• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
ETH Zürich Featured Masters Courses
"asylum" AND "seekers"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Asylum Seekers)

We have 29 Masters Degrees (Asylum Seekers)

  • "asylum" AND "seekers" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 29
Order by 
Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. Read more

Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. This interdisciplinary MSc offers the best of migration teaching from across UCL.

About this degree

The programme combines theoretical and policy debates about migration. Students are equipped with the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for the study of global migration and gain the opportunity to apply them in both general and more specialised contexts relating to the processes, policies and politics of migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), a compulsory methods module (15 credits), five elective modules (75 credits) and the research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Migration
  • Issues in Global Migration
  • Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods I

Elective modules

Students choose from a range of modules offered across UCL which specialise in migration. The list may include the following:

  • Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods II (essential only if intending further research training)
  • Thinking Space
  • Migration and Urban Multiculture
  • Mining Social and Geographic Datasets
  • Globalisation and Security
  • Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
  • Ethnicity, Migration and Health
  • Migration in the European Union
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
  • Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
  • Anthropology and Development
  • Postcolonial Cultural Geographies
  • Comparative Human Rights Law
  • Globalisation in the Twentieth Century
  • Equality, Justice and Difference
  • Population and Development
  • Economics of Migration (Economics prerequisites)
  • International and European Refugee Law

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, discussions, independent reading, practicals and workshops. The majority of modules are assessed through coursework although a small number are assessed by examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Global Migration MSc

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well equipped to work with migrants and asylum seekers in different parts of the world, and gain posts in UN, EU, national policy think tanks, government research and policy departments, NGOs, community-based and grassroots organisations. The programme provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue doctorates in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Programme Assistant, Migration Policy Institute Europe
  • Programme Manager, International Network for Aid, Relief and Assistance (INARA)
  • Campaign and Communication Intern, UNHCR (UN Refugee Agency)
  • Paralegal, Law Office of Robert B. Jobe
  • MSc in China and Globalisation, King's College London

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has internationally recognised expertise in the field of migration. It has two established research units, the Migration Research Unit and the Centre for Research on Economic Analysis of Migration. Cutting-edge research on migration also takes place across UCL in many different disciplines including law, public policy, anthropology, development planning, area studies, humanities and health. The involvement of such a wide range of disciplines in teaching on the MSc in Global Migration is unique.

Students benefit from the consolidation of migration expertise across UCL which is complemented by a departmental migration seminar series, and a vibrant and expanding body of PhD students in this field.

Migration research at UCL has a strong international dimension, benefiting from networks across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Geography

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Read more
The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the areas of law reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers to the regulation of charities in Ireland.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes reflection on the different aspects of national, European and International Law, with strong opportunities for specialization in both public and private law dimensions.
Leading this analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the various areas of law. This is reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers, to the comparative regulation of charities and NGOs.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Master’s programmes. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme, are modules such as: Issues in Comparative Charity Law; Key Issues in Conflict of Laws; Comparative Constitutional Law; and, Regulation of Food Safety. Having completed six modules, you will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful varied careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful, irrespective of the career you choose.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Economic Torts which adopts a comparative common law perspective to examine specific areas of the law of torts, such as the economic aspects to the law of torts, economic aspects of damages, commercial aspects of the law of torts and causation issues.

- Key Issues in Conflicts of Law is concerned with those laws governing legal disputes with a foreign element including jurisdiction and recognition of judgments under Brussels I and IIbis, the applicable law under Rome I & II and the use of public policy/ordre public.

- International Disaster Response Law assesses the history and emergence of international disaster response laws, rules and principles and responses to disaster relief outside of the immediate disaster area, with a particular focus on the international regime for protection of individuals.

- Regulation of Food Safety addresses how the differing interests and actors involved in the production and consumption of food interact to regulate the safety and quality of food and examines the current and future challenges in the regulation of food safety and quality.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/apply,79280,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

Read less
This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Read more

This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Unique in Scotland, it addresses questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes.

Why this programme

  • The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics, ethics, as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.
  • You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.
  • It offers innovative and wide ranging learning and teaching approaches from lectures and seminars, to project work, workshops and field based activities, along with assessment methods with practical options for collaborative and arts-based projects.
  • The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.
  • The programme features guest lectures and input from leading migration academics as well as practitioners working in this area.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project. Courses will be delivered via lectures and seminars supported by appropriate multi-media material, such as monographs, videos, podcasts, journal articles, reports and survey data. Coursework will involve project work, workshops and field based activities.

