus on a particular problem of film composition. These exercises are completed by each student and discussed in seminars and individually assessed. In term two, further exercises concentrate on issues having to do with scoring for live instruments, the combination of live and electro-acoustic elements and the integration a limited range of sound design into film scores. In addition, students will begin engaging with projects generated by other students at the NFTS. This process will continue and dominate the third term. Each student contribution to those films will also be assessed. Students will also participate in visits from industry professionals.

In year two, students’ activities will be dominated primarily by work generated from other parts of the school. However, lectures, seminars and the occasional workshop will be provided to clarify and expand issues arising from those projects. As in year 1, students will also participate in visits from industry professionals.

YEAR ONE

A series of composing workshops combining practical exercises and seminars:

- Basic narrative techniques
- Midi, sampling and audio
- Combining music and sound
- Narrative with dialogue
- Non-fiction scoring
- Instrumentation and orchestration
- Composing to script
- Improvisation

Ongoing analysis of feature film soundtracks and film structure Orchestration and recording with live musicians

Workshops with Sound Design and Editing students:

- Abstract Film Workshop
- Without Images - a sound-only project
- Animation exercises
- Dramaturgy Workshop – focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance
- Editing the Scene - editing drama rushes to learn the basics of scene structure

Productions

- Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
- Documentary poetry exercise collaborating with Documentary Direction, Editing and Sound Design
- First Year Film – the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments
- Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production
- Cross Spec - an introduction to film language and storytelling involving all departments

YEAR TWO

- Orchestration and recording with live musicians
- Improvisation
- Continued analysis of films
- 2nd year short fiction production, shot on a digital format
- Co-composing a feature film Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The Composing MA course is part of the Post Production department, where we are looking to assemble a group of students with diverse and varied backgrounds. There is no 'typical' student or perfect candidate who conforms to a mandatory list of qualifications. You might have had some Industry experience in your chosen field, or a background in the arts or other media. You may now be looking for a further professional qualification, or wish to broaden your knowledge of composing for screen, taking you to a higher level of work.

Students normally have a degree in music but applicants with equivalent practical experience are also accepted; some composing experience is preferred. We look for composers with a strong personal style, a flexible approach and an intelligent feel for drama and narrative. Candidates should normally be able to notate the music they wish to be performed acoustically, have an understanding of the main historical styles and be able to communicate with others using non-musical terms. It is essential that applicants have a strong and demonstrable interest in film.

APPLY WITH

Application Criteria

On receipt of the application form, duly completed and signed, each applicant will be provided with a link and password to download two film clips. They will be asked to write music to each of these clips, and return their completed work as Quicktime video files with sound and music track, either as downloadable links or as DVD’s sent to the school.

On being accepted for interview by the school, the applicants will be invited to bring further material that may be of interest for examination at the discretion of the interviewers.

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Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent… Read more
Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Course description

Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our student
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

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