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Masters Degrees (Arts Administration)

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This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy-music-pathway/. Read more
This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy-music-pathway/

Although professional management practice is a major element of the programme, the 'creative arts event' is the starting point for all teaching.

A music pathway has been added to the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy, which is run by the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths.

Instead of specialist theatre modules you take one 30 credit module from the MA Music or MMus programmes, and your dissertation/placement/business-plan will be directed towards musical organisations.

The MA introduces the key issues that concern the management of culture and in particular those within the performing arts.

Through both analysis of contemporary and recent practice, and practical work in a range of areas, you will develop a critical approach to the discipline.

The pathway provides an overview of the following areas:
arts funding structures in the UK (with reference to EU countries and the USA)
marketing for the arts
audience development
sponsorship
education programmes within the arts
programming
culture and tourism
cultural policy (including the role of the arts in national and cultural identity) and principles and structures of management
The aim of taught modules, projects and placements is to introduce you to new models of practice. These will be investigated and evaluated as a way of developing an understanding of management principles. Through this process, you will also be equipped with the necessary practical skills to enhance your potential as arts administrators.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Gerald Lidstone

Modules

Modules within ICCE

Cultural Policy and Practice- 30 credits
Introduction to Audience Development- n/a
Introduction to Fundraising- n/a
Seminar Series- n/a
The Management and Professional Practice 1: Internship- n/a
Management and Professional Practice 2: Business Planning for Arts Organisation- n/a
MA in Arts Administration & Cultural Policy Dissertation- 60 credits

Music Pathway option modules

The modules currently available include:

Contemporary Ethnomusicology- 30 credits
Critical Musicology and Popular Music- 30 credits
Material, Form and Structure- 30 credits
New Directions in Popular Music Research- 30 credits
Philosophies of Music-30 credits
Popular Music: Listening, Analysis and Interpretation-30 credits
Post-Tonal Theory and Analysis- 30 credits
Sound Agendas- 30 credits
Sources and Resources- 30 credits
Soviet and Post-Soviet Music and Politics- 30 credits
Strategies for Performance- 30 credits
Working with Original Musical Documents- 30 credits

Careers

This pathway allows you to pursue your interests in music, acting as a supplementary course to the main body of the Arts Administration programme.

Graduates typically go on to careers in the following areas:

Cultural policy: researching, developing, writing, analysing and evaluating policy for government agencies at national, regional and local level and for ‘think tanks’ concerned with culture and society
Management in building-based and touring theatre, dance, music and visual arts organisations
Arts education, arts regeneration and arts for social and community purposes
Audience development, fundraising, programming and planning
Independent producing in theatre, music or gallery-based organisations
Many students from this programme now have careers in major arts organisations worldwide or have progressed to MPhil/PhD degrees.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Humber’s Arts Administration and Cultural Management graduate certificate program is for those who wish to combine their passion for the arts, culture and heritage with business acumen and management skills. Read more
Humber’s Arts Administration and Cultural Management graduate certificate program is for those who wish to combine their passion for the arts, culture and heritage with business acumen and management skills. This distinctive program promotes diverse, multidisciplinary performing and visual artistic expressions supported by organizational competence in revenue development (earned and contributed), management of human resources (artists, volunteers, companies), planning (financial, strategic, special events, career), and communications (multi-platform, digital, marketing). The program is situated within the creative milieu of Humber’s renowned programs in theatre, writing, visual and digital arts, music, photography, animation, television and film. The program’s hybrid components allow for flexible learning arrangements. Real-world experience is gained through varied field placements in commercial, government and not-for-profit arts and culture organizations, and collaborative capstone projects which demonstrate to employers the breadth of graduates’ abilities.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:
• Develop a historical perspective with regard to the development and impact of artistic activity in Canada.
• Design and implement efficient box office eservices (including reservations and refund policies, ticket sales, staffing and customer services and inventory seat control), contract with touring companies for performances.
• Design and produce exhibitions for galleries and museums including labelling, display and public education.
• Plan, implement and manage fundraising activities to secure grant support from private foundations, corporations and government agencies.
• Plan, implement and manage fundraising activities and practices of public relations and communications, particularly as applied to the field of the arts.
• Develop a basic understanding of the negotiation and administration of arts contracts.
• Design and implement effective marketing and promotion strategies.
• Develop a wide range of basic administrative skills pertaining to human resources management, facilities management, organizational structure and internal relations and financial management.
• Develop essential skills related to fiscal planning, management and control.
• Communicate effectively in both written and spoken business communications.
• Develop a wide range of skills pertaining to the establishment and effective management of volunteers and boards of directors.
• Develop an understanding of the applications of microcomputers in the arts field, including word processing, financial records and reporting and ticketing.

