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Masters Degrees (Arts In Education)

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The Masters of Arts in Education (Dance Teaching) allows you to further your knowledge and expertise through research in your own practice. Read more

Programme Description

The Masters of Arts in Education (Dance Teaching) allows you to further your knowledge and expertise through research in your own practice. It is a modular programme delivered via distance learning, normally over two-three years. The programme offers high-quality dance teachers an opportunity to engage in:
•continuing professional development through completing a higher degree
•postgraduate research based on your own professional practice
•career progression which puts you at the forefront of dance teaching innovation.

Learning is flexible in that you study from home during hours which suit your employment and personal commitments.

Your student experience

The programme begins with a compulsory one-week induction seminar at RAD headquarters, London. Individual modules are delivered via distance learning through access to the RAD's virtual learning environment. Each module has a study guide which introduces you to key topics, concepts and readings and leads you through a series of study tasks in preparation for a final assessment. You are allocated a specialist tutor for each module who supports your studies through regular communication via email, telephone, Skype and online forums. Modules are studied across two semesters per academic year.

Programme Breakdown

Compulsory modules:
Research methods
This module introduces a range of education research models, paradigms and approaches for practice-based research and will equip you with an understanding of research design, data collection and ethics. It provides the foundation for research on all other modules on the programme, including your final research project.

Dance, education and culture
This module provides an opportunity to expand your knowledge and understanding of dance as a cultural practice, including the theatrical art form. The reading materials and tasks focus on developing critical thinking through study of key cultural theories and their application. The essay assignment allows you to draw on selected concepts and critical frameworks and to evaluate their potential application to your own professional practice.

Research project
This module comprises the design and delivery of an extended practice-based research assignment. The precise nature of the research will be determined by a number of factors, including the needs of your school/ work environment, the dance curriculum, and your specific knowledge, skills and research interests. You will have the option to attend a two-day seminar at the start of the module and will be assigned a supervisor to guide you through the research process. The module culminates in the submission of a 20,000 word dissertation.

Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma Awards

If you would like to study at Masters level, but are not yet ready or able to commit to the full Master of Arts in Education (Dance Teaching), you have the option to study the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma. With successful achievement of the required credits, you will be eligible to progress from the PG cert to the PG Dip or from the PG Dip to Masters.

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The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment. Read more
The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment.

Highly flexible, it caters for educators with a diverse range of experience, development needs, and study requirements. It is suitable for teachers, those in leadership or policy-making roles, and other practitioners working in education or related settings.

Creative Arts in Education

The creative arts provide opportunities for developing creative and aesthetic understanding, finding a personal and communal voice within different cultural contexts, and are linked to improvements in academic achievement.

This specialism will help you encourage creativity via the arts, understand the variety of roles the arts in education might take, and consider how arts teaching can benefit other areas of the curriculum and promote inclusion. Unique in integrating approaches to drama, music, dance and visual art, this MA includes visits to schools and venues such as galleries, as well as interactions with key cultural organisations. You may also specialise in a particular art form.

The syllabus may include:

Subject knowledge

– focus on music, visual arts, drama or dance including the latest innovations and best practice

Theory and practice

- latest ideas and concepts in arts education and your particular specialism; inter-relationship between art forms; arts and the wider curriculum; creativity and dialogue

Teaching and learning

– teaching approaches including practical models and demonstration; working with artists and other partners; promoting inclusion; curriculum design; use of new technologies

Creativity

– theoretical and practical approaches; relationship between creativity and dialogue; techniques for encouraging creativity in your students; assessing creativity

Modules

The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand, please see the website for a current list of modules available http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/education/educationma/modules/

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Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice. Read more
Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Through online delivery of content, our Higher Education MA offers you the flexibility to create a programme that suits your professional development needs in the field of university teaching, and is offered on a part-time basis over five years.

The programme allows you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules. You will do this by engaging with the explicit pedagogic framework that underpins the programme, emphasising the connections between concepts, theory and practice, teaching and research, disciplinary methods, and teachers and students.

