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IN BRIEF. Complies with the core curriculum of the Royal College of Physicians for Geriatric Medicine. Delivered off-site on a part-time basis. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Complies with the core curriculum of the Royal College of Physicians for Geriatric Medicine
  • Delivered off-site on a part-time basis
  • Identifies there is more to modern practice than technical medicine
  • A part-time only course

COURSE SUMMARY

Geriatric medicine is an expanding, acute speciality. With increasing numbers of elderly people the need for specialist training will continue.

This comprehensive course is offered in collaboration with the North Western Postgraduate Medical Deanery and will ensure that the theory underpinning knowledge is delivered alongside and applied to the clinical situation. It meets the needs of clients and physicians and ensures that a quality service is delivered effectively and efficiently. It is a modular course delivered off-site on a part-time, day release basis.

TEACHING

All teaching will endeavour to be evidence-based, holistic and multi-disciplinary, recognising that there is more to modern practice than simply technical medicine. It is a modular course delivered off-site on a part-time, day release basis.

ASSESSMENT

Medical Ethics and Law

  • 20 minute presentation – 20%
  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%

Medical Teaching and Communication

  • 45 minute observed teaching session - 20%
  • 3,000 word assignment – 80%

Health Service Management

  • 3,500 word Planning Change Management Assignment – 100%

General Principles of Ageing

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute presentation – 20%

Common Diseases of the Older Adult I

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Common Diseases of the Older Adult II

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Psychiatry of Old Age

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Medicine for the Older Adult

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Dissertation

CAREER PROSPECTS

This exciting and innovative course will enable you to gain a critical appreciation and in-depth understanding of the theoretical background underpinning your speciality. It also provides an opportunity to critically evaluate and appraise the current contextual and practice issues involved in the delivery of your specialist field.



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Dundee has an international reputation for diabetes research, education and informatics developments. Read more
Dundee has an international reputation for diabetes research, education and informatics developments. With the global growing prevalence of diabetes there is an increasing need for healthcare professionals to upskill in diabetes care and understand how to organise healthcare for the efficient management of chronic diseases.

The course has been designed to allow students to remain in their jobs while studying and for their studies to be able to have an immediate impact in their work environment.

What is so good about this course?

The programme aims to:

- provide a comprehensive programme of diabetes education for health care professionals
- develop competence in the diagnosis, treatment, and decision-making in the care of persons with diabetes
- establish students with a basic grounding in educational/ behaviour change theory with application to patient and professional education
- develop leadership and evaluation skills in the organisation and delivery of care in both primary care and hospitals to empower service delivery improvement
- establish a stimulating environment for research, teaching and learning about diabetes
- encourage a culture for training of health care professionals by the development of a network of experienced clinical teachers.
- allow health care professionals to enhance their knowledge and skills while remaining in work
- bring immediate benefits into the workplace through the application of their learning in their work-place based projects
- be culturally sensitive
- encourage a culture of multidisciplinary working in the workplace.

The course is aimed at working-professionals who wish to facilitate evidence-based change in clinical care and management within their healthcare system and recognise that this requires not just clinical knowledge but also skills in leadership, inter-professional education, organisational management, reflective professional practice and quality improvement.

Degree Combinations

Diabetes Care, Education & Management PGCert
Diabetes Care, Education & Management PGDip

How you will be taught

The teaching approach is one of blended learning with face to face teaching (lectures, group work, case discussions, workshops, simulation exercises, quizzes) blended with online activities, case based studies and workplace assessment. Much of the later work can be completed flexibly in the student's own free time, and has been designed around the needs of students who are also working full time.

There are 3 semesters per year. In each semester the student completes one module from a choice of 5 or 6 modules that will be offered each semester. In the partnership with the Dasman Diabetes Institute and Ministry of Health in Kuwait the face to face teaching is hosted at the Dasman Diabetes Institute.

How you will be assessed

All 20 credit modules are assessed on Coursework. To complete each module and to progress to the next, students are required to:

- Attend the face-to-face teaching.
- Complete the workplace-based assignment which requires participants to apply educational principles to their own situation and reflect on the result.
- Students are required to base their projects and activities within their own organisations so that they can utilise their new knowledge and build on opportunities created by the programme to shift the balance of care. The project (or an agreed part of the project) undertaken for Assignment 1 must be completed within 6 weeks from the end of the face-to-face teaching days.

Assignment 1: Workplace Project Report (2000 words - excluding reference list and appendices)
A critical examination of the student’s own workplace-based project, which is undertaken in response to the specific module aims and study topics (or a series of activities relating to the module).

Assignment 2: Reflective Essay (1500 words - excluding reference list and appendices)
A reflective analysis of the student’s own learning and development throughout the module, describing the impact that the module study activities and workplace-based project experiences have had upon their own thinking and professional practice.

Marks are awarded equally between Assignment 1: the description of the workplace-based assignment and Assignment 2: the reflective analysis of the project.

The Dissertation Module (60 credits) which must be passed to graduate with the MSc is assessed through a 12,000-15,000 word thesis.

What you will study

Students can choose to exit at Certificate, Diploma or MSc level.


- Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) Diabetes Care, Education & Management
The PG Cert requires the achievement of 60 credits through 3 modules: 1 Core module + 1 Educational module + 1 other module

- Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) Diabetes Care, Education & Management
The PG Dip requires the achievement of 120 credits through 6 modules: 1 Core module + 1 Educational module + 1 Organisational module + 1 Research module + 2 other modules

- Postgraduate Masters (MSc) Diabetes Care, Education & Management
The MSc requires the achievement of 180 credits. To obtain the MSc students must successfully complete the PG Dip (120 credits) + the Taught MSc Dissertation Module (60 credits).


