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This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Read more
This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Unique in Scotland, it addresses questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes.

Why this programme

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics, ethics, as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● It offers innovative and wide ranging learning and teaching approaches from lectures and seminars, to project work, workshops and field based activities, along with assessment methods with practical options for collaborative and arts-based projects.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme features guest lectures and input from leading migration academics as well as practitioners working in this area.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project. Courses will be delivered via lectures and seminars supported by appropriate multi-media material, such as monographs, videos, podcasts, journal articles, reports and survey data. Coursework will involve project work, workshops and field based activities.

The dissertation options have been designed to bring together practice and academic learning, allowing you to reflect on the experience of being directly and actively engaged with service providers and asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, working alongside them to explore how research may be transformative for organisations, individuals and communities.

Core courses

• Global migrations: histories, structures, experiences
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language .
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

Please refer to the website for

Background and Aims

http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemsc/#/backgroundandaims

Career prospects

On completing the programme, you will be equipped to apply your learning to a wide range of opportunities locally, nationally and internationally. This might include working with policy-making bodies, local and national governments, community organisations, NGOs and third sector organisations. The emphasis on applied learning makes this programme relevant to a range of professional settings where graduates may be working with asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, for example in education, social work, housing, equalities, campaigning and advocacy work, community development, human rights advocacy work, social research. It will also provide the necessary foundations for further study through doctoral research.

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Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. Read more
Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. This interdisciplinary MSc offers the best of migration teaching from across UCL's Faculties.

Degree information

The programme combines theoretical and policy debates about migration. Students are equipped with the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for the study of global migration and gain the opportunity to apply them in both general and more specialised contexts relating to the processes, policies and politics of migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), a compulsory methods module (15 credits), and five elective modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Migration
-Issues in Global Migration
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods I

Elective modules - students choose a range of modules for courses offered across UCL which offer specialisation on migration which may include the following:
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods II (essential only if intending further research training)
-Thinking Space
-Migration and Urban Multiculture
-Mining Social and Geographic Datasets
-Globalisation and Security
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health
-Migration in the European Union
-International Human Rights Law
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology and Development
-Postcolonial Cultural Geographies
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Globalisation in the Twentieth Century
-Equality, Justice and Difference
-Population and Development
-Economics of Migration (Economics prerequisites)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, discussions, independent reading, practicals and workshops. The majority of modules are assessed through coursework although a small number are assessed by examination.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well equipped to work with migrants and asylum seekers in different parts of the world, and gain posts in UN, EU, national policy think-tanks, government research and policy departments, NGOs, community-based and grassroots organisations. The programme provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue doctorates in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies.

Employability
Graduates have gone on to work in a range of careers related to migration. The recent destinations of students who graduated from this programme include law, research, policy making and campaigning work. One recent graduate is now a trainee barrister specialising in migration law, another works for a government agency for refugees in Norway. Other recent graduates have found employment in local government posts in the UK and in international organisatiosn such as the Migration Policy Institute. A number of graduates have also successfully received funding to complete further degrees.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has internationally recognised expertise in the field of migration. It has two established research units, the Migration Research Unit and the Centre for Research on Economic Analysis of Migration. Cutting-edge research on migration also takes place across UCL in many different disciplines including law, public policy, anthropology, development planning, area studies, humanities and health. The involvement of such a wide range of disciplines in teaching on the MSc in Global Migration MSc is unique.

Students benefit from the consolidation of migration expertise across UCL which is complemented by a departmental migration seminar series, and a vibrant and expanding body of PhD students in this field.

Migration research at UCL has a strong international dimension, benefiting from networks across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

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The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Read more
The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the areas of law reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers to the regulation of charities in Ireland.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes reflection on the different aspects of national, European and International Law, with strong opportunities for specialization in both public and private law dimensions.
Leading this analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the various areas of law. This is reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers, to the comparative regulation of charities and NGOs.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Master’s programmes. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme, are modules such as: Issues in Comparative Charity Law; Key Issues in Conflict of Laws; Comparative Constitutional Law; and, Regulation of Food Safety. Having completed six modules, you will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful varied careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful, irrespective of the career you choose.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Economic Torts which adopts a comparative common law perspective to examine specific areas of the law of torts, such as the economic aspects to the law of torts, economic aspects of damages, commercial aspects of the law of torts and causation issues.