Modules

Semester 1
• ARTC 5000: Introduction to Arts Management
• ARTC 5001: Digital Strategies
• ARTC 5002: Planning in Arts and Culture
• ARTC 5003: Human Resources in Arts and Culture
• ARTC 5004: Revenue Development
• ARTC 5005: Financial Management

Semester 2
• ARTC 5200: Youth, Diversity and Pluralism in Arts and Culture
• ARTC 5201: Social Media Applications
• ARTC 5202: Marketing Arts and Culture
• ARTC 5203: Cultural Policy
• ARTC 5204: Career Planning in Arts and Culture
• ARTC 5205: Capstone Project in Arts and Culture
• ARTC 5206: Field Placement 1

Semester 3
• ARTC 5500: Field Placement 2

Work Placement

Two guided field placements are highlights of the program, offering students relevant experience and the development of mentoring relationships. Students have participated in placements with more than 100 regional, national and international arts and culture organizations including The National Ballet; The Royal Conservatory of Music; The Stratford Festival; the Hockey Hall of Fame; and numerous galleries, theatres, concert halls, museums and festivals. Students are responsible, with assistance, for arranging their own field placement locations and terms, and for the completion of the required 420 hours.

Your Career

Our graduates have attained a variety of arts administration and cultural management positions in such organizations as Mississauga Arts Council, CARFAC Ontario, Theatre Ontario, ImagiNATIVE Film & Media Arts Festival, Canadian Film Centre, Soulpepper, Theatre Passe Muraille, Canadian Opera Company, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Toronto International Film Festival and Toronto Dance Theatre.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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This programme offers you the chance to engage with the key issues in the formulation of arts and cultural policy and the administration of the arts, in particular those relating to the performing arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy/. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to engage with the key issues in the formulation of arts and cultural policy and the administration of the arts, in particular those relating to the performing arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy/

This MA from the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship will enable you to develop an awareness of and a critical approach to the discipline, by studying arts policy and practice in Europe, audience development, fundraising, arts education, cultural tourism, regeneration through arts, arts diversity and social inclusion, copyright and the role of the arts in relations and diplomacy as well as national and cultural identity.

There are modules in:

Cultural Policy and Practice
Management and Professional Practice 1: Work placement
Management and Professional Practice 2: Business Planning for Arts
An option module in a complimentary area
Practitioners from many companies, venues and national organisations teach on the programme, providing a direct link with the profession. See our our partners in learning.

Through individual research and placement with an arts company or management organisation you will develop essential practical skills to enhance your potential and your employability as an arts administrator.

The programme also offers you one module in a complementary area. These at present are:

From the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship:

Entrepreneurial Modelling
Interpretation, Education and Communication in the Art Museum
Cultural Relations and Diplomacy
Cultural and Creative Tourism
Culture, Tourism and Regeneration
From the Department of Theatre and Performance:

Disability Theatre
Sociocultural Analysis of the Musical
Radical Performance
From the Department of Music - modules from MMus programmes. This also includes a module in Music Management.

