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Masters Degrees (Assistive Technologies)

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This exciting programme focuses on the design, development and clinical application of novel rehabilitative and assistive technologies. Read more
This exciting programme focuses on the design, development and clinical application of novel rehabilitative and assistive technologies. The programme is delivered by the Aspire Create team, which is engineering the next generation of these technologies, in partnership with clinicians at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital.

Degree information

You will engage in research-based learning and work on real-world medical engineering projects which are driven by a clinical need. Throughout the MSc, you will receive core training in “anatomy for engineers", biomechanics and research methodologies, before choosing modules that explore cutting-edge topics ranging from robotics and electronic implants to social cognitive rehabilitation and “disability and development”.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), a group research module (30 credits) and an individual project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers
-Assistive Technology Devices and Rehabilitation Robotics
-Biomechanics for Assistive Technologies
-Research Methods and Experiment Design
-Group research projects
-Individual research project

Optional modules - all students participate in two group research projects which put the theory from the core modules into practice. Each project results in a group report and an individual mini-viva.
-Disability and Development
-Electronic Devices and Implant Technologies
-Inclusive Design and Human-Machine Interfaces
-Social Cognitive Rehabilitation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of interactive lectures, seminars and hands-on laboratory sessions, supported by exercise/problem sheets and opportunities for reflection and discussion. Assessment is through coursework, research project reports, mini-vivas, MCQs and written exams.

Careers

Typical career destinations for our graduates range from, but are not limited to: academic researchers, biomedical R&D engineers, clinical scientists, and entrepreneurs who spin out their project work into start-up companies.

Employability
This course will give you the opportunity to enhance your employability by gaining and refining both technical and transferrable skills. Not only will you gain specialist theoretical knowledge, you will also learn how to put this into practice through our research based learning activities. The highly interdisciplinary research focus of this course will give you experience of the academic, clinical and third sectors. Importantly, you will refine your communication skills by interacting with different audiences (technical, clinical and lay) and learn how to pitch your arguments at the right level – this is a highly valued skill in any sector.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Rehabilitation engineering promises to revolutionise the way patients regain their independence. Complementary to drugs and surgery, this unique MSc focuses on how state-of-the-art technologies can be developed and translated into clinical practice.

You will tackle real problems, faced by people with complex and challenging medical conditions, such as spinal cord injuries and stroke.

There are plenty of networking opportunities throughout the course, which is run by internationally renowned UCL academics, in conjunction with clinicians at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital; assistive technology specialists from the Aspire charity; and our industrial research partners.

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The range of research topics for our Ageing MPhil, PhD and MD programmes is diverse. They include. biology of ageing; age-related diseases; ageing health and society; technology; nutrition and oral health; and ethics. Read more
The range of research topics for our Ageing MPhil, PhD and MD programmes is diverse. They include: biology of ageing; age-related diseases; ageing health and society; technology; nutrition and oral health; and ethics.

Increased life expectancy is one of the most notable human achievements of the last century. We are living longer, and our quality of life depends on healthy ageing. Older people are at increased risk of disease and disability. This can seriously affect their quality of life and impact on their families. This is why Newcastle's research and treatment of our ageing population is important for us all.

MPhil supervision is normally available in the following areas:

Biological mechanisms of ageing

Intrinsic cellular and molecular mechanisms and biomarkers of the ageing process.

Clinical studies of age-related diseases

Experimental medicine and translation of basic science for patient benefits.

Ageing health and society

The social dimensions of population ageing, and health care policy and provision.

Technology for an ageing population

Research and development of innovative assistive technologies to support independence and quality of life.

Nutrition and oral health

The role of nutritional factors in healthy ageing and the impacts of oral health.

Ethics, philosophy and engagement

Ethics and principles underlying attempts to improve the quality of later life. This includes working with older people and their representative organisations.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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OVERVIEW. This innovative course opens up the debate on the potential that AT can offer. This course has been designed for a wide range of graduate students or students with a specialist knowledge and/or experience of assistive technologies who can demonstrate their ability to study at postgraduate level. Read more
OVERVIEW

This innovative course opens up the debate on the potential that AT can offer. This course has been designed for a wide range of graduate students or students with a specialist knowledge and/or experience of assistive technologies who can demonstrate their ability to study at postgraduate level.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The philosophy of the course focuses on the centrality of the user of AT. It provides you with the opportunity to: reflect on work based practices, policies and procedures; utilise and critique the evidence base relating to the effective of use of AT; implement a work based project; engage with the product development and inclusive design processes; and, evaluate the impact of AT through research.

Learn more in the Assistive Technology MSc course brochure.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course has been designed to meet a wide range of student needs in relation to AT. It offers a series of modules, each carrying a specific number of credits that make up each stage.