- Key Issues in Conflicts of Law is concerned with those laws governing legal disputes with a foreign element including jurisdiction and recognition of judgments under Brussels I and IIbis, the applicable law under Rome I & II and the use of public policy/ordre public.

- International Disaster Response Law assesses the history and emergence of international disaster response laws, rules and principles and responses to disaster relief outside of the immediate disaster area, with a particular focus on the international regime for protection of individuals.

- Regulation of Food Safety addresses how the differing interests and actors involved in the production and consumption of food interact to regulate the safety and quality of food and examines the current and future challenges in the regulation of food safety and quality.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/apply,79280,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. Read more
This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. It provides advanced training in social science research methodology to fulfil Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) postgraduate research training requirements.

[[Why this programme}}

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics and ethics as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● You will be taught research methods by expert staff from a wide range of disciplines, allowing you to benefit from specialist knowledge and methodology.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme is the only Masters programme in Scotland with a focus on migration studies and social justice.

● This degree is taught jointly with the MSc Global Migrations & Social Justice, which has a stronger focus on the subject, with less emphasis on research methods.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project.

Core courses

• Global migrations: Histories, structures, experiences.
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design
• Qualitative methods
• Quantitative data analysis.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet Migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language.
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

For

Background and Aims

please check out the website http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/backgroundandaims

[[Career Prospects ]]
http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/careerprospects

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The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?. Read more
Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?

The multidisciplinary expertise of our university and the therapeutic professionalism of the Tavistock Centre combine to bring you this innovative twin-site Masters (two modules are taught at the Tavistock Centre in London and two modules at our Colchester campus) in the study of refugee care.

The central focus of our MA Refugee Care is to introduce a therapeutic dimension and a psychosocial perspective to working with this group of people, and is the only postgraduate course to offer a combination of modules with this emphasis, making a clear distinction between being therapeutic in working with refugees, instead of offering psychotherapy to them.

The course includes a thoughtful combination of practical and experiential elements, such as placements and institutional observations, to support a sound theoretical framework to understand the complexities of the refugee experience, such as family and societal factors, interactions with various services, institutions and organisations, and the inter-personal dynamics involved between refugees and their workers.

Our course is offered one year full-time, two years part-time or modular (up to five years), and teaching is for 25 weeks (over two and a half terms from October to mid-May). It is also possible to apply for a doctoral programme in refugee care, completing this MA first (without the dissertation) and then continuing to work on your PhD thesis (for an additional two years full-time or four years part-time).

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Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?. Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. Read more
Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?

Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. We help you examine migration processes and their consequences for today’s societies. You’ll explore issues of development, rights and diversity that shape migrants’ life chances.

You have the opportunity to follow your own interests within migration, development, human rights and refugees, or within migration, ethnicity, cultural diversity and rights.

This MA draws on the expertise of the Sussex Centre for Migration Research.

How will I study?

Across the autumn and spring terms, you learn through core modules and options. You also take a module that prepares you for further research and a professional career. This is delivered as a series of workshops including one that prepares you for your dissertation.

In the summer term, you undertake supervised dissertation work or a dissertation with placement.

You are assessed by term papers, unseen exams, a case analysis on research methods and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Many of our graduates have pursued successful careers in:
-International organisations and NGOs (such as UNHCR)
-Local government authorities
-Charities with a migration focus (such as the Refugee Council).

Others have continued their studies with a PhD, becoming scholars in migration studies.

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Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector. Read more
Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector.

It may be a suitable programme if your employer is looking to support relevant training and development opportunities for their staff.

