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Masters Degrees (Artefacts)

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Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more

Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

  • This MSc in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
  • You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
  • You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MSc you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses

  • Material culture in context
  • The process of artefact studies.

Optional courses include modules such as:

  • Lithic analysis
  • Independent study
  • Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
  • Early medieval artefacts 
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350). 
  • Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement.



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This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more

This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

About this degree

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists. They develop the ability to identify, describe, document, catalogue and analyse artefacts and artefact assemblages. Subjects covered include the description of ceramic, lithic and metal objects. In practical sessions, we cover drawing, photography and work with databases. Many sessions make use of the institute's extensive collections. The programme will also raise awareness of different approaches to artefact analysis and introduce recent discussions on the subject.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Working with Artefacts and Assemblages
  • Technology within Society

Optional modules

Students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include: 

  • Antiquities and the Law
  • Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Archaeometallurgy
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Experimental Archaeology
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Geoarchaeology
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Laboratory and Instrumental Skills in Archaeological Science
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Nature, Culture and the Languages of Art: theories and methodologies of art interpretation
  • Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
  • Social and Material Contexts in Art: comparative approaches to art explanation

Dissertation/report

The 15,000–word dissertation can cover any artefact-based subject matter. It normally combines a professional standard finds report with an analysis and an academic overview.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment of the core course is by weekly pieces of short work, a portfolio and the dissertation. The Technology within Society module is assessed by a project proposal and an essay.

Placement

Students have the option to undertake a 20-day voluntary placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit. The placement itself is not formally assessed other than through its contribution to the student's dissertation work. 

Tier 4 students are permitted to undertake a work placement during their programme, however they must not exceed 20 hours per week (unless the placement is an intergral and assessed part of the programme). This applies whether that work placement takes place at UCL or at an external institution. If you choose to undertake a placement at an external institution, you will be required to report to the department on a weekly basis so that you can continue to comply with your visa. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Artefact Studies MA

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording and analysing finds.

Employability

The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as a finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials-based PhD, this programme provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis  is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies will provide you with the high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. Read more

Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies will provide you with the high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world.

In particular, it is intended to equip you with a sound knowledge and critical understanding of current professional principles, good practice and contemporary debates relating to museum and artefact studies.

It aims to help you develop a variety of skills:

  • Professional skills, relevant to the care, management and exhibition of collections in museums
  • Analytical skills, relevant to the study of a wide range of materials and artefacts, from different periods and cultures, and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives
  • Research skills, relevant to studies of museums and artefacts, including an awareness of current theoretical issues
  • Communication skills - oral, written and visual - relevant to work in the museum profession and to academic research.

It also aims to encourage students to take personal responsibility for their own learning, team-work and professional conduct.

Course Structure

Two distinct routes can be followed through the MA in Museum and Artefact Studies. These comprise different combinations of modules.

Route 1

The first route is intended for students who firmly intend to pursue a career in museums and galleries. It comprises six compulsory taught modules:

  • Approaches to Museum and Artefact Studies
  • Museum Principles and Practice
  • Artefact Studies
  • Care of Collections
  • Museum Communication
  • Research Paper.

Route 2

The second route through the MA provides you with a different choice of modules. It is intended for students with a strong interest in artefact studies, who may wish to pursue a career in the cultural heritage sector or undertake further postgraduate research in museum or artefact studies after completing the MA course, but who also wish to keep their options open. It comprises four compulsory modules (one of which is a dissertation) and a choice of a fifth module:

  • Approaches to Museum and Artefact Studies
  • Museum Principles and Practice
  • Artefact Studies
  • Dissertation.

And either

  • Museum Communication

Or

  • Care of Collections

Or

  • A module from the MA in Archaeology (e.g. Prehistory; Roman Archaeology; Medieval Archaeology; Post-Medieval Archaeology; or the Archaeology of Egypt, the Near East and India (when available).

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in the Museums sector. Tutorials, seminars and workshops then provide opportunities for you to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Museum and Artefact Studies through placements and curating an exhibition and/or developing an educational programme for the University Museums.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge and ability as independent learners , giving you the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject. The programme aims to develop these key attributes in its students thereby preparing them for work or further study once they have completed the programme.