The dissertation options have been designed to bring together practice and academic learning, allowing you to reflect on the experience of being directly and actively engaged with service providers and asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, working alongside them to explore how research may be transformative for organisations, individuals and communities.

Core courses

  • Global migrations: histories, structures, experiences
  • Public social science for social justice 
  • Research design.

Optional courses may include

  • Access, equity, health
  • Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
  • Immigration and asylum law 
  • Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet migrations
  • Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
  • Racism and modernity
  • Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language . 

You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences.

Career prospects

On completing the programme, you will be equipped to apply your learning to a wide range of opportunities locally, nationally and internationally. This might include working with policy-making bodies, local and national governments, community organisations, NGOs and third sector organisations. The emphasis on applied learning makes this programme relevant to a range of professional settings where graduates may be working with asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, for example in education, social work, housing, equalities, campaigning and advocacy work, community development, human rights advocacy work, social research. It will also provide the necessary foundations for further study through doctoral research.



Read less
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

Read less
Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?. Read more
Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?

The multidisciplinary expertise of our university and the therapeutic professionalism of the Tavistock Centre combine to bring you this innovative twin-site Masters (two modules are taught at the Tavistock Centre in London and two modules at our Colchester campus) in the study of refugee care.

The central focus of our MA Refugee Care is to introduce a therapeutic dimension and a psychosocial perspective to working with this group of people, and is the only postgraduate course to offer a combination of modules with this emphasis, making a clear distinction between being therapeutic in working with refugees, instead of offering psychotherapy to them.

The course includes a thoughtful combination of practical and experiential elements, such as placements and institutional observations, to support a sound theoretical framework to understand the complexities of the refugee experience, such as family and societal factors, interactions with various services, institutions and organisations, and the inter-personal dynamics involved between refugees and their workers.

Our course is offered one year full-time, two years part-time or modular (up to five years), and teaching is for 25 weeks (over two and a half terms from October to mid-May). It is also possible to apply for a doctoral programme in refugee care, completing this MA first (without the dissertation) and then continuing to work on your PhD thesis (for an additional two years full-time or four years part-time).

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK).
  • Benefit from our established network of psychotherapists and gain work experience within a supervised clinical placement in a range of settings. 
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.
  • The only institution in Europe to offer training in all of the arts and play therapies, including dramatherapy, art and dance movement psychotherapy, music and play therapy.

Course summary

This course is designed for people who have prior dance experience and professional or volunteering experience with people in need, and would like to practise as a dance movement psychotherapist.

Dance movement psychotherapy is a relational process in which a client and therapist engage in an empathetic creative process using body movement and dance to assist the integration of emotional, cognitive, physical, social and spiritual aspects of self. We believe that focusing on the creative potential of individuals in a relationship creates a sound ethical basis for psychotherapeutic work.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as a dance movement psychotherapist. All graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK). Graduates often create their own positions; facilitating dance movement psychotherapy sessions within settings including: social services; special needs; schools; psychiatry; probationary and rehabilitation units; forensic psychiatry.

The course offers opportunities for you to explore and expand movement preferences, ways of interacting with others, belief systems, prejudices and values. Emphasis is placed on development of your own style as a dance movement psychotherapist. You also have the opportunity to perform and exhibit your ongoing work in a yearly Arts Therapies exhibition.

The MA in DMP benefits from cutting edge research conducted through the Centre for Arts Therapies Research (CATR) and this feeds directly into teaching. The programme ethos emphasises a critical consideration of different descriptions and explanations of bodies, human systems and therapeutic practices in different places and times. In the context of an individual student's experiences, beliefs, values and different 'cultures', our teaching actively promotes a participatory ethic, self-reflexive practices and the ability for critical reflection on: creative processes, intersubjectivity and the construction of social and power differentials, in learning and in psychotherapy.

Content

The uniquely interdisciplinary MA course in Dance Movement Psychotherapy integrates theoretical, experiential and clinical learning, preparing students to practice as dance movement psychotherapists. Cutting edge research cascades into teaching emphasising the social, biological and psychological construction of the moving body and meaning-making. Students are encouraged to develop a self-reflexive practice and the ability for critical reflection on creative processes.

