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Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies aims to provide students with high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. Read more
Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies aims to provide students with high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. In particular, it is intended to equip students with a sound knowledge and critical understanding of current professional principles, good practice and contemporary debates relating to museum and artefact studies.

It aims to help students develop a variety of skills:
Professional skills - relevant to the care, management and exhibition of collections in museums.
Analytical skills - relevant to the study of a wide range of materials and artefacts, from different periods and cultures, and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
Research skills - relevant to studies of museums and artefacts, including an awareness of current theoretical issues.
Communication skills (oral, written and visual) - relevant to work in the museum profession and to academic research.

It also aims to encourage students to take personal responsibility for their own learning, team-work and professional conduct.

Course Structure

Two distinct routes can be followed through the MA in Museum and Artefact Studies. These comprise different combinations of modules.

Route 1

The first route is intended for students who firmly intend to pursue a career in museums and galleries. It comprises six compulsory taught modules:
-Approaches to museum and artefact studies
-Museum principles and practice
-Artefact studies
-Care of collections
-Museum communication
-Research paper

Route 2

The second route through the MA provides students with a different choice of modules. It is intended for students with a strong interest in artefact studies, who may wish to pursue a career in the cultural heritage sector or undertake further postgraduate research in museum or artefact studies after completing the MA course, but who also wish to keep their options open. It comprises four compulsory modules (one of which is a dissertation) and a choice of a fifth module:
-Approaches to museum and artefact studies
-Museum principles and practice
-Artefact studies
-Dissertation
And either
-Museum communication
Or
-Care of collections
Or
-A module from the MA in Archaeology (e.g. Prehistory; Roman Archaeology; Medieval Archaeology; Post-Medieval Archaeology; or the Archaeology of Egypt, the Near East and India (when available).

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in the Museums sector. Tutorials, seminars and workshops then provide opportunities for students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow students to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Museum and Artefact Studies through placements and curating an exhibition and/or developing an educational programme for the University Museums.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners , giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject. The programme aims to develop these key attributes in its students thereby preparing them for work or further study once they have completed the programme.

In Terms 1 and 2 students typically attend 3-4 hours a week of lectures, up to 4 hours of tutorials or seminars, in addition to 2 workshops and 2-3 hours of practical sessions working with artefacts or museum environment-related matters or fieldtrips over the term. Students have a 20-day Museum placement at Easter in a museum or archive. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. Professional speakers are brought in to engage the students with issues within the professional body.

In Term 3 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required, to applying them within a real-life museum environment in the module Museum Communications where students work together on a specific project(s) with an opening date in May, June or July. Typically, students could be spending the equivalent of a working week as they complete the work for their projects, under supervision.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent research and research continues in Term 3, where the use of research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the Dissertation research project or the Research Paper. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have between 3 and 5 one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The Dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further academic work while the exhibition and Research Paper route is designed for a more professional environment.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend as well as Friends of the Oriental Museum events.

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This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more
This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists, practical issues of artefact study, and debates about the collection, interpretation, reporting and curation of archaeological materials. They develop the ability to evaluate different approaches to artefact studies and undertake the cataloguing and analysis of an artefact assemblage.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Working with artefacts and assemblages
-Technology within Society

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy I: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy II: Metallic Artefacts
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Experimental Archaeology
-Funerary Archaeology
-Geoarchaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Interpreting Pottery
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis

Dissertation/report
The 15,000–word dissertation normally combines a professional standard finds report with an academic overview.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment is through an essay, a portfolio, a project proposal and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording finds.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Project Team Officer, English Heritage
-Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Museum Building Manager, Hainan and Haopioen Arts Museum
-Artefacts Assistant, Maidstone Council
-Freelance Numismatist, Self-Employed Numismatist

Employability
The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials based PhD, this course provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis of the course is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

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Internationally recognised as a pioneering incubator of original designers who challenge the notion of how fashion products change and influence the world we live in. Read more

Introduction

Internationally recognised as a pioneering incubator of original designers who challenge the notion of how fashion products change and influence the world we live in.