On the programme you will analyse issues relating to your everyday teaching practice, share practice and explore solutions with your fellow participants and tutors.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied over three academic years and is part-time via distance learning. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

On successful completion of the PGDip in Higher Education and a review of a portfolio of work via an accreditation panel, participants may apply to become a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (subject to accreditation). The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Teaching in Your Own Discipline
-Researching in Higher Education
-Research Dissertation
-Signature Concepts in Higher Education
-Evaluating Educational Research
-Assessment and Feedback
-From Student Voice to Co-Enquiry
-Peer Observation of Teaching
-Moving into Academic Leadership
-Designing Technology Enhanced Learning
-Exploring Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Clinical Teaching
-Technical and Professional Skills Teaching in Veterinary Education

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Contribute to the development of participants' theoretically informed understandings, and teach in ways that support epistemological access for a diverse student body
-Respect participants' disciplinary backgrounds, and encourage participants to interrogate the nature of their own disciplines and relate this to ideas presented in the programme
-Promote reflective practice, requiring critical engagement based on evidence and theory with the roles and practices of higher education teaching, rather than having as its goal the teaching of a set of generic skills and techniques
-Disrupt participants' existing beliefs about teaching and learning

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes. The overarching programme learning outcomes are to:
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Knowledge and understanding
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Professional practical skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Key / transferable skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature
-Further details of the programme’s pedagogic framework is available by contacting the programme team. The programme is aligned to the requirements of the UK Professional Standards Framework at D3 which relates to Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

Initial enquires should be directed to Dr Dawn Morley -

STUDENT EXPERIENCE

As part of induction to the programme, you will have a discussion with a personal tutor to help you make the appropriate choices for your professional learning journey based on your previous teaching and learning experience in the higher education context and your developmental aspirations.

A personal tutor will work with you to develop a personalised plan to ensure you get the most from the programme by developing your professional knowledge and skills.

REGISTRATION

As we recognised that you will be working within your own higher education institutions while you study, the programme is offered as part-time registration. It is anticipated that the Diploma would be completed within two years of registration and the Dissertation would normally be completed within an additional year.

You will be registered initially for the MA in Higher Education (180 credits). However, you can choose to step-off at Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or the Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) Level.

You can decide to study for a general MA in Higher Education or a MA in Higher Education with a specialist pathway. Specialist pathways are only available for the MA in Higher Education (not at the award of Diploma).

If you decide, a pathway is right for you, you will need to take 60 credits from the specialist modules and conduct research within the Research Dissertation module on an area relating to the pathway. The following are the three specialist pathways available:
-Academic Leadership
-Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Education

If you decide to take the Academic Leadership pathway, you will be awarded for example, 'MA in Higher Education (Academic Leadership)'.

Postgraduate Certificate
The postgraduate certificate is built around the compulsory module of 'Teaching in Your Own Discipline'. You will choose three optional modules that help builds your own professional pathway and suits your needs.

Postgraduate Diploma
For the Postgraduate Diploma, based on your personal/professional development plan, you will choose three further modules that fulfil your personal and professional aims and which strengthens your activities, knowledge and professional values in your career.

You will also do the compulsory module of 'Researching in Higher Education', which aims to help you to start thinking about how to investigate and explore issues that intrigues and challenges you in the Higher Education landscape.

MA
For the MA in Higher Education, you will have to conduct a piece of independent research as part of the compulsory Research Dissertation module.

This allows you to investigate an issue that you have personally selected that will contribute to your growing understanding of your professional practice.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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In the Master's program Arts, Culture and Media/ Mapping Arts in Society students examine the role of the arts in society. In particular, students gain insight into arts worlds and their organization, aesthetic dimensions, social impact and the efficacy of arts education for contemporary culture. Read more
In the Master's program Arts, Culture and Media/ Mapping Arts in Society students examine the role of the arts in society. In particular, students gain insight into arts worlds and their organization, aesthetic dimensions, social impact and the efficacy of arts education for contemporary culture. Further, students learn to analyse and interpret artistic expressions with an enhanced view of how arts phenomena convey, negotiate or hasten cultural change. Additionally, the program explores how the arts relate to economic, social and technical developments in an increasingly mediated world. Digitalization and globalization remain import concepts for this study.

As a student of this program you choose an arts framework:
- Arts Policy and Marketing
- Arts Analysis and Critique
- Arts Education

In addition, you choose an art form to situate your professional framework:
- Film
- Literature
- Music
- Theater

You complete the program with an internship and your thesis.
The one-year Master's program in Arts, Culture and Media is a specialization within the Master's degree in Arts and Culture.

Why in Groningen?