In Terms 1 and 2 you will typically attend 3-4 hours a week of lectures, up to 4 hours of tutorials or seminars, in addition to 2 workshops and 2-3 hours of practical sessions working with artefacts or museum environment-related matters or fieldtrips over the term. You will have a 20-day Museum placement at Easter in a museum or archive. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge. Professional speakers are brought in to engage the students with issues within the professional body.

In Term 3 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required, to applying them within a real-life museum environment in the module Museum Communications where students work together on a specific project(s) with an opening date in May, June or July. Typically, you could be spending the equivalent of a working week as you complete the work for your projects, under supervision.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent research and research continues in Term 3, where the use of research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the Dissertation research project or the Research Paper. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have between 3 and 5 one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The Dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further academic work while the exhibition and Research Paper route is designed for a more professional environment.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend as well as Friends of the Oriental Museum events.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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The Archaeology MA inspires you to think about the human past from a variety of thematic and analytical perspectives. Newcastle is surrounded by world-class prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. Read more

The Archaeology MA inspires you to think about the human past from a variety of thematic and analytical perspectives. Newcastle is surrounded by world-class prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. We make full use of our rich archaeological landscape with regular study trips and fieldwork.

The Archaeology MA has five specialist pathways and a generic route to suit your individual needs, background and career aspirations:

  • Prehistoric Archaeology
  • Greek Archaeology
  • Roman Archaeology
  • Roman Frontier Studies
  • Late Antique, Medieval and Byzantine Archaeology

Newcastle University has a long and distinguished history of archaeology, including:

  • Prehistoric
  • Greek
  • Roman
  • Late Antique
  • Western Medieval
  • Byzantine
  • Historical Archaeology

We have access to some of the finest collections of archaeological artefacts in Great Britain in the on-campus Great North Museum: Hancock.

We provide quality teaching in small groups. This means you'll reach a level of familiarity with artefacts that most students can only dream of.

We have a range of period-based, practical and theoretical modules available. Our modules will give you an understanding of the interpretive approaches that archaeologists adopt. They will also help you understand the methodologies and sources available during your investigations.

You can develop a range of advanced practical skills in:

  • artefact analysis, including metallography and use-wear analysis
  • archaeological surveying, including topographical, buildings and geophysical survey
  • database and archive use
  • geographical information systems (GIS)
  • ancient languages

You'll join a vibrant archaeology community at Newcastle. You'll receive specialist teaching from leading academics in subjects of their research expertise.

Throughout the course you'll have opportunities to engage and learn about our innovative research. We have an extensive programme of invited speakers organised by our research groups. Our Postgraduate Forum also has a seminar series, annual conference and e-journal.

The Archaeology MA provides you with outstanding skills and the ability to enter a range of professions. You will gain advanced skills in literacy, research and project management. You could also choose to continue your academic career with a PhD in archaeology.

Fieldtrips

The North East has an outstanding prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. We take full advantage of this through regular study trips and fieldwork. You can also take optional modules with field trips to:

  • Rome 
  • Athens

The tuition of these trips is included in your course fees. If you select a module with an overseas trip you should budget about £450 to cover your flights and accommodation.

Delivery

All campus-based teaching takes place during the working week. Some field trips take place during holidays and weekends, depending on the modules taken. 

Contact and independent study times vary depending on the module and time of year.

Semesters one and two: You typically attend between 6 - 15 hours of teaching per week. The remaining hours of a standard week are for independent study.

Work experience

Work experience

There are many opportunities for you to gain archaeological experience outside your course. We'll encourage you to gain this experience whilst part of our archaeology community.

Staff carry out a wide range of archaeological projects. Most of our students participate in projects run in Newcastle and by partners in the UK and overseas.

Facilities

Facilities

Archaeologists have exceptional facilities on campus. This includes over 200 years of scholarship, libraries and archaeological collections built up by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle and the Great North Museum: Hancock.

You'll have access to one of finest archaeological collections in the UK. You can access the following internationally important collections:

  • prehistoric
  • Greek
  • Etruscan
  • Roman 
  • medieval artefacts
  • Gertrude Bell archive.