Content

MA Fashion Artefact is as original as its name suggests. The course is recognised as a pioneering incubator of ideas and philosophies and has been hailed as a leader in educational studio practice. It has developed and nurtured an impressive roster of alumni who have been awarded top prizes at many international competitions and had their work showcased at prestigious international exhibitions.

Students within Fashion Artefact develop both a comprehensive and personal perspective on fashion in its widest context. The course defines its position within education and the wider creative industries by focusing on the provocative possibilities of an ever-changing spectrum of arenas and audiences.

We believe that fashion is one of the most influential forms of expression in contemporary culture, serving as a reflection of our social behavior. We define fashion artefact as a post-modern metaphor of what occurs in today’s society. Consideration of the fashion artefact in its theoretical and social contexts allows us to gain an insight into complex underlying meanings and open them up for discussion and contemplation.

We strive for perfection and originality in both the exploration and pursuit of material methodologies in construction and manufacture, exploiting both hand-crafted and new technologies. The course leader and teaching team are all internationally recognised practicing artists and designers and are at the forefront of research within studio practice.

Structure

Term One

Creative and Technical Innovation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collaborative Unit (20 credits)
Technical Analysis and Development (40 units)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more
Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

-This MLitt in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
-You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
-You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MLitt you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses
-Material culture in context
-The process of artefact studies

Optional courses include modules such as:
-Lithic analysis
-Independent study
-Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
-Early medieval artefacts
-Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350).
-Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement.

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This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more
This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects.

It is intended for those who wish to become practising artefact conservators, or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range on disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules:
-Conservation Theory
-Conservation Skills
-Artefact Studies
-Care of Collections
-Conservation Practice
-Dissertation

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as a dissertation. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for students to implement and develop their skills, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allow students to continue their learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The dissertation allows students to develop advanced research skills in an aspect of conservation or artefact studies.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares students them for work or further study once they have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking their learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year students typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as students develop their abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of their work and reflections.

The emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in the first year of the course is continued through the dissertation, which marks out the researcher route. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have ten one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which students are strongly encouraged to attend.

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This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more
This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. It is intended for those who wish to become practising artefact conservators, or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range on disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules:
-Conservation Theory
-Conservation Skills
-Artefact Studies
-Care of Collections
-Conservation Practice
-Professional Practice

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as an industrial placement. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for students to implement and develop their skills, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allow students to continue their learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The industrial placement forms a major part of the contact time in the programme for Professional Practitioners, allowing students to gain direct experience of practical and applied skills in Conservation. Industrial partners include the Museum of London, National Museum of Wales and Victoria & Albert Museum.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares students for work or further study once they have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking their learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year students typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as students develop their abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of their work and reflections.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and acting in the role of professional conservator continues in the final year, where students have a placement in a working conservation lab for 9 months. They gain experience of working with a wide range of material and develop further their practical skills, within a real-life working environment. A focus is placed upon problem solving and organisational and managerial skills, under the supervision of a professional conservator. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which students are strongly encouraged to attend.

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The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
-Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
-If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
-Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
-There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
-We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered. The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Core and optional courses

Strands

Theory and Practice
-Museum Interpretation and Learning (Core)
-Museum Practice
-Heritage and Cultural Informatics
-Curating the Sciences
-American Material Culture
-Phenomenology
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Collecting and Provenance (in conjunction with History of Art)
-Cultures of Collecting (Core)
-Object Biography
-Provenance
-Collecting and Display
-Restitution
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Artefact and Material Culture (in conjunction with Archaeology)
-Material Culture in Context (Core)
-Process of Artefact Studies (Core)
-Critical Themes in the Display and Reception of Objects
-Science Based Analysis of Archaeological Material
-Early Medieval Artefacts
-Viking & Late Norse Artefacts
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist in a variety of roles within the cultural heritage sector; these include museums and galleries as well as historic houses, heritage sites and consultancy. Roles range from front of house, education and outreach to collections management, curation, marketing and management.

