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The Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland has a well-established graduate studies program backed by a strong tradition of research. Read more
The Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland has a well-established graduate studies program backed by a strong tradition of research. The Department has offered MSc programs since the inception of graduate studies at Memorial in 1960 and its first PhD program was created in 1969. In the present day, our students are supervised by faculty with international experience, connections, and recognition. Our research programs receive generous funding from NSERC, the CFI, and other organisations. Our labs and computer facilities are equipped to offer students world-class research opportunities.

Research opportunities in physical oceanography include coastal oceanography, numerical modeling, ocean acoustics, ocean mixing, fisheries oceanography, laboratory fluid dynamics, ocean instrumentation, and operational oceanography. Research in experimental and theoretical condensed matter physics spans four broad themes: (i) biomaterials and soft matter, (ii) magnetic and electronic materials, (iii) nanoscience and molecular physics, and (iv) photonics, spectroscopy, and microscopy. Theoretical and computational studies include numerical and analytic calculations pertaining to condensed matter (magnetic systems, superconductors, polymers, carbon nanostructures, the glass transition, nucleation and dynamics in supercooled liquids) and gravitational and black hole physics. Computational research within the Department is supported by excellent high performance computing facilities.

The MSc program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics
Condensed Matter and Material Physics
Analytical Laser Spectroscopy
Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence
Lattice gauge theories, QCD
Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory
Field Theory in curved spacetime
Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Lattice Gauge Theory enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Lattice Gauge Theory programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of Lattice Gauge Theory programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Quantum Fields and String enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Quantum Fields & String programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Quantum Fields and String you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Quantum Fields and String programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Chemical analysis plays a role in virtually all aspects of everyday life throughout the world. With analytical techniques and instrumentation becoming evermore sophisticated, there is an increasing demand for qualified analytical chemists. Read more
Chemical analysis plays a role in virtually all aspects of everyday life throughout the world. With analytical techniques and instrumentation becoming evermore sophisticated, there is an increasing demand for qualified analytical chemists. This industrially relevant course will provide you with a strong background in the theory of analytical techniques and give you the ability to apply these techniques to complex analytical problems. You can also choose to combine your studies with training in the fundamentals of management theory.

The Analytical Chemistry MSc (ie not including Management Studies) provides exemption from Part A of the Mastership in Chemical Analysis, the statutory qualification for a public analyst.

What will you study?

You will gain the key skills required in the specialised area of analytical chemistry, including good measurement and scientific practice, evaluation interpretation of data, and other professional and organisational skills. You will also study core analytical techniques and their applications.

You may also be offered a placement within industry (depending on your results and project availability), where you will carry out your independent research project.

You can choose to study Management Studies with this degree, setting your scientific knowledge in a vocational context.

Assessment

Exams, lab reports, assignments, case studies, oral and poster presentations, practical research project.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Modules
-Statistics and Quality Systems
-Molecular and Atomic Spectroscopy
-Separation Science
-Specialised Analytical Techniques
-Project

Management Studies pathway modules
-Statistics and Quality Systems
-Molecular and Atomic Spectroscopy
-Separation Science
-Business in Practice
-Project

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This course will enable you to gain a strong background in the theory of analytical and forensic techniques and how to apply them to complex problems such as those encountered at crime scenes. Read more
This course will enable you to gain a strong background in the theory of analytical and forensic techniques and how to apply them to complex problems such as those encountered at crime scenes. It emphasises the key skills required in this specialised area of science, including good measurement and scientific practice, sample collection and chain of custody, evaluation and interpretation of data, and constructing expert witness reports.

Kingston University has its own scene-of-crime house located on site, which is used to recreate crime scenes and enables you to put your investigative skills into practice. The property's garden is used by the forensic team's archaeologist for field investigations.

Lecturers on the course have wide experience in the forensics sector and many have worked either as forensic scientists or as expert witnesses. They are also actively engaged in forensic research, and are supported by visiting speakers from leading forensic consultancies.

What will you study?

You will explore recent trends in forensic science and learn about the latest analytical devices used, such as atomic and molecular spectroscopic and separation techniques and DNA profiling.

