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Masters Degrees (Atypical Development)

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This Master's programme will deepen students' knowledge of child development and developmental psychology and prepare them for professional work with children and young people, or progression to higher research degrees or employment as a researcher. Read more
This Master's programme will deepen students' knowledge of child development and developmental psychology and prepare them for professional work with children and young people, or progression to higher research degrees or employment as a researcher.

Degree information

This programme provides a high-quality education in the main theories, methods, and findings of psychological research relating to child development. The programme aims to enable independent learning and an approach to developmental psychology that is both informed and critical. Participants have the opportunity to conduct research that contributes to the field of child development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), an optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time one year or flexible study up to four years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, two core modules (60 credits), flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules
-Developmental Psychology
-Methodology and Statistics
-Social Development

Optional modules - Psychology graduates can take any optional module. Graduates seeking BPS accreditation must take either Atypical Development or Language Development
-Atypical Development
-Language Development
-or other approved Master's level modules

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures delivered both by UCL Institute of Education academic staff and guest speakers, group work, and computer workshops giving hands-on practice. Assessment is through coursework involving exercises in statistics and methodology, and extended pieces of writing on set topics as well as the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates are currently working as:
-Educational or clinical psychologists
-Practising psychologists in the field of child development in the public and private sectors
-PhD students.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-College Lecturer, Morley College
-Senior Lecturer, Middlesex University
-Mentor, The National Autistic Society
-MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London
-Behavioural Support Practitioner, Care UK and studying Advanced Professional Diploma Positive Behaviour Support, NHS Wales (Gwasanaeth Iechyd Gwladol Cymru)

Employability
This programme will prepare participants for progression to higher research degrees, employment as researchers or professional training to work with children and young people applying their psychological knowledge.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Psychology and Human Development has more developmental psychologists than most psychology departments. The Institute of Education houses major longitudinal studies such as the Millennium Cohort Study. It is conveniently located for attending research seminars in neighbouring colleges and Institutes, such as the Birkbeck Babylab and the Institute of Child Health. In addition to the Institute’s extensive library and online resources, students have access to Senate House, which contains the British Psychological Society collection.

Our alumni include professors of developmental psychology, educational psychologists, and clinical psychologists. The programme provides the opportunity for suitably qualified applicants to gain the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society.

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The MSc Atypical Child Development course aims to provide graduates with an advanced study in developmental Psychology focussing on patterns of atypical development and childhood developmental disorders. Read more
The MSc Atypical Child Development course aims to provide graduates with an advanced study in developmental Psychology focussing on patterns of atypical development and childhood developmental disorders. The course aims to provide you with:

• a critical understanding of the relationship between typical and atypical development
• a detailed knowledge of the research findings on specific examples of atypical child development (e.g. dyslexia, autistic spectrum disorders, motor co-ordination disorders, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder)
• an ability to use developmental psychological theories to formulate research questions
• the skills to apply theories and findings into different employment settings.

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This course focuses upon both infant and child development, addressing a broad range of topics concerning typical and atypical development. Read more
This course focuses upon both infant and child development, addressing a broad range of topics concerning typical and atypical development. Consideration is given to diverse aspects of cognitive and social development, issues of theory in developmental psychology, and psychopathology. The course is research-led and all staff are research-active, regularly publishing in the discipline's leading journals.

Why study Developmental Psychology at Dundee?

The MSc in Developmental Psychology draws upon the recognised expertise of numerous research-active staff, and addresses a broad range of material, including the scientific study of infancy and childhood, and typical and atypical development.

The School of Psychology has specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital. Learn more about our research facilities.

A distinctive feature of this course is that students have the opportunity to participate in the Fife Education Early Years Collaboration between Fife Council and this University for their Research in Practice module. Unusually, this provides 'hands on' experience of conducting psychological research with young children. It also gives students the chance to experience at first hand psychological work conducted in 'real world' settings.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:
Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis

Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology

Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace

Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis

Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology

Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level

Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment

Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audiences

Provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

Who should study this course?