You'll be based in the recently renovated Armstrong Building. It has:

  • dedicated study spaces
  • Reading Room
  • computers
  • free printing
  • photocopying
  • laptops for research trips,

You'll also get a personal research allowance and an interlibrary loan allowance to support your studies.



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Scientific analysis is a key tool in the study of archaeological artefacts and assemblages. Read more

Scientific analysis is a key tool in the study of archaeological artefacts and assemblages. This MSc offers detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of archaeological and heritage materials, and a solid background in the archaeology and anthropology of technology, allowing students to design and implement archaeologically meaningful scientific projects.

About this degree

This degree aims to bridge the gap between archaeology and science by integrating both a detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of inorganic archaeological materials and a solid background in the anthropology of technology. By the end of the degree, students should have a good understanding of the foundations of the most established analytical techniques, practical experience in their application and data processing, as well as the ability to design research projects that employ instrumental analyses to address archaeological questions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Laboratory and instrumental skills in archaeological science

Optional modules

You are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 75 credits. At least 15 credits must be made up from the following:  

  • Technology within Society
  • Archaeological Data Science

At least 30 credits must be made up from the following list below: 

  • Technology within Society
  • Archaeological Data Science
  • Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Archaeometallurgy
  • Geoarchaeology: Methods and Concepts
  • Key topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Working with Artefacts and Assemblages

In order to allow for a flexible curriculum, students are allowed to select up to 30 credits from any of the postgraduate modules offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology under other Master's degrees

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and laboratory work. A popular aspect of this programme is its extensive use of analytical facilities. Assessment is through essays, practicals, projects, laboratory reports and oral presentations depending on the options chosen, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archaeological Science: Technology and Materials MSc

Careers

Given our strong emphasis on research training, many of our MSc graduates take up further research positions after their degree, and over half of our MSc students progress to PhD research. Their projects are generally concerned with the technology and/or provenance of ceramics, metals or glass in different regions and periods, but most of them involve scientific approaches in combination with traditional fieldwork and/or experimental archaeology. 

Some of our graduates are now teaching archaeometry or ancient technologies at different universities in the UK and abroad. Others work as conservation scientists in museums and heritage institutions, or as finds specialists, researchers and consultants employed by archaeological field units or academic research projects.

Employability

Due largely to an unparalleled breadth of academic expertise and laboratory facilities, our graduates develop an unusual combination of research and transferable skills, including critical abilities, team working, multimedia communication, numerical thinking and the use of advanced analytical instruments. On completion of the degree, graduates should be as comfortable in a laboratory as in a museum and/or an archaeological site. They become acquainted with research design and implementation, ethical issues and comparative approaches to world archaeology through direct exposure to an enormous variety of projects. The range of options available allows students to tailor their pathways towards different career prospects in archaeology and beyond.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK. Its specialist staff, outstanding library and fine teaching and reference collections provide a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The excellent in-house laboratory facilities will provide direct experience of a wide range of techniques, including electron microscopy and microphone analysis, fixed and portable X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy, petrography and metallography under the supervision of some of the world's leading specialists.

The institute houses fine teaching and reference collections that are extensively used by MSc students including ceramics, metals, stone artefacts and geological materials from around the world. In addition, the institute has a wide network of connections to museums and ongoing projects offering research opportunities for MSc students.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Your programme of study. Museum studies allows you to understand all there is to know about showcasing historic artefacts to a variety of different audiences. Read more

Your programme of study

Museum studies allows you to understand all there is to know about showcasing historic artefacts to a variety of different audiences. You are taught by a combination of practical application and focus on history, collections, practises and understanding of the social roles of museums. MLitt in Museum Studies is ideally situated to take advantage of the University’s own internationally important collections and museums to explore these issues and to give you the opportunity for practical experience of working in a museum, working closely with professional as well as academic staff.

You are able to study collections from around the world within the university as Aberdeen holds collections within its own museums and galleries. Kings museums provides a constant range of collections and annual event 'Night at the Museum,' the Zoology museum provides all sorts of study materials to help with understanding of animals, there is also a Kings College and MacRobert ArtSpace which provides contemporary exhibitions. You can also look at items gifted to Aberdeen, and special collections in the library plus online virtual museums.