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This MSc programme concentrates on science-based archaeology and is ideal for people who want to become post-excavation or artefact specialists in the museum or commercial sectors. Read more
This MSc programme concentrates on science-based archaeology and is ideal for people who want to become post-excavation or artefact specialists in the museum or commercial sectors.

There are two pathways to choose from: Artefact, and Landscape and Environment. Each would be suitable for graduates in archaeology or science subjects, who want to start or further their careers in these exciting fields.

The programme would also be useful preparation for further academic research and the skills you'll gain, such as problem-solving and team work, will be attractive to any employer.

The MSc in Archaeology consists of 180 credits of study. You will take a taught programme of 120 credits, comprised of eight modules, each of 15 credits, divided evenly into four modules per semester. You will also be required to complete a 15,000-20,000 word research dissertation which is to be submitted at the end of the academic year. You will be able to tailor the degree programme to suit your interests and requirements as far as possible within the options available.

Why Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology?

Academic expertise

Archaeology, Classics and Eygyptology has 39 full-time academic staff, who are all actively engaged in research ranging from early prehistory through to late antiquity.

Here are some of our particularly strong areas:-

African archaeology
ancient languages
archaeology of the Mediterranean and the Near East
archaeological science
Egyptology
European prehistory
Greek and Roman history and culture.
Fieldwork is an important part of research in archaeology and we've projects based internationally, in Egypt, Greece, Bulgaria, Jordan, Turkey, Italy, Zambia and South Africa, as well as in the British Isles.

Taught masters programmes

We offer a unique breadth of taught masters degrees in Ancient History, Archaeology (MA or MSc), Human Evolution, Classics and Egyptology.

You can configure a wide choice of modules to suit your interests and requirements and there are opportunities to learn different approaches and techniques, as well as ancient languages such as Greek, Latin, Akkadian, Sumerian, Egyptian and Coptic.

All of our masters degrees provide intensive training to prepare you for doctoral research and employment.

Excellent resources

The Ancient World and Archaeology has been studied at Liverpool since the 1880s, so we've had plenty of time to build up an enviable library and a fantastic museum.

The Garstang Museum, which is in the ACE building, has outstanding archaeological collections, along with extensive laboratory facilities for conservation, lithics, geomagnetism, stable isotope, trace elements, finds processing and sample preparation.

We also have a GIS suite with facilities for archaeological drawing and offer 24-hour access for taught students to a dedicated Student Resource Centre, complete with PCs, personal lockers, desk space, wi-fi and a networked printer.

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The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

-If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
-You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses
-Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
-Research Skills

Optional courses - three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following
-Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
-Early Christian monuments of Scotland
-Early Medieval artefacts
-Viking and late Norse artefacts
-Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
-Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options
-Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies).
-Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
-Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies.
-Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.

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The MSc in Software Development provides a year of intensive education in software engineering and is ideal for graduates of disciplines other than computing. Read more

Software Development (conversion)

The MSc in Software Development provides a year of intensive education in software engineering and is ideal for graduates of disciplines other than computing.

This course is designed to develop the technical, analytical and professional skills required to take on software development roles within the IT industry.

Software development skills, such as programming, are essential to the technological evolution and advancement of most sectors within the economy. As a result, there is a very strong demand for software professionals.

Aims

The programme aims to:
◦provide a solid understanding of software engineering principles and techniques
◦develop the ability to analyse software problems, create and evaluate software designs and develop and appropriately test software solutions
◦foster critical analysis and evaluative skills pertaining to software engineering

What way is Software Development being taught

The programme is separated into three parts; a foundational element covering the basics of software development and programming; an advanced element where you can tailor your area of specialism; and finally a substantial individual project.

Foundational Element
Most foundational modules are studied in the first semester and cover introductory programming using the Java programming language alongside the foundations of software engineering and databases. Coverage of more advanced algorithmic and object-oriented programming continues into the second semester. The foundation modules are intended to provide students with an essential grounding in software engineering in a manner that is consistent with Level M requirements.

Advanced Element
The second semester provides a number of advanced software engineering modules which permit specialism within key areas of software development. The advanced modules currently encompass aspects such as Requirements Engineering, Software Quality, Software Design Principles and Patterns, and Software Testing and Verification. Alongside these there is an opportunity to take an introductory module in Capital Markets which would help to prime students for software development roles within the financial sector.