This course is aimed at:
Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of Developmental Psychology

Graduates considering a professional training in a developmental field, such as Educational or Clinical Psychology

Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD in Developmental Psychology

This course is also suitable for professionals working with children since many topics have obvious application to real-world problems (for example, attachment and its impact on behavioural and emotional development; nutrition and its role in cognitive development; the impact of marital breakdown on psychological development; etc)

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

How you will be taught

One-on-one supervision of a literature review and a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

What you will study

Core Modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research Dissertation
Research in Practice
Two Advanced Modules, typically from:

Developmental Psychopathology
Reading Development and Disability
Social, Emotional and Moral Development
Altered States of Consciousness
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Health in Groups
Evolution and Behaviour
Decision Making
Gesture, Cognition and Communication

Or One Advanced Module (from above) plus a Research in Practice module:

Fife Council Education Department Practicum Project

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only. Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs and have used the qualification to improve their chances of getting on to clinical and education psychology courses. Several students take the course to improve their chances of getting jobs as support workers in paediatric settings and Assistant Psychologists. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields of business.

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This degree programme explores the main theories, methods and research findings relating to infants and young children - five years and under - from a variety of perspectives, including psychology, education, and health, and also includes approaches to assessment and intervention. Read more
This degree programme explores the main theories, methods and research findings relating to infants and young children - five years and under - from a variety of perspectives, including psychology, education, and health, and also includes approaches to assessment and intervention.

Degree information

Students will learn about the development of infants and children from in utero life to five years of age from psychology, education, medical, and health and social-related perspectives. This will include coverage of typical and atypical development, maternal/primary caregiver and broader environmental factors and settings including nurseries and other informal learning settings, the importance of early social skills and specific childhood disorders and medical conditions. Students will be exposed to age-specific tools for evaluating typical and atypical development, and to intervention methods appropriate for certain neurodevelopmental disorders. There will be optional modules to allow specialisation within the areas of psychology, education and health, and students will undertake a research project under supervision.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), two to four optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The optional modules are chosen from a set of approved modules. A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (60 credits), two to four optional modules (60 credits), full-time one year or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four core modules (60 credits), part-time one year or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules - all core modules from the following list must be taken.
-Research Skills
-Prenatal and Newborn Development
-Infant Development
-Preschool Years

Optional modules - 60 credits of optional modules drawn from the following list (all modules are worth 15 credits unless stated otherwise):
-Infant and Neurodevelopmental Assessment
-Nutrition, Growth and Physical Activity
-Safeguarding and Children in Society
-The Health Child Programme 0-18
-Contemporary Issues in Infancy and Early Childhood Development
-Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Education (30 credits)
-Early Childhood Education (30 credits)

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme will be delivered via lectures, seminars and web-based materials (e.g. reading, videos); students will be evaluated by written work (essays, leaflets, commentaries, research thesis) and presentations.

Careers

This degree prepares students for progression to higher research degrees, and will enhance knowledge and awareness of the many variables relevant to early childhood development researchers or medical/educational professionals working with infants and young children.

Employability
Within this programme, students will acquire a solid knowledge and theoretical base of child development, environmental influences, medical and educational aspects within the prenatal to five-year period. They will meet and have opportunity to network with professionals from diverse fields including paediatricians, neurologists, psychologists, health visitors, play specialists and early years educators. Students will be exposed to a range of evaluation and treatment/intervention approaches and acquire research method, analysis and communication skills as well as communication skills for the lay public.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health is a world leader in the delivery of paediatric healthcare, research and education, and this programme will also take advantage of collaboration with other expert departments of UCL, thereby providing unique opportunities to interface across disciplines. This programme aims to integrate psychological development, education, medical aspects and health and social-related factors. Exposure to these topics will raise awareness of the many variables relevant to early childhood development.

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How do children learn to reason in increasingly abstract ways? How do they learn language with such remarkable speed and fluidity? How do children use their… Read more
How do children learn to reason in increasingly abstract ways? How do they learn language with such remarkable speed and fluidity? How do children use their reasoning and language skills to help them explain and understand people’s behaviour and emotions? Why does the amount of information that we can hold in mind at once increase from early childhood to adulthood? Why does children’s ability to control their own thinking, attention and behaviour improve as they get older? How does the development of children’s brains affect their behaviour, memory and ability to learn?