From the Department of Design:

Enterprising Leadership: An Introduction to the Discourse of Contemporary Leadership, Enterprise, and Innovation

Music Pathway

It's also possible to follow a Music Pathway in this programme, which allows you to broaden your musical knowledge and skills through largely theory and/or history-based modules.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the ICCE Administrator

Modules

Autumn term

You take four modules taught over two-and-a-half days (for full-time students).

Cultural Policy and Practice- 30 credits
Introduction to Audience Development- n/a
Introduction to Fundraising- n/a
Seminar Series- n/a

Spring term

You will study three modules on the programme over two days.

You choose one 'Shared Module', and then you take the Management and Professional modules which are broken up into Business Planning for Arts Organisations and an Internship.

The Shared Modules will allow you to continue to develop your understanding of a creative practice, or a specialist area of management. This module, therefore, comprises studies in one area of creative practice eg. Music, Theatre and Performance, Visual Arts, Entrepreneurship, or Cultural Diplomacy. (For some modules it will be necessary for a student to have a background in the area they wish to study as they are primarily concerned with the discipline rather than its administration/management – for example in music).

Summer term

Taught one day a week, you will have lectures and seminars that cover contemporary arts management issues such as: copyright and performing rights; touring; cultural leadership and diplomacy; and further develops some areas introduced earlier in the year, such as arts and tourism. During the term there are also timetabled sessions for individual tutorials relating to your dissertation.

MA in Arts Administration & Cultural Policy Dissertation- 60 credits

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Taugtht jointly between King's and Shakespeare's Globe, this unique MA programme offers you the opportunity to study the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Read more
Taugtht jointly between King's and Shakespeare's Globe, this unique MA programme offers you the opportunity to study the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

You will be able to draw on expertise at both King's and Shakespeare's Globe, studying Shakespeare close to the types of theatres for which he wrote and just a stone's throw from where his plays were originally performed.

At the Globe you will learn about early modern playhouses, audiences, performance practices and get to play on the stage and at King's you will cover early modern drama and other literary genres, examining Shakespeare alongside his contemporaries.

Key benefits

- Unique collaboration between Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and the Department of English, King's College London.

- Ideal opportunity to study the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in a theatrical context in the heart of London.

- Graduates of the degree have gone on to study for the PhD both at King's and at other major universities both in the UK and the US or to work in the creative industries, arts administration and publishing.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/shakespeare-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The degree is offered jointly by King’s and Globe Education. From 2015-16 teaching will be divided equally, capitalising on the academic and practical expertise of both of these institutions. At the Globe you will take two compulsory modules: ‘Early Modern Playhouse Practice: The Spaces, the Companies, the Business’ and ‘Staging Shakespeare in Early Modern Playhouses: Actors, Audiences and the Experience of Theatre-Going’. At King’s you will take a critical methodologies module (‘Working with Early Modern Literary Texts’), which includes training in palaeography and bibliography, and one optional module. Teaching across the degree is delivered by academics from King’s and Globe Education, complemented by visiting experts.

- Course purpose -

Advanced study of the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the context of the facilities and opportunities provided by Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and by King's. To provide a thorough knowledge of early modern drama, particularly Shakespearean drama, in its material and institutional contexts. Ideal grounding for further academic work and for work in arts administration, theatre, education, publishing.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught compulsory and optional courses assessed by coursework and/or examination plus a dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Recent graduates have gone on to PhDs at King’s and at the Universities of Cambridge, Columbia, New York, CUNY and Massachusetts, and subsequently to jobs at Cambridge, the Shakespeare Institute, Newcastle, and in North Carolina; to work in arts administration at eg Globe Education, National Theatre, Barbican, English National Opera; to edit for publishers in the US and UK.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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As public sector funding for the arts has become restricted, there is an increasing need for well qualified arts administrators, who are able to work at the interface between artistic creativity and sound business practice. Read more
As public sector funding for the arts has become restricted, there is an increasing need for well qualified arts administrators, who are able to work at the interface between artistic creativity and sound business practice. The growth of the arts and the creative industries has created a need for well qualified arts administrators. This MA has the potential to shape a new breed of professionals in the arts management field by offering Liberal Arts, Humanities, Fine Arts, Film, Media and Communication graduates the opportunity to acquire the appropriate management and business skills, thus enabling them to capitalize upon their previous grounding within the arts.

