• New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"artwork"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Artwork)

  • "artwork" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 40
Order by 
Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression. Read more
Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course will encompass all these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic art supervisors.

Why study Forensic Art at Dundee?

Forensic Art is the presentation of visual information in relation to legal procedures. A forensic artist may aid in the identification or location of victims of crime, missing persons or human remains, and may facilitate the identification, apprehension or conviction of criminals.

Forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge. The course provides training and expertise at the cutting-edge of the forensic art profession

What's so good about studying Forensic Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching methods include traditional and online lectures, practical workshops in the studio and dissecting room and small group discussions. These encourage debate around theoretical research-based solutions to current practical problems.

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

This highly innovative one-year taught MSc will encompass these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic artists.

Semester 1 (60 credits)

In semester 1 the focus is on the study of anatomy through dissection, prosection study, illustration and facial sculpture and applying this to life art practice. Students will also be introduced to research methods and digital media.

Anatomy 1 - Head and Neck (15 credits)

Anatomy 2 - Post Cranial (15 credits)

Life Art (10 credits)

Digital Media Practice (10 credits)

Research Methods (10 credits)

Semester 1 may be also taken as a stand-alone PGCert entitled ‘Anatomy for Artists’.


Semester 2 (60 credits)

Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison (25 credits)

Forensic Art (25 credits)

Medical-Legal Ethics (10 credits)

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Forensic Art and Facial Identification.

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a self-directed project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods are employed, including anatomy spot-tests; oral and visual presentations; portfolio assessment of 2D/3D image acquisition and of artwork; written coursework and examination, such as forensic case reports.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional vocational training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in forensic art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In forensic art, potential careers exist within the police force and overseas law enforcement. Possible careers include:

Police art & design departments producing law enforcement documents, image enhancement, CCTV surveillance, image collection, staff posters and presentations.
SOCO/CSIs in UK or overseas law enforcement agencies
Facial composite practitioner and witness interview expert in police force
Archaeological artist working with museums, institutes and exhibitions
Facial identification services
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

Read less
Design and carry out your own visual projects, exploring the relationships between word and image, as you prepare for a career as a visual artist in a growing creative industry. Read more
Design and carry out your own visual projects, exploring the relationships between word and image, as you prepare for a career as a visual artist in a growing creative industry.

Overview

Whatever your artistic background, our Master's course will develop your visual practice in areas that are important for illustrators and book artists, such as visual sequencing and visual text. It will challenge you to cross the divide between fine art and applied art found on many undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, making it a unique course for the UK.

Studying in our purpose-built studios at Cambridge School of Art, much of your work will be practice-based. You’ll propose and undertake self-directed projects, attending group critiques and tutorials that will help you develop your creative skills.

You'll also attend a series of integrated lectures and seminars. These serve two purposes. You’ll explore aspects of illustration and book art, such as the relationships between word and image, narratology and visual language. And you'll receive guidance on research methods and critical writing - which you'll put to immediate use on the course, as well as in your future career.

Throughout the course, you’ll collaborate and discuss your work with staff, visiting professionals and fellow students, giving you an invaluable opportunity to see how others respond to it. All of our teaching team are practising artists, so you’ll hear about the latest news and issues in the industry, and have access to sound careers advice.

Teaching times: 9am-5pm Tuesdays and Wednesdays (full-time); 9am-5pm Wednesdays in Year 1, Tuesdays in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career as a freelance illustrator or freelance book artist. In recent years these roles have been increasingly in demand thanks to the growth of interest in artists' books, graphic novels, self-publishing, e-books and an awareness of small, batch publishing. You’ll also gain skills that will be useful in many other fields, such as bookbinding or teaching. You might even find a way to combine it with your current career, as did Dr Katy Shorttle, whose artwork on health issues was recently featured by The Guardian (http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/gallery/2015/sep/25/ebola-mumps-old-age-inspire-doctors-artwork-in-pictures).

