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The Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL is a unique programme providing specialised training to those interested or already involved in offering health services to this very special sector of instrumental musicians, singers, dancers, actors and other performing artists. Read more
The Performing Arts Medicine MSc at UCL is a unique programme providing specialised training to those interested or already involved in offering health services to this very special sector of instrumental musicians, singers, dancers, actors and other performing artists.

Degree information

The MSc and diploma cover musculoskeletal injury, performance psychology, pain management, assessment and rehabilitation, disability, travelling and touring, dance and music performance science, management of the professional voice and research methodology. MSc students also engage in a research project and dissertation. The certificate is a limited curriculum version for non-clinicians or clinicians who wish to upgrade at a later time.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The MSc programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and the research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (eight core modules, 120 credits) A Postgraduate Certificate (four core modules, 60 credits). There are no optional modules for this degree.

Core modules
-Clinical Assessment and Rehabilitation of the Performing Artists
-Clinical Management of the Professional Voice*
-Pain and Disability Management within the Performing Arts World
-Environmental & Lifestyle Issues for the Performing Artist*
-Musculoskeletal and Neuromuscular Performance Related Injury
-Performance Psychology*
-Research Methodology
-Science of Dance and Music Performance*

*PG Cert core module

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake a research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 6,000–7,000 words, a presentation and a viva.

Teaching and learning
The delivery of the programme is through lectures, tutorials or workshops. Performing arts clinics and performance settings when possible are also included in the programme. Details about the lecturers and tutors can be found here.

Assessment is through coursework, written examinations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs).

Careers

Graduates gain in-depth knowledge of the diverse field of performing arts medicine. Their specialised skills can be incorporated in their own professional practice or they can participate in performing arts clinics in various settings e.g. conservatoires, orchestras, music or dance colleges.

Graduates' knowledge and experience is valued and they may be invited as educators and trainers in performing arts medicine and will become members of an ever-growing medical community with common interest in the wellbeing of the performer.

Graduates who have aspirations for further academic study and research activity, such as progressing to PhD, will receive appropriate guidance.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-GP (General Practitioner), Grove Surgery
-Physiotherapist, Freelance Physiotherapist
-Physiotherapist, NHS (National Health Service)
-Physiotherapist, Perfect Balance Clinic
-Lecturer, Birmingham Conservatoire

Employability
Assessing a performing artist requires specialised skills and the ability to associate health issues with the particular artistic activity. The course provides its students with broad knowledge of the art forms and their demands on the performer and how these impact on their wellbeing. With focused tutorials and real life scenarios the student builds the confidence to assess and diagnose or refer appropriately as well as to monitor rehabilitation and return to performance. The privileged position of the health professional in helping performers overcome often career threatening adversity is a most rewarding experience that enriches this type of work.

Why study this degree at UCL?

No other MSc programme currently exists that brings together all elements of Performing Arts Medicine. This unique programme has been designed for health professionals entering this diverse field.

The programme is taught and supervised by lecturers working in this and affiliated fields. Research is supported by the Institute of Sport Exercise and Health, the British Association of Performing Arts Medicine, orchestras, theatre companies, and music and dance colleges.

Graduate students present in international conferences and publish in journals becoming members of the global performing arts medicine community.

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Geared both to philosophy graduates, as a pathway into research in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry, and medical (and other) graduates, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques in the Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry. Read more
Geared both to philosophy graduates, as a pathway into research in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry, and medical (and other) graduates, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques in the Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry.

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry. They will also have the opportunity to study other areas of Philosophy, selected from a broad range of modules, covering all areas of the subject.

Key benefits

- Offers a pathway into the Philosophy of Medicine and Psychiatry particularly well suited to students whose undergraduate background is in medicine.

