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Masters Degrees (Arthurian Legend)

We have 3 Masters Degrees (Arthurian Legend)

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The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Read more
The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Research skills taught during the first semester will enable students to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary approaches and sources, ranging from theoretical, historical and cultural aspects of the Arthurian myth.

Background
Arthurian Literature is an established area of expertise in the School of English at Bangor University and has been taught here for over three decades. A long-standing record of teaching, research and publication attests to its vitality; the main specialists in the field are Dr Raluca Radulescu, whose work has focused on Malory, Arthurian romances and chronicles, especially through a cultural approach, and Professor PJC Field, currently President of the International Arthurian Society, and world-renowned for his work on the Arthurian legend through the centuries. However the course also draws upon the expertise available in other periods of literature within the School of English and other schools in the College of Arts and Humanities, ranging from post-medieval approaches in the School of English, or medieval Welsh, History and Archaeology, and Music. Staff in these areas contribute regularly to the teaching of Arthurian topics ranging from the medieval period to the present, including music and modern film adaptations.

Why Bangor for Arthurian Studies?
The attractiveness of the MA in Arthurian Literature at Bangor lies in its flexible, though comprehensive, approach to the study of this area. Students may choose to specialise in either the medieval or the post-medieval period but they will be required to take both modules with these titles in order to benefit from the wide coverage of the Arthurian legend they provide. At the same time they can enjoy all the benefits of one-to-one supervision in the Open Essay options, while also developing their research skills in the Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research Module (shared with the MA in English). Moreover, in-depth introductions to the study of medieval palaeography and codicology are available by collaboration with other relevant schools and disciplines, as a preparation to PhD level (see collaborative doctoral training scheme in palaeography and codicology organised by Dr Raluca Radulescu).

Students usually participate in the activities of the Centre for Medieval Studies, including the annual international postgraduate conference, ‘Medievalism Transformed’, the bi-weekly Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies seminar series (http://www.imems.ac.uk/) and the online postgraduate journal.

Structure
The MA in Arthurian Literature consists of two parts. Part One must be successfully completed before proceeding to the second part, the dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Compulsory Modules:

Part One

Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (30 credits), which develops knowledge of literary theory and research methods.
Medieval Arthur (30 credits), exploring the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to examining its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture.
Post-Medieval Arthur (30 credits), addressing the Arthurian myth and legends from the early modern period onwards, paying attention to the way the story was shaped in different centuries
Optional Modules:

Open Essay (30 credits): Supervised essays on topics of the student’s own choice.
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)
Manuscript and Printed Books (30 credits): An introduction to the study of medieval and early modern palaeography and codicology, in co-operation with the Bangor University Archives and Special Collections, which include the library of Bangor Cathedral
Subject to availability, students may choose relevant modules in medieval Welsh literature/Welsh Arthurian literature offered in the School of Welsh.
Part Two

Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece (20,000 words) of scholarly research, on a subject of your own choice and discussed in detail with a chosen supervisor. It will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.
Research Links with Industry
A collaboration with the tourist attraction ’King Arthur’s Labyrinth’ at Corris has led to fully funded Access to Masters MA places on this degree programme. The course also maintains links with people and organisations beyond Bangor: these might include guest speakers and visits to sites of literary interest.

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This diverse and flexible programme offers you a wide array of choice to explore the wealth of literature in English across periods and geographies. Read more

This diverse and flexible programme offers you a wide array of choice to explore the wealth of literature in English across periods and geographies.

Whether you want to pursue the interests developed during your degree, fill gaps in your knowledge or prepare for a future in research, you’ll have opportunities to sharpen your research skills and specialise in aspects of literary studies that suit your interests.

You can bring together English, American and postcolonial literatures to create an eclectic mix of research-led modules, from Arthurian legend to Shakespeare and psychoanalysis. It’s also a good starting point for exploring wide-ranging research interests that cut across periods and cultures.

You’ll be taught by tutors who are expert researchers in their fields and benefit from access to our world-class Library and Special Collections. It’s an exciting and dynamic environment in which to study some of the world’s greatest literature.