Modules

Process and Practice as Research
Visual Text
Sequence and Series
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through your self-directed visual projects, which will include written project proposals, developmental and final visual work, and a reflective commentary. On the Master's Dissertation module, you’ll submit a 6,000-word essay. Finally, the Master's Project will allow you to build on all previous modules to design a visual project which shows mastery of your subject.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in purpose-built art and design studios, with open access to our printmaking, bookbinding, letterpress and laser cutting facilities, and training from dedicated technicians. We also have many digital imaging resources that you’ll be able to use, including Macs, scanners, and A3/large-format printers, as well as photography darkrooms, animation and moving image studios and 3D workshops. Our University’s Media Services Unit stocks photographic and recording equipment that you can borrow.

Read less
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a flexible focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in many fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

Program goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

- pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available throughout the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in areas such as but not limited to: video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives offered in the college is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and completed and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

Accreditation

The MFA program in imaging arts and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in imaging arts, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university,

- Submit a portfolio containing a focused body of artwork that demonstrates visual sophistication, aesthetic awareness, skill, and craft, as well as a commitment to a purpose and idea.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.

- Submit three letters of recommendation.

- Submit a Letter of Intent, which should include a candidate's interest in obtaing an MFA, the selection of RIT for the MFA degree, and professional goals to be achieved.

- Submit an Artist Statement explaining the intention behind the portfolio submitted.

- Complete a graduate application through the Graduate Admission Website.

- Participate in an interview (optional).

Applicants who are capable of graduate level academic work, as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences will be recommended.

- Portfolio

The portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides understanding into the applicant’s performance to date, ability to create advanced, self-directed work and his/her aesthetic development and maturity.

Applicants should submit a portfolio of 20 images representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work. Images must be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website. Through Slideroom, applicants will submit their Letter of Intent and an Artist’s Statement.

The application deadline is Jan 15. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications received. Acceptance occurs only once a year for a fall admission.

Portfolio instructions to SlideRoom:

- Submit a portfolio of no more than 20 images to the college's portfolio website: rit.slideroom.com. (Size restrictions can be found through SlideRoom.) SlideRoom supplies space for titling and additional information about each image, such as: title of the work, date, size, and medium.
- Number images 1 to 20 in the order the applicant wishes them to be viewed.
- Include a numbered page detailing portfolio image information.
- Include a one-page Artist's Statement discussing submitted work and applicant’s creative process.
- Include a one-page Letter of Intert explaining why the applicant is interested in obtaining an MFA and specifically why RIT would be a successful fit for pursuit of a professional study degree.

Additional information

- Faculty

Thirteen full-time faculty members, all critically regarded for their artistic work in exhibition and publication, contribute to the MFA program. The faculty brings individual expertise and dedication to their work with graduate students, encouraging intellectual inquiry of contemporary art-making practices and aesthetics. The MFA program is supported by a staff of 30 full-time faculty members from the schools of Art and Photographic Arts and Sciences, faculty from the art history department, adjunct faculty members from George Eastman Museum, as well as noted regional, national, and international practitioners, critics, and historians. To learn about the MFA faculty, facilities, equipment cage, MFA events and curriculum, please visit the school's website at https://photography.rit.edu.

- Scholarships and graduate assistantships

All accepted applicants are awarded a university scholarship. Level of scholarship support is based on merit of application materials. Concurrently, the MFA program faculty grants graduate assistantships to all accepted applicants. Assistantships include a variety of positions, including team teaching, faculty assistant in the classroom and with research projects, gallery management, and working in an archive among opportunities. Upon acceptance into the MFA program, applicants are notified by the MFA director as to level of support for both the university scholarship and the graduate assistantship. Both scholarship and assistantship are renewable in the second year of graduate study.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work completed prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester hours of graduate work with a minimum grade of a B (3.0) or higher is transferable toward the degree, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

- Grades and maximum time limit

The average of all grades for graduate credit taken at the university must be at least a B (3.0) to qualify for the degree. University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program.

- Policy regarding student work

The School of Photographic Arts and Sciences reserves the right to retain at least one original piece of work from a student’s MFA thesis show for inclusion in the MFA Collection, to be used for educational, promotional, and exhibition purposes. Graduates must also submit a copy of the thesis publication to the School's MFA archive.

- William Harris Gallery

William Harris Gallery (http://cias.rit.edu/spas-gallery/) supports the exhibition of graduate thesis work, student work, and the works of contemporary image-makers. It maintains a calendar of exhibitions, public lectures, and receptions. Importantly, it also provides real world experience for interested graduate students, where they learn firsthand about gallery operations, installation, and communications as a gallery manager or staff member.