In this taught programme on Developmental Cognitive Science, you will learn how questions like these can be addressed using research techniques from several inter-related disciplines (e.g., Developmental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Computational Science, Neuroscience, Linguistics).

This programme aims to enhance your understanding of key theoretical and practical issues about typical and atypical development in children and young people, from a cognitive science perspective. It also aims to equip you with the skills required to conduct independent scientific research that addresses key issues in developmental cognitive science.

The University of Edinburgh has a long tradition of research expertise in developmental psychology and in cognitive science. This programme brings these two strands together focusing on a developmental cognitive science approach to both typical and atypical development in children and young people.

You will benefit from the breadth and strength of the interdisciplinary academic community at Edinburgh, for example by having the opportunity to select option courses and attend research seminars across different disciplines.

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This MSc is taught by our expert team of psychologists specialising in early childhood development. The course covers a range of topics from social and cognitive development, to autism and other atypical developmental issues, to the health psychology of infant feeding practices. Read more

Introduction

Why study at Stirling?

This MSc is taught by our expert team of psychologists specialising in early childhood development. The course covers a range of topics from social and cognitive development, to autism and other atypical developmental issues, to the health psychology of infant feeding practices. Teaching is grounded in practice with input from social psychologists, health psychologists, neuropsychologists and primatologists. As well as a month-long placement, you will also benefit from hands-on learning through our in-house playgroup which is integral to teaching and research on the MSc.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Catherine Grainger

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

What the MSc is for:
- To train you how to conduct research into child development.
- How the brain and mind develop is critical to our understanding of human psychology.
- Studying this requires special skills and knowledge that you will acquire on this course.

Who the MSc is for:
Graduates in Psychology or related subjects and professionals working with children as continued professional development.

How the MSc is taught:
In addition to core research methods modules, the course includes a seminar series with topics ranging from social and cognitive development to autism and other atypical developmental issues and the health psychology of infant feeding practices. The research placement allows direct experience tailored to each student’s career aspirations, and the dissertation allows extensive research into a chosen aspect of child development.

What you get
Office space and equipment, a personal academic supervisor, and inclusion in a vibrant, stimulating and friendly research community.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The course is made up of the following modules:
- Child Development: A series of participatory seminars with developmental psychologists covering a range of topics in child development: socio-cognitive development in pre-school children; the social and cognitive characteristics of Autistic Spectrum Disorders; the health psychology of infant feeding practices; representation and social learning in infancy; cross-cultural differences in cognition; language and communication development and assessment.

- Psychological Research Methods I and II: Covers a wide range of techniques used in psychological research and demonstrates these techniques in relation to topics in a range of areas.

- Advanced Statistics: Assumes a reasonable knowledge of statistics, although an additional introductory module is available. The main statistics teaching is aimed at introducing advanced methods such as multivariate statistics and the rationale of using statistical methods.

- Key Skills for Psychology Researchers: Focuses on the research process, including ethical reviews, professional conduct and disseminating research effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

- Qualitative Research Methods: Provides a broad but solid grounding in qualitative research methodology.
- Research Placement: This month-long placement, which can be in an applied setting in a childrens' charity, school or child services or within an academic setting such as a Research Assistant, is carried out in the Spring Semester, allowing students to broaden their practical research experience and enhance their employability skills.
The Division of Psychology also has its own Playgroup which supports developmental research and teaching.

We also offer some flexibility, allowing students to opt for a module from another subject area if this can meet personal training needs.

Dissertation

For those who go onto the MSc, approximately half of the course of study is devoted to a research project, leading to a 12,000-word dissertation.

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based.
Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).
The individual module components contribute towards 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The course is designed for those going on to do further research in developmental psychology and careers where a knowledge of developmental research is beneficial. The research placement enables you to gain direct experience tailored to your career aspirations and the dissertation allows extensive research into a chosen aspect of child development.

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The Education (Psychology) MA will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critical analysis of psychological theory and research and its contribution to educational issues and practice. Read more
The Education (Psychology) MA will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critical analysis of psychological theory and research and its contribution to educational issues and practice. It will develop students' understanding of research processes and give them the opportunity to undertake research in psychology of education.