Thanks to AUR’s connections and collaborations with numerous artistic and cultural institutions both in Rome and in Italy, this MA also offers the opportunity to gain invaluable professional experience. Rome and Italy are especially attractive for the study of arts, in general, and arts management in particular, given enormous resources that are available to scholars, art world professionals and students. Italy has a long and rich tradition of collecting, sponsoring and exhibiting visual arts. A special advantage available to students of Arts Management in Italy is a possibility to study some of the world’s oldest private collections and a specific system of patronage in the arts. Students will have an opportunity to conduct their research and internship in Roman and Italian arts institutions, some of which exist for centuries and manage the world’s most prestigious collections. This creates a unique academic experience and study environment, in which students can grow both professionally and intellectually.

Potential career paths
With this MA, students will be able to either seek employment with art-related organizations or management, or to pursue research at the Ph.D. level.

• Duration: 15 months
• Start date: Fall 2015
• Credits: 36

Courses and thesis
• Six core courses: 21 credits total
• Three electives: 9 credits total
• Internship and Thesis: 6 credits total

The complexity of today’s globalizing art world requires a diverse set of knowledge and skills. The range of potential responsibilities of arts administrators requires a graduate program which will give future art managers in depth knowledge about the structure of the contemporary art world, the nature of artistic and cultural values in general in connection to their market value, a solid knowledge of the business and market principles, in their application to the sphere of artistic and cultural production, as well as high level skills that will make future professionals in the arts management desirable candidates for a variety of posts in particular institutions of the art world, such as museums, galleries, art fairs and media reporting on art and analyzing the current artistic scene. The AUR’s MA in Arts Management enables students to acquire basic skills in the fundamental areas of art management and art administration, giving them an opportunity, through the selection of elective courses and internship experience to specialize in a particular area of their interest.

Learning Outcomes
With the MA program in Arts Management, AUR’s mission is to educate future professionals with an advanced knowledge of the contemporary art world and art administration/art management, who would be able to apply their knowledge in the global society. Upon completing the program students will be able to apply their knowledge and skills in all areas identified as the needed in the contemporary art world and art market. Students will be able to demonstrate:

• Advanced skills in the sphere of institutional management, which includes: in-depth knowledge of the way in which the key institutions of the contemporary art world (such as museums, galleries, art fairs, auction houses, art dealers and private collectors, and art media) function, the ability to design and carry out institutional strategic plans, and the ability to organize teamwork and recognize individual potentials of team members

• Advanced skills in the sphere of art project management, in particular: capacity to design and carry out demanding projects, such as international exhibitions, art fairs, logistics in realization of major art projects, artistic projects of the alternative artistic production and emerging artistic scenes, fundraising abilities (the ability to locate potential donors, such as art foundations, governmental and non-governmental organizations that sponsor art projects, and individual contributors), knowledge of basics of the financial management, which enables future professionals to design budgets and work with multiple financial sources

• Advanced knowledge of art market principles, including: market, social, political and cultural factors that structure the art market, specific features of the art market and institutions of art in Europe, USA, and emerging art markets across the globe, structure of the market price of artworks and factors that influence the price of artworks

• Advanced knowledge of relevant art theories, that explain and contextualize the complex artistic production and functioning of the contemporary art world, with the focus on: the value of art and how the cultural and aesthetic values are related to the market value, the broader social status of creativity and creative inquiry and the ways in which creative works are valorized, understanding the dynamics of the globalizing art market and the complexity of theoretical issues that the globalizing art world and art market pose, that involve ideological, economic and political issues, in addition to aesthetic ones

• Advanced knowledge of the social and cultural role of particular institutions of the art, such as museums, galleries, art fairs, public art projects and art publications

• Advanced knowledge of curatorial practices and exhibition design principles

• Students will also be able to clearly demonstrate that they have acquired the following abilities and skills: research skills, necessary to study at the graduate level and to write research papers, the ability to plan and execute an extensive research project, high level analytical skills, and the ability to communicate ideas and arguments effectively.