- Offers a wide selection of optional topics, both current and historical, covering the entire philosophical spectrum from aesthetics to logic and everything in between.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/philosophy-of-medicine-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding and skills in Philosophy of Medicine and Psychiatry. They will also have the opportunity to study other areas of Philosophy, selected from a broad range of modules, covering all areas of the subject. Those converting in from other subjects at undergraduate level will be strongly encouraged to take 'General Philosophy' as one of their options.

The programme has three elements:

(i) Two core modules, worth 20 credits each: Philosophy of Medicine and Perspectives on Death & Killing
(ii) Dissertation of around 10,000 words, on a topic in the philosophy of medicine, worth 60 credits.
(iii) Around four modules chosen from the MA courses in Philosophy, including General Philosophy, totalling 80 credits (with permission, one course may be taken outside the Department).

All students, including part-time students, should ensure that they are available to attend seminars at least two days a week.

- Course purpose -

The programme is geared equally to students who already have some training in Philosophy and to those who wish to convert into the field after pursuing another subject at undergraduate level (which may be, but need not be, Medicine). It will enable the former students to consolidate their existing knowledge and to augment it with a close focus on issues in the Philosophy of Medicine. The latter students will normally be expected (though not strictly required) to take a special ‘General Philosophy’ module, which will introduce them to key theories and arguments, concepts and terminology, and classic texts from right across the philosophical spectrum. For students of both kinds, the programme will provide a firm foundation for subsequent doctoral research.

- Course format and assessment -

Mostly taught through lectures and seminars; assessed through coursework and/or examinations plus a dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Further research in philosophy of medicine, or one or other branch of the medical profession; but also teaching, management, the financial or public sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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This course covers the history of science, technology and medicine, integrating the study of these areas and addressing big historical and policy questions. Read more
This course covers the history of science, technology and medicine, integrating the study of these areas and addressing big historical and policy questions. Students are introduced to general themes and approaches to this field in a team-taught, programme-specific module which explores the development of science, technology and medicine and its implications for history in general.

Key benefits

- Programme incorporates a distinctive approach to history, integrating the study of science, technology and medicine and being particularly concerned with addressing big historical and policy questions.

- Led by staff from the Department of History, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014), including those former members of Imperial College Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHoSTM), and at the fore of innovation and excellence in the history of science, technology and medicine.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/science-technology-and-medicine-in-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides teaching and research training at the postgraduate level in the history of science, technology and medicine (HSTM). It includes training in the research skills necessary for those who wish to go on to study for a PhD in the field, but is also designed for students who wish simply to study at the postgraduate level. Students are introduced to general themes and approaches to HSTM in a team-taught, programme-specific compulsory module. This explores the development of STM, its implications for history in general, and the historiographical and methodological issues that arise in studying it. Optional modules offer in-depth training in particular aspects of HSTM in different periods and places, with the opportunity to use primary sources where appropriate.

- Course purpose -

Provides a distinctive programme suitable both for those intending to proceed to a PhD and also for those who wish to study the history of science, technology and medicine at an advanced level. Encourages a distinctive approach to history, integrating the study of science, technology and medicine and being particularly concerned with addressing big historical and policy questions.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 4-8 hours of taught classes per week.

Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week.

The taught compulsory and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or take-home examination. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project. Read more
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to pursue a specialisation in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.
-Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
-Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses and two optional courses, you will then produce a dissertation on a topic related to the history of medicine.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history
-History of medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-History of medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000.

There are variations to the structure of the programme depending on your choice of an MSc or MLitt.

For the MSc you need to choose two optional courses from the social sciences training courses
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative methods
-Introduction to social theory for researchers.

Other optional courses are taught in History, Economic and Social History (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related Subject Areas in the School of Humanities (Archaeology, Celtic, Classics) and the College of Arts (such as English Language and French).