Modules can be chosen from the following selection. Many modules appear in more than one category to increase the flexibility of students to create a programme specific to their needs.

Core Modules

Modern Diabetes Care
Science of Diabetes
Organisational Approaches to the Delivery of Care
Clinical Modules

Advanced Diabetes Nutrition
Advanced Diabetes Practice
Diabetes in the Young
Management of CV Risk in Diabetes
Safety in Clinical Communication
Self-Management of Diabetes: person centred, enabling approaches to clinical practice
Education Modules

Clinical skills and Simulation for Education and Practice
Developing Safe Team Working Using Simulation
Facilitation
Leadership
Reflective Professional Practice
Self-Management of Diabetes: person centred, enabling approaches to clinical practice
Training the Trainers
Organisational modules

Facilitation
Leadership
Organisational Approaches to the Delivery of Care
Patient Safety & Quality Improvement in Diabetes
Reflective Professional Practice
Strategic Partnering
Research

Research Methods
MSc Dissertation

Employability

We would envisage this course/qualification being interesting to healthcare organisations who wish their healthcare professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, nurse educators, managers etc) to enhance their skills across a range of disciplines required for the management and care of diabetes and other chronic diseases.

This qualification is NOT equivalent to accreditation onto the diabetes medical specialist register e.g. allowing the individual to operate as a diabetes consultant.

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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere. Read more
The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere.

Course Overview

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David's long-established expertise within this field as part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The degree offers modules which encompass a range of aspects on bilingualism and language planning in Wales and internationally. Different pathways are offered to meet the professional demands of a variety of careers in the field of bilingualism. It consists of five modules in Part One and a dissertation of 15,000 words in Part Two.

In Part One students may choose from a range of modules according to their personal professional or vocational needs, including:
-Introduction to Bilingualism
-Societal Bilingualism (political aspects of language vitality)
-Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-Models of Bilingual Teaching
-Language Planning Essentials
-Research Methodology

Students will choose their own research subjects for the dissertation in Part Two based on aspects of the modules studied previously in Part One and agreed in advance with the Programme Director. It is intended that students will be given the opportunity to conduct in-depth research in a field of study which will promote their professional development.

Although the modular structure of the postgraduate degree allows students to study a single module, on the successful completion of three modules students will be eligible to exit the course with a Postgraduate Certificate in Bilingualism and Multilingualism, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Bilingualism and Multilingualism on the completion of five modules. Students wishing to progress to the MA in Bilingualism and Multilingualism would undertake an additional dissertation.

Modules

A summary of the aims of individual modules:
-CYAD-7015: Introduction to Bilingualism
-CYAD-7002: Societal Bilingualism
-CYAD-7007: Research Methodology
-CYAD-7008: Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-CYAD-7009: Development of Bilingual Education in Wales
-CYAD-7010: Models of Bilingual Teaching
-CYAD-7012: Language Planning Essentials

Key Features

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s long-established expertise within this field. The University is part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The programme aims to:
-Provide students with various aspects of bilingualism and multilingualism, both in Wales and in international contexts
-Develop students’ ability to critically analyse the various factors involved in the study of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to relate those factors to national and international contexts
-Equip students for various vocations involved with bilingualism/ multilingualism and enable them to apply basic principles, together with knowledge, understanding and subject-based skills, to their daily vocational needs
-Introduce students to the most relevant research and thinking in the field which forms the basis for the most recent theories and learning
-Develop students’ transferable skills and enable them to research, interpret and critically evaluate
-Develop students’ cognitive skills including their ability to reason, to critically analyse, as well as to think creatively in appraising any current policies in the field of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to propose improvements

The programme will focus on various aspects of bilingualism and language planning relevant to a range of professional and vocational posts in order to extend and deepen knowledge, understanding and skills in specific fields. The professional / vocational skills related to this programme will enable students to:
-Rise to the challenge which faces individuals in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning
-Undertake projects concerned with various aspects in the field
-Undertake individual and team research to promote linguistic plans and strategies
-Analyse and interpret data concerned with various developments
-Exhibit proficiency in the use of ICT in presentations and in communication

Students are given an opportunity to undertake field studies occasionally (eg in Scotland and Ireland) in order to study language revitalization projects and, when geographically convenient, to attend national and international conferences on bilingualism and language planning.

The advantage of the MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism to students is the flexibility which allows them to gain the necessary knowledge and skills through distance learning, by studying part-time or full-time and with the assistance of technology and the reading materials provided.

One can study as few as two modules per year and spread the cost over the period of study. By now, the course is studied by students in Wales and in various parts of the world including, for example, Italy, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia, Cyprus, Greece and Mongolia.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are adopted in order to enable students to illustrate their knowledge and skills in relation to learning outcomes, including:
-Written assignments
-Presentations (adapted for distance learning purposes)
-Extended essays

Assessment methods are adopted on the basis of their appropriateness for ensuring that students can show that they have achieved the learning outcomes which are explicit in every module and on which the assessment criteria are based.

At the start of every module students are provided with:
-The assignment(s) for the assessment of the module and the weighting for each assignment
-A list of the criteria used to mark an assignment or presentation
-Further guidance in relation to the requirements of the set tasks and dates for presentation

Following the completion of an assignment, each student will receive:
-A formal report containing an assessment of the individual criteria on which the final mark was based, and feedback containing comments on how to improve as part of a formative process
-An opportunity to discuss the assignment with a tutor if necessary

Every assignment is assessed internally by a second-marker and by an external examiner.