Course content

From the beginning of the programme you’ll start to develop your research skills, as a core module introduces you to the methods and approaches involved in researching literature and helps you to prepare for writing an independent research project / dissertation and for your future career.

You’ll also choose from our broad range of optional modules, which could mean you focus on topics such as American fiction in the 19th century, the memoir, the Brontës, Shakespeare or many others. Alternatively you may choose two of your optional modules from the School of English and a third from elsewhere in the University (subject to availability and agreement from the module tutor).

You’ll choose further optional modules in Semester Two. However, throughout the year you’ll also work on your research project or dissertation: a chance to showcase all the skills you’ve acquired by independently researching a literary topic of your choice. You’ll submit this by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Arthurian Legend: Medieval to Modern 30 credits
  • Africas of the Mind 30 credits
  • Reading (with) Psychoanalysis 30 credits
  • So Where do you come from? Selves, Families, Stories 30 credits
  • The Brontes 30 credits
  • Fictions of Citizenship in Contemporary American Literature 30 credits
  • The Enigmatic Body of Modernism 30 credits
  • Shakespeare's Tyrants 30 credits
  • Poetry of Catastrophe: Reading Paul Celan 30 credits
  • Global Indigeneity 30 credits
  • Feeling Time 30 credits
  • The Magic of Mimesis 30 credits
  • Romantic Ecologies 30 credits
  • The Literature of Crisis: Politics and Gender in 1790s Britain 30 credits
  • Turks, Moors, and Jews: Staging the Exotic in the Renaissance 30 credits
  • Victorian New Media 30 credits
  • Literature and the Politics of Language 30 credits
  • War, Mourning, Memory: 1914-1939 30 credits
  • Writing Identities: Criticism, Creativity, Practice 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll generally have two-hour weekly seminars in each module where you discuss the themes and issues arising from your reading, and you’ll be able to enhance your learning by attending the wide range of research seminars and talks by visiting speakers that we arrange throughout the year. You’ll also benefit from supervisions throughout semester 2 with your dissertation supervisor.

However, independent study is a vital part of the degree as it allows you to build your skills and explore your own ideas.

Assessment

Most of our MA modules are assessed with a single essay of around 4,000 words, which you’ll submit at the end of the semester. You’ll usually also be required to submit unassessed essays to gain feedback on your work and give presentations on your reading in seminars. The research project/dissertation is 12,000-15,000 words in length.



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This interdisciplinary degree will equip you with a broad understanding of historical and cultural aspects of the medieval world, as well as the skills to conduct high-level research. Read more

This interdisciplinary degree will equip you with a broad understanding of historical and cultural aspects of the medieval world, as well as the skills to conduct high-level research.

Core modules will develop your ability to read Medieval Latin and decipher palaeography, giving you the skills to transcribe, translate and analyse primary sources. You could even learn another medieval language such as medieval French or Old Norse. You’ll also focus on areas that interest you when you choose from optional modules on interdisciplinary themes across literature, history, art history, cultural studies and theology and religious studies, and study specialist modules offered by Schools across the University.

The Institute for Medieval Studies sits at the heart of the University, with impressive research resources and a wide range of expertise among its teaching staff. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge to explore the medieval period in the home of the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources.

Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You'll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin and could even choose to learn another medieval language. You'll also develop your understanding of research methods and bibliography and explore palaeography.

Then you'll build on this foundation with your choice of interdisciplinary optional modules, to explore areas that interest you, and even choose from some modules offered by other Schools on historical, literary or art historical topics. You'll also demonstrate the skills you've acquired in your dissertation, where you'll undertake independent research on a topic of your choice and submit your work by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you'll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits
  • Medieval Studies Dissertation 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Culture and Identity in the Later Fourteenth Century 30 credits
  • Old and New Beliefs in Medieval Scandinavia: From Pagan to Christian 30 credits
  • Arthurian Legend: Medieval to Modern 30 credits
  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 20 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Medieval German Language 30 credits
  • Old and Middle French 30 credits
  • Advanced Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Medieval English 30 credits
  • Old Norse 30 credits
  • Vikings, Saxons and Heroic Culture 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • How to be a Saint in the Middle Ages: Saints' Cults and their impact on culture and society (500-1500) 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills modules in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS



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