Read less
MA Fine Art aims to produce creative practitioners whose work already reflects a sense of historical documenting, mapping and cataloguing wishing to approach the interaction with audience and history from an inventive and strategic standpoint. Read more
MA Fine Art aims to produce creative practitioners whose work already reflects a sense of historical documenting, mapping and cataloguing wishing to approach the interaction with audience and history from an inventive and strategic standpoint. It enables students to respond creatively to ‘place’ through a structured project, developing artwork presented to identified audiences at the researched site, archive or in alternative contexts.

The MA Fine Art is a sequential programme of study, progressing from Postgraduate Certificate to Diploma and then Master’s Award in Fine Art. Students must complete 9 modules for the award of MA Fine Art.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Teaching and Learning involves a combination of lectures, seminars, screenings, presentations, group and individual tutorials, with case studies including artists’ initiatives, placements [if appropriate] to develop an integrated and experimental view of theory and practice. All students are allocated an individual supervisor according to their Fine Art Project and Contextual Study.

Students also undertake a Professional Practice Programme delivered by Research Staff, Visiting Artists, Lecturers, Curators, Funding Agencies and representatives from Public Arts, Administrators and Regional Arts Associations when available.

Attendance for part-time students will be on average one day a week and it may occasionally be necessary to attend on 2 days depending on the semester. Individual tutorials with supervisors are by prior arrangement.

The assessment process will be determined by the student’s satisfactory demonstration and completion of the entire module learning outcomes and assessment components. The ‘MA Fine Art Project’ and the ‘Contextual Report’ will be graded in percentage terms. Students must present the MA Fine Art Project in the public domain (the University or alternative venue) with an appropriate Contextual Report.

FURTHER INFORMATION

MA in Fine Art offers Two Awards in Full-Time or Part-Time mode with an annual intake starting in September: MA Site and Archive Intervention runs in parallel with MA Fine Art Studio Practice.

The MA Fine Art utilises the international profile of the staff research team and creates the possibilities for effecting dynamic shifts in cultural production. The employment opportunities today are greatly increased for post-graduate students suitably experienced as artist/arts professionals working in the expanded field of art practice, which is reflected in the content of this course.

The MA courses offer access to specialist teaching, workshop facilities and good technical support with supportive and accessible learning resources at the library and on the computer network to develop professional, creative and contextual skills.

A range of full time and associate lecturers, all of whom are practising and exhibiting artists teach Fine Art at the University. A team of qualified technical staff and visiting artists also supports the course.

MA Fine Art aims to produce creative practitioners whose work already reflects a sense of historical documenting, mapping and cataloguing wishing to approach the interaction with audience and history from an inventive and strategic standpoint. It enables students to respond creatively to ‘place’ through a structured project, developing artwork presented to identified audiences at the researched site, archive or in alternative contexts.

The Post Graduate Programme gives students the opportunities to realise an ambitious ‘Fine Art Project’ to define and sustain a high level of professional practice supported by a ‘Contextual Report’, which undertake an analytical, critical and creative approach to theoretical formats. It also explores strategies for research publications to create potential employment opportunities, dissemination of practice and publicity networks.

OPPORTUNITIES

A student having developed a programme of innovative work at Master’s Level could be expected to operate as a practising artist achieving both a professional level of awareness and high standard of visual work. However, careers in Fine Art can also encompass a broader range of possibilities, as artists and designers, work in the creative industries and the public realm and in education.

The MA Fine Art is a sequential programme of study, progressing from Postgraduate Certificate to Diploma and then Master’s Award in Fine Art. Students must complete 9 modules for the award of MA Fine Art.

Read less
Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance. Read more
Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance.

The Theatre Design MA course has just four places on offer in each intake, students receive focused individual mentoring and support from the BOVTS team and high-profile visiting professionals, all set in the environment of an integrated company staging fourteen productions a year.

The course duration is four terms; starting in April the course runs until July the following year.