A vital aspect of the learning process will also be the exposure of students to the cultural diversity of Rome and of Italy, and to make the most of the opportunities for on-site teaching visits.

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The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Read more
The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Its starting point is the student’s individual approach and choice of emphases; together with interdisciplinary projects it enables multidisciplinary exchanges with students and teaching staff from other disciplines.

The course aims to foster an independent artistic outlook within a framework of collective and interdisciplinary working interrelationships. The course of study sharpens students’ individual artistic practices through direct engagement with other artistic strategies. A knowledge of current discourse in other art forms causes their view of their own work to change.

Degree Structure

The Master’s degree comprises 120 ECTS credit points and is usually completed in four semesters. The degree is structured into three degree modules.

The degree places independent study and teaching, disciplinary foundations and transdisciplinary expansion in a balanced relationship. At the heart of the Master’s degree is artistic production, which includes an MA project in one of the specialisations. The didactic combination of one-to-one lessons with a high proportion of independent study, the targeted consolidation of technical and theoretical knowledge of the subject and context in elective courses, and the exchange between peers and professionals in various networks and in the joint Master’s fora support artistic production. Since in today’s artworld there is almost no generally binding canon of knowledge and skills, perfecting one’s art rests on individual decisions based on a wide-ranging knowledge of the dynamic state of the art.

Module Groups

Artistic Production/Master's Thesis (70 ECTS)
At the core of the programme, is the students' independent work on their own projects. This individual work is supervised by a personal mentor in one-to-one tuition. Students develop a deep understanding of their own authorship. They learn to present their work and to confront their own creativity with the strategies and approaches of other artists. In this endeavour, they are supported by numerous artistic personalities from the different departments of the BUA, as well as from the Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz in Basel and from further partner institutions in an international network.

Transdisciplinarity: Individuality in Context (30 ECTS)
The transdisciplinary aspect of the studies is largely based on the study of other genres' strategies of artistic authorship and by the search for common parameters for content and structure.
In lectures and seminars on contemporary art theory and media studies, common terminology is developed to facilitate communication about artistic strategies and production procedures beyond the limits of each discipline's specific vocabulary. The exchange among the different specialisations of the CAP occurs within the framework of tuition as well as in the interdisciplinary projects, but primarily in the common theory blocks, in the encounters with mentors from other disciplines and in the thematic project weeks that take place once per semester. Here, there are talks and practical workshops, transdisciplinary meetings, discussions, project and work presentations as well as courses on research strategies and scientific work. These block events not only heighten the understanding of one's own and unfamiliar working processes, they also prepare students for their professional future, when large projects will be realised in specialised artistic collectives and networks, which must be able to communicate across their fields' boundaries.

There is also tuition beyond the subject's artistic boundaries - on professional skills in economic terms. Students gain a basic understanding of how to set up a company and how to conduct self-promotion. This includes tuition about management, administration, law and copyright, marketing, project management etc.

Subject-related Theory and Practice (20 ECTS)
The third module group addresses the theory and practice of the respective specialisations. This includes courses on technical specialisation and perfection (for instance: composition, musical strategies, specific software knowledge, lighting, curating, exhibiting) and on the subject-related theory (for instance: lectures and guest seminars on contemporary art/music; graduate societies) as well as excursions and encounters with artists, institutions, clients, teachers etc. The various courses are open to all students of the MA CAP and the partner institutions, if they meet the individual course's requirements.

The degree programme culminates in the Master thesis. This consists of the public presentation of an independent artistic creation and the written reflection on the student's own practice. The written part can be conducted as a research project. Content and form of the artistic presentation, reflectiveness and relevance are evaluated by external experts.