- Fully aims to develop analytical skills in evaluating the role performed by the arts in society
- Unique combination of practical skills and academic reflection
- Specialization in different art forms: Film and TV, Music, Theater, Literature
- Guest lectures by outstanding artists, art organizers, cultural critics and policy makers

Job perspectives

The Master's programme in Arts, Culture and Media ± Mapping the Arts in Society is highly relevant for those students who wish to pursue a career:
- as a cultural critic with a specific interest in the institutional and societal context of art production, art distribution and art presentation;
- as a policymaker;
- in culture consultancy;
- in a managerial position in the professional field of the arts.

Job examples

- Analysis and Criticism
Because writing and thinking about the role of the arts in society is especially important for this framework, a position such as arts journalist editor, researcher or editor is ideally suited for this tack. These positions are found within newspapers, magazines and media companies.
- Arts Education
If you choose for Arts Education, you will work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Here, you will be ideally suited for a position in the national, provincial or local government or for an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.
- Arts, Policy and Marketing
With arts, policy and Marketing you can work, for example, as a professional organizer, manager, marketing or publicity agent. These positions appear in city theaters, festivals, orchestras or publishers and museums. In this field, you could also provide support and consultation for policy and other arts-related advice functions relating to national, provincial or local governments.
- Other job possibilities
There are other employment possibilities such as a position by a media company or for the advertisement and commercial field. Prior students have also begun their own successful arts organization, advice bureau or research institution in the field of arts, culture and event organizations.

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/

The programme is particularly relevant for students who have an MA degree and are looking to postion and develop their research and practice work.

It will be tailor-made to your individual research area and practice, giving you the opportunity to develop research skills and pursue your own area of interest.

You'll work closely with a personal supervisor to develop your work in the areas of filmmaking, photography and digital arts.

You’ll also receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to your chosen subject.

The programme meets the needs of two groups:

students who have completed an MA in Filmmaking, Photography, or Electronic Arts and cognate programmes (for example, our MA in Photography: The Image & Electronic Arts)
film, photography and electronic arts professionals who wish to extend their research-based practice

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sean Cubitt.

Structure

A personalised programme
The programme is personalised for each student, and is based on your individual research into your chosen practice. It gives you the opportunity to develop appropriate research skills and to pursue a research practice project of your own design, developed and reworked in discussion with a personal supervisor.

The curriculum is personalised for individual students, but all students will share a common curriculum and receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to their chosen subject.

The course will add value to recent MA practice graduates and to film, photography and electronic arts professionals by giving a deeper and more specialised engagement in a major research project supervised by staff experienced in both creative and professional research. Research training will give you the skills to design and complete your own research and to work to research briefs.

All students undertake the Practice-Based Research Methods Seminar in the first term, producing a detailed 5000 word project outline at the end. They will also take in the second term one of a selected range of optional modules to help develop their critical and theoretical awareness. In the first term, they begin work with their personal supervisor on the design and execution of their project. Supervision will determine the specific means used: some students will embark directly on a single piece of work; others may undertake a series of workshop-based activities.

Aims

The programme's subject-specific learning outcomes require you to think critically about a range of issues concerning the media, understood in the widest sense, and to be able to justify their views intellectually and practically. The central outcome will be to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project.

As appropriate to each individual project, you will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise your chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media. You will learn to produce high quality research under time constraints, by working independently.

All students will develop a range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: ‘the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development’. You will be guided to work independently and to think through the intellectual issues.

Progress is carefully monitored, to make sure that you are making progress towards the achievement of the outcomes. Different kinds of practical and intellectual skills are required for each part of the programme. In consultation with supervisors, you will be guided to the most appropriate practical and intellectual approaches, and to the most appropriate technical and critical sources.

Structure

You take the following modules:

Practice-Based Research Methods (30 credits)
This module provides research methods training for the MRes in Film Photography and Electronic Arts, and may be taken by practice-based students in the MPhil programme in Media and Communications. In all years it will address the legal and ethical constraints operating on research by practice. In any given year, the syllabus will address such topics as technique (colour, composition, editing, post-production, sound-image relations, text-image relations), anti-racist, feminist and decolonial critique; hardware and software studies; environmental impacts of media production, dissemination and exhibition; media critical approaches to art, political economy, and truth. The interests of students and supervisors will guide the selection of specific content of the course in its delivery, whose aim is to inculcate advanced thinking on the making, delivery and audiences for research-based practice.