You can choose to ‘step off’ the MSc programme following the completion of a full stage and gain the relevant award. The course is studied part-time and will normally take 3 years to complete the full MSc. The course stage runs over a standard academic year. The PG Certificate comprises three modules and starts in September each year ending in the following summer. The style of delivery includes blended learning and work-based study. Up to 16 days of University attendance are required for Stage1. This excludes time required for online study.

The Postgraduate Diploma runs over a standard academic year and includes four modules of study. These include two 10 credit modules (Technological Futures and Inclusive Design). Technological futures is primarily self-directed requiring 3 days of university attendance. Inclusive design is delivered using blended learning with approximately 6 University based sessions.

You are also required to undertake two research modules (20 credits each). There are two routes available which includes an online or weekly taught traditional route. The online route would require approximately 8 days of university attendance in total and the weekly taught traditional route would require a total of 20 half days of attendance.

For the dissertation, attendance is negotiated on an individual basis with your research supervisor as required.

A more flexible structure is possible if you wish to undertake the MSc at a slower rate, to enable you to have time for study and to respond to work or family commitments during the period of study. There is a requirement however that the MSc is completed within a period of five years to ensure all learning is still valid and current at the time of the award. From time to time, particularly within the Postgraduate Certificate, product showcases of new AT products and services are arranged to complement University based sessions as a means of extending your knowledge of AT solutions available.

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Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. Read more
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary degree programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two compulsory 30 credit core modules, four 15 credit optional modules and a 60 credit research project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30 credit core modules and four 15 credit optional modules. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30 credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Core modules
-Interaction Science
-Interaction Design

Optional modules
-Accessibility and Assistive Technologies
-Affective Interaction
-Future Interfaces
-Human Factors for Digital Health
-Persuasive Games
-Physical Computing and Prototyping
-Socio-technical Systems

Dissertation/report
The MSc project gives you the opportunity to conduct research in the area of human-computer interaction under the supervision of a member of UCLIC staff. A broad range of topics and questions are offered and you will work closely with your supervisor in selecting and carrying out your project. Many former projects have contributed to publications at leading international conferences, such as the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Teaching and learning
Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, reflective reports, and online peer learning tasks as well as more traditional academic essays.

Careers

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Employability
This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly indsutry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

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This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. Read more

Overview

This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. The emphasis is on stroke care, but also covers areas such as an understanding of Medical Education, Leadership for Health Professionals, Clinical Effectiveness and Research Methodology.

Each module consists of a mixture of different types of delivery, with some on line learning and face to face teaching, utilising a mixture of seminars, group work or short lectures.

There are a number of CORE modules and then a wide range of other generic modules that are optional. We have designed the award to be as flexible as possible, including enabling students to study some modules from other Keele awards.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalsciencestroke/

Course Content

Each module is given a credit rating within the national Masters framework. These may be transferable from or to other institutions where the learning outcomes are comparable.
Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Science: 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Science: 120 credits
Masters in Medical Science: 180 credits
(The Masters Degree must be completed within five years of registration, the Diploma within four years and the Certificate within three years. It will be possible to complete a Masters Degree in Medical Science in two years.)

Core Modules :

Acute and Hyperacute Stroke (15 credits)
Acute stroke care is a rapidly changing field with new investigations and treatments emerging. This module will address acute stoke unit care, thrombolysis, advanced imaging (e.g. CT angiography, perfusion/diffusion imaging, MRI, transcranial Doppler) and interventional treatments (e.g. intra-arterial thrombolysis and thrombectomy) and integration of clinical practice with research. It aims to respond to the need for healthcare professionals who can rise to the challenge of rapid changes in stroke care. This module will provide technical updating and personal development for those involved in front line stroke services by using small group teaching, on-line exams and practice in audit to enhance service delivery.

Community Stroke: Prevention and Life after Stroke (15 credits)
The NHS of the future will need creative, imaginative healthcare professionals who can rise to the challenge of service redesign and improvement. This module, through a reflective portfolio of cases will enable students to develop as critical thinkers and use those skills to develop project proposals for changes to practice. Employers will see their staff develop the skills to research, argue for and develop projects that they can see will make a difference in the areas of stroke prevention and life after stroke. Students will learn the skills to turn their ideas into practice.

Stroke Service Development and Improvement (15 credits)
Mortality of stoke has significantly reduced over the last 10 years, and fewer patients remain dependent with changes in service delivery and improved care. This module further develops the ability of participants to become leaders and change managers in the field of stroke service provision. Building on the module Community Stroke: Prevention and Life After Stroke (which is a pre-requisite) those closest to the needs of patients will have the chance to implement their ideas for how services need to change. The key output of the module will be a result of a pilot developed, implemented and evaluated by the student.