You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

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MTSU’s Master of Arts in Liberal Arts is an innovative program allowing students to earn a graduate degree through a course of study built around the subjects that they find most interesting and captivating. Read more
MTSU’s Master of Arts in Liberal Arts is an innovative program allowing students to earn a graduate degree through a course of study built around the subjects that they find most interesting and captivating. Anyone holding a bachelor’s degree can pursue long-held or new passions through a personally customized program developed around individual interests. Lifelong learners, professionals, students returning to school after a break, and recent graduates can find flexibility to fit their educational needs through this unique master’s program. Students attend engaging courses and have opportunities to participate in projects in the region or even enroll in education-abroad courses around the world. Top-quality professors bring varying research and teaching interests to the classroom through inspiring instruction. The M.A. in Liberal Arts allows students to refine skills, expand horizons, learn for the joy of it, and obtain the graduate degree they have always wanted.

Degrees

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Liberal Arts is a broadly interdisciplinary program allowing students to construct a personal plan of study from within the liberal arts departments and programs, which include Art, Communications Studies and Organizational Communication, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Global Studies and Cultural Geography, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science and International Relations, Sociology and Anthropology, and Theatre and Dance.

Students, with the guidance of the program director, will build an individualized course of study that will enhance career opportunities, provide preparation for further graduate work, or create opportunities for lifelong learning.

Master’s candidates will complete either a thesis or a capstone project (such as a creative project, an internship portfolio, or a research presentation). Students also must complete 15 hours in core classes and 12 hours of guided electives from graduate-level courses in College of Liberal Arts disciplines.

Career

Most professions need people with problem-solving and communication skills who understand global systems, can research a broad variety of topics, and can learn on the job. MALA graduates come from and/or choose career fields such as:

Advertising
Arts
Education
Human resources
Medicine
Military
Ministry
Nonprofits
Politics
Public relations
Urban planning/city management
Writing/editing

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This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project. Read more
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to pursue a specialisation in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.
-Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
-Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses and two optional courses, you will then produce a dissertation on a topic related to the history of medicine.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history
-History of medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-History of medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000.

There are variations to the structure of the programme depending on your choice of an MSc or MLitt.

For the MSc you need to choose two optional courses from the social sciences training courses
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative methods
-Introduction to social theory for researchers.

Other optional courses are taught in History, Economic and Social History (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related Subject Areas in the School of Humanities (Archaeology, Celtic, Classics) and the College of Arts (such as English Language and French).

You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

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This Master's degree in history explores how the formidable forces of science and medicine have fundamentally shaped who we are. Read more
This Master's degree in history explores how the formidable forces of science and medicine have fundamentally shaped who we are. The history of science and medicine covers the history of ideas, technologies and interventions, but it also takes into consideration the history of everyday experiences of health, illness and wellbeing. 'Ordinary' people turn out to be the extraordinary lens through which we can reflect on our past. Pain and illness change the way we look at the world: certain forms of suffering are increasing, with chronic pain, for example, now affecting around 40% of people in Britain and America. The provision of healthcare is also undergoing major shifts and history can teach us valuable lessons about how medicine and caregiving has been understood in the past.

This programme explores the historical roots and the social and conceptual foundations of modern science and medicine, equipping you with a deep understanding of how scientific and medical ideas and institutions relate to their broader historical context. It offers you the chance to study this fascinating, expanding area of social and cultural history at a department in which teaching is research-led, delivered by core staff with world-renowned research expertise. This is a growing field in which exciting new questions are being asked and new methodological approaches are being created and applied. Birkbeck is at the forefront of these advances and, unlike similar MA programmes, we cover the period from the ancient world to the present, and from global perspectives.

The programme provides a framework within which you can develop your research techniques and prepare for doctoral, professional or other research, but the primary focus is on providing a rich and varied experience of studying history at postgraduate level, allowing you to satisfy and expand your passion for the subject. The programme will also appeal to healthcare professionals and caregivers who may benefit from knowing more about the history of medicine, health and care.

