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Masters Degrees (Art Science)

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Data science combines computer science and statistics to solve exciting data-intensive problems in industry and in many fields of science. Read more
Data science combines computer science and statistics to solve exciting data-intensive problems in industry and in many fields of science. Data scientists help organisations make sense of their data. As data is collected and analysed in all areas of society, demand for professional data scientists is high and will grow higher. The emerging Internet of Things, for instance, will produce a whole new range of problems and opportunities in data analysis.

In the Data Science master’s programme, you will gain a solid understanding of the methods used in data science. You will learn not only to apply data science: you will acquire insight into how and why methods work so you will be able to construct solutions to new challenges in data science. In the Data Science master’s programme, you will also be able to work on problems specific to a scientific discipline and to combine domain knowledge with the latest data analysis methods and tools. The teachers of the programme are themselves active data science researchers, and the programme is heavily based on first-hand research experience.

Upon graduating from the Data Science MSc programme, you will have solid knowledge of the central concepts, theories, and research methods of data science as well as applied skills. In particular, you will be able to:
-Understand the general computational and probabilistic principles underlying modern machine learning and data mining algorithms.
-Apply various computational and statistical methods to analyse scientific and business data.
-Assess the suitability of each method for the purpose of data collection and use.
-Implement state-of-the-art machine learning solutions efficiently using high-performance computing platforms.
-Undertake creative work, making systematic use of investigation or experimentation, to discover new knowledge.
-Report results in a clear and understandable manner.
-Analyse scientific and industrial data to devise new applications and support decision making.

The MSc programme is offered jointly by the Department of Computer Science, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and the Department of Physics, with support from the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT) and the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP), all located on the Kumpula Science campus. In your applied data science studies you can also include multidisciplinary studies from other master's programmes, such as digital humanities, and natural and medical sciences.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The Data Science MSc programme combines elements from computer science and mathematical sciences to provide you with skills in topics such as machine learning, distributed systems and statistical methods. You might also find that knowledge in a particular scientific field is useful for your future career. You can obtain this through minor studies in the MSc programme, or it might already be part of your bachelor-level degree.

Studies in the Data Science MSc programme include both theoretical and practical components, including a variety of study methods (lectures, exercises, projects, seminars; done both individually and in groups). Especially in applied data science, we also use problem-based learning methods, so that you can address real-world issues. You will also practise academic skills such as scientific writing and oral presentation throughout your studies. You are encouraged to include an internship in your degree in order to obtain practical experience in the field.

Minor studies give you a wider perspective of Data Science. Your minor subject can be an application area of Data Science (such as physics or the humanities), a discipline that supports application of Data Science (such as language technology), or a methodological subject needed for the development of new Data Science methods and models (such as computer science, statistics, or mathematics).

Selection of the Major

You can specialise either in the core areas of data science -- algorithms, infrastructure and statistics -- or in its applications. This means that you can focus on the development of new models and methods in data science, supported by the data science research carried out at the University of Helsinki; or you can become a data science specialist in an application field by incorporating studies in another subject. In addition to mainstream data science topics, the programme offers two largely unique opportunities for specialisation: the data science computing environment and infrastructure, and data science in natural sciences, especially physics.

Programme Structure

You should be able to complete the MSc Programme in Data Science of 120 credits (ECTS) in two years of full-time study. The programme consists of:
-Common core studies of basic data science courses.
-Several modules on specific topics within data science algorithms, data science infrastructures and statistical data science, and on data science tools.
-Seminars and colloquia.
-Courses on academic skills and tools.
-Possibly an internship in a research group or company.
-Studies in an application domain.
-Master’s thesis (30 credits).

Career Prospects

Industry and science are flooded with data and are struggling to make sense of it. There is urgent demand for individuals trained to analyse data, including massive and heterogeneous data. For this reason, the opportunities are expected to grow dramatically. The interdisciplinary Data Science MSc programme will train you to work in data-intensive areas of industry and science, with the skills and knowledge needed to construct solutions to complex data analysis problems.

If you are focusing on the core areas of data science, you will typically find employment as a researcher or consultant, sometimes after taking a PhD in Computer Science or Statistics to deepen your knowledge of the field and research methods. If your focus is on the use of data science for specific applications, you will typically find work in industry or in other fields of science such as physics, digital humanities, biology or medicine.

Internationalization

The Data Science MSc is an international programme, with students from around the world and an international research environment. All of the departments taking part in the programme are internationally recognised for their research and a significant fraction of the teaching and research staff come from abroad.

The departments participate in international student exchange programmes and offer you the chance to include international experience as part of your degree. Data Science itself is an international field, so once you graduate you can apply for jobs in any country.

In the programme, all courses are in English. Although the Helsinki area is quite cosmopolitan and English is widely spoken, you can also take courses to learn Finnish at the University of Helsinki Language Centre. The Language Centre also offers an extensive programme of foreign language courses for those interested in learning other languages.