Specialisations

Fine Arts
In the Fine Arts specialisation current developments in art and the historical foundations of art are the reference for students’ work. Static and moving pictures in analogue or digital form, sculpture and installation techniques are options as much as conceptual and performative approaches or the treatment of social processes and documentary strategies. The course is notable for its strong engagement with the professional demands of sound, words and performative production. The Fine Arts specialisation collaborates closely with the Master of Fine Arts at the Academy of Art and Design Basel (HGK Basel). Students have a broad range of options from which to assemble the content of their studies according to their own needs. These are extended by the BUA’s membership in the Swiss Master of Fine Arts Network. The discipline-related foundations for the Fine Arts specialisation are generally laid by a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts.

Music and Media Art
In this programme the main focus is on sound art, experimental and electronic music. Students develop compositions, sound installations or other sound-based art forms. In seminars and lectures exemplary works of sound art from the past and present are discussed and analyzed. We teach compositional strategies and approach the subject matter from a contemporary and historical-theoretical point of view. Reference to one's own work is a key focus. The aim is not to solely work on the development of one's own artistic practices, but also to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of contemporary compositions and art forms. In addition to the MA CAP program students can attend other courses, which teach practical skills in programming with Max MSP,hardware hacking, audio technology or interface handling. The integration of sound and musical aspects into areas like performance art, literature and fine arts has increasingly gained importance over the last decades. Hence, this study program intensively deals with the musical-sound aspects of different art forms. In the MA CAP the interaction between the visual, performative, literary and sound aspects, brings students from different artistic areas together, encourages exchange and enables collaborative working.

Literary Writing/Translation
Literature reacts to other arts, just as much as it influences them. Students hoping to practice their literary art in the field of tension of contemporary art production and its advanced reflection, find in the CAP a wide range of teachers and students with diverse backgrounds. Alongside this vibrant exchange and proximity, they work on their own texts of all genres, under the supervision of mentors. This constitutes the core of the students` individual study profiles. Something unique about the CAP is, that the work of the literary translators (with the source languages German, French, Spanish, Italian, English and Russian and the target languages German or French) is regarded as artistic production. The offers for translators are expanded thanks to a cooperation with the "Centre de la Traduction Littéraire" at the University of Lausanne.

Performance
In the sense of physical presence, real or conceptual action, performance occurs in various artistic fields. It addresses certain issues relating to body, space and time. Considering the transdisciplinary history of performance, we understand it as a varied and open field of general performativity.
Performance is regarded as part of all the different artistic disciplines united under the umbrella of the CAP.
As an active form and physical action, it resides within music, fine arts and also literary writing and occurs in close connection with these separate forms. In addition, the focus on performativity opens up new forms of representation, viewing and listening, participating, which the studies are supposed to explore in the practical work as well as in the theoretical reflection.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

The health care industry is the fastest growing sector of the economy, with projected growth of 22 percent through 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. As the industry expands and evolves, there is increasing demand for skilled health care and public administration professionals to manage business operations and ensure high-quality care.

The Department of Health Care and Public Administration offers undergraduates and graduate degree programs that prepare you for in-demand leadership positions in hospitals and nursing homes, county, city, town, village government offices, school districts, and federal and state agencies.

Instructed by dedicated faculty, our programs stress leadership, problem-solving skills, ethical concerns, legal regulations, and cutting-edge information technology and computer-based management systems. Our M.P.A. in Public Administration is the only program on Long Island accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. The master’s and dual-degree programs offer advanced training in many essential functions in the management of health care and public service operations, including budgeting and finance, regulatory and legal compliance, policy, and human resources administration.

M.P.A. in Health Care Administration

The 42-credit Master of Public Administration degree in Health Care Administration provides the comprehensive curriculum needed to succeed in a highly complex, competitive and ever-changing health care environment. Courses examine both practical and theoretical problems in the field and provide an understanding of a wide range of topics including organizational structures, administrative techniques, policy analysis and program management.