Stroke Research (15 credits)
Research has led to great improvement in stroke care over the last decade. Through the infrastructure of stroke research networks more patients and staff are actively involved in the delivery of stroke research. This module has been designed to build on this experience of research and to enable participants to mover form delivering research to developing their own ideas into research projects. The development of an idea into a research protocol, user involvement, networking with professional bodies and other service providers, and becoming familiar with the grant application process will be covered. Students will meet experienced researchers, undertake private study and also receive feedback in small groups about their research ideas from peers and the module leader.

Optional Modules:

Concepts of Neurological Rehabilitation (15 credits)
Assistive Technologies in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation (15 credits)
Research Methods (15 credits)
Leadership and Management for Healthcare Professionals (15 credits)
Clinical Effectiveness (15 credits)
Contemporary Challenges in Healthcare Ethics and Law (15 credits)
Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits)
Strategic Management of Patients with Long Term Conditions (15 credits).
The Interface between Primary and Secondary Care (15 credits)
Literature searching and synthesis (15 credits)

Dissertation:
The award of an MMedSci (Stroke) follows successful completion of the taught modules which make up the Diploma in Medical Science and submission of a further 60 credits worth of learning. This latter may be a research dissertation on a subject related to the individual’s specialty, in which case candidates will also be expected to have completed the Research Methods, Literature Searching and Synthesis, or the Statistics and Epidemiology modules depending on the type of research. A practice based project is another possibility, such as evaluation of changes implemented in a clinical setting, educational projects, or exploration of ethical dilemmas in policy and/or practice. It is expected to be a significant piece of work, and we encourage all students to consider aiming for publication of their findings. All candidates will be expected to have a local clinical supervisor for their project and educational supervision will continue to be provided by the award team. Previous experience has shown us that this is an extremely popular component of the Degree. Candidates have often published or presented their dissertation at Regional and National meetings.

Teaching & Assessment

Each module consists of a mixture of different types of delivery, with some on line learning and face to face teaching, utilising a mixture of seminars, group work or short lectures.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

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Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, this course will provide you with the professional attributes to make a real difference to children, young people and adults with dyslexia and literacy difficulties. Read more
Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, this course will provide you with the professional attributes to make a real difference to children, young people and adults with dyslexia and literacy difficulties.

This course aims to provide you with the professional attributes to make a real difference to children, young people and adults with specific learning differences (dyslexia). You will have the opportunity to develop the skills, knowledge and confidence to act as a specialist teacher and/or assessor for dyslexia in line with British Dyslexia Association (BDA) requirements.

Why Study Dyslexia Research and Practice with us?

Our courses allow study for the ATS/APS or AMBDA for either Schools or FE/HE, making it suitable for those who need the relevant qualifications to be Non-Medical Helpers in HE, plus those working in FE. We have also introduced the ATS/APS Dyscalculia/Numeracy course for those who wish to specialise in dyslexia/SpLD and maths difficulties.

When learning to assess for the Postgraduate Diploma, we have copies of the main standardised tests which our students can borrow.

The Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma are both at Level 7, giving the successful candidate 120 CAT points of the 180 needed for an MA, therefore putting an MA within reach alongside the BDA accreditation.

What will I learn?

The Postgraduate Certificate will introduce you to the skills of screening learners and developing a bespoke programme to support them. It also covers the causal theories of dyslexia, implications of working memory deficit and use of assistive technologies.

The Postgraduate Diploma covers the skills necessary to assess for dyslexia, plus Access Arrangements.

The MA will then allow you to research an area of interest within dyslexia or other SpLDs.

How will I be taught?

You will attend six face-to-face weekend schools each year, comprising lectures, group sessions and tutorial support.

Teaching presentations and course materials are downloadable from the University’s website. You will be expected to independently follow up reading and commit to individual study (about six hours per week – though this will vary).
Attendance is 5-7pm on Fridays and 9.30am-4pm on Saturdays.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is through case studies, essays and a portfolio related to your practice.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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This postgraduate research degree provides the opportunity for students who wish to undertake an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) research project on any one of a wide range of interdisciplinary disciplines, under the supervision of our team of experts. Read more
This postgraduate research degree provides the opportunity for students who wish to undertake an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) research project on any one of a wide range of interdisciplinary disciplines, under the supervision of our team of experts.

AAL is one of the major emerging technology markets of the moment, offering the potential to enable and empower citizens in their daily lives using state-of-the-art technologies. Known as 'assistive technologies' in some areas, AAL facilitates everyday activities for people who require care and support, augmenting their quality of life and assisting their independence.