Degree information

Students develop understanding of the current issues in the psychology of education and have opportunity to engage in research. On successful completion of the programme students should be able to produce and communicate reasoned and informed argument, both in writing and orally. Students will also be able to critically evaluate theory and evidence in psychology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules
-Core Topics in the Psychology of Education
-Methodology and Statistics

Optional modules - students choose two optional modules either from the list below and/or from the wide range of Master's-level modules across the IOE offering:
-Atypical Development
-Cognitive Development and Learning
-Development Psychology and Psychobiology
-Issues in Educational Neuroscience
-Language Development
-Literacy Development
-Personality and Social Psychology in Education
-Psychological Aspects of Counselling
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Social Development

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates either in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words or a report of 6,000-7,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures given by both IOE academic staff and guest speakers, student preparation of tasks and longer presentations, group work, discussion, computer workshops giving hands-on practice. Assessment is through coursework and one two-hour unseen examination. Coursework can involve small exercises, critiques of set research articles and extended pieces of writing on set topics, and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's degree are currently working as professionals in educational settings, teachers and PhD students.

Employability
This programme offers a comprehensive research training in educational psychology. It provides a good grounding for doctoral study and valuable preparation for a research career in the academic community, the public sector or in industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is one of the world's leading centres for education and related areas of social science - students will learn from cutting-edge researchers in the field. For the third year in succession the IOE has been ranked as the world's leading university for Education (QS World University Rankings 2016).

Our alumni include government ministers; heads of schools; other educational institutions and NGOs; and Olympians and prize-winning authors.

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The Psychology of Education MSc will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critically analysing psychological theory and research, and exploring its contribution to educational issues and practice. Read more
The Psychology of Education MSc will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critically analysing psychological theory and research, and exploring its contribution to educational issues and practice. It is intended for people who wish to gain Graduate Basis of Certified Status so that they can proceed to professional training as an educational or other psychologist.

Degree information

This programme aims to equip students to develop understanding of the current issues in the psychology of education and provide them with an opportunity to engage in research. On successful completion of the programme students should be able to produce and communicate reasoned and informed argument, both in writing and orally. Students will also be able to critically evaluate theory and evidence in psychology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Core Topics in the Psychology of Education
-Methodology and Statistics

Optional modules
-Cognitive Development and Learning or Personality and Social Psychology

Students choose one module from the following:
-Atypical Development
-Developmental Psychology and Psychobiology
-Issues in Educational Neuroscience
-Language Development
-Literacy Development
-Psychological Aspects of Counselling
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Social Development

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, including guest speakers, student preparation of tasks and longer presentations, group work, discussion, and computer workshops giving hands-on practice. Assessment is through coursework and one unseen examination. Coursework can involve small exercices, critiques of set research articles and extended pieces of writing on set topics.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's degree are currently working as:
-PhD students
-Researchers in the public and private sectors
-Clinical and educational doctorate students.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Secondary School Head of Year, Unspecified London Borough
-Secondary School Teacher (A level Pyschology, Health and Society, Unspecified Secondary School
-Secondary School Teacher, Unspecified Catholic School and Sixth Form
-Special Educational Needs (SEN) Teaching Assistant, Unspecified Academy
-University Liaison Officer, Overseas Students Service Centre (OSSC)

Employability
This programme offers a comprehensive research training in developmental and educational psychology. It provides a good grounding for doctoral study and valuable preparation for a research career in the academic community, the public sector or in industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is one of the world's leading centres for education and related areas of social science - students learn from cutting-edge researchers in the field. For the third year in succession the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) has been ranked as the world's leading university for Education (QS World University Rankings 2016). Our alumni include government ministers; heads of schools, other educational institutions and NGOs; and Olympians and prize-winning authors.

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The MSc Applied Child Psychology combines an in-depth critical evaluation of current theory pertaining to psychological development in children and adolescents with advanced training in relevant research methods. Read more
The MSc Applied Child Psychology combines an in-depth critical evaluation of current theory pertaining to psychological development in children and adolescents with advanced training in relevant research methods.

The implications of psychological theory for policy and practice in various areas, including education, clinical and social contexts are also considered. This an ideal course for anyone wanting a career that involves working with children or for those interested in securing a doctoral training place in educational psychology.