The course aims to equip students with the necessary skills to initiate and manage truly inclusive arts projects with diverse and marginalised groups, for example those with learning difficulties or experiencing social exclusion due to economic or health reasons.

You can choose to study for either a full MA award or a PGCert. There are opportunities to work in diverse settings from schools, galleries, artist studios and design studios to day centres, photographic studios and FE colleges.

Past students have worked with a range of individuals and participant groups including people with learning disabilities, children, young people, elders, those experiencing homelessness, asylum seekers and youth offending teams. They have contributed both locally and to international projects in countries including Romania and Ukraine.

We value and encourage work across a range of art forms, including visual art, design, illustration, performance, film and photography.

Why study with us?

• Truly unique course that enables you to apply your passion for art in a positive community setting
• Focus on practical, vocational work that puts you in direct contact with marginalised groups, as you explore key issues in the inclusive arts debate
• Dedicated professional development module that gives you transferable skills in budget management, health and safety, partnership development and marketing
• Impressive employment rate, with graduates finding work as inclusive arts practitioners with various charities and trusts
• Support from specialist arts practitioners and professionals for collaborative working with diverse groups
• Guest speakers from the arts, health and voluntary sectors

Areas of study

Studies are based around a core of experiential work-related learning, integrated with theory. The course is designed to support participants' development and creativity as art practitioners within the contexts of inclusion, learning disability and marginalised community groups. Students work alongside diverse groups of people in a workshop setting, sharing experiences as partners in the process of learning.

Modules:

Working Together: Introducing Practical Collaboration
Participatory Practice and Creative Exchange: Inclusive Approaches to Collaboration
Research in Progress
Practice as Research
Looking Ahead: Continuing Professional Development
Option

Assessment takes place through presentations, seminar discussions, practical work and workbooks. The final research project is assessed through an exhibition rather than a dissertation.

Please visit the website to find out more about the syllabus:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/inclusive-arts-practice-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

On completion of the course, students are ideally placed to seek employment in a range of art, disability, community, health and education settings. Recent graduates have gone on to work for various organisations including Project Art Works, The Royal Academy and Kings College Hospital Trust as inclusive arts practitioners and workshop facilitators.

The course would also make a significant contribution to an artist's independent studio practice. Recent alumni have exhibited work at various locations including Phoenix Arts, Brighton Dome and Pallant House. Others have founded organisations such as Red Octopus Sensory Theatre and contributed to a wide range of projects and events .

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he Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) team at London South Bank University (LSBU) has a long history of delivering high-quality ANP education, initially with the first ANP programme in the UK based at the RCN Institute, London and subsequently at LSBU. Read more
he Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) team at London South Bank University (LSBU) has a long history of delivering high-quality ANP education, initially with the first ANP programme in the UK based at the RCN Institute, London and subsequently at LSBU. LSBU has provided ANP education at both degree and masters level in the past. However developments in policy related to advanced nursing practice have increasingly emphasised the need for masters level education to inform and underpin nursing activities at an advanced level.

Graduates would be required to enrol to undertake this MSc top-up within two years of completing the PgDip ANP. Those choosing to progress to the MSc ANP award have six years overall to complete this award from point of registration.

Dissertation

This dissertation module provides the opportunity to undertake an original enquiry in a chosen area of professional practice. Through the module you'll be able to consolidate and extend your knowledge and understanding of research and evaluation design or of systematic literature reviews. You'll be supported to develop the practical skills necessary to plan and carry out your chosen project. You'll be provided with an opportunity to identify major theoretical influences on salient practice concerns and set these within a critical framework. Additionally, you'll be encouraged to cultivate organisational and time management skills, which will be required to successfully accomplish the dissertation. The dissertation should be directly related to professional practice.

There are three choices of approach as discussed in the Assessment section.

Teaching and learning

Students will need to attend six planned dissertation preparation sessions, and will additionally be supported through the dissertation by a supervisor.