Research Project (120 credits)
The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other. The length of the textual element should normally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. The practical component should be a ‘substantial’ body of work. Given the potential range of media that can be used, and their differing potential relationships with the research process and the textual component, it is impossible to be precise. In the case of film/video it would normally entail the submission of a work (or works) of about 25 minutes in length (or more), but detailed requirements will be worked out on a case-by-case basis.

Students will undertake to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project in collaboration with their supervisor. The project will be informed by research, as appropriate, into the materials, techniques and critical contexts of production, distribution and exhibition in audiovisual, electronic image and allied arts. As appropriate to each individual project, students will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise their chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media, especially in relation to anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, environmental and other key ethical and political dimensions of their aesthetic practice. They will learn to produce high quality research under pressure, by working independently. The exact conceptual and methodological direction of the research must initially come from the student, though this will be developed and reworked in discussion with the personal supervisor. Areas of research can be drawn from a wide remit, including the full range of media and cultural forms of contemporary societies and may be theoretical or empirical; technically- or more academically-based. Projects which are conceptually coherent, and practicable in their aims and methods can be considered, subject only to the in-house expertise of staff. The module encourages the development of knowledge and skills specific to the production, distribution and exhibition of contemporary media.

Assessment

There are two assessment points:

A: You are required to write one 5,000 word essay linked to the Practice-Based Research Methods seminar. The exact theme and title will be decided in discussion between you and your supervisor and relate to your specialist field of research, but as a guide it will demonstrate your readiness to undertake the project through critical evaluation of legal, ethical, critical and reflexive parameters and functions of practice-based research.

In addition, you will be assessed in the option module you undertake during the Spring Term.

B: The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other.

Department

We are ranked:
22nd in the world for communication and media studies**
1st in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for media professionals, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

The department includes some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – the pioneers of media, communications and cultural studies. They actively teach on our programmes, and will introduce you to current research and debate in these areas. And many of our practice tutors are industry professionals active in TV, film, journalism, radio and animation.

We also run EastLondonLines.co.uk – our 24/7 student news website – which gives students the opportunity to gain experience working in a real-time news environment.

And we run regular public events featuring world-renowned writers and practitioners that have recently included Danny Boyle, Gurinda Chadha, Noel Clark and Tessa Ross. So you’ll get to experience the latest developments and debates in the industry.

Skills & Careers

The course is designed to support students who wish to strengthen their opportunities in professional media, including the media industries and creative practice, private sector firms, public sector institutions and civil society organisations with communications departments.

We envisage that a small proportion of graduates will seek careers in teaching, including secondary and higher education, in which case their projects and supervision will be tailored to that end.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The overall aim of the programme is to provide participants with the opportunity to enhance. previously acquired professional education and to develop critical enquiry, knowledge. Read more
The overall aim of the programme is to provide participants with the opportunity to enhance
previously acquired professional education and to develop critical enquiry, knowledge
and skills, attributes and competencies in preparation for developing roles in education
and well-being of older persons. The programme will provide opportunities to explore
evidence and research as the means to enhance and change practice. The programme also
provides opportunities to develop critical thinking and reflective skills at advanced practice
level.

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings offers an exciting opportunity to study at one of the world's leading arts organistions as well as being taught by leading academics in education research and teaching at King's. Read more
MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings offers an exciting opportunity to study at one of the world's leading arts organistions as well as being taught by leading academics in education research and teaching at King's. The programme is jointly taught by the Learning and Participation department at Southbank Centre and the Department of Education and Professional Studies at King's.

Key benefits

- A unique collaboration between King's College London and the Southbank Centre.

- Innovative programme for current and aspiring educators in arts and culture.

- Unrivalled location, allows students access to the wealth of cultural resources and institutions on the South Bank.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/education-in-arts-and-cultural-settings-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings offers an exciting opportunity to study at a world-class centre for music, dance, visual arts and literature where learning and participation is central to its artistic programme as well as being taught by leading academics in education research and teaching at King's. The programme is jointly taught by staff at Southbank Centre and the Department of Education and Professional Studies at King's.

The programme is relevant to those who currently work, or those who aspire to work, within education, learning and participation in arts and cultural organisations and related sectors. Students will be encouraged to develop their academic research skills to become reflexive educators working in arts and cultural settings.