The full time course is aimed at multi-skilled postgraduate level students. We encourage applicants with a range of experience and previous training in Theatre, Art and Design, (Architecture, Costume, Graphics, Interiors, Film Design, Painting, Sculpture, Drama and Theatre). We do not limit entry to students with previous training, although the majority of applicants come from degree courses. A comprehensive portfolio of artwork is required at interview.

Collaborative working with students from a range of disciplines at BOVTS, design students are offered at least three leading design positions on public productions at a variety of respected venues – from The Bristol Old Vic Theatre to the Brewery Theatre.

Master-classes and workshops with visiting professional practitioners help build a thorough understanding of the subject, these include script analysis, life and figure drawing, model making, technical drawing, CAD, Photoshop and model photography. Specialist lectures cover theatre design and costume history. Research and practical work are supported by site and production visits including trips to theatre design events and exhibitions.

An extensive portfolio of industry-standard work can be achieved over the course of four terms, including staged productions and theoretical projects. Students leave BOVTS with the skills, knowledge and confidence to build careers as professional designers. There are end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art in Bristol and in London.

Inspiring leadership by Head of Design Angela Davies, who is an award-winning theatre designer with high-level industry links. The course equips its graduates for entry into prestigious Theatre Design competitions such as the Linbury Prize for Stage Design and the RSC’s trainee scheme. BOVTS graduates held 5 out of the 12 final places in the Linbury Prize 2013.

Applications are accepted at least one year in advance of the course start date. The four-term course starts at the beginning of the summer term and completes at the end of the summer term of the following academic year.

Recent graduates have held design positions at the RSC, Pilmlico Opera, Bristol Old Vic, The Brewery Theatre and the Tobacco Factory, The Finsborough Theatre The Vault Festival and with Kneehigh Theatre Company.

To receive more information on course structure and highlights, please contact

Course Outline

Term 1
- Intensive skills-based classes from professional practitioners, including model-making and technical drawing
- Theatre script analysis and period research workshops
- Exploration of the collaborative creative process with a professional director and the MA Directors at BOVTS on the Theatre and Short Play Project
- Master-classes in advanced model-making techniques, technical drawing, an introduction to Photoshop and model photography
- Production and site visits.

Term 2
- Continued exploration of the design process through to presentation with meetings with a visiting professional on the Opera Project
- Regular design tutorials with additional workshops and classes to extend understanding.
- Theory is put into practice by designing the set or costumes for a BOVTS Spring production
- Collaborative working with a staff or visiting director and the BOVTS production teams for professional theatre venues

Term 3
- Design presentations and exploration of the production process through to full stage realisation.
- Close collaboration with actors, stage managers, technicians and scenic artists
- Work with the BOVTS MA Directors to complete production designs for the Brewery Theatre
- Skills classes and support in CAD and Photoshop and an introduction to portfolio design.

Term 4
- Series of small-scale productions for the Brewery Theatre
- Work begins on summer productions, exploring the role of set or costume designer in-depth
- More independent working with mentoring and support through the process
- Development of CV and professional portfolio
- Preparations for the end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art, Bristol and London
- Exhibitions and Industry interviews with professional practitioners from a range of theatre disciplines, providing networking opportunities and pathways to work

PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICATIONS ARE FOR APRIL 2016 ENTRY AND WILL CLOSE ON 27TH FEBRUARY 2015 AT 4PM.

Offline Applications
Please contact:The Admissions Office, 1-2 Downside Road, Bristol BS8 2XF.

Tel: 0117 973 3535.
Email: .

Read less
Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. Read more
Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. It is also used by the pharmaceutical industry to aid in explanation of their products and by television companies in the production of documentaries.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course employs highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced medical art supervisors.

Why study Medical Art at Dundee?

Medical Art is the depiction of anatomy, medical science, pathology and surgery. This may include medical images, models or animations for use in education, advertising, marketing and publishing, conceptual work in relation to research, education and publishing and two or three-dimensional visualisation for the training of specific medical professionals.

Medical and forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge.

What's so good about studying Medical Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

Internships

Short term internships in forensic and medical institutes throughout the world will be offered to selected students following graduation. Internship institutes offer these internships based on the reputation of the course and its tutors and include the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), USA; the Turkish Police Forensic Laboratory, Ankara and Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

Students on both Forensic Art and Medical Art MSc's share joint modules with increasing specialisation. Students may carry out their semester three Dissertation module either at the University or from a working environment or placement.