Modules may include:

Social and Cognitive Development in Children
The Child in Context
Research Skills for Working with Children
Observational Methods
Understanding Atypical Development
Clinical Aspects of Behavioural Disorders
Child Psychology Specialist Essay
Child Psychology Research Project.

For more information about the modules you may study on this course visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/childpsych

Facilities

The University has made significant financial investment in the Psychology Division over recent years upgrading accommodation, facilities and equipment used exclusively for the provision of our psychology courses and for research. We have a first class undergraduate teaching laboratory suite and a second teaching laboratory specifically catering for postgraduate students.

In addition there are specialist suites dedicated to particular areas of interest in psychology, including:

social interaction, group work and interviewing
computer gaming and cyberpsychology
eye-tracking
cognitive modelling and visual analysis
psychophysiology.

Alongside these are new flexible cubicles for student project work, a psychometric test bank library, and a technical workshop.

Delivery and assessment

The course is delivered through lectures, interactive workshops, small group teaching and one-on-one supervision. There will also be an expectation that students will engage in independent study during the course. All staff teaching on the course is research-active in their field of interest which includes members from the Communication for Inclusion Research Unit (CIRU) and the Specific Language Impairment Research Unit (SLIRU). Students will also have access to the extensive new facilities within the Division of Psychology and the University's Virtual Learning Environment.

International students in psychology can also access additional language and study skills support, as well as help in acclimatising, via our own International Student Support Officer.

You will be assessed in a variety of ways and on a modular basis through:

examinations
coursework
essays
laboratory reports
literature reviews
research project.

Career opportunities

Students generally choose the MSc Applied Child Psychology because they wish to pursue a career working with children (as a teacher, support worker, and so on).

Many already work with children and complete the course in order to improve their prospects of promotion and career progression. Others see the qualification as a means of helping to secure a path to teacher training or a doctoral training place in educational psychology. It is also possible to pursue an academic and / or research career in child / developmental psychology following graduation (by working as a research assistant or associate, for example, or by studying for a PhD).

Your qualification in psychology is likely to be popular with a whole range of potential employers because you will have demonstrated an ability to write essays and reports, to master advanced statistics and to talk and present in front of other people (amongst other transferable skills).

Careers and job application advice is available to all our postgraduate students and is provided on a one-to-one basis by a subject specialist within the Division, supported by the university wide careers service.

Scholarships

The School of Social Sciences offers a number of competitive scholarships for our full-time and part-time Masters courses. For more information please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3scholarships

Want to find out more? Come along to one of our postgraduate Open Evenings. For further details please visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3events

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In this programme, we aim to promote students’ knowledge of developmental psychology with a focus on atypical development across the lifespan. Read more
In this programme, we aim to promote students’ knowledge of developmental psychology with a focus on atypical development across the lifespan. The degree builds on the Department’s research strengths in this area, with core material from course team members who specialise in Autism Spectrum Disorder, cognitive development in atypical populations and language and literacy development.

You will acquire advanced knowledge of the theories and major findings in this field, and develop expertise in the methods and analytic techniques used in research.

The course is aimed at graduates wishing to enter an applied or research career in developmental disabilities, and is beneficial for students who wish to progress to a PhD in clinical, educational, or experimental psychology. It is also suited to those who wish to boost their research skills en route to, or after, behavioural therapy or clinical or educational psychology training.

Modules
Compulsory modules:
• Analysing and Interpreting Data
• Conducting and Presenting Psychological Research
• Developmental Disorders
• Developmental Psychology
• Research Dissertation

Optional modules (choose from topics in the following areas, which vary year-to-year and are aligned with our expertise):
• Applied Aspects of Psychology
• Cognitive Psychology
• Developmental Psychology
• Neuroscience
• Social Psychology

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This course looks at research in child psychology, focusing on the advanced study of psychological development in children and the implications of psychological theory and research for policy and practice. Read more
This course looks at research in child psychology, focusing on the advanced study of psychological development in children and the implications of psychological theory and research for policy and practice. It is ideal if you would like to start or promote a career working with children in areas such as teaching and social work; it also provides an excellent foundation for pursuing a research career in child/developmental psychology.