The MA offers teaching in methodologies used for designing, delivering and managing education programmes as well as for working at the interface between education and culture. Learning will be set against the background of current theoretical debates around cultural value, education, audience development, social inclusion, culture and identity, professional ethics within the cultural sector, and the economics and ‘social’ value of art and culture.

- Course purpose -

MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings is an innovative new teaching collaboration between the Department of Education & Professional Studies at King's and the Learning and Participation team at Southbank Centre. The programme is relevant to those who currently work, or those who aspire to work, within education, learning and participation in arts and cultural organisations and related sectors.

- Course format and assessment -

Southbank Centre research project; compulsory workshops in core transferable research-related skills; specialist taught modules; written assignments; project work; presentations.

Please note that most of the taught sessions take place in the evening from 5.30pm.

Career prospects

Education/Learning-related roles within arts and cultural organisations; career enhancement in art education; further studies.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This specialist course has been rated as ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted for 14 years with particular highlights being the high quality school placements, excellent partnerships with museums, galleries and the wider arts community and the managements and quality assurance of the programme. Read more
This specialist course has been rated as ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted for 14 years with particular highlights being the high quality school placements, excellent partnerships with museums, galleries and the wider arts community and the managements and quality assurance of the programme.

Because the course has been built around partnerships with primary, secondary and special schools, museums and galleries, community groups and artists, it offers you the opportunity to gain a PGCE in Secondary Art, Craft and Design Education with Qualified Teacher Status.

It will prepare you to become a highly effective practitioner, able to make a significant contribution to education and equipped to teach pupils across the range of art, crafts and design.

You’ll spend the majority of your time in two contrasting secondary school placements, with the remaining time at Northumbria University or at sites including museums, galleries, studios and workshops.

Thanks to our exclusive partnership with the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, you’ll also have access to BALTIC’s extensive library and archive.

Learn From The Best

This course will encourage you to challenge and develop your own personal philosophy and pedagogy by learning from a wide field of experienced practitioners.

Our delivery team include senior schools leaders, outstanding subject specialist teachers, research active lecturers, professionals from galleries, museums and creative organisations, artists, makers and designers.

They all model the attributes of an outstanding subject teacher and will encourage you to pursue and develop your own personal areas of expertise and interest by harnessing your prior experience and practice.

The majority of teaching staff are partners in external organisations including schools, museums and galleries across the North East, with a breath of expertise in arts, craft and design education. They include staff from our partner, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.

Teaching And Assessment

The course has two main components; school based placements in two contrasting schools and an arranged timetable of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials enrichment days, studio days and project days.

The arranged timetable explores four main areas: professional knowledge and generic educational practice; art education practice and knowledge; art education skills and knowledge; and art education research, theory and philosophy.

You’ll also get the chance to customise project briefs, co-design enrichment opportunities and address art, craft and design subject knowledge and skills gaps, plus undertake a primary placement and have placements in post 16 education to explore the transition stages.

You’ll be assessed using a variety of strategies including written assignments, presentations and reflective professional portfolios. You’ll also undergo in-school assessment of your professional conduct and the planning and teaching of lessons.

This assessment enables you to have the maximum impact on pupil progress and demonstrate that you meet the requirements to be awarded a PGCE and Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) aligned to the Teachers’ Standards 2012.

Module Overview
TE6674 - Professional Studies: Art, Craft and Design (NC, 30 Credits)
TE6675 - Professional Placements: Secondary Art, Craft and Design (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7055 - Contemporary Issues & Practice in Art and Design Education (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7056 - Inquiry of Current Issues in Art Education (NC, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

You’ll spend a minimum of 120 days, which will be the majority of your time, in two contrasting secondary school placements. They will be carefully matched to your individual academic and professional requirements, making sure you get great opportunities based on your needs.

You’ll also spend a significant amount of time at BALTIC and in our partnership museums, galleries and schools where you’ll be guided and mentored by experienced teachers and senior leaders.

Your training will include access to specialist art equipment including kilns, studio based equipment and materials – both on campus, and also across the partner organisations that you train in.

On top of that, you’ll be able to tap into our well-established network of subject-specialist, dedicated link tutors, all experienced senior leaders in arts education in secondary schools. They will ensure you make the best possible progress and are well prepared for your transition into teaching.

Digital learning is integrated and embedded into the course, from e-learning platforms to digital communication and presentations, and you’ll also use our e-learning portal, social networking platforms, digital communication tools and collaborative tools.