You will look at the role of the forensic scientist and learn how to, for example, investigate and analyse drugs of abuse, fibres and firearms and conduct fire investigation. There is also the opportunity to present expert evidence at a mock courtroom trial in a magistrates' court, examined by Kingston's own trainee lawyers and/or their law lecturers.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to carry out your research project in industry (depending on your results and project availability) or in Kingston University's extensive forensic and analytical laboratories.

Assessment

Exams, laboratory reports, assignments, case studies, oral presentations, poster presentations, practical research project.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Accreditation for this course

This course is accredited by the The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences for the component standards in Interpretation, Evaluation and Presentation of Evidence; Laboratory Analysis; and Crime Scene Investigation.

When you graduate you are eligible to apply to be an Associate Member (AFSSoc post-nominals) of The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Having completed appropriate continuing professional development in a forensic science workplace, you can also become a Professional Member (MFSSoc) or Accredited Forensic Practitioner.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Modules
-The Role of the Professional Forensic Scientist
-Separation Science
-Molecular and Atomic Spectroscopy
-Forensic Chemistry and Trace Analysis
-Project

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We offer postgraduate research degrees in Physics at the MPhil and PhD level in all of our major research areas such as Emerging Technology and Materials, Applied Mathematics, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Read more

Course Overview

We offer postgraduate research degrees in Physics at the MPhil and PhD level in all of our major research areas such as Emerging Technology and Materials, Applied Mathematics, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

We supervise MPhil and PhD students whose interests match the expertise we have in our four main research themes.

Condensed matter and nanoscale physics

We research electronic, optical, structural and magnetic properties of novel solid-state materials, particularly novel semi-conductor structures and nanostructured materials such as nanocrystals and nanowires. Theoretical studies use quantum mechanical approaches and involve massively parallel supercomputing.

Our development of new approaches to quantum modelling is changing the size and complexity of systems that can be modelled. Experimental work takes place at synchrotron facilities in Europe and America and related work takes place with colleagues in the Emerging Technology and Materials (ETM) Group in the School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering.

Biophysics

Our research in biophysics explores the structure and function of cells with the aim of creating artificial life and building machines based on biological parts. Projects include protocell development and the construction of a cyborg robot. An understanding of biological physics is needed that uses techniques including single molecule manipulation, atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy.

Astrophysics

Galaxies and the interstellar medium, the source of the galactic magnetic field and its influence on the structure of the galaxy form the focus of our research in astrophysics. There is also interest in cosmology, particularly the early universe and its origin in the big bang.

Ultrafast optics

Our research focuses on coherent optical control of atomic collisions in ultracold gases by femtosecond laser light for studies of problems in fundamental physics, such as the measurement of time dependence of the fundamental constants of nature. We also research metrological protocols for characterisation of broadband light, specifically those relating to foundational aspects of quantum mechanics and its application.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Postgraduate Researcher Development Programme, doctoral training centres and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/physics-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/physics-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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Advance your knowledge of analytical chemistry, your practical skills and professional and organisation skills on this course. You learn the fundamentals of analytical chemistry and how it is applied to pharmaceutical, environmental and materials analyses. Read more
Advance your knowledge of analytical chemistry, your practical skills and professional and organisation skills on this course. You learn the fundamentals of analytical chemistry and how it is applied to pharmaceutical, environmental and materials analyses. The course is taught by researchers with an international reputation in advanced analytical techniques, such as the application of mass spectrometry to the analysis of biological matrices. Tutors also have expertise in production and detection of nanoparticles and detection of pollutants, particularly in soil.

This course is suitable if you wish to increase your knowledge and skills and increase your competitiveness in the job market or pursue a PhD. It will also suit you if you work in a chemistry-related profession and are seeking to further your career prospects.
You gain experience and understanding of:
-Key techniques in separation sciences, including liquid and gas chromatography.
-Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, such as atomic absorption and emission, NMR and IR.
-Analytical technologies applied in process control and solving complex biological problems.

This is a multi-disciplinary course where you learn about various topics including statistics, laboratory quality assurance and control, environmental analysis and fundamentals of analytical instrumentation.

You also gain the transferable skills needed to continue developing your knowledge in science, such as data interpretation and analysis, experimental design and communication and presentation skills.