Assessments

The assessment is a 12,000 word dissertation on either:

a) A research project

b) A work based project - service evaluation, audit, role evaluation, practice development project

c) A mini systematic review - a review that aspires to the rigour of a Cochrane review but recognises the student has time limits and is unlikely to get access to, for example, much grey literature.

Employability

To date we have prepared over 1,000 ANPs who have gone on to enjoy excellent employment opportunities. For example our graduates are now making a positive impact on service delivery and patient care in general practices, walk-in centres, urgent care centres, minor injury units,A&E departments, refugee/asylum seekers/homeless projects, elderly care facilities, 'out of hours' developments, rapid response services, prison services, intermediate care teams, generalist and specialist acute services,critical-care and ITU, outreach initiatives that cross traditional healthcare boundaries, and innovative community-based services. Some are now lead nurses within social enterprises, partners in general practices, nurse representatives on commissioning boards, community matrons and nurse consultants.

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This course examines the human rights actors, activities and mechanisms used to define and protect human rights. A key concept is the role of practitioners/activists in the field. Read more
This course examines the human rights actors, activities and mechanisms used to define and protect human rights. A key concept is the role of practitioners/activists in the field. The course deals with political developments in the UK, in Europe and internationally, and explores the extent to which human rights are enshrined in and supported by deeper politics and culture, and by institutions, structures, movements and values.

Key features
You will benefit from exceptional teaching by enthusiastic human rights specialists and will acquire essential practical skills required in the field, eg advanced research training, campaign design and impact evaluation. You will also be supported in preparing your dissertation, in which you will research an area of interest in depth.

You will have the opportunity to arrange a placement in a human rights organisation, increasing your employability in the field.
Lively discussion is encouraged, with visiting speakers, leading academics and figures from human rights and international organisations contributing to the debate.

What will you study?

You will look at the actors and activities involved in the protection of human rights. Integral to your study are explorations of who these actors are (campaigning movements, pressure groups, nation states, international and transnational organisations) and what their contributions can be to the development and securing of human rights.

You will analyse current international situations and relations between states and non-state actors where conflicts have resulted in considerable violations of rights, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of international human rights mechanisms.

You will investigate the challenges and demands that arise from the continual and growing movements of peoples, refugees, asylum seekers and migrants as they flee conflicts and disasters, seeking realisation of their fundamental rights.

Assessment

Essays, reports, project work, presentations, dissertation or applied research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Dissertation
-Human Rights: Architectures, Actors, Activism
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal
-Strategies for Achieving Human Rights

Optional modules
-Conflict Theory and Resolution
-Contemporary Issues and Case Studies in Security and Conflict
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-From State to Global Politics
-Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations
-Working within the Human Rights Movement

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Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK. Read more

Research profile

Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK.

Applied research includes policy-related work on asylum seekers, non-governmental organisations, sustainable development and participatory rights. Our regional expertise is not confined to Scotland and the UK but includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and North and South America.

Particular research strengths include:

law and justice
politics, governance and the state
nationalism and citizenship
war, violence and displacement
medicine and health
science and technology studies
history and theory of anthropology
development and environment
kinship and relatedness
death and the limits of the body
material culture, identity and memory
contemporary hunter-gatherers
linguistic anthropology
urban anthropology
anthropology of landscape

Training and support

The PhD programme combines work on your thesis project, usually based on long-term fieldwork, with systematic training in anthropological and social research skills. Research training is also available in the form of our MSc by Research.

The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout the course of doctoral studies.

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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The TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) pathway through the MA in Education involves six taught modules and a dissertation on a research topic of your choice. Read more
The TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) pathway through the MA in Education involves six taught modules and a dissertation on a research topic of your choice. The programme accommodates both early career teachers seeking a grounding in the core disciplines of TESOL, and those with considerable experience hoping to consolidate or progress into specialist areas of expertise.

In addition, for students who are 'early career' or who have not studied beyond degree level for some years, Developing MA Literacies has been designed to support transition towards MA level teacher-researcher. It can be taken either as a fully assessed option, or as a support module to run alongside MA studies.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/ma-in-education-tesol/

Why choose this course?