Career Opportunities

The University has excellent resources, thus enabling us to offer a range of modules available to suit professional developmental needs and personal interests. The degree has a broad focus which is suitable for a range of professional fields and aims to equip students with the information and skills to work confidently in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning. The course offers a range of experiences and would appeal to anyone involved in the development of the use of language in modern society, including:
-Language Officers
-Policy Makers & Government Officers
-Language Planners
-Teachers & Trainers
-Translators
-Youth/ Community Workers
-Those currently working in adult education in various countries
-Those developing learning opportunities in both youth and adult contexts

The MA degree offers opportunities to progress to undertake subsequent research for a PhD.

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The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. Read more

Overview

The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice. Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive. Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/sspp/postgraduatetaught/criminology/professionaldocorate/

Course Aims

- Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners.

- Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place.

- Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

Course Content

Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40106)
Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice
Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40103)
Assignment: A general research methods critique

Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)
Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-40107)
This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis
This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis.

Additional Costs

Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

Award Pathway Option

Upon successful completion of the taught part of the DCrim programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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It aims to produce successful individuals who can. - Understand the whole of the professional design development process and how the initial phases flow to inform the latter stages. Read more

Course Overview

It aims to produce successful individuals who can:
- Understand the whole of the professional design development process and how the initial phases flow to inform the latter stages.

- Appreciate commercial realities and the designer’s role in business.

- Design desirable products for bespoke, batch or mass manufacture.

- Understand sustainability, inclusively, and other important ethical and social issues that must be considered by today’s designers.

- Have traditional design skills such as sketching, dealing with form, communication and innovation.

- Are able to use design tools such as 3D CAD, CAM and rapid prototyping in order to optimise the design and reduce time to market.

The Cardiff School of Art & Design have substantial expertise in the delivery of courses at the interface of engineering and product design whilst the National Centre for Product Design & Development Research is one of the UK’s leading centres for rapid product design & development whose expertise covers the whole process from design management, concept and detailed design, ergonomics and CAD to prototyping, tooling and batch manufacture.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/mscapd.aspx

Course Content

MSc students take the following modules:
- APD401M Product Development Principles & Practice (20 Credits)
- APD403M Sustainability Issues in Design for Production (20 Credits)
- MAA7001 Research Methods in Art & Design (20 Credits)
- APD405M User Testing & Evaluation (20 Credits)
- APD406M Form Shape & Colour (20 Credits)
- APD407M Major Project (60 Credits)
- APD408M(A) Industrial Placement (20 Credits)

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

- Facilities
Dedicated studio space. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers an extensive range of spaces, workshops and equipment, creating a vibrant and creative learning environment, within a new purpose designed building and a fully renovated extension. Workshop and technical facilities include a foundry; and access to other workshops across the full range of Art and Design disciplines. Membership of the Fablab is included in the indicative coursework costs below. Cardiff School of Art and Design has a wide range of tools and equipment for use by students; necessary workshop training in their use includes access to materials used as part of timetabled workshop inductions. You also have access to and use of recycled materials within workshop areas.

Assessment

For each module, assessment is as follows:
- APD401M Product Development Principles & Practice (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent assignment. This will normally be a written assignment.

- APD403M Sustainability Issues in Design for Production (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This module will typically be assessed via a design project. A proportion of the assignment may however be awarded for written or presentatio​n work.

- MAA7001 Research Methods in Art & Design (20 Credits) Written submission, plus seminar presentation, typically 3,000 words plus a 10-20 minute presentation.

- APD405M User Testing & Evaluation (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This module may be linked with others in order to provide a design project vehicle. In any case it will involve practical exercises and a proportion if not all of the assignment may be awarded for written or presentation work.

- APD406M Form Shape & Colour (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This project is likely to be assessed through practical design activity, although a proportion of the assignment may be awarded for written or presentation work.

- APD407M Major Project (60 Credits). 18,000-word equivalent. Performance will be measured using the Final Report, Formal Presentation, Viva Voce examination and final product. Of the marks that are available for the project the allocation of the marks to each of the measures is as follows:

Final Report: 40%

Final Product (prototype): 40%

Formal Presentation: 5%

Viva Voce: 15%

- APD408M(A) Industrial Placement (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. A 3000 word ( maximum) report reflecting on the student’s experience within the professional working environment. A reflective placement Logbook (or Blog equivalent) recording critical reflections on events, activities and experiences. Important Note: Because of the difficulties of assessment in the workplace and the potential for disparity of treatment, this module is not awarded a mark other than “Pass” or “Fail”.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group), exploring the theme of lectures and allowing students to clarify their understanding.

These sessions may also be workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run. This may include, for example, communal writing or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

Your year(s) of study with us enable you to develop professional contacts, observe how successful practitioners make their living, and hone your skills and ideas for commercial and professional advantage. Such cross-disciplinary collaborations prepare you for a world where you will inevitably work with people from all walks of life. Your live projects and assessments will get you accustomed to the importance of deadlines and working to specific briefs and tight specifications.

Over the next few years, CSAD will be developing opportunities for incubation of business proposals from its graduates and postgraduate training to get business opportunities up and running.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Technology has always been central for the diagnosis and treatment in orthopaedics, biomechanics and rehabilitation, and the use of technology has never been greater than it is at the present time. Read more
Technology has always been central for the diagnosis and treatment in orthopaedics, biomechanics and rehabilitation, and the use of technology has never been greater than it is at the present time. For instance, twenty-five years ago there was only one type of artificial hip and today there are more than forty. This rapid development has considerable implications for all those working in the fields of orthopaedics and rehabilitation. This programme aims to provide an understanding of the principles involved in the development, application and evaluation of orthopaedics, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology.