You complete a research project to develop your research skills and their application to real world situations. You are supported by a tutor who is an expert in analytical chemistry.

Your laboratory work is carried out in our teaching laboratories which are extensively equipped with the latest models of analytical instruments such as HPLCs and GCs. This is supplemented by access to our research facilities where you have access to more sophisticated equipment, such as NMR and a suite of various types of mass spectrometers.

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Applicants should normally have a degree (bachelors or equivalent) in chemistry that is accredited by the RSC. Applicants whose first degree is not accredited by the RSC, or with overseas degrees or degrees in which chemistry is a minor component will be considered on a case by case basis on submission of their first degree transcript.

Candidates who do not meet the RSC criteria for accreditation will be awarded a non-accredited masters qualification on successful completion of the programme.

Applicants will be informed in writing at the start of the programme whether or not they possess an acceptable qualification and, if successful on the masters programme, will receive an RSC accredited degree. If you do not meet the RSC criteria for accreditation, you will be awarded a non-accredited masters after successfully completing the programme.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mscpgdippgcert-analytical-chemistry

Course structure

Full time – 14 months to Masters. Part time – typically 2 years to Masters. The diploma and certificate are shorter. Starts September.

Course structure
The Masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

Core modules
-Quality issues, laboratory accreditation and the analytical approach (15 credits)
-Separation, detection and online techniques (15 credits)
-Surface analysis and related techniques (15 credits)
-Drug detection and analysis (15 credits)
-Methods for analysis of molecular structure (15 credits)
-Process analytical technology (15 credits)
-Professional development (15 credits)
-Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
-Research project (60 credits)

The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits.

Assessment
Assessment methods include written examinations and coursework including:
-Problem-solving exercises.
-Case studies.
-Reports from practical work.
-Research project assessment includes a written report and viva voce.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Antimatter Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Antimatter Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Antimatter Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Antimatter Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.
The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group (AMQP) at Swansea University comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources.

The Particle Physics Theory Group (PPT) has fourteen members of staff, as well as postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, the Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

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Materials are substances or things from which something is or can be made. Technological development is often based on the development of new materials. Read more
Materials are substances or things from which something is or can be made. Technological development is often based on the development of new materials. Materials research plays an important part in solving challenging problems relating to energy, food, water, health and well-being, the environment, sustainable use of resources, and urbanisation.

An expert in materials research studies the chemical and physical bases of existing and new materials; their synthesis and processing, composition and structure, properties and performance. As an expert in materials research, your skills will be needed in research institutions, the technology industry (electronics and electrotechnical industry, information technology, mechanical engineering, metal industry, consulting), chemical industry, forest industry, energy industry, medical technology and pharmaceuticals.

This programme combines expertise from the areas of chemistry, physics and materials research at the University of Helsinki, which are ranked high in international evaluations. In the programme, you will focus on the fundamental physical and chemical problems in synthesising and characterising materials, developing new materials and improving existing ones. Your studies will concentrate on materials science rather than materials engineering.

Upon graduating from the programme you will have a solid understanding of the essential concepts, theories, and experimental methods of materials research. You will learn the different types of materials and will be able to apply and adapt theories and experimental methods to new problems in the field and assess critically other scientists’ work. You will also be able to communicate information in your field to both colleagues and laymen.

Depending on the study line you choose you will gain in-depth understanding of:
-The synthesis, processing, structure and properties of inorganic materials.
-Modelling methods in materials research.
-The structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems.
-The synthesis, structure and properties of polymers.
-Applications of materials research in industrial applications.
-The use of methods of physics in medicine.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

In the programme, all teaching is based on the teachers’ solid expertise in the fundamental chemistry and physics of materials. All teachers also use their own current research in the field in their teaching.

Your studies will include a variety of teaching methods such as lectures, exercises, laboratory work, projects and summer schools.

In addition to your major subject, you can include studies in minor subjects from other programmes in chemistry, physics and computer science.

Selection of the Major

At the beginning of your studies you will make a personal study plan, with the help of teaching staff, where you choose your study line. This programme has the following six study lines representing different branches of materials research.

