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Artists doing strange things with technology. This sums up our MADtech Programme. To imagine, interpret and change human interaction with a transforming world you will use and artistically explore different technologies. Read more
Artists doing strange things with technology. This sums up our MADtech Programme. To imagine, interpret and change human interaction with a transforming world you will use and artistically explore different technologies. You will do so with a tinker mentality: play and experimentation are important aspects in your development and will carry a special emphasis on the research you do. This mentality, combined with a critical reflective attitude and conceptual skills, will lead to unexpected perspectives, resulting in multimedia artistic work.

The Frank Mohr Institute at the Minerva Art Academy offers two international Masters of Arts:
-MA Painting
-MA MADtech (Media, Art, Design & Technology)*, each consisting of a two-year curriculum.


Past, present and future

At MA MADtech we are constantly searching for the dialogue between different viewpoints from the past, present and future: between art and science, laboratory and applied research, stable and unstable media, old and new technology, local and global forms of society. We do so collectively, sharing our views and ideas, working in groups and learning from each other. At the same time, you will follow your own path, improving your knowledge and skills, learning to reflect critically on your own position, role and work as well as on the world around you.

Hybrid practice

Participants of our programme come from different practices, media, art and design, and share a fascination for technology. The combination of these areas gives you the opportunity to develop your artistic vision, working in a hybrid practice as a critical and engaged artist. As your art engages with the world, you will grow as an individual as well as in your artistic profession, reinforcing the power of your imagination and exploring your own connection to a transforming, technologically charged society.

Art & Research

MADtech is all about combining art and technology, creating hybrid forms of art, using traditional as well as brand new, unexpected means, content and media. Experimentation, tinkering and playing are vital methods for developing your work, backed up by thorough reflection. Artistic technology research is therefore a major part of the master programme. You will take part in collaborative artistic research projects, exploring the possibilities and limitations of transdisciplinary and transmedial situations in contemporary culture. This will help you to understand the links between aesthetics, technology, materiality, thinking and politics.

Enriching your work and ideas

You enter this programme with your own research topic. You will develop and refine these ideas during your first year, enriching your ideas through the knowledge and skills that you will gain, the experiments that you will carry out and the collaboration that you'll encounter. The second year is almost entirely devoted to your graduation work and artistic research, leading to your master thesis. During your time with us you will be part of a community where education, research and the artistic practice meet and reinforce each other.

Hybrid Arts Lab

For most of your work, research and lectures you will go to our building on the Praediniussingel. There you will find our Hybrid Arts Lab, also called HAL 24/7.
It includes an artistic technology research lab, seminar, project, lecture and exhibition rooms, media and photography studios, common workplaces, common kitchen and individual studios. You also have access to your studio 24 hours a day, seven days a week. At HAL we provide plenty of facilities, which you can use, technologically and otherwise as well as sufficient technical support. If you require more complex, technological facilities, you are welcome to make use of the Hanze facilities at the Institute of Engineering in Assen.

Expert meetings, artist's talks and exhibitions

You can attend interesting expert meetings, artist's talks and exhibitions, for instance by lectors of the Centre of Applied Research and Innovation Art & Society. During the 'Energize Festival' an international workshop called 'Recycling Electronics' took place here. Another interesting example is the expert meeting concerning photography research in cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural artistic practices, which involved current students and alumni. Every year, the course Research & Development/New Media Art Practices organises different collaborative projects and workshops, for example, with CREW Immersive Media and Blast Theory.

Centre of Applied Research and Innovation Art & Society

The Art & Society research centre of the Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen covers the practice based research of Minerva Art Academy. The Art & Society research centre consists of three research groups: Lifelong Learning in Music, Image in Context and Popular Culture, and Sustainability & Innovation.

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The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design.

Typically this might include teachers, aspiring artists or designers, aspiring academics, or recent graduates in Fine Art or Design who wish to further their professional practice. It will also cater for those students with first degrees outside Art & Design who wish to convert their career path by following a more theoretical route in Art and Design.

The MA Art and Design is designed as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module [RS]) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design will align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design curriculum is designed so that students:
- Explore and develop concepts, skills or philosophies
- Develop creative skills
- Have a trajectory towards progression to MPhil/PhD

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/ma.aspx

Course Content

The suite of Master of Art (Art and Design) pathways currently offered is:
Art History through Practice
Art, Science & Technology
Design Futures
Ecologies
Fashion Design Futures
Philosophy

Learning & Teaching

The MA Art and Design is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the fine-art/design expertise in a respective fine-art/design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA Art and Design students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA Art and Design programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Art and Design Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (75 hours).

- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (125 hours).

- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Employability & Careers

The MA Art and Design acts as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards potential future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. The MA Art and Design programme aims to develop increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The History of Art MA at UCL draws on the world-leading research and teaching expertise within the department, and is designed to enable students to acquire specialised knowledge pertaining to the field of art history and to develop independent research skills. Read more
The History of Art MA at UCL draws on the world-leading research and teaching expertise within the department, and is designed to enable students to acquire specialised knowledge pertaining to the field of art history and to develop independent research skills.