Within the city there is an art gallery showcasing major works from all periods and artists globally. There are regular UK wide touring exhibitions showing regularly within the city. Many of the regions well known castles provide wide ranging collections of well known artefacts from different periods of art, allowing tours and special exhibitions.  If you want to go further afield Edinburgh and Glasgow provide many of the national museums of Scotland within the city centre featuring major global works of art, and special exhibitions year round.  

Optional courses from the programme allow you to study other related disciplines and knowledge within the museum and gallery sector such as understanding more about connoisseurship in art galleries and Art in Scotland, Northern artefacts, New World literature, researching for museum collections, and specific marketing or arts business courses.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Museum Practice
  • The Museum Idea

Optional

  • Understanding People and Environment (extended)
  • Research Skills in Anthropology
  • Northern Worlds
  • Theory and Method in Research
  • Marketing Management
  • Introduction to Art History for Business
  • Connoisseurship: Art in Scotland
  • Researching Museums Collections
  • Reviewing Museums
  • Business for Arts
  • New World Narratives Literatures: Discovery and the Americas

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • Aberdeen provides you with history, museums, and the opportunity to apply your knowledge within the campus area.
  • You have a great range of optional courses you can choose from depending upon the direction you want to go in and your interests.
  • You are taught by experts in their relevant disciplines all related to the museum and gallery sector

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs..

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture ;

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.

- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.

- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.

- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.

- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups

There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture

The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century

This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism

This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:

For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:

- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)

- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen

- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered

- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings

- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Art, Media and Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies. The Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society focuses on the transformations that cultural products undergo as a result of digitalization and globalization. Read more
Art, Media and Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies.

The Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society focuses on the transformations that cultural products undergo as a result of digitalization and globalization. In this program you will analyze how digital cultural products and artefacts critically reflect societal issues, such as the financial crisis, the rise of populism or the ‘tyranny of intimacy’ of social media. Furthermore, you will investigate the public impact of activities carried out by a range of different authors and artists. You will use theories and analytical tools to understand what is at stake here. Central questions are: How can art reshape the public sphere? What are new dimensions of information in the current public sphere?

As a student of Art, Media and Society, you take an interdisciplinary approach to media and art in the modern digital and culturally diverse society, and find yourself at the interface between culture, media, aesthetics and politics.

In this Master’s program, you study digital cultural products and artefacts in contemporary society: phenomena of high and mass culture as well as fashion and advertising, narrative forms of expression such as journalism and personal blogging, as well as literature and visual art focusing on varied purposes: to articulate human rights, to challenge neoliberal development, and to forge alternative local and transnational solidarities. You investigate how information circulates in various contexts, what the social, political and ethical implications are of cultural products, and how roles of producing and consuming these products are negotiated.

In addition, you study theories about the way cultural products and artefacts are experienced and responded to. You practice and further develop your ability to communicate your knowledge and to define, formulate, develop and implement projects. The purpose of the Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society is to educate professionals with clear profiles.

Career Perspective Art, Media and Society

Art, media and society prepares you for a career in today’s global, digital and cultural diverse society. An average of 80 % of our students finds a job within a year after graduating. Our alumni work in the (online) media sector, in education, as programmer of film, theater, festival or debate. The third unit of the Master’s program is especially focused on developing the specific role of the cultural scholar in society.

The program prepares you for a job in the cultural sector, or the media sector, in which you have to organize, analyze, interpret, write and present.

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This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more

This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts.

The required module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

  • A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's.
  • Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations.
  • Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies.
  • Located in the heart of literary London.

Description

Our Early Modern English Literature MA is an innovative and exciting partnership between the Department of English at King’s and the British Library. 

The course focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts, meaning both the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print as well as the way they were received. The specific process through which a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is central to its interpretation. 

You will learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts, and to edit them for the modern reader. In focusing on transmission, the course explores the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re) production on the way it is interpreted.