Thanks to advances in medicine and improved knowledge of the links between lifestyle and health, a large proportion of the world is living longer. Diseases like Alzheimer's naturally increase proportionally with life expectancy and this has huge implications for those affected, their family, the healthcare sector and society in general. Those using wheelchairs or with conditions such as autism and Down's syndrome can also benefit from AAL, as these novel technologies can be used to support independence inside and outside the home, when travelling or at work – stimulating socialisation and promoting more positive lifestyles.

Perhaps the most compelling case for AAL is the use of smart homes to support independent living for people of older age, but many other applications exist or are in development. Billions of euros have been invested in the technologies through the European Union's Framework Programmes since 2007, such as the three-year Poseidon project currently supported by Middlesex University. These projects are bringing a proliferation of new systems, requiring a combination of new equipment, software, interfaces, and services.

Possible Projects:
The architecture of a space as an enabler for AAL
Inclusive design
Context-aware reasoning for intelligent environments
Software engineering of AAL systems
Adaptive AAL systems
System personalisation
Measuring effectiveness of AAL systems
Companion robots
Reliable AAL services
Security issues
Ethics in AAL systems,
New areas of application for AAL systems (offices, shopping, leisure, education, etc.)

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This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice and careers in academic medicine by applying the principles of the scientific method to studies in both anatomical research and clinically-applied anatomy. Read more

Overview

This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice and careers in academic medicine by applying the principles of the scientific method to studies in both anatomical research and clinically-applied anatomy. Anatomy encompasses all levels of structural organisation, topographical, neuroanatomical, histological, cellular and developmental, as well as providing a basis for studies in radiological imaging and pathology. This approach allows students to integrate recent advances in molecular genetics, cell biology, microscopy, imaging and computer simulation to biological and clinical problems concerning the human body.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalscienceanatomicalsciences/

Course Content

A total of 180 credits are required to achieve the MMedSci (Anatomical Sciences) Intercalated.

One third of the credits are associated with the major dissertation/project, one third are anatomy-related taught modules with practical content, and one third comprises a combination of core generic methodology modules and a choice of modules in areas of cell and molecular biology or applied clinical science.

COURSE MODULES

FOUR CORE modules which are compulsory:

Applied Morphological Techniques and Imaging (30 credits):

This module, taken early in the semester, introduces some of the key research techniques employed in anatomical, experimental and pathological investigations, including whole body methods, optical, confocal and electron microscopy, histochemical and immunocytochemical staining methods, and quantitative techniques such as morphometry and stereology. In general, half-day theory sessions are followed by practicals and visits to various research and pathology laboratories and seminars involve critical analysis of the literature and applications to project design and research grant funding.

Applied Clinical Anatomy 1 (15 credits):

A six-day module spread over semester 1, covering practical, theoretical and applied aspects of the anatomy and development of the muscular, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The unit includes anatomy prosection practicals, anthropometry, ultrasound imaging and critical analysis of the research literature particularly in the field of neuromuscular anatomy, variations, anomalies, and applied anatomy.

Applied Surgical Anatomy (15 credits):

This module, spread over both semesters, provides students with the opportunity to acquire a thorough knowledge of anatomy as applied to surgical diagnoses and procedures as a foundation for understanding and developing the scientific and evidence base of current practice. Activities include anatomy dissection labs, small group work and presentations, case-based discussions and critical appraisal work on the anatomical and surgical literature and self-directed learning.

Research Methods in Health (15 credits):

The aims of this module are as follows:

• To develop the students’ understanding of the philosophical and methodological bases of health and social research
• To enable the student to make an informed and appropriate choice of research design and methods
• To equip the student with critical appraisal skills
• To provide the student with the methodological foundation for a research dissertation

THREE OPTIONAL modules, ideally ONE from each of groups A, B, and C by discussion with the course tutors:

Group A

• Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits)
• Medical Education 15 credits)

Group B

• Stem Cells: Types, Diagnoses and Applications (15 credits)
• Cell & Tissue Engineering (15 credits)

Group C

• Physiology of Neuromusculoskeletal Tissue (15 credits)
• Psychosocial Aspects of Pain (15 credits)
• Concepts of Neurological Rehabilitation (15 credits)
• Physiology and Pharmacology of Pain (15 credits)
• Assistive Technologies in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation (15 credits)
• Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging (15 credits)