The compulsory core course will introduce you to the systematic study of historiography and the methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of historical source material. You can explore the enormous breadth of research interests in the department via the 3 option modules you choose, which span from the ancient to the contemporary. Finally, the dissertation gives you the chance to pursue your own interests and undertake your own research and critical thinking under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This Master's degree offers an innovative approach to an exciting area of historical and cultural study and is taught by renowned scholars, including Professor Joanna Bourke.
The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Birkbeck is home to several doctoral candidates and postdoctoral fellows, working in the areas of medical history and medical humanities, who are funded by the Wellcome Trust. Students on this programme are eligible to apply for Wellcome Trust studentships.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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The programme addresses what has become a significant need in the field by offering an innovative interdisciplinary approach to Creative Arts and Mental Health. Read more
The programme addresses what has become a significant need in the field by offering an innovative interdisciplinary approach to Creative Arts and Mental Health. The programme is taught by mental health professionals and specialists in live art, performance art, theatre and performance history. This MSc seeks to attract professionals in education, artists, and mental health practitioners who would like to learn in more breadth and depth how art and performance can be used to understand experiences of mental health and illness, and how arts offers critique and challenge to conventional practices that may be evidence based but still risk disempowerment. Art enables the stories of individuals and groups to be better embraced. Students will be offered core modules in mental health and in performance and then select optional practice-based modules in arts-based research and arts-programme evaluation and in live art and performance.

The course is delivered by experts in the centre for psychiatry and the drama department at QMUL, both leading research departments that rank amongst the top in the country.

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Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone. Read more
Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone.

In this MA programme, you are introduced to many questions asked about medicine from within the humanities. For example, you have the opportunity to examine the history of Western medicine and to consider how medical practice is presented in, and shaped by, literature and the arts. You have the chance to reflect on what is involved in classifying something as a disease or an abnormal mental state, and to explore various ethical and legal problems that arise within medicine.

As a interdisciplinary programme, the MA is taught by scholars from many different disciplines across the University, including the Departments of Philosophy, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature and Religious Studies and the Schools of Arts, English, History and Law.

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/3/medical-humanities

You take four modules across the autumn and spring terms, including one core module and from a variety optional modules, before undertaking a supervised 12-15,000-word dissertation over the summer.

The programme is aimed primarily at people with a humanities background, but we also welcome healthcare practitioners or those with medical backgrounds who are interested in the growing field of the medical humanities.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, philosophy was ranked 12th for research impact in the UK. We were also ranked 16th for research intensity and in the top 20 for research power.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 97% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

Modules -

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

PL821 - Medical Humanities: An Introduction (30 credits)
CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI866 - History of Science and Communication (30 credits)
LW862 - Death and Dying (20 credits)
LW863 - Consent to Treatment (20 credits)
LW866 - Medical Practice and Malpractice (20 credits)
Show more... https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/3/medical-humanities#!structure

Assessment

Assessments vary across the modules. Typically the main assessment is a 5-6,000 word essay and a dissertation of 12-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- introduce you to a variety of ways in which medical science and practice can be examined within the humanities and social sciences, and to a range of questions and issues that it raises. In doing so, part of the richness of medical science will be revealed, as well as its problems. The relevant disciplines include history, literature, philosophy and law
- place the study of various materials (such as texts, images, data, legal judgments, etc) at the centre of student learning and analysis
- expose you to a variety of methods, writing styles, researching styles, concepts (etc) that are used across a range of academic disciplines in relation to specific topics and questions in medical science and practice
- expose you to some of the various possibilities and problems that medical science and practice has raised and continues to raise
- develop your capacities to think critically about past and present events and experiences in relation to medicine
- encourage you to relate the academic study of medical science and practice to questions of public debate and concern
vpromote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate from different Humanities and related disciplines
- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in philosophy is a valuable and flexible qualification, which allows you to develop skills in logical thinking, critical evaluation, persuasion, writing and independent thought.

Graduates have gone on to positions in journalism, administration in the civil service, education, advertising and a range of managerial positions. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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Science is an integral part of modern literary culture and forms wider cultural and societal concerns. The programme explores the links and works within Science. Read more
Science is an integral part of modern literary culture and forms wider cultural and societal concerns. The programme explores the links and works within Science.