Degree information

Students develop skills for engaging with visual materials and gain historical knowledge, enabling them to interpret artefacts in relation to their social and cultural contexts. They are introduced to current methodological debates in the field and encouraged to define their own position through reasoned historical and theoretical arguments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a core module (30 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Methods, Debates and Sources in History of Art

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Human and Non-Human in Medieval Art
-Cannibalism and the Early Modern Image
-Vision, Tourism, Imperialism: Art and Travel in the British Empire, 1760-1870
-American Media: Publicity and the Logics of Surveillance
-Politics of the Image: Germany 1890-1945
-Art as Theory: The Writing of Art
-Art and Technology in Nineteenth-Century France
-Photographic Cultures: Photography's Publics and the Production of Politics
-On Sex and Violence
-Race/Place: Exotic/Erotic
-Tracing the Body: Technologies of Representation in 18th and 19th-Century France

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 13,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, as well as gallery and museum visits. Assessment is by two essays for each of the taught courses (six essays in all), the dissertation and a viva.

Careers

UCL's History of Art graduates have a excellent record of success in entering PhD programmes, careers in museums and galleries, the art trade, the heritage industry, art publishing, and art conservation. The unique combination of visual analysis and intellectual rigour offered by the MA has also proven valuable in diverse careers including journalism, publishing, and advertising. For those aspiring to an academic career, the MA is a requirement for a PhD, and many former MA students have sucessfully received funding for research degrees, and subsequently obtained academic positions, at prestigious institutions in the UK, North America, and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Artist Assistant, Ai Weiwei
-Head of Client Service, Bonhams 1793
-Collections Assistant, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts
-PhD History of Art, University College London (UCL)
-Museum Intern, Peggy Guggenheim Collection

Employability
Our History of Art MA provides focused training in the history of art and its methodologies. It encourages students to develop original critical thinking on all aspects of visual culture, and promotes a serious engagement with historical and contemporary cultural debates. You will learn how to work collaboratively as well as independently to develop your skills in written and oral communications. The MA is an excellent starting point for a career in academia, curating, for working in the heritage industry, commercial art galleries, and other sectors of the cultural industries.

Why study this degree at UCL?

History of Art at UCL is one of the most dynamic centres for the study of art history and visual cultures in the world. The department is top-rated for research; and all staff are active researchers in a range of specialist fields. Our teaching and research move beyond traditional forms of art history to address visual and material cultures more broadly, and we are committed to a wide range of critical and historiographical enquiry.

The MA in History of Art is a challenging and versatile degree; you will study in a community of c. 40 graduate students; at the same time you will work in smaller groups and in close contact with tutors in your special subject courses.

The department is located in Bloomsbury, close to the Warburg Institute, the British Library, and the British Museum. The National Gallery, Tate Galleries, and the Victoria and Albert Museum are also within easy reach. UCL's own Art Museum holds many rare and important works.

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The Art and Design PGCE is a challenging and forward-looking programme which prepares students to teach across the 11–18 age range, encouraging them to relate art, craft and design education to contemporary art practice. Read more
The Art and Design PGCE is a challenging and forward-looking programme which prepares students to teach across the 11–18 age range, encouraging them to relate art, craft and design education to contemporary art practice. It has a strong reputation for promoting innovation in education theory, practice and policy.

Degree information

This programme aims to inform and inspire, to challenge orthodoxies and encourage a freshness of vision. It provides support and guidance for learning and teaching in art and design, identifying strategies to motivate and engage pupils in making, discussing and evaluating visual and material culture.

Through seminars and studio-based activities, students will study the concepts, processes and skills of art, craft and design, sharing their knowledge and understanding with other student teachers and considering how it relates to the secondary curriculum. Towards the end of the PGCE, students will build on their own practice by initiating a curriculum development project, culminating in the display of their work at a final exhibition that represents their personal philosophy for art and design education.

Students undertake two level 7 (Master’s-level) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level (level 7) modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Subject Studies (30 Master's-level credits)
-Wider Educational Studies (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
You will spend two-thirds of your time (120 days) in schools, working with art and design mentors who support you through your two school placements. We are fortunate to have a good choice of schools with whom we work, with some outstanding mentors and strong art and design departments. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placements. Assessment is by practical teaching, assignments and portfolio tasks. Students also record their progress in an assessment record file (ARF). This will form part of an ongoing portfolio charting the student's continuing professional development.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers and heads of art and design departments in schools and colleges, while others have jobs as education officers in galleries and museums. Graduates in this area can also be found working as lecturers on art foundation courses.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Art Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
-Art Tutor, London College
-Freelance Video Editor/Animator
-Art, Design and Technology Teacher, London School
-Creative Studies Teacher, Unspecified Essex Academy

Employability
A PGCE from the IOE carries considerable currency in schools which, alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Education (IOE) provides excellent studio space and facilities for Art and Deisgn, including a computing suite where students will learn about how information and communications technology is used in art and design education. The programme also has strong links with galleries, museums and other sites for learning, which are recognised as an important resource for engaging students in cultural and social issues.