Dissertation/Project:
This may take the form of one long (9 month) dissection or laboratory-based research topic written up to include a literature review, methodologies, results and discussion. Alternatively, this could comprise a short dissection or laboratory research project and a related medical education research project written up as above. Some short exploratory anatomy lab research projects may be undertaken in the style of Applied Clinical Anatomy 2.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Higher and Professional Education (PgCHPE) course is aimed at those who are new to teaching in higher and professional education and those with experience who would like to reflect on and enhance their practice. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Higher and Professional Education (PgCHPE) course is aimed at those who are new to teaching in higher and professional education and those with experience who would like to reflect on and enhance their practice. Through the course, we aim to enhance student learning by reflecting on the needs of individual learners, and the range of strategies we might use to meet those needs. The PgCHPE programme is wholly aligned to the UK Professional Standards Framework (UK PSF) and participants who successfully complete the PgCHPE course automatically become Fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and also receive the Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA) PDF award for Learning, Teaching and Assessment. Participants on the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) route will also gain NMC accreditation on successful completion of the course and NMC portfolio.

Course content

The Postgraduate Certificate in Higher and Professional Education (PgCHPE) is structured into two discrete modules; typical content for these modules is indicated in the Course content section. As the programme is dynamic, it will reflect continuous change in the Higher and Professional Education arena, and will change in response to the emergence of new contemporary topics, and the availability of new technology supported learning tools.

Facilitating Learning module – sample programme
-Introduction to Constructive alignment
-Learning theories and Learner Centred approaches
-Supporting Diverse Learners
-Effective Communication and Resource Share
-Learning Styles and Characteristics
-Motivation and Problem-based Learning
-Teaching Models and Styles of delivery
-Personal tutoring
-Feedback and Assessment
-Micro-teach
-Reflection and Evaluation
-Assignment Workshop

Innovation and Contemporary Practice – sample programme
-The Changing context of HE: Technology, innovation and change
-Assistive technologies - JISC workshop
-Student experience: student voice; Twitter and Qualtrics
-Mobile technologies; bring your own device
-Student interactions with learning spaces: psycho-geography and virtual worlds
-Flipped classrooms
-Assignment workshop
-Employer Panel
-The 3 Es: employability, enterprise and entrepreneurialism; Partnership working and the curriculum
-Disruptive innovations: MOOCs
-External forces – strategic priorities
-Impact for staff – implications for practice

The PgCHPE consists of 2x30 credit modules, “Facilitating Learning” and “Innovation and Contemporary Practice”. New participants are welcome to start the course at the beginning of either module. It is intended that the course will be run following the pattern illustrated above.

During the Facilitating Learning module, we will consider the diverse motivations and approaches to learning of individual learners, and the implications for effective for teaching, learning and assessment. You will be involved in the peer observation of teaching and will gain feedback on your own approaches.

During the Innovation and Contemporary Practice module, we will consider the key features of the changing context of HE, exploring topics such as the student experience, the learning environment and employability. We will also examine technology supported learning and the use of relevant tools within our own environments.

Each module lasts for four months, and it is intended that participants will complete the course within a twelve month period. This distribution of the modules over one academic year will allow you sufficient time to transfer the learning of knowledge, skills and techniques into your own disciplinary practice. It will also provide sufficient opportunity for your learning to be consolidated through discussion and feedback with subject-related mentors. In this way the course will strive to connect centrally driven content about the scholarship of learning and teaching with your own practice within their subject/professional domains.

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The certificate in Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technologies provides professionals, parents, and other community members instruction and training in assessment, pedagogy, and technology that support students that relay on UDL and AT for learning. Read more
The certificate in Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technologies provides professionals, parents, and other community members instruction and training in assessment, pedagogy, and technology that support students that relay on UDL and AT for learning. The UDL/AT graduate certificate is based on the following assumptions:

-With UDL and/or AT support, students of all abilities can reach their potential
-Practitioners who use UDL and/or AT must understand concepts, how to assess, and implement best practices
-Multidisciplinary teams must collaborate to support student who utilize AT must collaborate
-Knowledge in UDL/AT requires course work, guided observation, and supervised practicum

Highlights

-West Chester University's long standing quality and expertise in the field of special education
-Interdisciplinary program includes Special Education, Secondary and Professional Education, and Communicative Disorders
-Courses may be applied to PA teaching certification and/or to M.Ed. in Special Education (online and/or face-to-face format)
-Cohort model designed to increase student-to-student collaboration and provide social support for online learners
-Field placements arranged in student's community

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WHAT YOU WILL GAIN. - Practical guidance from biomedical engineering experts in the field. - 'Hands on' knowledge from the extensive experience of the lecturers, rather than from only the theoretical information gained from books and college reading. Read more
WHAT YOU WILL GAIN

- Practical guidance from biomedical engineering experts in the field
- 'Hands on' knowledge from the extensive experience of the lecturers, rather than from only the theoretical information gained from books and college reading
- Credibility as a biomedical engineering expert in your firm
- Skills and know-how in the latest technologies in biomedical engineering
- Networking contacts in the industry
- Improved career prospects and income
- An EIT Advanced Diploma of Biomedical Engineering

Next intake is scheduled for June 06, 2017. Applications are now open; places are limited.