Key areas of study include Contemporary DMP and psychotherapeutic theories, Feminist embodied reflexivity, clinical placement and supervision (for one-two days a week), dance movement improvisation skills and interventions, embodied performance practice, experiential anatomy for clinical practice, human development, movement and growth, Laban Movement Analysis and video observation.

Embodied practice and working with attention to the art of dance is placed at the centre of the programme. Drawing from Feminist, Psychoanalytical, Phenomenological and Systemic frameworks, the training emphasises the creative role of curiosity and a 'not knowing' position, a respect for difference, and appreciation of the effects that mutual influences have in all relationships.

Modules

Here are examples of modules:

  • Creative Processes: Reflexive Movement Improvisation
  • Theoretical Approaches in Dance Movement Psychotherapy
  • Psychopathology: Alternative World Views

Career options

Graduates can enter a variety of roles including: NHS clinical practice within in and out patient services, community services, prison services, special needs schools, performing arts contexts, drug rehabilitation, in social services with immigrants and asylum seekers, in shelters with women who have suffered domestic abuse, dementia services, learning disabilities services, child and adolescent mental health services.

Email Now



Read less
Global Health is an attempt to address health problems and issues that transcend national boundaries, and are informed by the circumstances and experiences of countries in differing contexts. Read more
Global Health is an attempt to address health problems and issues that transcend national boundaries, and are informed by the circumstances and experiences of countries in differing contexts. The underlying assumption is that the world's health problems are shared and are best tackled by cooperative action and the sharing of innovative solutions.

The M.Sc. Global Health aims to prepare graduates to contribute on a broader scale to the design, implementation, and management of health programmes, health systems development and health policy. The course augments traditional approaches to public and international health by bringing together perspectives and insights from a range of health and social sciences in understanding and resolving the challenges of global health. These problems may arise, for example, in relief and development programmes in developing countries; in conflict and post-conflict situations; with refugees, asylum seekers and economic migrants; with tourists and business travellers. All countries give rise to inequities in health, wealth, education and human rights, and the interconnectedness of these issues will be a major theme running throughout the course.

The course also lays emphasis on 'local' experiences that resonate globally in the case of Ireland. These include the influence of poverty and rapid social change on health and identity in Ireland; migration and refugee welfare, the consequences of ethnic conflict, the peace process and the challenges of reconciliation for creating inclusive health services. The strongest emphasis within the course is on health in developing countries and the impact of globalisation. We develop a strong emphasis on the influence of socio-cultural, economic and health policy issues.

The programme aims to provide graduates with a greater appreciation of the global interconnectedness of health problems and the range and depth of research methodology that can be used to work through these challenges. The M.Sc. Global Health course is particularly designed for practitioners, policy makers, health system planners, programme managers, analysts and health researchers, who wish to understand the broader and interconnecting causes of many health problems from a global perspective as well as those who aspire to build a career in the global health arena.

Read less
Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?. Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. Read more
Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?

Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. We help you examine migration processes and their consequences for today’s societies. You’ll explore issues of development, rights and diversity that shape migrants’ life chances.

You have the opportunity to follow your own interests within migration, development, human rights and refugees, or within migration, ethnicity, cultural diversity and rights.

This MA draws on the expertise of the Sussex Centre for Migration Research.

How will I study?

Across the autumn and spring terms, you learn through core modules and options. You also take a module that prepares you for further research and a professional career. This is delivered as a series of workshops including one that prepares you for your dissertation.

In the summer term, you undertake supervised dissertation work or a dissertation with placement.

You are assessed by term papers, unseen exams, a case analysis on research methods and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Many of our graduates have pursued successful careers in:
-International organisations and NGOs (such as UNHCR)
-Local government authorities
-Charities with a migration focus (such as the Refugee Council).

Others have continued their studies with a PhD, becoming scholars in migration studies.

Read less
Taught classes as well as counselling skills training, supervision and reflective practice modules emphasises the application of current psychological knowledge informed by empirical research in the work of the counselling psychologist. Read more
Taught classes as well as counselling skills training, supervision and reflective practice modules emphasises the application of current psychological knowledge informed by empirical research in the work of the counselling psychologist. The students are facilitated to be aware of current research findings and to incorporate them into their clinical practice. In the first year the course offers academic and practical skills training in counselling psychology and related research. After the first few weeks of concentrated, full time coursework and personal development work, 2 full days per week are spent on placement and 2-3 days in classes. The D.Couns.Psych. offers a wide range of course approved placement options in community, health, mental health, education and private practice settings, as well as welcoming new student recommended sites, particularly for those students residing outside the greater Dublin area. At least 3 different placements are required during the 3 years of the course. The second year involves further training in counselling theories and practice, and students conduct a research dissertation related to counselling psychology, initiated during the summer before entering second year.