The programme consists of two seperate courses, the Postgraduate Diploma in Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology and the MSc in Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology. For each course there are four groups of distance learning modules. In addition, the MSc course includes a project. The courses must be completed within a period of two to five years from the start date.

This programme is delivered by the Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery Department.

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, to reflect the multi-disciplinary aspect of the research carried out at the Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery Department where the majority of staff are tutors on this programme, the respective staff were returned into Unit of Assessment 25 (General Engineering - Biomedical Engineering) and Unit of Assessment 8 (Primary Care and Other Community Based Clinical Subjects) where 90% and 85% of our quality profile was deemed of international class.

Aims of the Programme

The programme is intended to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the technological aspects of orthopaedics and rehabilitation.

Programme Content

The programme consists of four taught modules: Introductory Topics, Biomechanics, Rehabilitation Technology and Orthopaedic Technology. In addition, those studying for an MSc, undertake a research project in a relevant area.

Each student is assigned a tutor, who is available for direct contact by telephone; a telephone answering service is available after office hours, and you may also contact your tutor by email, post or fax. Email is the preferred option for all tutor contact.

For detailed information on the syllabus, visit the course website.

Methods of Assessment

The modules are assessed by a combination of written examination and continuous assessment. In addition, the research project, undertaken by those studying towards an MSc, is assessed by dissertation and oral examination.

Coursework:
At the end of each module group you submit an assignment to your tutor(s) for assessment. A copy of the assignment is returned to you with your marks and the original is retained by the University. The assignment forms the coursework element of the final assessment.

Examinations:
Written examinations are held during March every year in Dundee and also by arrangement at fully approved examination centres throughout the United Kingdom and overseas. You will sit either four or five examinations, depending on the introductory modules you have studied. You must complete all the modules in a module group, including the assignment, before you can sit the exam(s) for that group. You may choose to sit all the exams together or spread them throughout your course.

Dissertation:
The Masters project is assessed by dissertation and viva (oral examination). Vivas are held during September each year in Dundee. Course regulations require MSc students to pass the final assessment for the Diploma course before they may submit their dissertation.

Learning Materials

For each module, you receive learning materials consisting of a module guide and one or more study guides. The module guide for each module provides information about the structure, recommended reference materials and the tutor support system. Modules consists of several individual units, each unit dealing with a different aspect of the module. For every unit there is a study guide that explains the objectives of that unit (what you will have learned by the end of the unit) and leads you through the learning material, section by section, using text, illustrations, activities, exercises and references to the recommended textbooks.

You monitor your own progress through the unit by completing the self-assessment questions, which are placed at regular intervals throughout the text, and checking your answers against those provided in the study guide. At the end of each study guide, there is a short exercise which you complete and return to your tutor for marking.

Tutor Support

When you need to discuss any aspects of your study, you may contact your tutor for support. Your tutor is available for direct contact by telephone at set times during the week, as specified in the module guide for each module. A telephone answering service is available after office hourse and you may also contact your tutor by email, post or fax.
You recieve a regular newsletter and are encouraged to contact other students, even to form local groups where possible, to share ideas.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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This programme is delivered by the Institute of Motion Analysis & Research within the Department of Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery at the TORT Centre. Read more
This programme is delivered by the Institute of Motion Analysis & Research within the Department of Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery at the TORT Centre.

The Institute of Motion Analysis and Research (IMAR) was established in 2003 by combining the Foot Pressure Analysis Laboratory and the Dundee Gait Laboratory at the Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery Department, University of Dundee. However, gait analysis has been at the forefront of development in this field for the past 25 years and foot pressure measurement for the past 16 years, which gives us a tremendous bank of knowledge on which to draw. IMAR's main goal is to promote excellence in teaching and research and to provide a comprehensive clinical service in the field of motion analysis.

A third laboratory dedicated to Sports Biomechanics is currently nearing completion to augment and support the current facilities of IMAR.

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, to reflect the multi-disciplinary aspect of the research carried out, the respective staff at IMAR were returned into Unit of Assessment 25 (General Engineering - Biomedical Engineering) and Unit of Assessment 8 (Primary Care and Other Community Based Clinical Subjects) where 90% and 85% of our quality profile was deemed of international class. This is an excellent outcome taking into consideration that IMAR was only established in 2003.

Aims of the Programme

The programme is intended to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the technological aspects, and the fundamental and advanced concepts of motion measurement and clinical analysis.

Programme Content

This is a modular course, which includes a foundation module, plus the following subjects:
Motion Measurement
Fundamentals in Motion Analysis
Advanced Motion Analysis
For more details, visit the course website.

In addition, those studying for an MSc undertake a research project in a relevant area.

Methods of Assessment

The modules are assessed by a combination of written examination and continuous assessment. In addition, the research project, undertaken by those studying towards an MSc, is assessed by dissertation and oral examination.

Coursework:
At the end of each unit you submit an assignment to your tutor for assessment, along with an assignment card containing a signed declaration that the work submitted is your own. A copy of the assignment is returned to you with your marks and the original is retained by the University. The assignments form the coursework element of the final assessment for both courses.