INTRODUCTION

Biomedical engineering is the synergy of many facets of applied science and engineering. The advanced diploma in biomedical engineering provides the knowledge and skills in electrical, electronic engineering required to service and maintain healthcare equipment. You will develop a wide range of skills that may be applied to develop software, instrumentation, image processing and mathematical models for simulation. Biomedical engineers are employed in hospitals, clinical laboratories, medical equipment manufacturing companies, medical equipment service and maintenance companies, pharmaceutical manufacturing companies, assistive technology and rehabilitation engineering manufacturing companies, research centres. Medical technology industry is one of the fast-growing sectors in engineering field. Join the next generation of biomedical engineers and technicians and embrace a well paid, intensive yet enjoyable career by embarking on this comprehensive and practical program. It provides a solid overview of the current state of biomedical engineering and is presented in a practical and useful manner - all theory covered is tied to a practical outcomes. Leading biomedical/electronic engineers with several years of experience in biomedical engineering present the program over the web using the latest distance learning techniques.

There is a great shortage of biomedical engineers and technicians in every part of the world due to retirement, restructuring and rapid growth in new industries and technologies. Many companies employ electrical, electronic engineers to fill the vacancy and provide on the job training to learn about biomedical engineering. The aim of this 18-month eLearning program is to provide you with core biomedical engineering skills to enhance your career prospects and to benefit your company/institution. Often universities and colleges do a brilliant job of teaching the theoretical topics, but fail to actively engage in the 'real world' application of the theory with biomedical engineering. This advanced diploma is presented by lecturers who are highly experienced engineers, having worked in the biomedical engineering industry. When doing any program today, a mix of both extensive experience and teaching prowess is essential. All our lecturers have been carefully selected and are seasoned professionals.

This practical program avoids weighty theory. This is rarely needed in the real world of industry where time is short and immediate results, based on hard-hitting and useful know-how, is a minimum requirement. The topics that will be covered are derived from the acclaimed IDC Technologies' programs attended by over 500,000 engineers and technicians throughout the world during the past 20 years. And, due to the global nature of biomedical engineering today, you will be exposed to international standards.

This program is not intended as a substitute for a 4 or 5 year engineering degree, nor is it aimed at an accomplished and experienced professional biomedical engineer who is working at the leading edge of technology in these varied fields. It is, however, intended to be the distillation of the key skills and know how in practical, state-of-the-art biomedical engineering. It should also be noted that learning is not only about attending programs, but also involves practical hands-on work with your peers, mentors, suppliers and clients.

WHO WOULD BENEFIT

- Electrical and Electronic Engineers
- Electrical and Electronic Technicians
- Biomedical Equipment/Engineering Technician
- Field Technicians
- Healthcare equipment service technicians
- Project Engineers and Managers
- Design Engineers
- Instrumentation Engineers
- Control Engineers
- Maintenance Engineers and Supervisors
- Consulting Engineers
- Production Managers
- Mechanical Engineers
- Medical Sales Engineers

In fact, anyone who wants to gain solid knowledge of the key elements of biomedical engineering in order to improve work skills and to create further job prospects. Even individuals who are working in the healthcare industry may find it useful to attend to gain key, up to date perspectives.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The program is composed of 18 modules. These cover the basics of electrical, electronic and software knowledge and skills to provide you with maximum practical coverage in the biomedical engineering field.

The 18 modules will be completed in the following order:

- Basic Electrical Engineering
- Technical and Specification Writing
- Fundamentals of Professional Engineering
- Engineering Drawings
- Printed Circuit Board Design
- Anatomy and Physiology for Engineering
- Power Electronics and Power Supplies
- Shielding, EMC/EMI, Noise Reduction and Grounding/Earthing
- Troubleshooting Electronic Components and Circuits
- Biomedical Instrumentation
- Biomedical Signal Processing
- C++ Programming
- Embedded Microcontrollers
- Biomedical Modelling and Simulation
- Biomedical Equipment and Engineering Practices
- Biomedical Image Processing
- Biomechanics and Assistive Technology
- Medical Informatics and Telemedicine

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

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The School of Engineering and Digital Arts offers research-led degrees in a wide range of research disciplines, related to Electronic, Control and Information Engineering, in a highly stimulating academic environment. Read more
The School of Engineering and Digital Arts offers research-led degrees in a wide range of research disciplines, related to Electronic, Control and Information Engineering, in a highly stimulating academic environment. The School enjoys an international reputation for its work and prides itself in allowing students the freedom to realise their maximum potential.