As the leading PGCE in Art and Design in the country, this programme has a strong reputation for promoting innovation in education theory, practice and policy. The tutor team provide a wide range of expertise and interests in contemporary art practices, alternative pedagogies and art histories.

A distinctive feature of the programme is the final exhibition where, using their own creative practice, artist-teachers develop work representing their personal philosophy for art and design education.

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The Water Technology programme is a two year programme with a joint degree. The programme is offered jointly by Wageningen University, University Twente and University of Groningen with education being provided at the Technological Top Institute for Water technology (TTIW Wetsus), in Leeuwarden. Read more

MSc Water Technology

The Water Technology programme is a two year programme with a joint degree. The programme is offered jointly by Wageningen University, University Twente and University of Groningen with education being provided at the Technological Top Institute for Water technology (TTIW Wetsus), in Leeuwarden

Programme summary

There are a lot of new and existing global problems related to the availability and quality of water for personal, agricultural and industrial use. And these problems require sustainable solutions with a minimal impact on the environment. Water technology has unfortunately not been a focal point of most academic research and education programmes, despite its enormous importance to society. Instead, the expertise of various research groups is usually concentrated on other processes and in some cases, only later dedicated to water treatment in spin-off projects. New technologies will be necessary to develop new concepts for the treatment of waste water. And also for the production of clean water from alternative sources like salt (sea) water, waste water or humid air in order to minimise the use of precious groundwater. These challenges require academically trained experts who can think out-of-the-box and help to find practical solutions in the near future. A dedicated joint Master Water Technology programme has been created to train and educate these experts.

The MSc Water Technology is situated in Leeuwarden, the capital of water technology, and is offered jointly by three Dutch universities: Wageningen University, the University of Twente and the University of Groningen. A combined technological approach, based on state-of-the-art universities in science and technology, will search for solutions to several developments within business and society; with a worldwide impact on the demand for and use of water. One dedicated Master programme with joint degree allows for flexibility and can be adapted to the changing needs of the labour market. Wageningen University offers a strong focus on environmental sciences, the University of Twente on science and technology, and the University of Groningen on fundamental sciences. Students will be educated in the multidisciplinary laboratory of the technological top institute for water technology called Wetsus.

The MSc Water Technology programme specifically targets students interested in beta science and technology. The programme offers a unique combination of scientific insights and technological applications from the field of Biotechnology and Chemical Engineering. This combined approach for problem solving within the global framework of water problems is an asset to the programme. The programme is a valuable addition for postgraduate students with a completed bachelor degree in Environmental Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology; or in related fields with a strong knowledge of mathematics, physics, chemistry and/or biology, and with affinity of water processes. Students are challenged with examples and case studies of real (research) problems that they might encounter as water professionals.

Students apply for the MSc Water Technology programme at Wageningen University, but will be registered at the other two universities as well. They will have access to the facilities of all three universities. Upon the successful completion of the programme, students receive one joint degree MSc Water Technology issued by all participating universities.

Specialisations

There are no official specialisations within the programme Water Technology. Students specialise themselves by doing a thesis within one of the research fields. Some examples are: Priority compounds, Virus Control, Applied water physics, Desalination, Concentrates, Biofouling, Aquatic worms, Advanced waste water treatment, Algae, Separation at source, Resource recovery, Membrane processes and operation for wastewater treatment and reuse and Sensoring.

Your future career

This study domain is becoming more and more relevant due to the urgent need for new technologies to meet global water problems. Water technology for public drinking water production and sewage water treatment is a very large market. Furthermore, the largest use of fresh water is for irrigation purposes. The industrial water supply and industrial waste water treatment also represent a significant market. There is no question that businesses involved in water technology will grow tremendously. Besides this, human capital is a basic condition to guarantee the success and continuity of the development of sustainable technologies. In many EU countries, the lack of talented technological professionals is becoming an increasingly limiting factor. The programme prepares students for a professional position in the broad area of water technology. Graduates have good national and international career prospects in business and research.

Student Stefanie Stubbé.
"Wetsus gave me the opportunity to get personalized education: teachers that take the time for you and fellow students that challenge and collaborate with you at the same time. Water technology is going to be huge in the future; I already experienced that at several companies when I searched for an internship. Although it is sometimes hard work and far away from the "city-life" in the Netherlands; I've never regretted my choice to start this Master!"

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Environmental Sciences

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School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established Art and Design PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance. Read more
School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established Art and Design PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance.