Research Focus

The MSc programme in Data Science is offered jointly by three departments and two research institutes. Their research covers a wide spectrum of the many aspects of data science. At a very general level, the focal areas are:
-Machine learning and data mining
-Distributed computation and computational infrastructures
-Statistical modelling and analysis
-Studies in the programme are tightly connected to research carried out in the participating departments and institutes.

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This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics. Read more
This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics.

•Enrol on a truly innovative course, collaboratively developed with academic experts across a number of disciplines that include: Art and Design, Science, Education, Health and Community, Technology and Environment
•Enjoy access to a number of different established research centres across Liverpool John Moores University
•Develop real world skills on a programme unique to the UK and decide which areas of art and science you wish to follow as the programme progresses
•Explore art and science project briefs in unexpected forms

This practical, collaborative and vocational discipline can be applied to a rich variety of creative contexts and purposes within collaborative areas in art and science.

The MA is a studio based programme with collaborative practice and discovery at its core. The programme will offer a number of options for study and collaboration including; science and archaeological visualisation, museums, advertising, education, public health, biomedical communications, sports science and forensics.

You will focus on the practical application of art in a science context and be guided in understanding how this translates through a sequence of set and self-initiated projects.

You will define your existing practice and extend its scope and ambition within an art and science context, while studying themes related to public engagement, ethics, data protection and working with humans in research, and developing an understanding of current research happening in collaborative areas in art and science.

The programme will encourage you to work across other disciplines and, where appropriate, collaborate with other MA programmes within the Liverpool School of Art and Design, as well as other postgraduate taught courses across LJMU and external partners. It aims to help you to understand research happening in collaborative areas in art and science, and to develop research skills and relevant approaches to your practice and the critical techniques to support your final project.

Learning takes place predominantly through the creative and critical exploration of research focused Art in Science projects.

The programme is delivered full time over one year and features a significant amount of independent study. You will exhibit your final work at the Masters degree show which involves all Liverpool School of Art and Design's taught postgraduate Masters students.

Facilities and Research Groups

The programme is based in the Liverpool School of Art and Design’s John Lennon Art and Design building, a purpose-built facility in Liverpool city centre which encourages interaction between different disciplines and sharing of ideas and expertise.

As a Masters student on this course you may become linked to our Exhibition Research Centre, Design Lab, Contemporary Art Lab and the Face Lab.

Throughout the programme you will have opportunities to visit and potentially collaborate with research centres across LJMU. This may include: The Centre for Advanced Policing Studies, Centre for Public Health, Astrophysics Research Institute, Centre in Evolutionary Anthropology and Palaeoecology and the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Level 7

-Studio practice (Art in Science)
-Research and Practice
-Collaborative practice
-Major project (Art in Science)

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential. Read more
Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include Early Modern art and architecture; the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

To supplement what you learn in the classroom, frequent staff-led visits to London museums and galleries will expose you to the some of the world’s best museums and galleries, and you will be strongly encouraged to apply for a placement in order to gain experience in the museum and gallery world. On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

This course is available on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example Structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History and Theory - MA
-Dissertation - MA Schemes
-Researching Art History
-Art, Science, Knowledge (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Critique and Curating (optional)
-Curating Inside Out (optional)
-Exhibition (Joint Project) (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Topics in Art History (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)

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This pioneering course investigates the creative relationships between art and science and how to communicate them. Read more

Introduction

This pioneering course investigates the creative relationships between art and science and how to communicate them. With access to important collections in London you’ll explore the making and presentation of your work and pursue innovative outcomes in practice and research, towards professional engagement in art and science authorship and creative practice.

Content

Synergies in our Fine Art Programme - incorporating BA Fine Art, MA Art and Science, MA Fine Art, MA Photography, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, and MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy - create a dynamic context for exploring practices and issues within contemporary culture.

This pioneering postgraduate course responds to a fast-emerging territory for interdisciplinary and collaborative art practice. MA Art and Science gives students an opportunity to interrogate the creative relationships between art and science and how they can be communicated. You'll explore different approaches to making and presenting your work with the aim of proposing and realising innovative outcomes in practice and research.

In its extended full-time mode MA Art and Science gives you the flexibility to access London's richly varied opportunities for work and study while maximising your personal and professional development.

Structure

MA Art and Science lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode.'

MA Art and Science is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 3 units:

Unit 1 (40 credits) and Unit 2 (20 credits) run concurrently and last 15 weeks.

Unit 3 (120 credits) follows after the completion of Units 1 and 2 and runs for 45 weeks.

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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of art history before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of art history before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our School of Philosophy and Art History.

At Essex, you can progress onto our MA Art History and Theory, MA Curating Contemporary Art, MA Gallery Studies and Critical Curating, or MA Gallery Studies with Dissertation.

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also study two important areas of art history, focusing on a combination of Italian Renaissance art, modern European art, and contemporary art.

Our School of Philosophy and Art History is ranked 6th among art history departments in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014) - ahead of all but three of the Russell Group - with 89% rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’. As such, you will be taught by some of the most innovative scholars in the field. Additionally, because we are a small school, you will be taught by our expert staff in your very first year, a rarity in UK art history courses.