Personal development work, including individual therapy, is required throughout the 3 years. The third year includes small group supervision, reflective practice, and advanced counselling and psychotherapy theory and its application. However, the main focus will be on research. A research project resulting in the doctoral dissertation is carried throughout the three years. Courses are taught and supervision provided by both core staff and other practitioners from varied theoretical orientations. Humanistic theory underlies the course. Psychodynamic and systemic perspectives are also emphasised, and training in cognitive behavioural approaches is provided. Practical placements continue through the summer and always follow the placement site's calendar, not that of College. Guidelines for all aspects of the course are provided. All components of the course must be passed i.e., practical, academic; research, and personal development, as well as members of the Court of Examiners recommending the student as suitable to receiving the Doctorate in Counselling Psychology degree.

Graduates of this course are skilled to conduct mental health assessments and therapy with individuals, couples and groups across the lifespan. Typically, they start to specialise during their studies and further develop their skills after the course. They are employed by Health Service Executive, e.g. the National Counselling Service, Refugee and Asylum Seekers Service, Autism Services; Voluntary agencies, e.g. St. John of God's Services, Brothers of Charity Services, National Association for the Deaf; third level student counselling services; private practice; research settings; and multiple other locations.

Read less
Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector. Read more
Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector.

It may be a suitable programme if your employer is looking to support relevant training and development opportunities for their staff.

The course aims to equip students with the necessary skills to initiate and manage truly inclusive arts projects with diverse and marginalised groups, for example those with learning difficulties or experiencing social exclusion due to economic or health reasons.

You can choose to study for either a full MA award or a PGCert. There are opportunities to work in diverse settings from schools, galleries, artist studios and design studios to day centres, photographic studios and FE colleges.

Past students have worked with a range of individuals and participant groups including people with learning disabilities, children, young people, elders, those experiencing homelessness, asylum seekers and youth offending teams. They have contributed both locally and to international projects in countries including Romania and Ukraine.

We value and encourage work across a range of art forms, including visual art, design, illustration, performance, film and photography.

Why study with us?

• Truly unique course that enables you to apply your passion for art in a positive community setting
• Focus on practical, vocational work that puts you in direct contact with marginalised groups, as you explore key issues in the inclusive arts debate
• Dedicated professional development module that gives you transferable skills in budget management, health and safety, partnership development and marketing
• Impressive employment rate, with graduates finding work as inclusive arts practitioners with various charities and trusts
• Support from specialist arts practitioners and professionals for collaborative working with diverse groups
• Guest speakers from the arts, health and voluntary sectors

Areas of study

Studies are based around a core of experiential work-related learning, integrated with theory. The course is designed to support participants' development and creativity as art practitioners within the contexts of inclusion, learning disability and marginalised community groups. Students work alongside diverse groups of people in a workshop setting, sharing experiences as partners in the process of learning.

Modules:

Working Together: Introducing Practical Collaboration
Participatory Practice and Creative Exchange: Inclusive Approaches to Collaboration
Research in Progress
Practice as Research
Looking Ahead: Continuing Professional Development
Option

Assessment takes place through presentations, seminar discussions, practical work and workbooks. The final research project is assessed through an exhibition rather than a dissertation.

Please visit the website to find out more about the syllabus:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/inclusive-arts-practice-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

On completion of the course, students are ideally placed to seek employment in a range of art, disability, community, health and education settings. Recent graduates have gone on to work for various organisations including Project Art Works, The Royal Academy and Kings College Hospital Trust as inclusive arts practitioners and workshop facilitators.

The course would also make a significant contribution to an artist's independent studio practice. Recent alumni have exhibited work at various locations including Phoenix Arts, Brighton Dome and Pallant House. Others have founded organisations such as Red Octopus Sensory Theatre and contributed to a wide range of projects and events .