Degree information

This programme aims to inform and inspire, to challenge orthodoxies and encourage a freshness of vision. It provides support and guidance for learning and teaching in art and design, identifying strategies to motivate and engage pupils in making, discussing and evaluating visual and material culture.

Through seminars and studio-based activities, students will study the concepts, processes and skills of art, craft and design, sharing their knowledge and understanding with other student teachers and considering how it relates to the secondary curriculum. Towards the end of the PGCE, students will build on their own practice by initiating a curriculum development project, culminating in the display of their work at a final exhibition that represents their personal philosophy for art and design education.

Students undertake two Master’s-level (level 7) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Subject Studies (30 Master's-level credits)
-Wider Educational Issues (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
You will spend two-thirds of your time (120 days) in schools, working with art and design mentors who support you through your two school placements. We are fortunate to have a good choice of schools with whom we work, with some outstanding mentors and strong art and design departments. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placement at the host school or alliance. Assessment is by the observation of practical teaching, assignments and a portfolio (which links into continuing professional development in the induction year).

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers and heads of art and design departments in schools and colleges, while others have jobs as education officers in galleries and museums. Graduates in this area can also be found working as lecturers on art foundation courses.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Art Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
-Art History Teacher, Unspecified College
-Head of Art and Design, Unspecified Academy

Employability
A PGCE from the UCL IOE carries considerable currency in schools, which alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Art and Design PGCE is a challenging and forward-looking programme which prepares students to teach across the 11–18 age range. As the leading PGCE in Art and Design in the country, this programme has a strong reputation for promoting innovation in education theory, practice and policy. The tutor team provide a wide range of expertise and interests in contemporary art practices, alternative pedagogies and art histories. A distinctive feature of the programme is the final exhibition where, using their own creative practice, artist-teachers develop work representing their personal philosophy for art and design education.

The IOE provides excellent studio space and facilities for Art and Design, including a computing suite where students will learn about how information and communications technology is used in art and design education. The programme also has strong links with galleries, museums and other sites for learning, which are recognised as an important resource for engaging students in cultural and social issues.

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The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level. Read more
The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level.

The course facilitates critical debate between artists working both within and across media areas including painting, photography, digital imaging, printmaking, sculpture, installation and site-specific art. Alongside their studio-based enquiry, students undertake related research into the broader context of contemporary art practices and theoretical debates.

The course offers access to comprehensive specialist resources with technical instruction and support. Students are continually mentored by research-active staff to position their practice within professional cultural environments, arts-related employment or higher-level academic research.

Both full time and part time students benefit from spacious and well-equipped facilities and external links with galleries, which have included the Milton Keynes Gallery, NN Contemporary (Northampton), Corby Cube Gallery and Rugby Museum and Art Gallery. The course often offers international study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

In addition to the course having very good links with regional galleries and arts organisations, students are encouraged to engage with external activities and events, both national and international. A group of MA Fine Art students recently attended a printmaking residency at the world-renowned Frans Masereel Centrum in Belgium.

Our teaching staff have a broad range of research interests reflecting the disciplines available on the course, and all staff are practicing artists who publish and exhibit both nationally and internationally. Visiting speakers have included the internationally known artists Richard Long, Marcus Harvey, Simon Callery, Ian Davenport, Mark Francis, Lisa Milroy, David Batchelor, Richard Deacon, Svetlana Fialova, Richard Patterson, Ian McKeever, Dan Hays and Richard Wilson along with innovative arts organisations such as Artangel.

Course content

Upon commencing the Masters programme, students undertake the module ‘Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies’ (20 credits). This provides a grounding in different research-based methods and methodologies in Fine Art.

During the first trimester students also undertake the 20 credit studio-based module ‘Fine Art Practice’ wherein students begin to critically re-appraise and position their creative practice. Full-time students will also be enrolled on ‘Interfacings,’ a 20 credit module that considers a set of theoretical debates, issues and contexts that are pertinent to an interdisciplinary approach to artistic practice.

During the second trimester students enrol on the 40 credit module ‘Fine Art Practice and Context.’ This module culminates in a public developmental exhibition of their work. Alongside this module, full-time students can opt to take either the project-based ‘Independent Study’ module or the 20 credit module ‘Creative Practice and Enterprise.’

The final stage of the MA Fine Art course entails the student producing and exhibiting a body of creative work or completing a 15-18,000 word dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-Fine Art Practice and Documentation
-Interfacings: Fine Art and Postmodern Practice
-Creative Practice and Enterprise
-Fine Art Practice and Context
-Independent Study in the Arts
-Research project
-Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies

Opportunities Abroad

International study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

Methods of Learning

The MA Fine Art course supports all learners’ experience and development through a breadth of regular tutorial approaches. Tutor and learner contact is additionally enriched through a host of visiting artists of international stature. Modes of teaching delivery encompass tutorials, group crits, research supervision, lectures and seminars.