COURSES
Semester 1
Compulsory
Critical Approaches to Literature, Science and Medicine

Optional
The Museum Idea
More Than Human
M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature
New World Narratives: Literature, Discovery and the Americas

Semester 2
Optional
M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature
Irish and Scottish Science Fiction
Creative Writing: Narrative, Medicine, Psychology

Semester 3
Dissertation

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This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are. Read more
This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are: What can the humanities contribute to healthcare? How do they differ from the sciences? And what can they tell us about illness?

Key benefits

- Unrivalled central London location, giving immediate access to important medico-historical and cultural resources, including libraries, galleries, archives and museums, e.g. The Wellcome Collection and Library, the Hunterian Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the British Library.

- World class expertise in a breadth of subject areas, including: History of Psychiatry, Literature & Medicine, Philosophy of Medicine and Mental Disorder, Medical Portraiture, Nursing and Film, Bioethics.

- Taught at the Wellcome-funded Centre for the Humanities & Health, which supports the research activities of internationally renowned scholars in the field; has a vibrant and active post-graduate and post-doctoral community; and hosts a lively programme of seminars, conferences and events.

- Close links between the School of Arts & Humanities and one of the largest Schools of Biomedicine in Europe.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-humanities-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The Medical Humanities constitute a growing field of scholarship productive of powerful, innovative analyses of health care issues today. The chief educational aims of this course are to explore the foundations of the field and teach analytical and critical skills that enable students to address questions such as:

Does studying the humanities make us more humane? How are the humanities different from the sciences? What new angles do they offer on old ethical dilemmas? What is health? What is illness? What kind of evidence about illness does literature provide? What is narrative and how embedded are narrative ways of thought in health care practice?

Students who take this course will come away from it with a strong sense of how a variety of humanities disciplines conceive of health and illness and of the contributions these can make to health care. The disciplines involved include Philosophy, Literature, Film, Psychiatry, Art History and Nursing.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Medical Humanities incorporates the previous King's MA Literature and Medicine programmes. The course allows students to choose a broader range of modules within their degree, interact with a wider range of students, and gain a firm footing in the medical humanities by following common core modules. Students will come from a wide variety of academic and health backgrounds: biosciences such as medicine, nursing, psychology; from health law and social work and humanities trainings in philosophy, film and/or literary studies. They will develop further skills in visual, bioethical, literary, historical and philosophical analyses of health care.

- Course format and assessment -

Seminar-based teaching; dissertation workshops; assessment by coursework.

Career Prospects:

The programme will appeal to medical and health professionals; students of health policy; those who wish to pursue further academic study in medicine and/or the humanities or those hoping to study on a Medical Humanities PhD programme and considering careers in journalism or bioethics.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. Read more
Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. The programme involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing you to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices.

The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages, particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department. The programme can also be studied in Canterbury and Paris, where you relocate to Kent’s Paris centre for the spring term.

The MA in Comparative Literature is an ideal programme for those wanting to engage in and pursue detailed literary and cultural analysis that crosses national boundaries.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/318/comparative-literature

Course structure

The programme comprises three main interweaving strands:

- themes and major figures in European literature

- interactions between European national literatures, as reflected in important genres such as autobiography and the fantastic

- comparative literature in theory and practice, with an emphasis on the history of the discipline and ways of reading literature comparatively.

These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts: national literatures, genres, media and theory.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP805 - European Modernism: Sexual and Textual Deviance (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
LS810 - History and Memory: Exploring the Independence Period through memoirs Research Methodology (30 credits)
FR804 - Real Fictions: The Documentation of Modernity (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for the academic study of comparative literature at MPhil/PhD level

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender, or physical disability from within the UK

- further the University’s International Strategy by attracting graduate students from abroad as well as from the UK

- enable you to begin to specialise in your areas of interest

- enable you to hone your ability to read literature and literary theory critically and comparatively

- provide you, consistent with point one above, with a transition from undergraduate study to independent research

- provide you with a training that will culminate, if followed through to PhD level, in the ability to submit articles to refereed journals in comparative literature.