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

Medical Art students study:

Semester 1 (60 credits)
Anatomy - Head and Neck
Anatomy - Post Cranial
Life Art
Digital Media Practice
Research Methods

Semester 2 (60 credits)
Medical Art 1 - Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2 - Communication and Education
Medical-Legal Ethics

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a research project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Art.

How you will be assessed

Anatomy modules will be assessed by spot-tests and practical examinations and coursework. Medico-legal ethics will be assessed by both a written exam and coursework. All other modules will be assessed by coursework.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in medical art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In medical art potential careers exist in the NHS as well as industry. Medical art and visualisation is a rapidly changing and broad discipline. Possible careers include:

NHS medical illustration departments producing patient information and illustration services for staff
E-learning
3D model making (including clinical/surgical skills trainers) companies
Digital art and animation studios
Publishing houses
Illustration studios
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance illustration and fine art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

Read less
This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council reflecting its high quality. Successfully completing this course will mean that you are eligible to apply for professional registration as an art therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council. Read more

Why choose this course:

• This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council reflecting its high quality.

• Successfully completing this course will mean that you are eligible to apply for professional registration as an art therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council. You will also be able to register as a full member of the British Association of Art Therapists, the UK's professional organisation for art therapists.

• This course reinforces the centrality of the image and the role of the imagination in the practice of art therapy.

• You will develop the professional skills you'll need to work in clinical environments.

• A major part of the course is the Independent Scholarship, which will help you to integrate your learning from all areas of the course and develop your clinical reasoning and professional identity.

About the course:

This course will give you experience of clinical art therapy practice and supervision, as well as closed group work and current theory. You'll also have the opportunity to improve your technical art skills through studio work and explore your potential for self expression and communication through image making.

You'll have a personal tutor, who will monitor your overall progress. As well as the taught components of the course, you'll take part in clinical placements and personal therapy as this is a requirement for professional registration. This is a private arrangement and the cost is not included in the fees, although individual or group therapy is acceptable.

You'll take part in a closed art therapy group led by a state registered art therapist and deepen your understanding and relationship with your art form through your work. You'll study the nature of human development and health and disability in art therapy as part of your development to relate theory and research to practice. While you're doing your clinical placements you'll be supervised by an appropriate therapist and also attend a reflective practice group, which will be led by a state registered art therapist.

You'll take part in personal therapy, for a minimum of one hour each week throughout the course, to meet the professional registration requirements. This can be either individual or group therapy.

Your assessments will be through written assignments, verbal presentations, production of artwork and reports based on your performance in the clinical settings.

Read less
This course engages with performance as an interdisciplinary and connected practice embracing contemporary theatre, live art, and installation, and digital performance, site-specific and interventional artwork. Read more
This course engages with performance as an interdisciplinary and connected practice embracing contemporary theatre, live art, and installation, and digital performance, site-specific and interventional artwork. You will have the opportunity to create performance work for a range of environments including ‘black box’ studio theatres and gallery settings. Practice based work is supported by critical and contextual studies in the form of lectures, seminars and screenings. There will also be opportunities to develop your research skills within the wider field of performance studies. The course is aimed at emerging artists and new graduates from a variety of disciplines. It will enable you to further develop your skills as theatre makers and performance practitioners to a professional level.

Read less
As a professional masters’ programme, our MFA offers you an unparalleled opportunity to become an established theatre maker right at the heart of one of the world’s most popular cities. Read more
As a professional masters’ programme, our MFA offers you an unparalleled opportunity to become an established theatre maker right at the heart of one of the world’s most popular cities. You will work with our specialist academics - many of who are already established performing artists – in high-quality theatres both in San Francisco and the UK, with some opportunities to work in other parts of Europe. Our aim is to develop you and your talents through intensive mentoring and a wide-range of showcasing opportunities. Our programme explores innovative devising techniques which places you at the centre of the contemporary art in San Francisco’s Bay Area, and gives you a platform to perform to large audiences throughout the 22-month course.