Schedule

During the first and second trimester specific modules are delivered usually on Mondays 9:30-12:30 and 13:00 – 16:00.

Assessments

The course is assessed in both theory and practice by assignment, examination, portfolio submission and exhibition.

In addition to an ongoing series of formative assessment points, the MA Fine Art course has three formal assessment periods that occur at the end of each trimester in February, May and September respectively.

Facilities and Special Features

The Fine Art subject is enriched through a spectrum of professional specialist spaces including: Fine Art New Media Space, Photographic Studio, Photographic Dark Room, Wood Workshop, Metal Workshop, Plaster and Resin Workshop, Etching Printroom, Screen Printing Room (including laser cutting), The Drawing Lab (Drawing research space and life room), Canvas Preparation Room and bookable installation spaces.

Careers

The course prepares students for the professional cultural environment and higher research study. PhDs at the University of Northampton can be pursued through traditional or practice led methodologies and this course provides a comprehensive and relevant foundation.

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more
This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

◾Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
◾You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
◾Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates.

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses
◾Research methods in practice
◾Theories of the Avant Garde
◾Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
◾Art, embodiment, transgression
◾Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts
◾a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
◾a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature
◾a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art
◾Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
◾Independent study
◾Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

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The Secondary Postgraduate Certificate in Education is a one academic year (36 week) course that trains graduates to be secondary school teachers of Art and Design. Read more
The Secondary Postgraduate Certificate in Education is a one academic year (36 week) course that trains graduates to be secondary school teachers of Art and Design.

The PGCE programme has been designed to train teachers to practice as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). Trainees are assessed against the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) across the age range. Trainees will also often gain experience of the 16-18 age range, although they will not be formally assessed in this phase.

Art and design stimulates creativity and imagination. It provides visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a unique way of understanding and responding to the world. Pupils use colour, form, texture, pattern and different materials and processes to communicate what they see, feel and think. Through art and design activities pupils learn to make informed value judgements and aesthetic and practical decisions, becoming actively involved in shaping environments. They explore ideas and meanings in the work of artists, craftspeople and designers. They learn about the diverse roles and functions of art, craft and design in contemporary life and in different times and cultures.

Key benefits

• 24 weeks are spent on placement: a total of eight weeks in one placement during the autumn term and 16 weeks in a second placement during the spring and summer.

• As well as teaching, the programme includes contact time with a Senior Professional Tutor and a Subject Mentor, directed study time and personal study time.

• There is an opportunity to spend time in a primary school and some students may also visit other institutions, such as special schools or colleges of further education.

Course detail

The course is active and practical allowing trainees to develop professional competence through work undertaken in schools and in the University. It is our view that teachers of art and design must be artist teachers, so trainees develop their subject knowledge through a range of workshops including drawing, painting, stained glass, ceramics, printmaking and photography among others. We also work with different subject areas in cross-curricular projects such as exploring geographical themes through art and design media; responding to the work and landscape of a WW1 poet through art, english and geography and creating a medieval experience for children at Chepstow Castle with history and design technology trainees.

Trainees work with young people, develop their expertise in their specialist subject area, share and discuss educational issues and study relevant educational research. The course is just the beginning of what we hope will be a process of continual professional development throughout a challenging and rewarding career.

Structure

The course is part of the Department's programme for Initial Teacher Training. Units studied are:

• Enabling Learning
• Meeting Curriculum Challenges
• Becoming a Teacher

These units are studied in both the school and the University-based parts of the course, the work on each site being complementary.

During the course, consideration will be given to the National Curriculum GCSE and to post-16 courses including AS, A-level, and to the rapidly expanding vocational area of the art and design curriculum. Learning to teach involves a wide range of other skills including the development of young people's ability to communicate and justify their ideas and decisions in art and design, and more generally to develop their language across the curriculum as a whole.

Format

The course is split between university based study (12 weeks) and school based study (24 weeks). The university based blocks look at educational issues related to Art and Design teaching, and the role of Art and Design in the school curriculum. Examples of sessions include:

• Developing a rationale for teaching Art and Design
• Subject knowledge workshops in a wide range of media, including ceramics, screenprinting and photography
• Writing creative and motivational schemes of work and lesson planning
• Planning a school visit

A comprehensive series of seminars and workshops provides opportunities to extend your understanding of a range of pedagogical methodologies within art and design, such as how best to explain, demonstrate, ask questions, support students' progress in your subject and much more, through a reflective approach to your own practice. You will be introduced to the latest ideas and resources for teaching art and design, share and develop a wide variety of teaching approaches and learning activities and become aware of the wider subject community that is made up of art teachers and art educators through the National Society for Education in Art and Design. You will also have the opportunity to develop your subject knowledge through a range of university based workshops, and will be able to select one new area to investigate and produce a range of personal work for exhibition during the course.