- Course content is tailored to your own professional context, with practical as well as scholarly tasks and assignments, and discussion with fellow TESOL practitioners worldwide on cutting edge practice and research.

- The generic research module gives you a skills and research base that involves you in wider educational debates nationally and internationally.

- The programme builds in explicit support for the academic literacies and skills needed to be successful as an MA teacher-researcher.

- The programme accommodates both the early career TESOL specialist as well as the experienced practitioner seeking career consolidation or development.

- Options allow for a range of professional specialisms, including English as an Additional Language, ELT Materials Development and English for Specific Purposes.

- The programme can be taken fully online at a distance, fully on campus, or a combination of the two. The programme offers the unique opportunity for campus and distance-based students to work interactively with one another online.

- You are also part of the Learning, Culture and Identity research community which includes talks, conferences, guest speakers and the opportunity to hear former MA students in their current work contexts.

- There are opportunities for campus-based students to participate in a volunteer placement scheme teaching Oxford-based asylum seekers. This experience can be built into coursework and assessment.

- The programme is taught by a highly research-active team that is well published and highly visible in the TESOL world. Students will find themselves part of an active research community.

- Because Oxford is one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, and alongside our own excellent libraries and resource centres, our postgraduate students have access to the world-renowned Bodleian Library, the Bodleian Law Library and the Radcliffe Science Library.

- Oxford is a centre of multiple language schools such as St Joseph's School and St Clare's College. This makes it a thriving environment for foreign students and the practice of TESOL.

- We offer a wide range of Postgraduate Certificates, specifically designed for part time students who are working full time. Sessions typically run in the evenings, with some online discussions. On completion of a postgraduate certificate you can then choose to go onto study a further three modules and the successful completion of a dissertation will complete your MA Education.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, student and staff-led seminars, and project work. Teaching, learning and assessment draw on the different backgrounds, experience and knowledge of participants, and encourage critical reflection.

Teaching style is highly participatory, and engages you in workshop activities, online discussion, peer evaluation, presentations and research projects, with students drawing on their professional experience, home culture and language.

Campus students are encouraged to meet fortnightly in self-run sessions to follow up class readings and tasks and involve their online peers in these discussions through Skype, Facebook or online discussion.

The programme is supported by a full online ‘virtual learning environment’ which includes readings, discussions, session materials, peer support for assignments, and opportunities for students on campus and online to share professional concerns and debates.

Each course module is assessed separately and is based on coursework such as individual essays, seminar presentations, reports, portfolios, investigative research and group work.

How this course helps you develop

Students on the TESOL programme have been able to make links, develop skills, and identify opportunities which have led to the following career changes:
- setting up a language school
- writing coursebooks for an international publisher
- becoming an editor for a TESOL publisher
- teaching at a university language centre for international students
- teaching mother tongue (eg Mandarin) in the UK
- becoming an English as an Additional Language (EAL) coordinator in a UK school.

- Postgraduate certificates
Alternatively, you can develop your professional practice in specialist areas through our range of Postgraduate Certificate Awards.

Careers

Recent students graduating with an MA Education (TESOL) have moved from teaching into teacher professional development, management of language schools and language businesses, materials and test writing.

Others have gone from school to university teaching and from general English to specific English teaching for academic purposes, business and law.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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This intensive MSc programme runs over two academic years and is for graduates from any discipline wishing to train and qualify as social workers. Read more
This intensive MSc programme runs over two academic years and is for graduates from any discipline wishing to train and qualify as social workers.

Through a combination of academic and professional modules, you will focus on both the social science knowledge base of social work, and on developing your practice-relevant knowledge, skills and values through 200 days of practical learning.

Taught by qualified social workers with a range of practice specialisms and research interests, this course offers exciting opportunities to learn alongside students from related professional disciplines including occupational therapy, teaching, nursing and medicine, mirroring the interprofessional nature of social work practice.

Users of social work services, carers and experienced practitioners are also actively involved in the course and the delivery of teaching sessions.