Format and assessment

- Study -

- There will be four intensive residencies taught by Chichester faculty, with direct support from SF staff and professional mentors). Three of these are delivered in San Francisco, while one is taught on exchange in Chichester.
- The programme also includes weekly distance-learning (video conferencing) classes, taught by Chichester Faculty alongside UK MA students.
- There will also be weekly workshop classes and critical sharing, led by San Francisco-based faculty.
In addition to taught classes, students learn through residencies at our professional partner organisations and through peer-driven sharing-sessions and making sessions.

- Performance -

- You will have extensive opportunities to showcase their work in San Francisco and in the UK. Working closely with our professional partners: Z Space and CounterPULSE in San Francisco, you will be able to showcase your work within the vibrant Bay Area performance community.
- A five-week exchange trip to the UK will also allow you to perform in Chichester and, potentially, over parts of the UK and Europe.
- You will be mentored by leading Bay Area artists. A final professional/community project will allow you to launch your practice in a defined and energized manner.

This MFA will be run jointly by performance artists and lecturers from both the University of Chichester’s Department of Theatre and the California Institute of Integral Studies’ Department of Writing, Consciousness and Creative Inquiry. As a Department we have been working in San Francisco for several years and feel, with your help, we can make a crucial contribution to one of the United States’ biggest theatre-making communities. The MFA will provide you with an unparalleled opportunity to make high-quality theatre work and establish or refine their creative and professional identity.

Work placements

We invite you to join us for performances, workshops, and symposia across San Francisco and, furthermore, a chance to participate in a five-week exchange programme at leading theatres and festivals in the UK – including the Edinburgh Fringe. Here you will work with our London-based creative partners Forest Fringe to create bold new work for experimental performances in San Francisco.

Where this can take you

Our goal is to create - with your help - an international community of performance artists committed to breaking down old hierarchies and create flexible artwork, applicable to anyone and everyone. We will also encourage you to build the appetite for experimental shows in San Francisco and seize upon other opportunities to perform in the UK and other leading locations.

Facilities

Our programme is run in the famed San Francisco Bay Area, because Theatre at Chichester has made considerable commitment to working across cultures and in contexts that allow cultural exchanges. However, there will be plenty of opportunities to learn and work at Chichester and, during the last two years, we have developed our campuses. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

The refurbishments include a purpose-built Assembly Theatre, used by Theatre students for rehearsals and performance. We also have a number of soundproofed practice rooms for rehearsals and lessons, as well as lecture and seminar rooms. Our Chapel is also a fantastic venue for performances and rehearsals, and is the centre piece of the campus. There are also several dance studios, a fully-equipped 250-seat theatre, and a 110-seat studio theatre.

Our new award-winning Learning Resource Centre is at the heart of the campus, and we offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research. A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. Also situated in our LRC is Costa Coffee and nearly 100 open-access work stations. An equipment loans centre offers laptops, tablets and other electronic devices for short and long term loans.

How to apply:

https://dotmailer-surveys.com/f31ueg1e-c011re4a

Funding for postgraduate students:

For information on funding and scholarships, please visit: http://www.chi.ac.uk/study-us/fees-finance/funding-and-money-advice-0/funding-postgraduate-students

Read less
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

MA Textiles within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Masters Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Masters Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suits and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty.These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunity whilst also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

CIRIC The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services.

 The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at Swansea Metropolitan University. CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

Assessment

Our students have access to a diverse range of equipment and resources, which in most cases are sufficient to complete their programme of study. We provide the basic materials necessary for students to develop their practical work within our extensive workshop and studio facilities. However, it is likely that art and design students will incur some additional costs to extend their investigation of their personal practice. For example, purchasing their own specialised materials and equipment, joining in optional study trips, and printing.

Read less
MFA Fine Art at Wimbledon College of Arts supports students in claiming their art practice through sustained practical experimentation and contextual research. Read more

Introduction

MFA Fine Art at Wimbledon College of Arts supports students in claiming their art practice through sustained practical experimentation and contextual research.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- To be taught over 2-3 days per week, depending on the stage in the course, with access to the MFA Fine Art studios and College workshops on these days

- To conduct research and gain practical experience in the remainder of their week

- Access to the University of the Arts London’s libraries 6 days

- Time to explore and claim their art practice through acquiring a high level of awareness about the contemporary art world and understanding how their work operates within this territory