Research-Rich Learning

Arts education is an area rich in ongoing research, which is strongly reflected in the content of this course.

Our members of teaching staff come from a wide range of backgrounds and have a diverse range of research interests and expertise.

Prominent and key research areas include arts education; craft education; how arts can improve health and wellbeing; being an artist teacher; creative and cultural sector partnerships and collaborations. Other topics covered include ceramics in education; education in museums and galleries; quality assurance in schools; and creativity in education.

These fascinating areas are all explored and applied across and throughout the breadth of teaching on this course.

Give Your Career An Edge

Graduates from this course enjoy a consistently high employment rate and many students secure a position even before graduation.

This programme has outstanding recruitment, regularly recording excellent employability for its graduates. In 2015, 95% secured a job within three months of graduation and 100% within six months of graduation.

The vast majority of students who study this course go into secondary arts education, but those who don’t often choose to work in educational roles in museums and galleries or have gone on to successfully work in international arts education and administration.

Most of our recent graduates are based in the UK but some are tapping into the growing demand for outstanding graduates with a PGCE in schools across Europe and the Middle East.

Your Future

Many of our former students have told us that this course was transformative for them, both professionally and personally, providing long term impacts on their careers, with many jumping up the career ladder to middle and senior leadership.

Many graduates also decide to return to the programme to support our trainee teachers by guest lecturing, mentoring and developments research in arts education through the programme.

Becoming a secondary art teacher has the potential to be a hugely satisfying professional choice, and you’ll be able to make an immeasurable impact on students throughout the lifetime of your career.

The course carries a consistent record of delivering fantastic opportunities for progression after completion, with high employability levels and overall year-on-year outstanding satisfaction from students.

Your placements in two contrasting school settings aim to provide you with the best possible all-round experience of teaching at secondary level, which will stand you in excellent stead when it comes to applying for teaching roles.

If you decide to continue your studies, successful completion of this course means you could carry 60 credits forward towards a full or part time Masters degree at Northumbria making it cheaper and quicker.

With an excellent national reputation and plenty of choices and opportunities on this programme to make it a really personalised experience, your professional career in arts education can really take off.

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This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts students have access to well equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam;or the Vilnius Art Academy.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - Mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising artists.

Many Contemporary Arts master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising artists whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within art galleries and museums; teaching further or higher education; new technologies; arts administration; arts and regeneration, conservation.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and music and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist and musician/composer in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts-and-music/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts-related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts and Music students have access to well-equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising cross artform practitioners.

Many Contemporary Arts and Music master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising cross artform practitioners and sound artists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within performance, festival management, new technologies; arts administration; arts and music teaching, arts for health, acoustic ecology, and as community cross artform activists.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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The MA in Arts Management has been developed to take account of the significant changes taking place in the arts and across the creative industries. Read more
The MA in Arts Management has been developed to take account of the significant changes taking place in the arts and across the creative industries. Working in close collaboration with sector partners the course is appropriate and adaptive to this changing and challenging environment. Their direct input will help expand your theoretical understanding and professional knowledge through hands-on experience and work-based learning.

The course offers a unique opportunity to engage with an extensive range of regional, national and international arts and cultural organization covering the full range of the creative industries from dance, theatre and music to digital creativity, the fine arts and fashion to heritage, museums and cultural tourism.

"The arts stimulate us, educate us, challenge and amuse us. They are of instrumental, as well as intrinsic, value and their social benefits are numerous and beyond doubt." [Maria Miller, Culture Sector Minister, April 2013]

Culture, the arts and the creative industries in the UK are estimated to be worth around £36 billion to our economy – our creative and cultural excellence plays a crucial role in our national identity, and is recognized globally.

In the 21st century, culture and arts policy and practice are being shaped against a background of enormous change and challenge across the creative sectors. Arts managers and administrators are instrumental in the governance and sustainability of the creative sectors. From policy makers to caretakers of arts buildings and infrastructure, from pioneers of economic innovation to leaders of excellence in creative practice, cultural leaders and managers of the arts will increasingly need to be flexible, responsive and imaginative practitioners, equally comfortable in a variety of settings, and adept at working in partnership with a wide range of organisations. They will need to be people who see the arts and culture as a vital part of the wider economy.