Your plan of study is comprised of 18 credits of foundation courses, including: "Principles of Public Administration," "Organizational Theory and Behavior in the Public Sector," "Economic Environment and the Public Sector," "Analytical Methods," "Computer-based Management Systems" and "The Policy Process in Health Care Administration."

The Advanced Core Curriculum (nine credits) explores various aspects of public sector administration, including: "Human Resource Administration," "Fundamentals of Budgeting and Finance," and "Administrative Responsibility and the Legal Environment." Nine credits of electives and a thesis round out the program.

A specialization in Gerontology is available.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

The health care industry is the fastest growing sector of the economy, with projected growth of 22 percent through 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. As the industry expands and evolves, there is increasing demand for skilled health care and public administration professionals to manage business operations and ensure high-quality care.

The Department of Health Care and Public Administration offers undergraduates and graduate degree programs that prepare you for in-demand leadership positions in hospitals and nursing homes, county, city, town, village government offices, school districts, and federal and state agencies.

Instructed by dedicated faculty, our programs stress leadership, problem-solving skills, ethical concerns, legal regulations, and cutting-edge information technology and computer-based management systems. Our M.P.A. in Public Administration is the only program on Long Island accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. The master’s and dual-degree programs offer advanced training in many essential functions in the management of health care and public service operations, including budgeting and finance, regulatory and legal compliance, policy, and human resources administration.

M.P.A. in Public Administration

The M.P.A. in Public Administration prepares you for a wide range of managerial and leadership positions in local, state and national government, the law, and non-profit organizations. For administrators already employed in public service, this 42-credit program provides opportunities to improve your administrative skills, pursue a specific area of interest and prepare for increasing levels of responsibility and management.

The required foundation courses include “Principles of Public Administration,” “Organizational Theory and Behavior in the Public Sector,” “Computer-based Management Systems” and “The Policy Process in Health Care and Public Administration.”

In the Advanced Core Curriculum you will explore various aspects of public sector administration, including “Human Resource Administration,” “Fundamentals of Budgeting and Finance,” and “Administrative Responsibility and the Legal Environment.” Nine credits of electives and a thesis complete this comprehensive course of study.

The M.P.A. degree is accredited by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration.

A specialization in Nonprofit Management is available.

The M.P.A. program at LIU Post prepares students for service in executive and managerial-level positions public, nonprofit, and health care organizations. Our graduates are currently serving in the hospitals and health care practices; local and national nonprofits; and local, state, and federal government positions.

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This unique MA will enhance your critical understanding of the musical theatre as a popular entertainment genre- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-musical-theatre/. Read more
This unique MA will enhance your critical understanding of the musical theatre as a popular entertainment genre- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-musical-theatre/

It will help you to sharpen your practical skills as a creative artist. On a practical level, it will assist you in working as a freelance writer, composer or producer of musical theatre.

The MA focuses on the dramaturgy of the musical as a key factor in the future development of the genre.

Expert professionals are regularly employed as visiting tutors, to maintain direct links with the industry.

You follow one of the two pathways as either:

-producer
-writer or composer

You undertake an analytic case study of a musical or production, a placement project and dissertation (producers), and a creative project involving either book and lyrics or music for a short original musical (writers and composers). Producers share some classes with students on the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Secretary.

Modules & Structure

You undertake an analytic case study of a musical or production, a placement project and dissertation (producers), and a creative project involving either book and lyrics or music for a short original musical (writers and composers). Producers share some classes with the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy.