Examinations:
Written examinations are held during March/ April each year in Dundee. Under special circumstances exams can also be sat by arrangement at approved examination centres (for example, at British Council Offices) outside, and in the United Kingdom. If you sit an examination outside Dundee you will be responsible for paying any costs the examination centre may charge

You must complete all the modules in a module group, including the assignment, before you can sit the exam(s) for that particular group. You may choose to sit all the exams at one time or spread them throughout your course .

Dissertation:
The MSc project is assessed by dissertation and viva (oral examination). Vivas are held in Dundee.

Available Courses

MSc (distance learning) - Normally up to 36 months £8,650
PGDip (distance learning) - Normally up to 36 months* £5,650
PGCert (distance learning) - Normally up to 18 months £2,825
MSc (in house) 12 months - £10,000

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
*PG Dip to be normally completed in 24 months if the MSc is being considered.

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The aim of the part-time Executive MBA is to help you become a reflective practitioner by encouraging you to integrate the theories and knowledge gained from the programme with the skills, values and insights derived from experience you gained before and after the MBA. Read more
The aim of the part-time Executive MBA is to help you become a reflective practitioner by encouraging you to integrate the theories and knowledge gained from the programme with the skills, values and insights derived from experience you gained before and after the MBA.

Our Executive MBA consists of ten core modules, two elective modules and a dissertation. The programme runs for 28 months (4 taught semesters and a dissertation). It has been designed to meet the needs of experienced middle managers looking for ways to develop their understanding and knowledge of business.

The dissertation enables you to conduct an investigation into a significant challenge facing your organisation and produce practical recommendations for improvement.

You will benefit from insights from internationally renowned academics, industry experts and business practitioners and will learn with and from experienced managers from a variety of specialisms and sectors.

On completion of the programme you will have enhanced self-understanding and an ability to demonstrate leadership of your team and organisation.

Distinctive features:

• A programme designed to fit around work commitments, only requiring three days away from the office at any one time.

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

Structure

Our two-year part-time MBA programme has been designed to fit around work commitments, with modules delivered in weekday blocks of three days.

• Part one:

The structure of the degree consists of 12 x 10 credit modules in part one. This will consist of 10 core modules and a choice of two electives from three in any one academic session.

• Part two:

Part two will consist of a 60 credit dissertation which describes an individual piece of research work conducted within your own organisation or industry.

You will be expected to submit your dissertation no later than the January following the end of year two. This is to allow you to schedule your research work around the normal commitments of your employment and family life.

Year one

In year one you will undertake core modules and one optional module.

Intellectual skills are promoted within teaching blocks through presentations, the examination of case studies, group discussion, debate and assignment. The case study sessions will enable you to apply the theoretical concepts taught in the lectures to real-world contexts.

Core modules:

Corporate Finance
Operations Management
Marketing
Strategic Management
Organisational Behaviour
Leadership and Professional Development

Optional modules:

Business Analysis
Lean Thinking
Management Consulting

Year two

In year two you will take the following core modules and can choose one of the two optional modules not taken in the first year.

Upon successful completion of the taught modules you will undertake a dissertation based on a piece of research within your own organisation. The dissertation is submitted in January following the end of the second year.

Core modules:

Human Resource Management
International Business
Business Economics
Sustainable Business Management
Dissertation MBA Part Time

Optional modules:

Business Analysis
Lean Thinking
Management Consulting

Teaching

Our teaching is heavily informed by research and combines academic rigour with practical relevance. Our internationally leading faculty consists of academics who are at the forefront of knowledge within their field. They bring the lessons learnt from their most recent research into the classroom, giving you access to up to date real life examples and scenarios and critical business thinking.

Your teaching and learning resources will be provided and we will be responsive to your needs and views. For your part, you will need to put in the necessary amount of work both during and outside formal teaching sessions, and to make good use of the facilities provided.

The Executive MBA is taught in thirteen blocks of three days which typically run from 9am to 5pm. Once a module is completed you will have approximately four weeks to complete an assignment. A great deal of learning happens within the cohort itself as you learn about other sectors, and how to bring about organisational change, together.

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including elective module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate.

The Executive MBA Programme Director is also on hand to provide advice and guidance and to help with any issues you may encounter whilst undertaking the course.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work and generic written feedback.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

All modules are assessed by a written assignment of 3,000 words given to you at the end of each module. You will have around four weeks to complete each assignment.

You are also required to submit a 20,000 word dissertation.

Career prospects

If you joined us you would find yourself part of a group of roughly 20 managers from a broad range of organisations. Over the last few years this has included Admiral Insurance, Scottish & Southern Electricity, Deloitte, Cardiff Council, NHS, Amazon, General Electric, Fire & Rescue Service, and many other successful private and public organisations.

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IN BRIEF. Great employer demand for graduates of this course. Access to excellent facilities including over 20 wind tunnels and a DC10 jet engine. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Great employer demand for graduates of this course
  • Access to excellent facilities including over 20 wind tunnels and a DC10 jet engine
  • Accredited course by the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, giving you the opportunity to achieve chartered engineer status
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

The aerospace industry is at the forefront of modern engineering and manufacturing technology and there is an expanding need for highly skilled chartered Aerospace Engineers.

If you are looking to pursue a career in aerospace engineering this course will enable you to apply your skills and knowledge of engineering devices and associated components used in the production of civil and military aircraft, spacecraft and weapons systems.

This module has been accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. On graduation you be able to work towards Chartered Aerospace Engineer status which is an independent verification of your skills and demonstrates to your colleagues and employers your commitment and credentials as an engineering professional.

TEACHING

The course will be taught by a series of lectures, tutorials, computer workshops and laboratory activities.