Research areas

Areas of particular research strength in Comparative Literature at Kent include the European avant-garde, modernism and postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literary theory, literature and medicine, literature and the visual arts, literature and sexuality, and literature and philosophy. The list below indicates the range of current research interests of members of staff within Comparative Literature and the other disciplines with whom we work closely. Many of these staff are members of the Centre for Modern European Literature. They can supervise postgraduate students for the MA or PhD degrees in any of their respective areas of expertise. If you are considering applying to undertake a research degree, we encourage you to contact us to discuss your plans at an early stage of your application.

- The European avant-garde
- Modernism and postmodernism
- Postcolonial literature
- Literary theory
- Literature and medicine
- Literature and philosophy
- Literature and sexuality
- Literature and the visual arts

- Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing. Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

Comparative literature graduates develop key skills, including critical thinking, analysis and problem solving. They go on to successful careers in areas such as the media, academia and many different cultural institutions including libraries, museums and galleries.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Gain the formal research training experience you need to begin an exciting professional research degree at James Cook University. Read more
Gain the formal research training experience you need to begin an exciting professional research degree at James Cook University.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Research Methods, graduates will be able to:
*Identify, investigate, analyse and synthesise a research problem applying appropriate methodological concepts and theories in a small-scale research project
*Apply knowledge and understanding of research ethics in the preparation of a successful ethics application for a research project
*Design, plan, conduct and complete a substantial research-based thesis with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability
*Analyse and interpret results from a research project, and critically evaluate and synthesise results in the context of contemporary research literature and / or demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in a relevant discipline area and/or related areas of professional practice
*Demonstrate a high standard of ethical conduct in research, exercising autonomy, responsibility, accountability, and well-developed independent judgement
*Communicate specialised knowledge, ideas and arguments accurately, coherently and creatively to a variety of audiences through written manuscripts and oral presentations.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF RESEARCH METHODS (GCertResMeth)

Course articulation

Students seeking admission to a research higher degree should consult the University’s HDR Degree by Research Requirements.
Students seeking admission to a Masters by Research must have obtained at least a GPA 5.0 (Credit) for the Graduate Certificate of Research Methods.
To be eligible to apply for direct admission to a PhD, students must have obtained at least a GPA 6.0 (Distinction) for the Graduate Certificate of Research Methods, and have successfully completed an appropriate research methods subject at AQF 8 or higher.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Gain the formal research training experience you need to begin an exciting professional research degree at James Cook University. Read more
Gain the formal research training experience you need to begin an exciting professional research degree at James Cook University.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Research Methods, graduates will be able to:
*Identify, investigate, analyse and synthesise a research problem applying appropriate methodological concepts and theories in a small-scale research project
*Apply knowledge and understanding of research ethics in the preparation of a successful ethics application for a research project
*Design, plan, conduct and complete a substantial research-based thesis with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability
*Analyse and interpret results from a research project, and critically evaluate and synthesise results in the context of contemporary research literature and / or demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in a relevant discipline area and/or related areas of professional practice
*Demonstrate a high standard of ethical conduct in research, exercising autonomy, responsibility, accountability, and well-developed independent judgement
*Communicate specialised knowledge, ideas and arguments accurately, coherently and creatively to a variety of audiences through written manuscripts and oral presentations.

Award title

Graduate Diploma of Research Methods (GDipResMeth)

Course articulation

Students seeking admission to a research higher degree should consult the University’s HDR Degree by Research Requirements.
Students seeking admission to a Masters by Research must have obtained at least a GPA 5.0 (Credit) for the Graduate Diploma of Research Methods.
To be eligible to apply for direct admission to a PhD, students must have obtained at least a GPA 6.0 (Distinction) for the Graduate Diploma of Research Methods.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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