Bath, a relatively small city with a resident population of about 80,000, attracts over 4 million visitors every year. It hosts an annual series of internationally renowned arts and cultural festivals, has been a fashionable spa for leisure and pleasure since the 18th century, and is a World Heritage Site with a rich offering of museums and galleries. It is also a city at the heart of the South West, ideally situated between Bristol and London on the M4 high tech and creative industries ‘corridor’.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course builds on your previous experience and background, expanding your professional arts knowledge, management skills, entrepreneurial thinking, and creative leadership skills. Designed and delivered in close collaboration with leading arts organisations, the course will provide you with the theoretical framework, appropriate skills and practical experience to meet the challenges of working in your chosen field.

The modules cover theory, critical thinking, skills development and practical experience; they have been designed to allow you to demonstrate an ability to analyse historic and current debates in and about culture and the arts; to apply this analysis to contemporary practice, structures, funding and participation; and to relate both to the complex range of activities involved in ‘managing the arts’.

The programme is offered in a modular format. You will take a mix of taught modules in the first two trimesters (120 credits), including a compulsory work-placement and complete a dissertation or placement-based project in the third trimester (60 credits). To achieve the MA you will need to complete 180 credits in total.

MODULES

Trimester 1
• Arts Management in the 21st Century (core module, 30 credits)
• Management in Practice (core module, 30 credits)

Trimester 2
• Research and Writing for the Arts, Heritage and Culture (core module, 30 credits)
• Supported Placement (core module, 30 credits)

Trimester 3 (75 words per section)
• Placement Project or Research Project (option module, 60 credits)
OR
• Heritage, Museums and Arts Management: an international perspective* (option module, 60 credits)

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The course will enable you to combine academic study with placements and practical work, and to accommodate the needs of those in paid employment. Learning is encouraged through participation in a wide variety of activities including lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, online activity and discussion, work-based learning, and research projects. Each module will include contributions from leaders in their field, whether for short lectures or longer workshops; a number of them will continue to act as mentors and help guide you through your placement project or final dissertation. The subject for this will be developed in consultation with the course leader and, where relevant, with your placement host.

Access to key thinkers and doers is an integral part of the course. As well as reflecting on the uncertainties of the moment, the course is intended to introduce you to people who are dealing with them for real.

Face-to-face contact during tutorials and workshops is intended to encourage and facilitate peer-support and shared learning; there will be opportunities for joint and group working.

STAFF / TUTORS

Staff on this course offer you access to a wide range of academic and practical expertise in Arts Management. We are committed to delivering the highest quality teaching and learning and the application of that learning to deliver effective practice in the workplace. There will also be a range of professional arts management practitioners from across the arts and cultural sectors who will deliver lectures and workshops, mentor students on placements and research projects, and work professionally with students on collaborative public projects.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Careers in arts management are varied and cover every cultural and artistic area. They include roles in:
• Events and venue management
• Programming events and seasons
• Audience development
• Community engagement and social inclusion
• Education and learning
• Marketing, press and communications
• Production management
• Fundraising
• Visitor services, ‘front-of-house’ management, retail services
• Managing artists and performers

The course includes a range of generic skills and opportunities that are aimed at increasing employability for our postgraduates in the voluntary sector, social enterprises, fundraising, and a wide range of administrative and management roles.

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This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 5-11 years and covers all areas of the Key Stage 1 and 2 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Read more
This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 5-11 years and covers all areas of the Key Stage 1 and 2 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. You'll gain 60 Masters level credits and be awarded with a Post-Graduate Certificate of Education.

The programme will give you an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice, equality and diversity to prepare you for a career in London schools. As a part of the programme you will experience different schools and also have an opportunity to work in an Alternative Education Setting. At Masters level you'll have the opportunity to develop a specific area of expertise.

LSBU has a particular focus on social justice and equality that is well matched to the needs of schools in urban and multicultural areas. At LSBU we encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues.

Upper Primary Pathway

From 16/17 this pathway will be available. If you select this pathway, you will gain the knowledge and skills to teach within the primary sector, with a focus on the 7-11 age range (KS2). Your school placements will ensure that you experience a variety of school settings. Your reading placement will be in Key Stage 1, and both your block practices will be in Key Stage 2.

Bursaries

The Government provides the following bursaries to be off-set against tuition fees, via the Training Agency. Tuition fees need to be paid by all students direct to LSBU. Students can use any bursary they receive from the Training Agency for this purpose.