The Material Legacy of Early Modern Literary Texts module, which is taught at the British Library, is specifically designed to teach you how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide, and how to identify the factors and people involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Course purpose

Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with four to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 26 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 13 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We assess all of our modules through coursework, normally with a 4,000-word essay. For your dissertation module, you will write a 4,000-word critical survey and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more

The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

  • If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
  • You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
  • Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses

  • Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
  • Research Skills

Optional courses

Three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following

  • Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
  • Early Christian monuments of Scotland
  • Early Medieval artefacts
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts
  • Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
  • Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options

  • Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies)
  • Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
  • Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies
  • Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.



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Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. Read more

Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. This MPhil is both an academic programme and professional training; it will give you a framework of theoretical knowledge and a range of practical experience which will enable you to contribute to the understanding and preservation of culturally significant textile artefacts.

Why this programme

  • If you are looking to enter a career in textile conservation practice in a museum or other institution, or to pursue doctoral-level research in this field, this programme is designed for you.
  • You will take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
  • You will be based in our specialist conservation laboratories. The facilities include workrooms, a wet lab, dye lab, chemistry lab and well-equipped analytical lab.
  • You will benefit from our close links with Glasgow Museums, as well as the University’s own Hunterian Museum. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You will have the opportunity to draw on the museums’ rich and varied textile collections.
  • This is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and one of only a few specialist textile conservation programmes in the world.
  • You will be taught by visiting specialists from local and national museums in Scotland and the wider UK.

Programme structure

You will take core courses over two semesters in each year, with a work placement in the summer between the first and second years. You will write up your dissertation over the second summer and submit it at the end of August.

The core courses will develop an understanding of

  • the practical skills used in textile conservation
  • related practical skills including dyeing and photography
  • the science underpinning textile deterioration and conservation treatments
  • preventive conservation techniques
  • the technological, cultural, historic and aesthetic contexts of textile artefacts
  • the place of conservation in the wider cultural sector.

Core courses

Year 1

  • Research methods in practice
  • Principles and practice: core skills and ethics
  • Understanding textiles: technology
  • Principles and practice: developing skills
  • Preventive conservation
  • Material cultures
  • Placement

Year 2

  • Principles and practice: advanced skills
  • Conservation in practice
  • Deconstructing the artefact 
  • Principles and practice: conservation projects
  • Professional development
  • Research management
  • Dissertation

Career prospects

The programme is at career-entry level and graduates are qualified to go on to a post-training internship or directly into the workplace as a textile conservator in a museum or other institution around the world, as well as to undertake further study at PhD level.

The great majority of graduates of this programme and of its predecessor, the Textile Conservation Centre’s MA Textile Conservation programme, now work in museums and other institutions. Graduates of the two programmes have an outstanding record of employment on graduation and of remaining in the sector. They now work in nearly 30 countries and are in senior positions worldwide.

MPhil graduates have been awarded Mellon Fellowships at Denver Art Museum, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution in the USA.

In the UK, others work for:

  • National Museums Scotland
  • Historic Royal Palaces
  • The Victoria and Albert Museum 
  • The National Maritime Museum
  • Freelance conservators

Graduates also work in museums in Singapore, Japan, Qatar, the USA, Canada and other countries around the world.

However, it is worth noting that many graduates go on to short-term contract posts initially. It is easier to find a textile conservation post if you are able to be flexible in terms of location.



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Research profile. The MSc by Research in Archaeology is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Archaeology is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

We welcome applications from anyone keen to work in fields that overlap with or complement our academic staff interests. These include human osteoarchaeology, forensic anthropology and archaeology, isotopes and science-based methods of investigation, geographical information systems, early civilisations and urban societies in the Mediterranean and Europe, Egyptology, Roman archaeology, the Byzantine world and late antiquity, hunter-gatherers and the spread of farming in Europe, megalithic monuments, later European prehistory and the archaeology of Scotland. As part of your application, you must submit a viable research proposal which sets out your aims and plans, while demonstrating your knowledge of the chosen field: this will be scrutinised as part of our admissions process. Two supervisors will be appointed to work with you on the project. It is a good idea to consult with prospective supervisors in advance of an application.