The combination of lectures, laboratory work, tutorials and group-based projects employed throughout the foundational and advanced elements equips students with the skills needed to both design and implement complex software systems.

Project Element
Three month summer projects are taken individually with supervision from a member of the School's teaching staff. The projects permit students to combine and apply the skills gained within individual modules towards the creation of a significant software artefact. Projects can be selected by students from a list put forward by the local software industry and the School. Where appropriate an industrial co-supervisor will be assigned.

Modules

Semester 1
Programming I
Databases
Software Engineering

Semester 2
Programming II
Web and Mobile Applications
Software Testing and Verification
Software Design Principles and Patterns

Assessment

The MSc in Software Development is, by its nature, an intensive and practical programme of study. Students build strong software development skills by putting theory into practice and this is reflected within the assessment. A mixture of individual and group based projects, assignments and practical examinations provide the primary means of assessment within modules, with written examinations also employed for some modules. The summer project is assessed through a written dissertation alongside the presentation and demonstration of the created software artefact.

Career Opportunities

The School has strong links with the local, national and international software companies situated around the University. Students have ample opportunity to meet and engage with employers through hosted careers fairs, guest lectures and industrial facing demonstrations. Where possible, MSc dissertations will be set and co-supervised by an industrial partner and may involve an on-site placement.

Employment opportunities in software engineering are excellent as evidenced through the consistent and continued growth of the software sector. A career within the profession is not only well remunerated but also rewarding, with software professionals able to select between a range of career progression paths. Given the diversity of career paths, the communicative, business-related, client-facing, analytical and evaluative skills gained from a primary degree are strongly valued by IT employers and will help augment the employment opportunities of graduates from this MSc.

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-Digital Media Arts provides an opportunity to study one or more digital specialisms including video, kinetics, animation, sound, games, photography, social and interactive media. Read more
-Digital Media Arts provides an opportunity to study one or more digital specialisms including video, kinetics, animation, sound, games, photography, social and interactive media
-Experiment and explore emerging technologies and develop innovative and effective combinations of practices and media
-Develop high-level skills in your chosen specialisms or areas of interest supported by expert tutors.
-Project-based work where the emphasis is on the creative, informed application of new technologies and devices to produce compelling user experiences
-You will be able to produce a substantial self-initiated digital media project supported by excellent resources and expertise

Why choose this course?

Digital Media are everywhere in the modern world, affecting all aspects of our lives, our work, leisure and social and personal relationships. The MA Digital Media Arts award allows students to gain practical experience and knowledge of the ways that a range of contemporary digital media are produced and used, both alone and in combination. Working in one or more specialisms which can include video, kinetics, animation, games, photography, social and interactive media, students are encouraged to experiment with combinations of media through digital ‘sketches’ and then, through developing more extended works informed by their individual interests, to pursue a substantial, practical enquiry into an original creative application of digital media in a major project.

Students typically explore areas such as interactive advertising, responsive objects and environments, networked information and social-media systems, interactive video, live performance technology and digital art installations.

Careers

Interactive Advertising production, Digital strategists, Multimedia producers for TV and Radio, Media designers for Museums and public information systems, Games developers, VJ for live performances, Digital Activism, User Experience innovators, digital entrepreneurs.

Teaching methods

The course is delivered through a mix of seminars, lectures and tutorials by an expert, specialist, teaching team. As a Digital Media Arts student, you will produce a range of practical projects and gain skills in a variety of technologies and systems while at the same time developing your knowledge of current developments and practices across the digital media field. For your master’s degree project, you will specify and then produce a substantial digital media artefact which reflects your own interests and career plans. We particularly encourage experimentation and cross-disciplinary projects including those that seek to redefine the ambitions, functions and social organisations that digital media can support. During the course, some students will participate in selected undergraduate technical classes in addition to their masters study so that they can update or develop specific skills. Professional, theoretical and critical skills are also taught alongside the technical and design content through the use of academic blogs and presentations.