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council, as the regulatory body for social workers and other health professionals. You will address the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Workers throughout the course, alongside the College of Social Work's Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF).

Course structure

In line with the guidance of the College of Social Work, students undertake 200 days of practical learning across the course. This involves 30 days of developing practice skills within the university, a 70-day placement in year 1 and a 100-day placement in year 2.

Learning in practice is supported by periods of study at the university, directed study (with a range of learning materials) and small-group practice tutorials. The course reflects the interprofessional nature of social work, with opportunities for shared learning experiences with education, nursing, medical and occupational therapy students.

Areas of study

Year 1 introduces core skills, theories and approaches for social work practice in its interprofessional context and fosters a critical understanding of key law, policy and human growth across the lifespan.

Year 2 focuses on more complex and accountable practice together with the development of more specialised skills and knowledge. There is also a focus on research in social work and the critical use of evidence to underpin own practice.

Modules:

Reflective Social Work Practice 1
Lifespan Development: Social and Psychological Contexts
Legal and Policy Contexts of Decision-Making in Social Work
Practice Learning 1
Research in Social Work: The Dissertation
Reflective Social Work Practice 2
Decision-making in Assessment, Risk and Protection
Contemporary Social Work Practice
Practice Learning 2

Careers and employability

Social work is a rewarding career for those committed to improving the life opportunities and wellbeing of others, whilst promoting rights and social justice.

Registered social workers generally have little trouble finding employment. There are many relevant vacancies advertised locally and nationally, and there continues to be a demand for social workers both in established posts and with agencies who provide temporary staff to statutory organisations.

Social workers can specialise in many different areas, including working with children, youth offending, family centres, older people, disabled people, mental health services, homeless people, asylum seekers and refugees, and substance misuse.

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This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. Read more
This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. It also offers international human rights practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge and further develop intellectual and critical skills.

Key features of the course include opportunities to:
-Develop a multidisciplinary understanding of human rights and social justice as they exist today in theory, policy and practice.
-Develop an understanding of how human rights organisations work in theory and practice.
-Engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Cluster and the Department of Law and Criminology.
-Complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights.
-Learn from experienced practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations.

The MA Applied Human Rights combines a robust academic and intellectual learning environment covering law, politics, criminology and and social science with first-hand opportunity of experiencing how human rights organisations work in theory and practice. This course addresses the implications of global changes for human rights practitioners.

During the course you investigate contemporary local and global human rights topics, including:
-Gender violence.
-Children as soldiers.
-Radicalisation and counter-terrorism.
-Deaths in custody.
-Refugees and asylum seekers.
-Global security.
-Torture.
-Poverty.

You also gain the experience and skills needed to carry out in-depth case studies on key contemporary challenges to the human rights regime.

A unique opportunity available on this course is being able to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects, public events, case reviews, seminars and workshops.

Throughout your studies you develop a range of intellectual, conceptual and practical skills by analysing complex material and communicating the findings in clear, concise and accessible language. These transferable skills help you develop knowledge of human rights in an applied context. This gives you a sound basis for a career in many areas of human rights policy and practice.

You also learn through guest speakers (previous guest speakers include Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips) how human rights principles are applied in practical situations, to inform responses to a particular social problem. In addition, we have experts working on various human rights projects (such those for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Council, United Nations, Amnesty and Clarion Global) providing real world case studies to provide a strong applied flavour to the course.

You can complete a dissertation which can be based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest, or can choose to plan and take part in a project on human rights.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/ma-applied-human-rights

Course structure

Full time – 1 year. Part time – 2 years. Starts September.

Modules
-Human rights in the 21st century
-Advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice
-Principles of human rights and social justice
-Researching human rights
-Project management for human rights
-Dissertation

Assessment: essays, reports, case studies, dissertation.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS 6.5 score with a minimum of 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other skill areas or equivalent. If your English language skill is currently below IELTS 6.5 we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English score.

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