-Aimed at childcare professionals, including teachers, paediatric nurses and social workers, this course will develop their knowledge of child psychology and enhance their professional work.
-Areas of expertise include: psychosocial issues concerning living with facial disfigurement and impairment in childhood and adolescence; children's expertise in describing and recalling faces; reading development in blind children; phonological awareness and letter knowledge in reading development; bullying; the development of biological at-risk children (very pre-term); children's regulatory problems (crying, feeding, sleeping) and ADHD; autism, face processing and ‘Theory of Mind'; anxiety disorders; learning and the role of cognitions in fears and anxiety; language development in typical development and developmental disorders; pre-verbal infant cognitive, social and emotional development; and development of numerical abilities.

What will you study?

Taught by researchers active in the field of child psychology, this MSc has a strong research focus, and you will be encouraged to approach empirical research critically. You will study four, year-long, 30-credit modules, including three core modules and one option module, plus a 60-credit dissertation.

You will be introduced to the theories of child psychology, considering them in relation to the real world, and will cover the empirical research and theories of developmental psychology, focusing on implications for policy and practice. You will also study the application of developmental psychology to social policy, such as social issues, education and school issues and health, and the factors influencing the development of children's relationships. You will consider both typical and atypical development, including a range of developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, dyslexia, etc. Your dissertation enables you to study an area of interest in depth and gain valuable research skills.

Assessment

Essays, in-class tests, presentations, unseen examinations, laboratory reports and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Applications of Psychological Research
-Cognitive and Social Development
-Development in Typical and Atypical Populations
-Methods and Statistics for MSc Psychology
-Psychology Dissertation

Optional modules to be confirmed.

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The PhD and MSc by Research in Clinical Psychology offer the chance to work with, and be supervised by, a range of clinical academics across many areas of psychology. Read more

Research profile

The PhD and MSc by Research in Clinical Psychology offer the chance to work with, and be supervised by, a range of clinical academics across many areas of psychology.

Candidates should note that these programmes do not lead to Chartered Clinical Psychologist status.

Our research involves national and international collaborations, with many projects involving NHS partnerships.

We have specific research strengths in the areas of children and adolescents; developmental psychopathology of mental health; ageing and older adulthood; adult psychological problems; brain injury; chronic health conditions; psychological therapies research, including cognitive behavioural interventions; emotions and emotion regulation; sex offenders; learning disability; neuropsychology; quality of life; severe and enduring mental health problems; and the development and validation of measures.

Specific areas of interest include cognitive behaviour therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, psychosis, health psychology, and qualitative approaches.

Recent successful PhD topics have included eating disorders and emotion; chronic pain; quality of life and intellectual disabilities; developmental factors in adolescent mental health, and intervention for bipolar disorder.

We have an active research group in the area of applied developmental psychology and psychological therapies research for severe mental health issues. We coordinate the Edinburgh Child and Adolescent Psychology Network. The group’s research areas include child and adolescent health and mental health; cognition, language and learning; social development and relationships; and atypical development.

For more detailed information about potential PhD supervisors in this area, their research interests and publications, please visit our website.

Our research interests include:

onset and recovery from severe and enduring psychological disorder
mindfulness and third wave approaches
medically unexplained symptoms
child and adolescent mental health
eating behaviours and disorders
attachment and emotion regulation and sex offenders.

Training and support

The PhD and MSc by Research programmes allow you to conduct an independent research project that makes a significant contribution to your chosen field of study and to further develop your research skills. We provide expertise in a variety of research methods including qualitative and quantitative approaches.

You will be assigned two supervisors (usually one for MSc by Research) and you will meet with your supervisors regularly. Workshops, seminars and courses in research methods are available to postgraduate students undertaking a higher degree by research.

We work in close collaboration with the Graduate School of Social & Political Science, enabling School of Health in Social Science research students to benefit from the extensive suite of social science research courses offered by both Schools.

With close ties with other humanities disciplines and with colleagues in the College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine, we offer PhD students excellent opportunities for interdisciplinary supervision and research project development.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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The Language, Literacies and Dyslexia programme, is aimed at teachers, speech and language therapists and other professionals working with children, young people and students in further and higher education at pre-16 and FE/HE education levels who have difficulties with learning literacy skills. Read more
The Language, Literacies and Dyslexia programme, is aimed at teachers, speech and language therapists and other professionals working with children, young people and students in further and higher education at pre-16 and FE/HE education levels who have difficulties with learning literacy skills.