All students on this programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Work Placement

There are work related learning opportunities on this course, all students complete a live external brief as part of their coursework.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Major Study: Digital Media Arts
-Media Discourses
-Practice 1: Media
-Practice 2: Media
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. Read more
This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. By combining cutting edge research from the fields of criminology, archaeology, art history, heritage studies, and law, via discussion of compelling case studies, this course will allow you to explore the criminal networks that function in the area of art crime and what can be done to protect our past and our culture for the future.

Why this programme

-This is the only online art crime and illicit antiquities research programme currently available and is the first University-accredited postgraduate degree offered on this topic.
-You will be taught by leading academics in this field, who are members of the Trafficking Culture Project, the only academic research group devoted to the study of the illicit trafficking of cultural objects .
-This programme is taught entirely online through pre-recorded lectures and optional real-time seminars. This allows distance learners maximum flexibility while maintaining the high level of instructure and peer interaction needed to explore such challenging topics.
-Students who successfully complete the PgCert will have the opportunity to come to Glasgow, to complete a full masters degree in the areas of criminology and art history.

Programme structure

You will take three courses across three semesters (includes summer teaching). During each course you will investigate and present an art or antiquities crime case study, produce a portfolio-quality ‘digital artefact’ and write an essay for assessment. Depending on your needs and goals, you can take one of the courses individually or all three to achieve the qualification.

Core courses
-Antiquities trafficking
-Art crime
-Repatriation, recovery return

Career prospects

This programme complements careers in the museums and heritage sector, in law enforcement and security, in related fields of law, in fine art and provenance research, and should qualify students to proceed to a full masters degree in archaeology, heritage studies, museums studies, art history, criminology or other related discipline.

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The MA Education programme is an exciting opportunity to join with other students in discussion and collaborative learning while being taught by a team which is highly skilled in supporting your needs as a postgraduate student. Read more
The MA Education programme is an exciting opportunity to join with other students in discussion and collaborative learning while being taught by a team which is highly skilled in supporting your needs as a postgraduate student.

Course detail

The course engages you with current issues and debates in education, enabling you to gain critical awareness and understanding and to develop new insights. You will engage in research and advanced scholarship in the discipline and will develop as a self-directed, independent learner who is able to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively.

Modules

• Developing Criticality
• Methods of Enquiry
• Global Perspectives on Education
• Critical Contemporary Issues in Education in a National Context
• Local Independent Study/Project

Dissertation: Education

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research focused on a topic that is relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus and nature of the investigation will be agreed with a supervisor.

Major Project: Education

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research investigation and artefact development on a topic relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus, nature of the investigation and intended output will be negotiated and agreed with a supervisor. For example, through your second year studies you may have developed a particular interest which you wish to pursue further. Enterprise education was the example given above for illustrative purposes and so taking this example further, the student decides to focus the final study on social enterprises and new models of education between social entrepreneurs and schools. S/he chooses the major project option rather than the dissertation option as this allows scope to include artefacts in written, aural or visual form alongside the written component.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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Our MA Education. Early Childhood programme offers you the opportunity to learn about and develop your knowledge of current issues from a wide range of perspectives on education and to focus your study towards your particular interest in Early Childhood. Read more
Our MA Education: Early Childhood programme offers you the opportunity to learn about and develop your knowledge of current issues from a wide range of perspectives on education and to focus your study towards your particular interest in Early Childhood.

The Year One modules introduce you to the skills you need for Master’s level study and you will develop in-depth knowledge of a range of approaches and methods through which education is investigated.

In Year Two there is a choice to adopt a local, national or global perspective. You might choose to study global changes and effects on education or contemporary educational issues and changes at national level, or you might have a specific ‘local’ issue you want to study. This ‘local’ issue might be something relevant to you and your employer if you are employed in a work setting, or it might be a special interest in some aspect of Early Childhood that you choose to examine in more depth. In Year Three you will study the Dissertation/Major Project and the focus for this study will be on Early Childhood. You will have a specific tutor who will supervise this work.

Course detail

We have designed the MA programmes to support you to engage proactively in education from a theoretical or practical approach, or a combination of the two.