The School of History, Classics & Archaeology, and our relationships with other subject areas and external organisations, such as the National Museums of Scotland and Historic Environment Scotland, allow us to arrange interdisciplinary study and supervision.

Programme structure

A long dissertation is the sole form of assessment, but you will also attend a prescribed training course and are encouraged to take other relevant courses.

Facilities

Our building offers you exceptional, modern facilities, resources and study spaces, in a stunning location.

Our postgraduate students have access to:

  • A dedicated study and computing lab with printing, copying and scanning facilities, overlooking the Meadows, one of the city’s best-loved green spaces.
  • Two research rooms, shared with undergraduates, housing some of our impressive book collections and a small selection of computing facilities.
  • A large common room overlooking the Meadows, shared by students and staff.
  • Our PhD study room. Subject to available desk space, you may apply after semester one of your first year.
  • A number of small-scale teaching rooms, well-equipped with facilities such as data projection and smart boards.
  • Exhibition areas, filled with artefacts and artwork from our collections.

All of our facilities are in addition to the multiple libraries and computer labs provided across the University’s estate. Many of our rooms overlook the Meadows.

Our location, right in the heart of Edinburgh, means you will be based close to the city’s cultural attractions and facilities, including a wealth of libraries, archives, museums and galleries, which provide uniquely rich support for the disciplines we teach.

Archaeology students benefit from our laboratories for artefact analysis, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, bone chemistry and computing (with a wide range of software applications). There is an extensive reference collection of archaeological materials, such as pottery, metal, stone and glass artefacts, in the V Gordon Childe teaching collection. Students can also benefit from the facilities, archives, collections and expertise of a range of heritage agencies and commercial archaeology units based in the city of Edinburgh.

Career opportunities

Archaeology graduates can follow a variety of career options. The programme equips you to go on to advanced study, and also provides a solid foundation for a career. You will gain practical as well as academic experience, teamworking and analytical skills, and will be able to work in a variety of contexts. Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police. An archaeology degree does not restrict you to a career in archaeology.



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This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially the capital, Rome. A term is spent in Rome, in which you study the monuments and artefacts of the ancient city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history and archaeology of Rome.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology-rome.html

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome, where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Course Structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years.

Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

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With strong links to the media, The Liverpool Screen School houses the industry relevant technology that will advance your professional development, and ability to gather and report throughout this globally relevant News Journalism Masters programme. Read more
With strong links to the media, The Liverpool Screen School houses the industry relevant technology that will advance your professional development, and ability to gather and report throughout this globally relevant News Journalism Masters programme.

•Masters degree available to study full time (one year)
•Teaching delivered in £38million Redmonds Building
•Develops your understanding and knowledge of the practice of journalism, particularly broadcast, for use in an international context
•Gain a working knowledge of international relations relevant to the concerns of mainstream news organisations
•Secure the expertise required to produce quality journalism suitable for broadcast
•Develop research skills at Masters level

News journalism in the 21st century is a 24-hour business, transcending boundaries, timelines and cultures. You will become part of a supportive, scholarly community dedicated to developing your skillset to meet contemporary broadcast standards for the UK.

The Masters in International News Journalism, delivered by the respected Journalism teaching team within the Liverpool Screen School, has been designed to provide a deep understanding and knowledge of the practice of professional journalism, particularly focusing on broadcasting.

The course delivers a combination of practical experience, using the School’s state of the art media suite facilities and strong, Masters-level research skills which you will demonstrate in your dissertation.

You will develop a working knowledge of international relations and several key journalistic disciplines. You will also be expected to show originality in the application of knowledge, and the boundaries of knowledge, through ground-breaking research. On completion of the Masters, you will be able to deal with complex issues systematically and creatively and you will be encouraged to show originality in tackling and solving problems.