Some modules will include a structured factory visit to illustrate the processes and techniques and to enable investigations to be conducted.

Engineers from the industry will contribute to the specialist areas of the syllabus as guest lecturers.

ASSESSMENT

The coursework consists of one assignment, and two laboratory exercises.

  • Assignment 1: Control design skills. (30%)
  • Laboratory 1: Feedback control design skills and system modelling skills. (10%)
  • Laboratory 2: Flight dynamics (10%)
  • The first 5 assignments are of equal weighting of 10%, assignment 6 has a weighting of 20%
  • Assignment1: Matlab programming skills assessed.
  • Assignment2: Simulink/ Matlab for control programming skills assessed.
  • Assignment3: Matlab simulation skills assessed.
  • Assignment4: Matlab integration skills assessed.
  • Assignment5: Matlab matrix manipulation knowledge assessed.
  • Assignment 6: Aerospace assembly techniques.

FACILITIES

Mechanical Lab – This lab is used to understand material behaviour under different loading conditions and contains a tensile test machine and static loading experiments – typical laboratory sessions would include tensile testing of materials and investigation into the bending and buckling behaviour of beams.

Aerodynamics Lab – Contains low speed and supersonic wind tunnels – typical laboratory experiments would include determining the aerodynamic properties of an aerofoil section and influence of wing sweep on the lift and drag characteristics of a tapered wing section.

Composite Material Lab – This lab contains wet lay-up and pre-preg facilities for fabrication of composite material test sections. The facility is particularly utilised for final year project work.

Control Dynamics Lab – Contains flight simulators (see details below) and programmable control experiments – typical laboratory sessions would include studying the effects of damping and short period oscillation analysis, forced vibration due to rotating imbalance, and understanding the design and performance of proportional and integral controllers.

Flight Simulators

Merlin MP520-T Engineering Simulator    

  • This simulator is used to support engineering design modules, such as those involving aerodynamics and control systems by giving a more practical experience of aircraft design than a traditional theory and laboratory approach. As a student, you'll design and input your own aircraft parameters into the simulator before then assessing the flight characteristics.
  • The simulator is a fully-enclosed single seat capsule mounted on a moving 2-degree of freedom platform which incorporates cockpit controls, integrated main head-up display and two secondary instrumentation display panels.
  • An external instructor console also accompanies the simulator and is equipped with a comprehensive set of displays, override facilities and a two-way voice link to the pilot.

Elite Flight Training System    

  • The Elite is a fixed base Piper PA-34 Seneca III aircraft simulator used for flight operations training and is certified by the CAA as a FNPT II-MCC Multi-Crew Cockpit training environment. It has two seats, each with a full set of instrumentation and controls, and European Visuals, so you see a projection of the terrain that you're flying through, based on real geographic models of general terrain and specific airports in Europe.

EMPLOYABILITY

This is a highly valued qualification and as a graduate you can expect to pursue careers in a range of organizations around the world such as in aerospace companies and their suppliers, governments and research institutions.

FURTHER STUDY

You may consider going on to further study in our Engineering 2050 Research Centre which brings together a wealth of expertise and international reputation in three focussed subject areas.

Research at the centre is well funded, with support from EPSRC, TSB, DoH, MoD, Royal Society, European Commission, as well as excellent links with and direct funding from industry. Our research excellence means that we have not only the highest calibre academics but also the first class facilities to support the leading edge research projects for both post-graduate studies and post-doctoral research.

Visit http://www.cse.salford.ac.uk/research/engineering-2050/ for further details.




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IN BRIEF. Maintain your CPD for professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. Flexible access to modules which equip you with the critical skills needed for contemporary practice to improve the lives of service users. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Maintain your CPD for professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.
  • Flexible access to modules which equip you with the critical skills needed for contemporary practice to improve the lives of service users
  • Enhance your career, professional credibility and employability with the scope to take one module or progress to the awards of PgCert, PgDip or master's
  • A part-time only course

COURSE SUMMARY

Social Workers are required to intervene in the lives of vulnerable people and people in crisis making decisions which impact directly on individuals, families and society. The emphasis in this course is on the application of skills (practical, critical and intellectual), knowledge and research to social work practice, with the aim of improving opportunity and outcomes for service users and communities.

Modules are offered which are relevant at whatever stage of career you are at – from modules to support you at the outset of your social work career to modules which develop supervision and management skills. All modules have been developed in collaboration with regional stakeholders.

You may enter the course as sponsored student from your employer or may be self-funding.

COURSE DETAILS

If you are a newly qualified social worker you will usually come onto the course to undertake Professional Practice (ASYE) and/or Consolidation of Professional Practice and/or Applied Critical Reflection.

If you are more experienced social workers you may wish to access modules individually or you can undertake a number of modules in order to gain a PgCert, PgDip or MSc.

TEACHING

This course has an integrated approach to teaching and learning, focusing on lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as independent learning methods.

Teaching is usually over five weeks, one day per week.

You will be encouraged to critically analyse and reflect upon your own practice experiences.