Assessment

In order to pass the course, trainees are required to pass each unit. They are assessed on a number of written assignments and also on classroom practice against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Careers / Further study

The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programmes now include 40 credits of assessment at Master's Level (Level M). For candidates who opt not to attempt the requisite credit at Level M, a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education will be available as an alternative award.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics. Read more
This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics.

•Enrol on a truly innovative course, collaboratively developed with academic experts across a number of disciplines that include: Art and Design, Science, Education, Health and Community, Technology and Environment
•Enjoy access to a number of different established research centres across Liverpool John Moores University
•Develop real world skills on a programme unique to the UK and decide which areas of art and science you wish to follow as the programme progresses
•Explore art and science project briefs in unexpected forms

This practical, collaborative and vocational discipline can be applied to a rich variety of creative contexts and purposes within collaborative areas in art and science.

The MA is a studio based programme with collaborative practice and discovery at its core. The programme will offer a number of options for study and collaboration including; science and archaeological visualisation, museums, advertising, education, public health, biomedical communications, sports science and forensics.

You will focus on the practical application of art in a science context and be guided in understanding how this translates through a sequence of set and self-initiated projects.

You will define your existing practice and extend its scope and ambition within an art and science context, while studying themes related to public engagement, ethics, data protection and working with humans in research, and developing an understanding of current research happening in collaborative areas in art and science.

The programme will encourage you to work across other disciplines and, where appropriate, collaborate with other MA programmes within the Liverpool School of Art and Design, as well as other postgraduate taught courses across LJMU and external partners. It aims to help you to understand research happening in collaborative areas in art and science, and to develop research skills and relevant approaches to your practice and the critical techniques to support your final project.

Learning takes place predominantly through the creative and critical exploration of research focused Art in Science projects.

The programme is delivered full time over one year and features a significant amount of independent study. You will exhibit your final work at the Masters degree show which involves all Liverpool School of Art and Design's taught postgraduate Masters students.

Facilities and Research Groups

The programme is based in the Liverpool School of Art and Design’s John Lennon Art and Design building, a purpose-built facility in Liverpool city centre which encourages interaction between different disciplines and sharing of ideas and expertise.

As a Masters student on this course you may become linked to our Exhibition Research Centre, Design Lab, Contemporary Art Lab and the Face Lab.

Throughout the programme you will have opportunities to visit and potentially collaborate with research centres across LJMU. This may include: The Centre for Advanced Policing Studies, Centre for Public Health, Astrophysics Research Institute, Centre in Evolutionary Anthropology and Palaeoecology and the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Level 7

-Studio practice (Art in Science)
-Research and Practice
-Collaborative practice
-Major project (Art in Science)

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Information technology (IT) is all around us, forming the very destiny of our lives…our world. IT advances a wide array of disciplines, such as engineering, business and medicine, and even art and archaeology. Read more
Information technology (IT) is all around us, forming the very destiny of our lives…our world. IT advances a wide array of disciplines, such as engineering, business and medicine, and even art and archaeology.

The Master of Information Technology (MIT) provides the knowledge, understanding and skills to solve real-world problems with cutting-edge technology. You learn to create innovative IT solutions in your chosen area, in order to work in the industry at the highest levels.

As an MIT graduate, you could become a software engineer, an enterprise data architect, a mobile systems analyst, or even a chief technology officer.

The MIT caters to students from a variety of backgrounds. If you do not have previous training in IT, the course includes preparatory units that will give you the IT knowledge needed for the remainder of the course. However, if you already have a degree in IT, you can accelerate your study with an exemption from these preparatory units, or perhaps study further elective units in areas of your choice.

The course offers you the opportunity to explore a wide range of areas, such as software engineering, mobile and distributed systems, project management and machine learning.

In your final semester, you may take part in an Industry Experience program, working in a small team with industry mentors to develop entrepreneurial IT solutions. Or you may undertake a minor-thesis research project, investigating cutting-edge problems in IT under the supervision of internationally recognised researchers.

High-achieving students who complete the research component may progress to further research study.

The MIT is accredited with the Australian Computer Society (ACS).

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/information-technology-c6001?domestic=true

Overview

This course prepares students for work in the information technology industry at the highest levels. It provides students with a previous tertiary qualification in another discipline area with the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable them to deal effectively with advanced issues involving the application of information technology.

Students with previous studies in a technical IT area can complete in three semesters (full-time) by applying for credit for foundation units.

Career opportunities

Graduates of the MIT will have the knowledge and skills to solve complex social, economic and technical problems within the context of information technology. Students will develop deep theoretical and practical knowledge in specific areas so that they will have the intellectual and conceptual foundation to play leading roles in the development of the information technology industry.

Course Structure

PART A. Foundations for advanced information technology studies
These studies will provide an orientation to the field of information technology at graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of IT application, theory and practice. You will gain an understanding of information technology real world IT problems and gain problem solving skills. Your study will focus on IT project management, software, network and systems areas.