Experimental Materials Physics
Here you will study the properties and processing of a wide variety of materials using experimental methods of physics to characterise and process them. In this programme the materials range from the thin films used in electronics components, future fusion reactor materials, and energy materials to biological and medical materials. The methods are based on different radiation species, mostly X-rays and ion beams.

Computational Materials Physics
In this study line you will use computer simulations to model the structures, properties and processes of materials, both inorganic materials such as metals and semiconductors, and biological materials such as cell membranes and proteins. You will also study various nanostructures. The methods are mostly atomistic ones where information is obtained with atomic level precision. Supercomputers are often needed for the calculations. Modelling research is closely connected with the experimental work related to the other study lines.

Medical Physics
Medical physics is a branch of applied physics encompassing the concepts, principles and methodology of the physical sciences to medicine in clinics. Primarily, medical physics seeks to develop safe and efficient diagnosis and treatment methods for human diseases with the highest quality assurance protocols. In Finland most medical physicists are licensed hospital physicists (PhD or Phil.Lic).

Polymer Materials Chemistry
In this line you will study polymer synthesis and characterisation methods. One of the central questions in polymer chemistry is how the properties of large molecules depend on the chemical structure and on the size and shape of the polymer. The number of applications of synthetic polymers is constantly increasing, due to the development of polymerisation processes as well as to better comprehension of the physical properties of polymers.

Inorganic Materials Chemistry
Thin films form the most important research topic in inorganic materials chemistry. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is the most widely studied deposition method. The ALD research covers virtually all areas related to ALD: precursor synthesis and characterisation, film growth and characterisation, reaction mechanism studies, and the first steps of taking the processes toward applications. The emphasis has been on thin film materials needed in future generation integrated circuits, but applications of ALD in energy technologies, optics, surface engineering and biomaterials are also being studied. Other thin film deposition techniques studied include electrodeposition, SILAR (successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction) and sol-gel. Nanostructured materials are prepared either directly (fibres by electrospinning and porous materials by anodisation) or by combining these or other templates with thin film deposition techniques.

Electronics and Industrial Applications
Sound and light are used both to sense and to actuate across a broad spectrum of disciplines employing samples ranging from red hot steel to smooth muscle fibres. Particular interest is in exploiting the link between the structure and mechanics of the samples. The main emphasis is on developing quantitative methods suitable for the needs of industry. To support these goals, research concentrates on several applied physics disciplines, the main areas being ultrasonics, photoacoustics, fibre optics and confocal microscopy.

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers the master of science (MS) degrees in physics, with the option of specialization in astronomy. Read more
The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers the master of science (MS) degrees in physics, with the option of specialization in astronomy. Although we offer a course-only MS, our graduate program is mostly oriented toward current physics research.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

Research toward a degree may be conducted in either experimental or theoretical areas. Experimental programs include magnetic materials, high-energy physics, materials science, observational extragalactic astronomy, and particle astrophysics. Theoretical programs include condensed matter, elementary particles, atomic and molecular physics, extragalactic astronomy, astrophysics and particle astrophysics.

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Physics has always remained and still is at the center of science and technology. The laws of physics that are reached through observations and careful experimentation find applications from the subatomic particles to the astronomic formations such as stars and galaxies. Read more
Physics has always remained and still is at the center of science and technology. The laws of physics that are reached through observations and careful experimentation find applications from the subatomic particles to the astronomic formations such as stars and galaxies. On the other hand, design of advanced technology materials, fabrication of semiconductor devices, the development of optical communication systems have all evolved as applications of physics. Our department has both theoretical and experimental research activites. Quantum information theory, gravitation and condensed matter physics are among our theoretical research interests. On the experimental research side, we have three advanced laboratories where we focus on solid state lasers, optoelectronic and nano-photonic materials and devices. Our M. S. Program aims at teaching fundamental physics at a high level and coupling this knowledge with a research experience in either theoretical or applied physics depending on the interests of the student.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Photonic and Laser Materials
• Microphotonics
• Nanophotonics
• Gravitation, Cosmology, and Numerical Relativity
• Mathematical Physics
• Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Information Theory
• Theoretical High Energy Physics
• Quantum Optics, atomic, molecular and optical physics
• Statistical mechanics of biophysical systems

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