We include creative approaches to teaching, learning and assessment and you are supported by a team of tutors who are active researchers. We have designed the programme to enable you to study with others who are interested in a wide range of educational issues; for example people working in primary, secondary, post-compulsory or higher education; libraries and archive professionals; people working in museum education; people with mentor roles; Early Years teachers, play workers or Children’s Centre managers.

The course engages you with current issues and debates in education, enabling you to gain critical awareness and understanding and to develop new insights. You will engage in research and advanced scholarship in the discipline and will develop as a self-directed, independent learner who is able to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively.

Modules

• Developing Criticality
• Methods of Enquiry
• Global Perspectives on Education
• Critical Contemporary Issues in Education in a National Context
• Local Independent Study/Project

Dissertation: Early Childhood

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research focused on a topic that is relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus and nature of the investigation will be agreed with your supervisor; for example it could be an investigation into developing parental involvement in early learning or young children’s perceptions of outdoor play.

Major Project: Early Childhood

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research investigation and artefact development on a topic relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus, nature of the investigation and intended output will be negotiated and agreed with your supervisor; for example the written component could be an investigation into strategies to promote smooth transition from Foundation Stage to Key Stage One, together with artefacts including a dissemination strategy you have developed which may include a booklet and good practice guidelines for practitioners in the setting.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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MA Education. Mentoring offers the opportunity to learn about and develop knowledge of current issues from a wide range of perspectives on education and focus your study towards your particular interest in Mentoring. Read more
MA Education: Mentoring offers the opportunity to learn about and develop knowledge of current issues from a wide range of perspectives on education and focus your study towards your particular interest in Mentoring.

Course detail

Our MA Education: Mentoring programme offers you the opportunity to learn about and develop your knowledge of current issues from a wide range of perspectives on education and to focus your study towards your particular interest in Mentoring.

The Year One modules introduce the skills you need for Master’s level study and you will develop in-depth knowledge of a range of approaches and methods through which education is investigated. In Year Two there is a choice to adopt a local, national or global perspective. You might choose to study global changes and effects on education or contemporary educational issues and changes at national level, or you might have a specific ‘local’ issue you want to study. This ‘local’ issue might be something relevant to you and your employer if you are employed in a work setting, or it might be some aspect of your special interest in Mentoring that you choose to examine in more depth. In Year Three you will study the Dissertation/Major Project and the focus for this study will be on Mentoring. You will have a specific tutor who will supervise this work.

Format

We have designed the MA programmes to support you to engage proactively in education from a theoretical or practical approach, or a combination of the two.

We include creative approaches to teaching, learning and assessment and you are supported by a team of tutors who are active researchers. We have designed the programme to enable you to study with others who are interested in a wide range of educational issues; for example people working in primary, secondary, post-compulsory or higher education; libraries and archive professionals; people working in museum education; people with mentor roles; Early Years teachers, play workers or Children’s Centre managers.

The course engages you with current issues and debates in education, enabling you to gain critical awareness and understanding and to develop new insights. You will engage in research and advanced scholarship in the discipline and will develop as a self-directed, independent learner who is able to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively.

Modules

- Developing Criticality
- Methods of Enquiry
- Global Perspectives on Education
- Critical Contemporary Issues in Education in a National Context
- Local Independent Study/Project

In the third and final year of part-time study you will study either the Dissertation or Major Project:

Dissertation: Mentoring

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research focused on a topic that is relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus and nature of the investigation will be agreed with your supervisor; for example it could be an investigation into developing the role of the learning mentor or an investigation into mentor support strategies for NQTs or the development of peer buddies in the playground.

Major Project: Mentoring

This module is the culmination of the MA Education. It engages students in a substantial piece of research investigation and artefact development on a topic relevant to an educational context and manageable within the time and credit constraints of a Master’s dissertation. The focus, nature of the investigation and intended output will be negotiated and agreed with your supervisor for example the written component could be an investigation into mentees perceptions of mentor support, together with artefacts including a dissemination strategy you have developed which may include a booklet and good practice guidelines for the setting.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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