You will develop the knowledge and qualities needed for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgment, personal responsibility and initiative, in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The course is designed for international students and will allow you to develop your language skills alongside your intellectual and journalistic knowledge and key skills.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

Journalism Studies

An introduction to the theoretical concepts surrounding the study of journalism. The module will cover a range of subjects including news values, law and ethics, agenda setting, gatekeeping, representation and stereotyping, the use of language, the business of a newsroom and the effects of online journalism on the news agenda

International Relations for Journalists

Examines the theory and practice of international relations focusing in particular on cultural, economic and security relations

Academic research for Journalists

Provides you with a thorough understanding of academic research methods and methodologies suitable for journalism social research and the production of research papers and dissertations at masters level

Advanced UK broadcast Journalism

You will synthesise your skills in writing, reporting and production while working to produce journalism broadcast artefacts both in groups and individually that approach professional UK standards

Introduction to UK Journalism

You will research and produce original news artefacts for a range of media outlets. You will demonstrate developed writing and production skills for a range of news outlets showing a clear understanding of target audiences

Dissertation

You will produce a written dissertation that researches a key issue relating to International Journalism and demonstrates mastery in its analysis or evaluation

Broadcast Journalism Project

This module builds on the Advanced UK Broadcast Journalism module to enhance your professional practice and apply features treatment to a story

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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The Professional Doctorate in Design (DDes) is aimed at candidates who currently work in a design discipline, and who wish to engage in research that relates to their professional role. Read more

About the course

The Professional Doctorate in Design (DDes) is aimed at candidates who currently work in a design discipline, and who wish to engage in research that relates to their professional role. It is also appropriate for candidates who wish to enhance their experience and employability through research training in Design, including those who wish to pursue an academic career. Fields of study may include, but are not limited to:

- Graphic Design and Typography
- Digital Design
- Interaction Design
- 3D printing/additive manufacture
- Architecture
- Product Design
- Interior Design
- Fashion

The DDes is a structured doctorate that can be undertaken part-time using a combination of online and on-campus research activities and supervision. This allows candidates to study in their home countries and to attend at the University only once per year. Candidates can also choose to attend for blocks of full-time study at the University, thereby shortening the overall duration of their studies, and playing an active role in the university’s research community.

The course philosophy is that practice and research cannot be separated. Candidates will be expected to continue with their professional practice and to bring this to bear upon the research questions in the professional doctorate. Most candidates will have established workplaces. For those who do not, or for self-employed or studio practitioners, we offer blocks of time at the University with studio and workshop space provided. At the end of the course we expect that candidates will present a portfolio of both textual and non-textual work, including a written thesis and supporting artefacts that tell a comprehensive story about the research project, its context, its methods and for whom the outcomes will have impact.

Frequently Asked Questions - http://www.herts.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/11898/ProfDocFAQs-2015.pdf

Why choose this course?

- Outcomes include both written thesis and practical
- Part-time doctorate that can be undertaken by candidates based overseas via a virtual research environment, with attendance on campus once a year.
- Directly addresses the international debate concerning the nature of research in creative areas.
- Equips candidates with a range of conceptual and practical skills.
- Structured assignments providing a thorough grounding in practice-led research and the relationship between academic and professional values individual supervised research in the candidate’s own area of professional expertise.
- Individual supervised research in the candidate’s own area of professional expertise.
- Leads to an internationally recognised UK doctorate in Design.

Careers

After successfully completing the doctorate the candidate will have the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue research and to contribute to the development of commercial, institutional and national structures for research in creative areas in their home countries. Research in the Creative Arts is an emerging area and we expect graduates from our programme will take leading roles in its international development.

Teaching methods

The course begins with a series of online study and research skills, which provide a thorough grounding in the philosophical and theoretical issues surrounding notions of so-called practice-based research and the relationship between academic and professional values. At the end of Year 1 when this Phase has been successfully completed, the candidate then undertakes an individual supervised research project in his or her own professional discipline. During this second Phase there are online study materials and structured learning experiences that guide the candidate towards the presentation of a comprehensive outline of the doctoral research. Once the second Phase has been successfully completed (normally during Year 3), the candidate focuses on the production of a written thesis and accompanying artefacts that communicate the content of the research project. Throughout the whole programme we expect both practice and theoretical research to be completely integrated.

Work Placement

This course does not offer work placement. The concept of the professional doctorate (in contrast to the PhD) is that students are already professionally engaged in the workplace, and use this experience as the basis of their doctoral study. Research questions that are grounded in the workplace form the focus of the inquiry, and solutions are implemented through the workplace.

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