PART C. Advanced practice
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a research pathway including a thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this first option. For students to be able to progress to HDR, this course must have a minimum 12 points of research.

The second option is a program of coursework involving advanced study and an Industry experience studio project.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a discipline cognate to information technology, will receive credit for PART C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/information-technology

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/information-technology-c6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Immerse yourself in the world of emergent digital technologies. Integrating science, technology and art, we’ve created a multi-disciplinary, research-focused environment in which you can develop your own personal digital practice. Read more
Immerse yourself in the world of emergent digital technologies. Integrating science, technology and art, we’ve created a multi-disciplinary, research-focused environment in which you can develop your own personal digital practice. From artists and designers to curators and musicians, our programme encourages critical discourse through the creative and innovative application of digital technologies.

Key features

-Break through the traditional boundaries of science, art and technology. Work in a cross-discipline environment and learn to implement pioneering digital technologies.
-Build a path to an exciting and dynamic career – our students have gone on to work as web designers, games developers, lecturers and digital consultants.
-Engage in a dynamic and integrated approach to teaching, designed to nurture creative communities and define new areas of innovation.
-Participate in international research collaborations though close relationships with the Centre for Media Art and Design Research (MADr) and the Institute of Digital Art and Technology (i-DAT). You’ll also benefit from strong links to all of their affiliated PhD programmes.
-Cultivate advanced digital skills through access to exclusive technological facilities including the Immersive Vison Theatre and IBM funded Smarter Planet lab.
-Join our network of award-winning graduates in the creative and technology sectors. Previous students such as Adam Montandon and Gianni Corino have gone on to win accolades from the Media Innovation Awards, Summit International Awards and Scrittura Mutante Awards.
-Study remotely, foster professional relationships and work alongside your studies through our flexible approach to learning. Modules are delivered via workshops and symposium sessions in digital media venues, supported by interactive online technologies.
-Establish and define your personal digital practice through your major project. Tailor your assessment to your own creative needs, by choosing from different proportions of practical and written work. Explore your individual interests with the support of two dedicated project supervisors.
-Choose to study digital art and technology as either a Master of Research (MRes) taught programme or Research Masters (ResM) research programme.

Course details

Benefit from both online and offline learning, giving you the flexibility to study remotely and maintain employment alongside your programme. Learn to embed theory in critical practice and prepare for your final project. Investigate virtual, networked and augmented environments in context and explore new digital architectures through diverse development tools and models. Full-time study allows you to take taught modules in parallel with your research project over one year. As a part-time student you’ll study the taught modules first, followed by the research project over a period of two years. Undertake a creative and experimental production accompanied by a dissertation or report as your final major project. Choose from different ratios of practical to written work and define your own digital practice, exploring your individual interests. You’ll also benefit from having two allocated project supervisors.

Core modules
-DAT701 Invisible Architecture
-DAT702 Synthesis
-DAT703 Project/Dissertation

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Programme description. Please be advised that this programme is not being offered for the 2017/18 academic year. The curriculum of this programme is also under review. Read more

Programme description

Please be advised that this programme is not being offered for the 2017/18 academic year.

The curriculum of this programme is also under review. Programme structure and course availability is subject to change.

This programme encourages creative, holistic and practical knowledge of this increasingly polymathic field, grounding practical schooling in criticism, art writing and curating in knowledge of key histories and theories of contemporary art. The programme addresses issues raised by the practices of contemporary art, criticism and curating as a means of encouraging you to contribute both critically and practically.

Artists think and act. Being contemporary means engaging with multiple perspectives and different ways of learning. Students of contemporary art theory conduct research in relation to a broad range of creative, cultural and historical contexts in ways that are speculative, writerly, philosophical, organisational, social and economic.

Students apply aesthetics, art theory and criticism, art historiography, anthropology, and critical theory to engage with contemporary art’s variety of media, technologies, images, artefacts, tactics, texts, cultural contexts and professional practices.

Programme structure

Coursework is based on a strategy of blended learning, combining the latest open-source educational technology with more conventional face-to-face lecture, seminar and workshop-based teaching methods. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of peer learning; group work, field work and experiential learning.

Research projects are student-led, personalised and supervised by a team of academic staff who aim to support whichever direction is most appropriate to your interests, skills and strengths. Theory students form an integral part of our graduate school, writing, producing and commissioning projects in a family of media and adapting approaches drawn from an increasingly wide array of disciplines.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to provide you with both an overall level of expertise in recent developments in art practices and theories, and a high degree of specialisation within this field, culminating in an original Research Project. As such, the programme has the following specific aims:

To undertake a systematic examination of major international art practices since the 1970s.

To analyse the major strands of theory and criticism that have informed art practices, institutions and related cultural ecologies.

To explore some of the principal critical and theoretical positions informing the interpretation of contemporary art and its organisational contexts.