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

We undertake high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/262/electronic-engineering

Project opportunities

Some projects available for postgraduate research degrees (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/postgraduate/projects_funding/pgr_projects.aspx).

Research areas

- Communications

The Group’s activities cover system and component technologies from microwave to terahertz frequencies. These include photonics, antennae and wireless components for a broad range of communication systems. The Group has extensive software research tools together with antenna anechoic chambers, network and spectrum analysers to millimetre wave frequencies and optical signal generation, processing and measurement facilities. Current research themes include:

- photonic components
- networks/wireless systems
- microwave and millimetre-wave systems
- antenna systems
- radio-over-fibre systems
- electromagnetic bandgaps and metamaterials
- frequency selective surfaces.

- Intelligent Interactions:

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

- Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems:

The Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems Research Group comprises a mixture of highly experienced, young and vibrant academics working in three complementary research themes – embedded systems, instrumentation and control. The Group has established a major reputation in recent years for solving challenging scientific and technical problems across a range of industrial sectors, and has strong links with many European countries through EU-funded research programmes. The Group also has a history of industrial collaboration in the UK through Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

The Group’s main expertise lies primarily in image processing, signal processing, embedded systems, optical sensors, neural networks, and systems on chip and advanced control. It is currently working in the following areas:

- monitoring and characterisation of combustion flames
- flow measurement of particulate solids
- medical instrumentation
- control of autonomous vehicles
- control of time-delay systems
- high-speed architectures for real-time image processing
- novel signal processing architectures based on logarithmic arithmetic.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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An MSc-level conversion programme for those with first degrees in numerate disciplines (e.g. Maths, Physics, others with some mathematics to pre-university level should enquire). Read more
An MSc-level conversion programme for those with first degrees in numerate disciplines (e.g. Maths, Physics, others with some mathematics to pre-university level should enquire). The programme targets producing engineers with the knowledge and skills required for working in the communications industry on programmable hardware, in particular. There is a high demand for people to fill such roles in communications and test & measure equipment vendors, and in many smaller companies developing devices for the internet of things.

The huge growth of interconnected devices expected in the Internet of Things and the goals of flexible, high-speed wireless connections for 5G mobile networks and beyond, require programmable, embedded electronics to play a vital role. From the development of small, intelligence sensors to the design of large-scale network hardware that can be functionally adaptive in software-defined networking, there is a huge demand for advanced embedded electronics knowledge and skills in the communications sector.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1223/embedded-communications-engineering

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media.

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EL829 - Embedded Real-Time Operating Systems (15 credits)
EL849 - Research Methods & Project Design (30 credits)
EL893 - Reconfigurable Architectures (15 credits)
EL896 - Computer and Microcontroller Architectures (15 credits)
EL822 - Communication Networks (15 credits)
EL827 - Signal & Communication Theory II (15 credits)
EL871 - Digital Signal Processing (DSP) (15 credits)
EL872 - Wireless/Mobile Communications (15 credits)
EL873 - Broadband Networks (15 credits)
EL890 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Research areas

- Communications

The Group’s activities cover system and component technologies from microwave to terahertz frequencies. These include photonics, antennae and wireless components for a broad range of communication systems. The Group has extensive software research tools together with antenna anechoic chambers, network and spectrum analysers to millimetre wave frequencies and optical signal generation, processing and measurement facilities. Current research themes include:

- photonic components
- networks/wireless systems
- microwave and millimetre-wave systems
- antenna systems
- radio-over-fibre systems
- electromagnetic bandgaps and metamaterials
- frequency selective surfaces.

- Intelligent Interactions:

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

- Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems:

The Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems Research Group comprises a mixture of highly experienced, young and vibrant academics working in three complementary research themes – embedded systems, instrumentation and control. The Group has established a major reputation in recent years for solving challenging scientific and technical problems across a range of industrial sectors, and has strong links with many European countries through EU-funded research programmes. The Group also has a history of industrial collaboration in the UK through Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

The Group’s main expertise lies primarily in image processing, signal processing, embedded systems, optical sensors, neural networks, and systems on chip and advanced control. It is currently working in the following areas:

- monitoring and characterisation of combustion flames
- flow measurement of particulate solids
- medical instrumentation
- control of autonomous vehicles
- control of time-delay systems
- high-speed architectures for real-time image processing
- novel signal processing architectures based on logarithmic arithmetic.