You elect to follow one of two pathways on the programme – Producers, or Writers and Composers. In each case, the programme involves five separate modules:

1. Genre study – autumn and spring terms, both pathways.
This module runs for 20 weeks. It begins in autumn with an historical survey of the development of the American musical, from ‘Showboat’ (1927) to ‘Sweeney Todd’ (1979). It continues in the spring term with a look at new forms of musical theatre that have resulted from the fragmentation of the classic tradition of ‘book’ musicals, with the innovation of the ‘concept’ musical, the impact of rock musicals, the ‘invasion’ of Broadway by the British ‘megamusical’ and the subsequent globalisation of the market by Cameron Macintosh and Disney.

2. Case study – autumn and spring terms, both pathways.
This module involves a 15-week introduction to the different structural components (book, music, lyrics, choreography, scenography) and industrial factors (producers, marketing, technology, conomics)
determining the production of musicals today. The module is taught by a range of professional and academic experts with a variety of different perspectives on the subject.

3. Shared complementary/contextual module 1 – autumn term.

Students choose one of these modules:

4. Shared complementary/contextual module 2, - ‘Musical Theatre and Society’
5. Creative project/dissertation – spring and summer terms, both pathways.

Assessment

Genre study is assessed by two 3,000-word essays; the case study is assessed by means of a 4,000-word essay. The nature and form of creative projects, dissertations and research/placement projects are agreed with the Module Convenor during the programme.

Skills

You will develop a critical understanding of the collaborative processes involved in the creation of musical theatre in the UK and USA.

Composers and librettists/lyricists will achieve an enhanced ability to engage with the integration of dramaturgical and musical components of musical theatre writing, and a comprehension of the various factors involved in working within the industry.

Producers will acquire an overall perspective on the industrial and organisational factors involved in musical theatre production, including methods of theatre marketing, systems of arts funding and policy, and a working knowledge of the strategies involved in producing a small-scale musical.

Producers will also develop skills of leadership and teamwork and the ability to develop and critique their own approaches to working in musical theatre production.

Careers

Typical careers for graduates of this MA include:

musical theatre composer
librettist
lyricis
tproduce
marketing manager
production assistant

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. Read more
This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. They consider theoretical and methodological questions and are invited to question the relevance of the disciplinary distinction between History of Art and Archaeology to the study of the non-Western world. Courses cover a time period spanning from antiquity to present-day, contemporary art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in Asian and African art history and archaeology, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students studying the Music, Film and Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East in historical and contemporary contexts. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of Asia and Africa.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/mahistartarch/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in Art and Archaeology (15PARC999).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught courses in the first year, and one taught course and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught course in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It is submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This is the only history of art and archaeology degree in Europe focused on the great religious traditions of Asia. Read more
This is the only history of art and archaeology degree in Europe focused on the great religious traditions of Asia. It includes within its scope diverse countries, regions and time periods from antiquity to the present, with a particular emphasis on Buddhism in South, Central and Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, China, Korea and Japan. Hinduism, Shinto and animistic and syncretic practices are also studied. Students consider iconography, ritual, faith and pilgrimage in their multiple regional and historical guises. They study temple buildings, statues and paintings, formal, informal and popular.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of Asia, many of whom are principally concerned with religious art. Their ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as music and religion in Asia, historically and in the present. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the religions, languages, history and cultures of Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maraa/

Teaching & Learning

- Teaching
Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

- Assessment
For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

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On this programme students engage with some of the most dynamic and contemporary aspects of Asian and African art, as well as issues of collection, display, representation, tourist art, and shifts between regional, national and global identities. Read more
On this programme students engage with some of the most dynamic and contemporary aspects of Asian and African art, as well as issues of collection, display, representation, tourist art, and shifts between regional, national and global identities. By focusing on theoretical and methodological questions, they are equipped with the terms and approaches needed for in-depth study of contemporary art. This is combined with the study of contemporary art from a range of Asian and African contexts.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in contemporary Asian and African art, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as contemporary global Media, Film and Music. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in, for example, the film, cinema, languages and modern history of Asia and Africa.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/macaaa/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to Contemporary Art and Art Theory listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Art and Art Theory of Asia and Africa (15PARC995).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching & Learning

- Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

- Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Read more
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean (http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaea/

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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