This distance learning masters level programme is essential for practitioners seeking to become specialist practitioners, employable to assess and teach learners with dyslexia and literacy difficulties of school age or in further/higher education. Successful completion of modules 1-3 which meet the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) criteria in practical assessments, allows students to apply for the BDA professional qualification.

The University of Birmingham offers three awards at masters level.

Postgraduate Certificate (3 modules, 12 months of part-time study, Sept – end of August)
Postgraduate Diploma (6 modules, 24 months part-time study, Sept – August)
MEd (6 modules+ dissertation, 36 months part-time study, Sept – August)
You can register for the first year’s study and half way through the year you will be invited to consider if you to wish extend your registration to a further award.

The programme provides a broad and critical perspective of language literacies and literacy difficulties/dyslexia through sociocultural and cognitive research, as well as education policies. It embraces school and further educational demands of literacy skills, the demands of family and social literacy practices, and peer demands of new literacies, such as digital literacies. The programme establishes the fundamental relationship between language and literacy in typical and atypical development. Students study literacy difficulties/dyslexia in contexts of monolingual, multilingual and multimodal (eg digital literacies).

Studying at a distance means you can work from anywhere, such as in your home or workplace in the UK or overseas. All your studies will be in English and it is a requirement that you practice in an educational context of monolingual or additional English (EAL/ESL/EFL). Reference would be made to contexts that are multilingual and multimodal.

Specialist professional practice in dyslexia/specific learning difficulties

All students follow the same programme and module requirements for study and assessment that develop knowledge and practice in specialist assessment and teaching for learners with literacy needs and difficulties.

Successful completion of the Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) award, meets the specialist professional practice competencies required by the Joint Qualifications Council UK, and the British Dyslexia Association’s AMBDA accreditation, in diagnostic assessment, and intervention/ specialist teaching with learners with literacy difficulties/ specific learning difficulties at school and FE/HE levels of provision.

The PGCert award allows practitioners, who wish, to apply for the BDA’s accreditation (ATS/APS, AMBDA, AMBDA FE/HE) depending on their professional qualification – please visit the BDA website http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk for further information.

The Department of Disability Inclusion and Special Needs (DISN) in the School of Education, has a very strong profile in professional development, regionally, nationally and internationally. The tutors who run this programme have strong national and international profiles in the field of research and practice in language and literacy difficulties and dyslexia. The department also runs a number of other courses in special education which may interest you.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited conversion programme is designed to provide you with a broad and critical awareness of psychological theory and practice. Read more
This British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited conversion programme is designed to provide you with a broad and critical awareness of psychological theory and practice. You will be provided with opportunities which allow you to focus on aspects of psychology with particular relevance to your own experience and interests.

Why this programme

-If you are considering a change in direction, to pursue a career, either academic or professional, in psychology, successful completion of this programme will confer eligibility for BPS Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC).
-You will develop a range of transferable intellectual and practical skills which are easily adaptable to the labour market and attractive to employers.
-Through engaging in a wide range of stimulating learning activities, you will develop an enquiring and analytical approach to research literature and the practical applications of psychology.
-The programme is designed to support your subsequent successful pursuit of a career in psychology and related disciplines.

Programme structure

You will take eight core and two optional courses, followed by a research project/dissertation. Additional programme elements include attendance research project sessions designed to support you in your dissertation throughout. You will also be allocated an academic supervisor to advise you on your individual research project.

Core courses
-Cognitive psychology
-Conceptual and historical issues in psychology
-Developmental psychology
-Individual differences
-Physiological psychology
-Research methods 1
-Research methods 2
-Social psychology

Optional courses
-Applied qualitative methods
-Atypical development
-Clinical health psychology
-Current issues in psychology
-Educational psychology
-Perception and visual cognition
-Professional skills

Career prospects

As this programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society, successful graduates from the programme are eligible for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the Society (GBC). Our graduates have successfully progressed to further professional training in the field of psychology.

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