Careers

The programme targets producing engineers with the knowledge and skills required for working in the communications industry on programmable hardware, in particular. There is a high demand for people to fill such roles in communications and test & measure equipment vendors, and in many smaller companies developing devices for the internet of things.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Computer Animation Master’s programme at Kent is oriented towards current industrial needs, technology and practice. It is designed to be a direct route into this high-profile, modern and creative industry, and has been developed jointly by the School and our industrial partner Framestore CFC. Read more
The Computer Animation Master’s programme at Kent is oriented towards current industrial needs, technology and practice. It is designed to be a direct route into this high-profile, modern and creative industry, and has been developed jointly by the School and our industrial partner Framestore CFC.

Develop your knowledge and understanding of the animation process, software tools, techniques and packages, and the technical aspects of working in a professional animation environment. The MSc programme offers invaluable experience of working to professional briefs and under expert supervision of professional animators to prepare you for a career in industry.

Competition is fierce in animation and visual effects and success depends on your concentration levels, constant practise and ability to grasp the essence and modern techniques of animation. Successful former students are now working in animation and animation layout roles for companies such as Sony Games and Framestore CFC on major titles in games, television and film.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/248/computer-animation

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The School, which was established over 40 years ago, has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. We have a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly, supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

This intensively taught postgraduate course lasts a full year. It takes place in a dedicated computer laboratory where you have your own seat and computer for the duration of the course. The course lectures and workshops, whether led by visiting professionals or staff, are all held in this room. Demonstrations and showing of films are by means of an HD projector. By the end of the year, the lab will be where you live as much as your accommodation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EL831 - Digital Visual Art set-up (15 credits)
EL832 - Animation Principles (15 credits)
EL833 - Visual Training (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL863 - Advanced 3D Modelling (15 credits)
EL864 - Pre-Visualisation (15 credits)
EL865 - Action in Animation (15 credits)
EL866 - Acting in Animation (15 credits)
EL830 - Computer Animation Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop your knowledge and understanding within the field of 3D computer animation, which will equip you to become a professional in the animation and visual effects industry

- produce professionally-trained animators who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D animation software for producing animated films

- provide you with proper academic guidance and welfare support

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential

- strengthen and expand opportunities for industrial collaboration with the School of Engineering and Digital Arts.

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed the programme with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students will be in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline.

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/) has an excellent record of student employability (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/school/employability.aspx). We are committed to enhancing the employability of all our students, to equip you with the skills and knowledge to succeed in a competitive, fast-moving, knowledge-based economy.

Graduates who can show that they have developed transferable skills and valuable experience are better prepared to start their careers and are more attractive to potential employers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Read more
This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Students with an interest in topics covered by our research teams will find this is an excellent opportunity to get involved in progressive research.

Why study MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The MSc Computing Research degree is designed for graduates with a good degree in Computing or a related subject who wish to gain deep knowledge of research methods and experience of working in an active research environment.

The School of Computing provides a distinctive, balanced and enjoyable learning environment, matched to the future needs of both society and the computing field. Its research has strong foundations in mathematical and logical techniques, and in probabilistic and machine learning algorithms that are applied in its work on computer vision and multi-agent systems. In its applied research, the multi-disciplinary School has an international reputation in computer support for older and disabled people, healthcare computing, space systems and interaction design. All these areas of research have been developed through strong, long-term relationships with other leading academic institutions worldwide, and in collaboration with professional and industrial partners. The School is also active in commercialising its research, with several recent spin out companies fostering an entrepreneurial atmosphere.

The School of Computing has four major research groups:
Assistive and Healthcare Systems
Computational Systems
Interactive Systems Design
Space Technology Centre

What's so good about MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing research. We currently have 23 academics and 35 researchers working alongside our 27 PhD students. Since January 2008 our school of computing has generated 313 publications and counting. In this time, we've produced 129 projects totalling more than £12.3 million in funding making Dundee a great place to come to engage in computing research.

We encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to computer systems design and production, and will enable you to develop the skills so that you can undertake independent research and participate in proposal development and innovation.

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

Postgraduate culture

The School of Computing maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students - you're far more than just a matriculation number to us. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from research-active staff in the School of Computing. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

What you will study

You study three taught modules, during the period January-March, making your module selections with your advisor, as follows:
Computing Research Frontiers
One of: Designing Innovative Research OR Research Methods
One of: Human Computer Interaction OR Multi-agent Systems and Grid Computing

Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the individual research project which runs from May to December. You will be based with one of the research groups within the School of Computing:

Assistive & healthcare technologies
Computational systems
Interactive systems design
Space technology centre

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Careers

Our students are highly employable:
They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft
They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year

Graduates may also choose to continue to a PhD in the School of Computing or elsewhere.

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

Dundee has been described as the largest village in Scotland which gives an indication of how friendly and compact it is. With a population of 150,000 it is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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