Teaching modes include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Critical incident analysis
  • Presentations
  • Guided reading
  • Independent study
  • Participation on BB (virtual learning) site

ASSESSMENT

BY MODULE

  • Professional practice (ASYE)
  • Reflective assignment (50%) - 3,500 words and Professional discussion (50%) - 20 mins
  • Consolidation of Professional Practice
  • Case Analysis (70%) - 3,500 words and PCF analysis (30%) - 1,500 words
  • Applied Critical Reflection Assignment
  • Reflexive account(100%) - 5000 words
  • Working with Children and Young People
  • Critical Evaluation Report (100%) - 5,000 words
  • Personalisation in Practice
  • Case commentary (20%) - 1,500 words and Assignment (80%) - 3,500 words
  • Risk assessment and analysis in child care
  • Case Analysis (100%) - 5,000 words
  • Risk Assessment and Analysis in Adult social care
  • Case Analysis (100%) - 5000 words
  • Project Management and Methods of Inquiry for Health and Social Care Practice
  • Evidence based business plan (30%) - 2000 words and Oral presentation (70%): Justify and defend the business case via the via voce - 20 mins
  • Research Methods
  • Research proposal (100%) - 5000 words
  • Developmental Supervision
  • Critical Analysis of recorded (1hr max) supervision session (100%) - 4,500 words
  • The ‘Me ‘in leadership for health and social care practice
  • Patch Work Text equivalent to an assignment of 5,000 words (100%)
  • Leading Education in Practice
  • Poster presentation to peers (100%) - 30 minute (+ 10 minutes for discussion)
  • Dissertation
  • Dissertation (100%) - 15,000 words - either systematised literature review or practically orientated project

EMPLOYABILITY

  • Completing CPD is now an essential part of maintaining your professional registration.
  • By undertaking CPD modules and courses, students demonstrate to employers a commitment to the profession.
  • Undertaking modules leads to better career prospects and promotion.
  • Modules are aligned to the College of Social Work’s Professional Capabilities Framework ASYE, Social Worker, Experienced Social Worker, and Advanced social worker levels.
  • Successful completion of the course demonstrates your capability to become a Strategic level social worker.
  • The course supports The College of Social Work developmental pathways of Professional Social Work Educator, Advanced Social Work Practitioner and Social Work Manager.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Social work at the University of Salford has links with a wide variety of agencies in the Greater Manchester area. We work with local authorities, not-for-profit agencies and the voluntary sector. We work with over 300 agencies and are involved in collaborative training with our local authority partners.

This course and the modules have been designed with the involvement of local employers to support workforce development and the needs of stakeholders.



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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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Since its inception in 2003, our distance learning MA Antiques course has been inspiring researchers and practitioners; individuals who want to develop a specialised interest in antiques without the necessity of on-campus attendance, and who wish to do so on a part-time basis. Read more
Since its inception in 2003, our distance learning MA Antiques course has been inspiring researchers and practitioners; individuals who want to develop a specialised interest in antiques without the necessity of on-campus attendance, and who wish to do so on a part-time basis.

Whether it’s a leisure activity, you wish to be an antique dealer or you want recognition of your professional status in antiques, our MA Antiques course appeals to a wide range of students. This postgraduate course has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The MA Antiques has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments. We accommodate such needs by offering a clear structure of progression, balanced by flexible personal tutorials: for which you can expect to have weekly one-to-one contact with academic staff via web based visual conferencing. It is this bespoke interaction with academic staff that our students tell us they find both supportive and inspirational. Our post graduate distance learning students come from a wide diversity of nationalities and locations: America, Canada, England, Germany, Greece, Scotland, and South Africa, to name a few.

Assessment is by 100 per cent coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. For each of the 40 credit modules you undertake, you will have both a mid-module assignment and an end of module assignment to complete. Through weekly tutorials you will receive on-going formative feedback and guidance, but the final module mark and summative feedback is based on the end of module assignment only.

COURSE OUTLINE

MA Antiques offers:
-A postgraduate qualification in antiques with a proven success rate
-Marketing advantages for your business, and/or your own career development
-The opportunity, after the first year, to specialise in a field of your choice
-Support for students who, after a long period away from formal education, may find postgraduate study daunting at first
-Encouragement for individuals who may not have formal entry qualifications - experience counts
-Assessment by 100% coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. So, no examinations, summer school or on campus requirements

OPPORTUNITIES

The course structure offers specific career progression through enabling individuals to apply themselves to one of three routes: academic publication, research funding, or exhibition/research project management. Previous topics from our graduates have included:
-The Hallmark System for English Silver: An Instrument of Enforcement or a Method to Identify Period Silver?
-A Web site Exhibition of Chinese Jade from the GvS Collection
-Regency Metamorphic Library Chairs (1790 -1840)
-Imitation or Innovation in Bretby Art Pottery
-Modern Art for the Table -The 1934 Harrods Exhibition
-Panelled Furniture: A Survey of 17th and 18th Century
-The contribution of Edmund Evans, Walter Crane, Randolph Caldecott and Kate Greenaway to the design of Victorian books for children

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Have you ever wondered. Why are some people more creative than others? What influences encourage creativity? Is it possible to teach creativity? This type of questioning drives the curiosity behind the MA in Creative Thinking. Read more
Have you ever wondered: Why are some people more creative than others? What influences encourage creativity? Is it possible to teach creativity? This type of questioning drives the curiosity behind the MA in Creative Thinking. The course is intended for aspiring researchers who want to develop a specialised interest in Creative Thinking without the necessity of on-campus attendance. Ultimately, the MA is about creating postgraduates who can interrogate, and eventually add to, research on Creative Thinking (we’re particularly interested in research related to the Creative Industries). If that’s your aspiration also, then read on.