Read less
he Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) team at London South Bank University (LSBU) has a long history of delivering high-quality ANP education, initially with the first ANP programme in the UK based at the RCN Institute, London and subsequently at LSBU. Read more
he Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) team at London South Bank University (LSBU) has a long history of delivering high-quality ANP education, initially with the first ANP programme in the UK based at the RCN Institute, London and subsequently at LSBU. LSBU has provided ANP education at both degree and masters level in the past. However developments in policy related to advanced nursing practice have increasingly emphasised the need for masters level education to inform and underpin nursing activities at an advanced level.

Graduates would be required to enrol to undertake this MSc top-up within two years of completing the PgDip ANP. Those choosing to progress to the MSc ANP award have six years overall to complete this award from point of registration.

Dissertation

This dissertation module provides the opportunity to undertake an original enquiry in a chosen area of professional practice. Through the module you'll be able to consolidate and extend your knowledge and understanding of research and evaluation design or of systematic literature reviews. You'll be supported to develop the practical skills necessary to plan and carry out your chosen project. You'll be provided with an opportunity to identify major theoretical influences on salient practice concerns and set these within a critical framework. Additionally, you'll be encouraged to cultivate organisational and time management skills, which will be required to successfully accomplish the dissertation. The dissertation should be directly related to professional practice.

There are three choices of approach as discussed in the Assessment section.

Teaching and learning

Students will need to attend six planned dissertation preparation sessions, and will additionally be supported through the dissertation by a supervisor.

Assessments

The assessment is a 12,000 word dissertation on either:

a) A research project

b) A work based project - service evaluation, audit, role evaluation, practice development project

c) A mini systematic review - a review that aspires to the rigour of a Cochrane review but recognises the student has time limits and is unlikely to get access to, for example, much grey literature.

Employability

To date we have prepared over 1,000 ANPs who have gone on to enjoy excellent employment opportunities. For example our graduates are now making a positive impact on service delivery and patient care in general practices, walk-in centres, urgent care centres, minor injury units,A&E departments, refugee/asylum seekers/homeless projects, elderly care facilities, 'out of hours' developments, rapid response services, prison services, intermediate care teams, generalist and specialist acute services,critical-care and ITU, outreach initiatives that cross traditional healthcare boundaries, and innovative community-based services. Some are now lead nurses within social enterprises, partners in general practices, nurse representatives on commissioning boards, community matrons and nurse consultants.

Read less
This course examines the human rights actors, activities and mechanisms used to define and protect human rights. A key concept is the role of practitioners/activists in the field. Read more
This course examines the human rights actors, activities and mechanisms used to define and protect human rights. A key concept is the role of practitioners/activists in the field. The course deals with political developments in the UK, in Europe and internationally, and explores the extent to which human rights are enshrined in and supported by deeper politics and culture, and by institutions, structures, movements and values.

Key features
You will benefit from exceptional teaching by enthusiastic human rights specialists and will acquire essential practical skills required in the field, eg advanced research training, campaign design and impact evaluation. You will also be supported in preparing your dissertation, in which you will research an area of interest in depth.

You will have the opportunity to arrange a placement in a human rights organisation, increasing your employability in the field.
Lively discussion is encouraged, with visiting speakers, leading academics and figures from human rights and international organisations contributing to the debate.

What will you study?

You will look at the actors and activities involved in the protection of human rights. Integral to your study are explorations of who these actors are (campaigning movements, pressure groups, nation states, international and transnational organisations) and what their contributions can be to the development and securing of human rights.

You will analyse current international situations and relations between states and non-state actors where conflicts have resulted in considerable violations of rights, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of international human rights mechanisms.

You will investigate the challenges and demands that arise from the continual and growing movements of peoples, refugees, asylum seekers and migrants as they flee conflicts and disasters, seeking realisation of their fundamental rights.

Assessment

Essays, reports, project work, presentations, dissertation or applied research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Dissertation
-Human Rights: Architectures, Actors, Activism
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal
-Strategies for Achieving Human Rights

Optional modules
-Conflict Theory and Resolution
-Contemporary Issues and Case Studies in Security and Conflict
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-From State to Global Politics
-Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations
-Working within the Human Rights Movement

Read less
Over six core modules, two electives and a dissertation, you explore and critique key concepts and models in public health theory, policy and practice. Read more

Over six core modules, two electives and a dissertation, you explore and critique key concepts and models in public health theory, policy and practice.