- Their skills to be honed through our Professional Toolkit, with a course curriculum based on the recent Arts Council England’s recommendations for skills-sets required for both artists and arts organisations to flourish

- To create a web folio instead of a formal academic written paper, which contextualises and showcases their artwork

- Learn how to set up websites and use their online presence to profile their work

Structure

The course is delivered over 2 years for 30 weeks each year and includes:

- Studio teaching which actively explores links between practice based experimentation and outcome

- A cross-disciplinary lecture and seminar programme supporting the contextualisation of student practice and an understanding of different discourses of the contemporary art world

- Developing both on and off site creative collaborations to test and develop negotiation skills, personal interaction abilities and develop student self-awareness

- A professional practice programme of discussion groups, seminars, lectures run by artists and curators

Read less
This exciting new MA in Illustration offers you the opportunity to question, develop and reflect upon you own practice by exploring both traditional and innovative techniques. Read more

Why take this course?

This exciting new MA in Illustration offers you the opportunity to question, develop and reflect upon you own practice by exploring both traditional and innovative techniques. Through a negotiated project you will be encouraged to define your role as a creative practitioner in a broad social, political and historical context. This MA would suit graduates from arts based courses but also professionals returning to education to complete ‘unfinished creative business’.

The staff team has a wealth of experience with internationally renowned practitioners in the field of artist’s books and zines, practice-based PhDs and printmaking. The course benefits from an extensive dedicated collection of artists’ books and zines located within the illustration studios. You will consider the question “what is illustration?” and seek to redefine and cross boundaries. A strong social awareness ethos underpins the course enabling you to develop a unique voice within the creative industries.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Reflect on and challenge your illustration practice through a mix of lectures, seminars, group critiques, themed events, short projects, workshops and individual tutorials.
Engage with high profile visiting lecturers alongside the University’s dedicated careers department to build your Professional Practice skills.
Develop your existing skills through specialist workshops which could include print workshops, Adobe workshops that could lead to Adobe Certified Associate status, laser cutting and 3D printing, photography, collage and drawing.
Explore themes such as, narrative and sequential illustration, humour and satire, ethical and social positioning of the artist, and exploring literary sources for inspiration, limited edition publications, small presses and artists’ books.
Discuss the social responsibility of the illustrator as a cultural producer.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will provide you with the practical skills necessary to compete in a commercial arena and rhetorical skills to enable you to promote your work.

Our graduates could pursue careers such as:

Art director
Animator, storyboard artist and digital illustrator
Graphic/editorial designer
Toy and character designer
Comic book or graphic novelist
Printmaker and small press publisher
Zinester

Module Details

This course will help you learn independently through practice-based study, culminating in a self-defined project, with a reflective report. You will also position your work in relation to what is happening at the forefront of the subject area, with particular focus on social, political and social issues.

Here are the units you will study:

Proposal: This unit is about designing an independent practice-based project that will form the basis of your body of work. You will research a theme related to your practice and develop an independent programme of study outlining research and development.

Illustration Major Project: You will produce a resolved body of work responding to and reflecting on your initial MA proposal. This will consist of critical diary/blog, media experiments, sketchbooks and final artwork(s). It could take a variety of forms, e.g. artists book, print sequences, children’s books, comics and zines, animation etc.

A Question of Research: This unit provides an introduction to debates and research methods relevant for creative practitioners and your application to a pertinent research question. It also encourages self reflection on the research process.

Contextual Research in Illustration – You will use a variety of forms/techniques to communicate your research into your practice and the reverse. It will consist of three elements that build upon each other: a verbal presentation - sharing research and development; Illustration major project reflective document - evidencing methodology through to resolution; and a final project statement with accompanying digital portfolio of images.

Programme Assessment

You will receive guidance and supervision throughout the programme that encourages independent learning. There will be regular contact teaching time including group tutorials, 1-1 tutorials and workshops but we also aim for you to engage in the wider studio culture that develops within the subject area along side the undergraduate students in illustration.

During the final stage of the course in the summer term the learning becomes more independent and self-managed, making your timetable more flexible.

You will be assessed after the submission of your work for each unit. We also present structured feedback to ensure your project development on the right track.