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE

Year 1
-CQ4021 Creative Thinking and e-learning (40 Credit)
-CQ4022 Issues and methodologies for researching into Creative Thinking (40 Credit)

Year 2
-DD4921 Dissertation Project Research 1 and 2 (40 Credit)
-DD4922 Dissertation Project Research 3 and Evaluation (40 Credit)

Finalists
-DD4991 Dissertation Project (20 Credit)

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The MA Creative Thinking has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments. We accommodate such needs by offering a clear structure of progression, balanced by flexible personal tutorials: for which you can expect to have weekly one-to-one contact with academic staff via web based visual conferencing. It is this bespoke interaction with academic staff that our students tell us they find both supportive and inspirational. Our postgraduate distance learning students come from a wide diversity of nationalities and locations: America, Canada, England, Germany, Greece, Scotland, and South Africa, to name a few.

Assessment is by 100% coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. For each of the 40 credit modules you undertake, you will have both a mid-module assignment and an end of module assignment to complete. Through weekly tutorials you will receive ongoing formative feedback and guidance, but the final module mark and summative feedback is based on the end of module assignment only.

OPPORTUNITIES

The course structure offers specific career progression through enabling individuals to apply themselves to one of three routes: academic publication, research funding, or research project management; some will take the course as an intermediate step towards securing a higher research degree, such as a PhD, or building their progression toward an academic post; others, due to their interests, may want to build skills on project funding; those who want to gain first-hand experience of research project management will be able to undertake a pilot project within a specialist area of creative thinking.

FURTHER INFORMATION

With any field of study, some ideas/theories/practices achieve notoriety more on being fashionable rather than through academic credibility. Certainly, this is the case with such a wonderful area of enquiry as Creative Thinking. The only way to navigate through such confusing information is to become informed on the topic. This is fundamentally what the MA in Creative Thinking aims to help you achieve: informed understanding on Creative Thinking.

Furthermore, a significant difference between good quality research and poor quality research is in relation to research methodology. For this reason, the course gives you the opportunity to cover a broad range of methodologies and practices which belong within established areas of creativity research, in addition to exploring their theoretical and epistemological groundings.

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The one year, part time Postgraduate Certificate offers an exciting opportunity for those working within clinical audit to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification. Read more

Overview

The one year, part time Postgraduate Certificate offers an exciting opportunity for those working within clinical audit to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification. The overall aims of the course is to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical audit projects and programmes; enhance the value of clinical audit at individual, team and organisation level and to support the professional development of those working in clinical audit – whether at clinical or non-clinical level.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalscienceclinicalaudit/

Course Aims

The programme will:
• explore clinical audit within wider health policy and regulatory contexts
• promote greater understanding of governance, quality, assurance and the management of risk within and between healthcare organisations
• equip students with an appreciation of system design, thereby enabling the critical review and further development of clinical audit rameworks
• develop practical skills in clinical audit
• enable participants to effectively engage and motivate others so as to bring about change and quality improvement
• actively support the development of clinical audit within the NHS (or other, health-related) organisations

The PG Certificate will normally be available part time, over one year. However, it may be possible for students to take the PG Certificate over two years, by agreement. A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake group exercises as well as complete an extended project relevant to their own role.

Course Content

The PG Certificate requires successful completion of four, 15 credit modules. The modules are:
• Governance and Assurance in Healthcare
• Clinical Audit
• Managing Change and Quality Improvement
• Realising the Potential of Quality Audit

Course Content
Induction Session (including Study Skills and an Introduction to the University e-learning system)

Module One: Governance and Assurance in Healthcare
This module will enable participants to critically consider the governance requirements and regulatory frameworks which apply to healthcare organisations and within this the role and value of clinical audit as a source of assurance. The key focus will be on governance and healthcare in the NHS, although the module will draw on developments in other sectors and countries as these have influenced the requirements placed on healthcare organisations in the United Kingdom.

Core topics include:
• Understanding the NHS: Roles, Responsibilities and Relationships
• What is Governance and Why Does It Matter?
• Governance, Risk, & Assurance within the NHS
• Assuring the Quality of Care: The Pivotal Role of Clinical Audit

Module Two: Clinical Audit:
This module considers what constitutes robust clinical audit (at both strategy, programme and project level) and explores the value of clinical audit at all levels of an organisation - locating this within the wider quality framework for an organisation or team. The module also provides an opportunity for students to critically review the key stages within the clinical audit cycle, develop their skills in planning and undertaking audits and identify the key challenges involved in managing clinical audit projects and programmes.

Module Three: Managing Change and Quality Improvement:
All healthcare organisations are dependent on their staff, so how do you get the best from them? This module explores the core concepts associated with change so as to enable students to effectively manage the behavioural and organisational issues associated with audit and quality improvement programmes. The aim is for students to (i) develop strategies and actions and (ii) be able to apply a range of different tools and techniques which together enable them to contribute to the successful delivery of sustainable change across professional, functional and hierarchical boundaries.

Module Four: Realising the Potential of Quality Audit:
This module requires students to bring together the knowledge and skills from earlier in their programme of study and to purposefully apply these in a well researched, extended project. Students will be required to critically examine a self-chosen empirical issue or, preferably, a specific work-related problem and develop a related action plan.

Teaching & Assessment

The Postgraduate Certificate is assessed through coursework. This will involve completion of individual and group exercises together with submission of a formal assignment at the end of each module. There will be a choice of assignment subjects for each module and assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Further Study:
The PG Certificate in Medical Science (Clinical Audit) provides a bespoke introduction to clinical audit at postgraduate level and is a qualification in its own right. However, should students wish to continue their studies, the course has been designed to act as a precursor to further academic study at Keele University and other institutions. Students who successfully complete the PGCertificate can, for example, progress onto the Diploma or Masters in Medical Science within the Faculty of Health at Keele.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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