To provide you with a set of critical tools necessary for the advanced analysis and creative organisation of art and contemporary culture.

To provide you with a set of competencies, skills and understanding that will enable you either to undertake further academic research and/or to pursue a range of creative careers.

Career opportunities

This programme will enable you to develop the creative, organisational and economic knowledge required for a career in the contemporary art world, as a critic or a curator. You will also be qualified to teach studio art and theory in higher education and to work as a self-employed artist.



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Infertility is a common problem with approximately 1 in 7 couples of reproductive age being diagnosed as infertile - equating to 72.5 million people globally - and there is an increasing demand for assisted reproductive technology (ART). Read more
Infertility is a common problem with approximately 1 in 7 couples of reproductive age being diagnosed as infertile - equating to 72.5 million people globally - and there is an increasing demand for assisted reproductive technology (ART). This course will provide a robust and wide ranging education in human clinical embryology and ART.

Professor Barratt, Programme Director of the new programme MSc Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception has been confirmed as one of the lecturers at the forthcoming Campus Workshop "From gametes to blastocysts – a continuous dialogue" to be held in Apex City Quay Hotel, Dundee, 7-8th November 2014. This programme is organised by the ESHRE Special Interest Group Embryology.

Why study Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception at Dundee?

The MSc in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception is a new taught master’s programme which has been designed to provide a robust and wide ranging education in human clinical embryology and ART (assisted reproductive technology). Students will gain a systematic understanding of clinical embryology and ART whilst developing high level laboratory skills in various aspects of clinical embryology, andrology and ART.

The emphasis of the course is on humans and clinical ART/embryology and offers practical experience in handling and preparing HUMAN gametes.

FOLLOW US

Follow us at https://www.facebook.com/mscembryologyassistedconception/ to keep up to date with our latest news

The University of Dundee has excellent clinical links and a close working relationship with the NHS and students will benefit from a scientifically rigorous programme with teaching drawn from experienced embryologists, scientists and clinicians.

A key benefit of the programme is that it offers a unique opportunity to gain substantial exposure to an NHS IVF clinic (NHS Tayside). This will allow students to observe the practice and management of a working IVF clinic and benefit from teaching by staff involved in ART, and will be of considerable benefit for those wanting a clinical based career. The NHS Tayside IVF clinic has recently benefitted from a substantial investment in its facilities which has created a high quality clinical environment.

The blend of scientific, practical skills and the integration with an NHS facility giving students first hand experience and exposure to the workings of an NHS IVF clinic will provide students with an excellent base to enter a career in ART either in a clinical or research setting.

How you will be taught

The MSc is full time programme (September to August) and will consist of 5 taught modules and a research project. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, discussion and journal clubs as well as self-directed study. The research project will be carried out under either in the research laboratory or in the IVF clinic.

What you will study

The course is divided into 6 modules:

Module 1: Fundamental science (Semester1)
Module 2 Advanced Applied laboratory skills in ART (Semester 1 and 2)
Module 3: Statistics (Semester 1)
Module 4: Running a successful ART laboratory and clinical service (Semester 2).
Module 5: Clinical Issues and Controversies in ART (Semester 2)
Module 6: Research Project (Semester 3)

How you will be assessed

The programme is assessed using a variety of traditional and more innovative approaches. We use essays, portfolios, folders of evidence, research proposals, learning contracts, exams, OSCEs, and assessed online activities such as debates and team work.

Careers

Due to the increased demand for infertility treatment there has been a substantial growth in the demand for high quality laboratory and clinical staff in this area.

Approximately 1:7 couples are infertile and IVF is the predominant treatment for infertility contributing ~2% of the births in the UK and up to 5% in some EU countries. IVF is a rapidly growing field and as an example of this the number of cycles treated in the UK has increased by almost 30% in the last 4 years (http://www.hfea.gov.uk).

Following successful completion of the MSc students could apply for a training position in ART e.g. in embryology and/or andrology. Alternatively the MSc would be an ideal preparation for undertaking a PhD or applying for a research position. Clinically qualified graduates would gain valuable skills to enable them to specialise in reproductive medicine and assume responsibility within an ART clinic.

Skills that students will acquire include:

* In-depth understanding of basic reproductive physiology and a detailed knowledge of human ART;
* Sperm preparation and cryopreservation
* Recruitment of patients and donors for research
* Preparation of ethical approvals and appreciation for the ethical issues in ART
* Detailed work with human eggs and sperm (including assessment of gamete quality)
* Time lapse imaging of human embryos
* Business planning for running an ART laboratory and clinical service.
* QA and QC in the ART laboratory
* Troubleshooting in an ART lab
* The role of media and marketing in the development of an ART service.
* Detailed and practical knowledge of the HFEA and legislative and regulatory framework.
* Knowledge of basic IVF laboratory techniques e.g. preparation of dishes, witnessing
* Appreciation of the clinical diagnostic and pathways in ART

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