The course is interesting to

  • (public) health practitioners currently working in the UK or overseas: each year, the cohort has been made up of around 60% overseas students from all over the world alongside students from a range of public health organisations in the local area. If you currently work in a public health role you can gain academic credit for work based learning in the public health practice elective
  • practitioners not in a public health role, but working in organisations with a (potential) public health remit, for example local authorities, housing associations, schools, social services, criminal justice system, voluntary and community organisations
  • practitioners working with population groups who experience inequality, for example people with disabilities, older people, asylum seekers and refugees, people who are unemployed, people with mental health conditions, people with chronic illness, and who wish to explore these communities in a public health context.
  • students who have just completed their undergraduate studies in a related discipline. In the past we have had students from social work, education, sports science, food and nutrition, nursing and a range of professions allied to medicine.

You explore the links between policy, evidence and practice and you address key questions including

  • how is the health of individuals, groups and populations determined?
  • who is responsible for health and what is the role of the government?
  • how can health be promoted?
  • which skills are required for health promotion and developing the public health agenda?
  • what are the implications of emerging agendas?

The course builds on the growing importance of health promotion, public health, and health and community development on local, national and international levels.

You learn how successful management of public health requires development of critical approaches to theory, practice, and outcome measurement. We give you the knowledge and skills to be more effective in your role.

You develop knowledge in the 10 key public health competencies and standards needed to join the UK Voluntary Register for Public Health specialists. This registration allows you to work at a senior level in public health.

These include • strategic leadership for health • working with and for communities • developing health programmes and services • reducing inequalities.

Work experience

If you don’t already work in this sector, we work closely with local health organisations and may be able to provide you with access to work experience that will help you get the most out of your studies and improve your chances of find a job after the course.

International students are most welcome on this course. At Sheffield Hallam University we provide international students with a wealth of support, from pre-arrival right up to, and including, study support whilst you are studying here. Please see the International Experience Team webpage for more information.

Course structure

Full-time – 18 months (four modules a semester plus dissertation)

Part-time – typically three years (two modules a semester plus dissertation). Part-time students attend four hours a week on campus during the day. 

Design

Each of the modules is an independent module of study and can be taken alone. The core modules do, however, have a number of themes developed across them. These include

  • tackling inequalities in health
  • the relationship between policy, evidence and public health practice
  • local, national and international perspectives in health

Core modules

  • Health promotion principles, policy and practice
  • Inequality, health and poverty
  • Health, culture and public health development work
  • Public health evidence
  • Foundation of epidemiology A
  • Foundation of epidemiology B
  • Infectious diseases and long term conditions
  • Dissertation

Options

Choose one from

  • Public health nutrition
  • Public health practice

Assessment

Students are assessed using a variety of methods: reports, presentations, book reviews and essays and for all but three assessment tasks students are able to choose a public health topic and/or population group on which to focus their work. There are no examinations.

Employability

By successfully completing this course, you may find that it makes it easier to gain promotion, or enter jobs in public health departments of primary care trusts. Previous graduates have gained roles such as teenage pregnancy coordinator, health promotion specialist and five-a-day co-ordinator. Others have joined local authorities, the voluntary sector such as Agewell, and become Sure Start managers.

A number of graduates have remained in their roles as health visitors, public health nurses or midwives, working more strategically and in more depth. Overseas students have used the qualification to work successfully in their own countries. Some people have taken the course to work towards becoming a nurse consultant.

The course also provides an excellent foundation for further academic study including PhDs.



Read less
Prepare for a career in social work with a course that is well connected with social work and social care service providers in the region. Read more

Prepare for a career in social work with a course that is well connected with social work and social care service providers in the region. As a result of these connections, you get the benefit of supervised practical work in a range of social work settings.

Placements and work experience

Practical work experience is at the heart of this course. We have a 100% record of placing students in quality-audited placements. You spend 170 days putting what you’ve learned into practice in real working situations, such as • social work teams • family centres • primary care practices • hospitals • mental health settings • women's refuges and a range of family support services for vulnerable people.

These placements take place with our partners in local authority, private and voluntary agencies across South Yorkshire and the North East Midlands. Previous students have worked in statutory local authority social work teams, NHS mental health units, youth offending teams working with the police, and charities including the NSPCC, Age UK, Barnados, Mind and Women's Aid.

Your placements are supported by 30 specialist skills days. You work with experts, professionals and service users on specific topics such as how to assess risky behaviour, or interventions for safeguarding children. In your final year, we run a workshop with employers on how to apply for jobs in social work.