Student Destinations

We anticipate that once you have completed this degree the scope of your opportunities within the creative industries will have widened giving you the rhetorical skills to enable you to effectively promote your work. You will have consolidated or repositioned your practice as a creative individual giving you a competitive edge in the commercial arena as an illustrator/artist. Alternatively, for those who wish to continue studying, there is always the option of progressing to doctoral level in your specialised area of illustration.

Our graduates could pursue careers such as:

Children’s book author/illustrator
Animator, storyboard artist and digital illustrator
Graphic/editorial designer
Comic book or graphic novelist
Educational, heritage or medical illustratort
Printmaker and small press publisher
Zinester

Read less
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Read less
The MFA program is dedicated to helping students understand both the making and theorizing of art against the background of the diverse intellectual environment of a major university, and within the context of local and international art communities. Read more
The MFA program is dedicated to helping students understand both the making and theorizing of art against the background of the diverse intellectual environment of a major university, and within the context of local and international art communities. The MFA degree is also the standard qualifying degree for teaching visual arts at the post secondary level. Most students are given the opportunity to teach foundation courses as Teaching Assistants, thus providing them valuable experience in visual arts instruction.

Students in the program may work in any area of contemporary art production including painting, drawing, printmaking, three-dimensional and installation work, photography, digital art, intermedia, video, performance, sound, or in any interdisciplinary form. The program does not include training in applied art, commercial art and design, graphic design, film or television.

Each MFA student receives his/her own private studio (approximately 250 square feet) and access to the department's extensive facilities including a state-of-the art Photo/Digital lab, Printmaking unit, and Workshop. MFAs participate in an intensive weekly studio seminar that is also a forum for critical discussions about leading issues in contemporary art, visual culture, and cultural theory. Students take additional academic coursework to enrich their particular focus, and present their Major Paper research and artwork to peers, faculty, and the public at their final oral presentation (occurring in the spring of their final year) and at a final critique (occurring during their graduation exhibition). Open Studios, interdepartmental critiques, and organised exhibitions showcase the students' art production and broaden their exposure to the local art scene and beyond.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Fine Arts
- Specialization: Visual Arts
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Research focus

Students in the program may work in any area of contemporary art production including painting, drawing, printmaking, three-dimensional and installation work, photography, digital art, intermedia, video, performance, sound, or in any interdisciplinary form. The program does not include training in applied art, commercial art and design, graphic design, film or television.

Read less
This is a truly international course, attracting students from all over the world with a diverse range of cultures and identities. Read more
This is a truly international course, attracting students from all over the world with a diverse range of cultures and identities. It will provide you with a strong theoretical and technical underpinning for the principal areas of study thanks to lecture series on filmmaking techniques, green screen, MOCAP, computer graphic principles, the fusion of art and technology, personal research, and applied digital effects theory and practice.

We accept students from a broad range of art-based subject areas including fine art, photography, architecture, filmmaking, fashion design, and graphic design. We will also consider applications from non-art based subjects such as computer sciences or engineering, as long as good art skills can be demonstrated. Knowledge of digital effects and computer graphics are not a pre-requisite for entry, as everything is rapidly taught from basics. A strong set of traditional art and photography skills are however highly beneficial, and demonstration of all art-based skills should be done at application stage in the form of a digital portfolio.

MA Digital Effects and the National Centre for Computer Animation is the UK’s only officially recognised Houdini Certified School. This incredible software is now at the forefront of the VFX Industry, and knowledge of it is a must for anyone wanting to progress their careers in this field.

Digital Effects is one of three Master's degree pathways created by the National Centre for Computer Animation NCCA. All pathways share a great deal of core teaching, but also have specific pathway teaching. If your primary area of interest is mostly illustration or figurative character-based, then our 3D Computer Animation Programme may be a better choice for you. If your application portfolio is mostly technical or programming-based work without much in the way of original artwork, then our Computer Animation & Visual Effects Programme may be the better choice. Our assessment panels will automatically pass applications deemed better suited to another pathway onto them, so it is a good idea to familiarise yourself with all our Master's pathways to help ensure Digital Effects is the right programme for you.

Please watch the recorded BU Webinar 'MA Digital Effects'. Presented by Phil Spicer, Senior Lecturer In Computer Animation, this webinar will give you an excellent insight into this Master's programme.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X