If you have a 1st Class or 2.1 Degree or a PhD you will be eligible for a bursary of £3,000

You do not need to apply for bursaries. Once you have firmly accepted an unconditional offer of a place on a Teacher Training course (and supplied proof of your degree grade) the University will liaise with the Department for Education to put your bursary in place.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/primary-pgce

Modules

H Level Modules:
- Core curriculum
This module covers all aspects of the English, mathematics, science and computing national curriculum at Key Stage 1 and 2.

- Professional studies
This module covers theories of learning, planning, teaching and assessment, classroom management and employment.

- Foundation subjects
This module covers the national curriculum foundation subjects including: history, geography, art and design, music, and design technology.

- School experience
School experience begins in week four of the course. During your Reading Mentor placement you'll be placed in a local school three times a week, gaining experience in the teaching of reading. You'll have opportunities to work with a designated child to develop an in-depth understanding of how teaching relates to pupil learning and progress. Your first block school experience is eight weeks and culminates with you leading a class. School experience 2 is a nine week block, and by the end of this placement you will be expected to teach the whole class for up to three days a week.

- Alternative education setting
In term two you will arrange your own placement following your interests in an Alternative Education Setting. This placement is designed to give you a wider view of education and develop explicit skills that you will then be able to take into mainstream practice. For example you may choose to work in a Special Educational Needs setting or in a Pupil Referral Unit.

M Level Modules:
- Equality, inclusion and citizenship
This module will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context. You'll undertake a small piece of classroom research.

Plus one of the following module options:
- SEND (Special Educational Needs and Disability)
This module discusses and explores how to enable learners with Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities (SEND) to achieve in their learning. If you select this module your first block school experience will in in a Special Needs school and your Alternative Education Assessment will be in a main stream school.

- Connect, consume, create: ICT in the Primary School
Explore the most up-to-date research, knowledge and understanding that underpins ICT and the Computing curriculum in primary schools.

- Performing Arts
Prepares you to teach the performing arts subjects in a culturally diverse society.

- Raising Achievement in Mathematics (RAiM)
The RAiM module will help you gain knowledge and understanding to successfully teach mathematics with competence and confidence, and begin to develop as a specialist in this area. Part of your Alternative Education Setting placement will be in a mathematics department of a secondary school.

- English: Language, learning and culture
This module focuses on spoken language as a key area of the English curriculum in order to explore culture and deepen learning in the classroom.

Employability

Completion and employment rates for our PGCE are both above the sector norms and we have been identified as a good provider of initial teacher training (OFSTED 2014). Although we pride ourselves in providing teachers for London schools, successful students enter the teaching profession in a variety of schools/nurseries within the UK.

All students entering the course have the possibility of gaining up to 60 credits at Masters level, which can be used by students to count towards the award of full Masters qualifications (such as the LSBU MA in Education) gained via further study after graduation.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

Academics from other institutions and related industries are invited as guest speakers to form part of the Equality Inclusion and Citizenship module. The Alternative Educational Settings placement provides an opportunity for you to experience teaching and learning in a completely different environment, and is one of the unique aspects of our programme. This placement may be related to your choice of Masters Level option module. For further information please see Programme Modules.

Placements

During the course you will undertake placements in at least two schools. Placement schools are chosen to provide different experiences including size, organisation and location. Our partnership works with a wide range schools across London. Placements are allocated as best fit for each trainee, but if you live in outer London or beyond it may require careful planning by you so that you are able to work at assigned schools.

In addition you will undertake a placement in an alternative education setting. The choice of placement will depend on the option you choose and your interest in the education sector. Examples of placements include SEN schools, pupil referral units, hospitals, overseas etc.

A key element of the programme is to prepare you to work in multi-cultural, urban settings. In terms of school experience placements you will normally be required to do at least one practice in an inner or outer London state school.

Teaching and learning

The university based sessions are taught through lectures, workshops, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials. The aim throughout is to encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues, aims and objectives. We aim to provide a learning community that actively challenges inequality and injustice.

In particular, the module on Equality, Inclusion and Citizenship will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context.

You will be encouraged to make links between the theoretical and practical elements of the course. We use an interactive model of teaching and learning and you will be encouraged to think critically about subjects to inform your understanding of effective methods of teaching and learning and how best to apply these in classroom situations.

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