There are also opportunities to spend time studying abroad. Previous students have attended a summer school in Berlin, gaining new, international perspectives on social work and discovering how it is practised around the world.

Facilities

During the time you spend at university, you are based at our Collegiate Crescent Campus which includes our £13 million purpose-built Robert Winston Building, a newly built Heart of the Campus complex and a learning centre which is open 24 hours and seven days a week. You use specialist facilities including our courtroom, where you learn how to give evidence, and our virtual reality training environment which is used to practise different cases.

Expertise

We are one of the most experienced providers of social work, education in the country, and we have a wide range of expertise. Social work is part of the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, which enables us to apply specialist knowledge and resources from across a range of health and social care professions.

All our teaching staff are qualified and experienced social workers, or have experience in related professions. You experience a range of different ways of learning, including role play with actors, real-life case studies and virtual reality experiences alongside lectures and seminars,

Many of our lecturers are involved in research in social work and have a well-established reputation in various international projects, including

  • international practice learning opportunities for students
  • EU-funded projects to develop an international curriculum
  • projects developing social work practice and social work education.

Professional recognition

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). After successfully completing the course you are eligible to apply to register with them to practise as a social worker.

We are in a transitional period where the work of the College of Social Work has come to an end and some functions are temporarily hosted by the British Association of Social Work.

Course structure

This is a full time course that can lead to professional registration as a social worker and therefore requires extensive study.

Taught modules take place on average three days a week. but you will be required to engage in study outside of these times. A large proportion of the course is spent on placement within social care organisations – during these times you are required to attend for five days a week. 

Social work programmes provide a combination of practice learning and academic modules, that build together in order to equip you with the range of knowledge and skills you need in order to meet the requirements of this challenging profession. The strategies of teaching, learning and assessment across the 24 months are progressive, so that you gradually develop the abilities to be a self-directed learner. At the beginning of each year there will be an induction period to help you orient yourself to the shape of your studies for that year, and the increasing levels of academic and professional standards expected of you.

Additionally, some of the academic modules contain skills days, which further reinforce that there are strong links between the intellectual abilities you need in order to be a social worker, and the practice skills that are also needed. The programme structure comprises five interrelated elements

  • pre-enrolment and induction
  • the inter professional learning module
  • core professional modules
  • mandatory practice education modules
  • independent learning

Year one modules

  • Introduction to social work
  • Law and policy for social work
  • Psycho-social theories and methods for social work practice
  • Readiness for social work practice
  • Research knowledge, methods and skills for social work
  • Practice learning 1 and 2
  • Social work skills development days

Year two modules

  • Theories and knowledge for social work, applied across the life course
  • The organisational context of social work
  • The enhanced social work practitioner
  • Dissertation

Assessment

  • essays
  • examinations
  • practice-learning portfolios
  • group and individual presentations
  • report writing.

Employability

You will be able to take advantage of a high demand for qualified social workers in the South Yorkshire and East Midlands regions and nationally in areas such as • social services departments • education and other local authority departments • residential care • housing associations • national and local voluntary organisations • private sector care providers.

You can work in careers alongside other professionals including • nurses • police officers • lawyers • teachers • occupational therapists • doctors • housing officers • a range of care and support staff.

You work with a range of people who require professional support such as • children and young people • parents and carers • people with mental health problems, learning difficulties or physical disabilities • older adults • refugees and asylum seekers.



Read less
Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK. Read more

Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK.

Applied research includes policy-related work on asylum seekers, non-governmental organisations, sustainable development and participatory rights. Our regional expertise is not confined to Scotland and the UK but includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and North and South America.

Particular research strengths include:

  • law and justice
  • politics, governance and the state
  • nationalism and citizenship
  • war, violence and displacement
  • medicine and health
  • science and technology studies
  • history and theory of anthropology
  • development and environment
  • kinship and relatedness
  • death and the limits of the body
  • material culture, identity and memory
  • contemporary hunter-gatherers
  • linguistic anthropology
  • urban anthropology
  • anthropology of landscape

Training and support

The PhD programme combines work on your thesis project, usually based on long-term fieldwork, with systematic training in anthropological and social research skills. Research training is also available in the form of our MSc by Research.

The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout the course of doctoral studies.

Scholarships and funding

Find out more about scholarships and funding opportunities:



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X