Our expert staff

We are a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and the built environment, across cultures and media, from the early modern period to the present day.

Our staff’s research interests include activist art, modernist art and totalitarianism, art and science, the artistic status of body modification, expressions of societal anxiety in art, as well as architecture and urbanism.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindo co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

Our outstanding art history facilities give you the opportunity for object-based learning, which is rare in other universities, and also e-nable you to gain curatorial experience:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an ongoing programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks by curators and artists, and exhibitions organised by our curatorial students
-Enjoy regular visits to London galleries, including Tate Modern, Tate Britain, the National Gallery and the Royal Academy of Arts, as well as many independent and alternative spaces
-Access our lively common room and departmental film collection
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery runs an exciting programme of art exhibitions, film screenings and talks

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History with English for Academic Purposes - Graduate Diploma
-English for Academic Purposes
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Photography in History (optional)
-The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, New Media, Software and the Internet (optional)
-Art & Ideas III (optional)
-Art, the Law and the Market (optional)
-Reworking the Past (optional)
-Visualising Bodies (optional)
-Inventing the Future: Early Contemporary 1945-1980 (optional)

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The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design.

Typically this might include teachers, aspiring artists or designers, aspiring academics, or recent graduates in Fine Art or Design who wish to further their professional practice. It will also cater for those students with first degrees outside Art & Design who wish to convert their career path by following a more theoretical route in Art and Design.

The MA Art and Design is designed as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module [RS]) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design will align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design curriculum is designed so that students:
- Explore and develop concepts, skills or philosophies
- Develop creative skills
- Have a trajectory towards progression to MPhil/PhD

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/ma.aspx

Course Content

The suite of Master of Art (Art and Design) pathways currently offered is:
Art History through Practice
Art, Science & Technology
Design Futures
Ecologies
Fashion Design Futures
Philosophy

Learning & Teaching

The MA Art and Design is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the fine-art/design expertise in a respective fine-art/design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA Art and Design students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA Art and Design programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Art and Design Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (75 hours).

- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (125 hours).

- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Employability & Careers

The MA Art and Design acts as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards potential future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. The MA Art and Design programme aims to develop increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

MSc in Data Science aims to equip students with a solid grounding in data science concepts and technologies for extracting information and constructing knowledge from data. Students of the MSc Data Science will study the computational principles, methods, and systems for a variety of real world applications that require mathematical foundations, programming skills, critical thinking, and ingenuity. Development of research skills will be an essential element of the Data Science programme so that students can bring a critical perspective to current data science discipline and apply this to future developments in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Key Features of the MSc Data Science

The MSc Data Science programme focuses on three core technical themes: data mining, machine learning, and visualisation. Data mining is fundamental to data science and the students will learn how to mine both structured data and unstructured data. Students will gain practical data mining experience and will gain a systematic understanding of the fundamental concepts of analysing complex and heterogeneous data. They will be able to manipulate large heterogeneous datasets, from storage to processing, be able to extract information from large datasets, gain experience of data mining algorithms and techniques, and be able to apply them in real world applications. Machine learning has proven to be an effective and exciting technology for data and it is of high value when it comes to employment. Students of the Data Science programme will learn the fundamentals of both conventional and state-of-the-art machine learning techniques, be able to apply the methods and techniques to synthesise solutions using machine learning, and will have the necessary practical skills to apply their understanding to big data problems. We will train students to explore a variety visualisation concepts and techniques for data analysis. Students will be able to apply important concepts in data visualisation, information visualisation, and visual analytics to support data process and knowledge discovery. The students of the Data Science programme also learn important mathematical concepts and methods required by a data scientist. A specifically designed module that is accessible to students with different background will cover the basics of algebra, optimisation techniques, statistics, and so on. More advanced mathematical concepts are integrated in individual modules where necessary.

The MSc Data Science programme delivers the practical components using a number of programming languages and software packages, such as Hadoop, Python, Matlab, C++, OpenGL, OpenCV, and Spark. Students will also be exposed to a range of closely related subject areas, including pattern recognition, high performance computing, GPU processing, computer vision, human computer interaction, and software validation and verification. The delivery of both core and optional modules leverage on the research strength and capacity in the department. The modules are delivered by lecturers who are actively engaged in world leading researches in this field. Students of the Data Science programme will benefit from state-of-the-art materials and contents, and will work on individual degree projects that can be research-led or application driven.

Modules

Modules for the MSc Data Science programme include:

- Visual Analytics

- Data Science Research Methods and Seminars

- Big Data and Data Mining

- Big Data and Machine Learning

- Mathematical Skills for Data Scientists

- Data Visualization

- Human Computer Interaction

- High Performance Computing in C/C++

- Graphics Processor Programming

- Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

- Modelling and Verification Techniques

- Operating Systems and Architectures

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Career Destinations

- Data Analyst

- Data mining Developer

- Machine Learning Developer

- Visual Analytics Developer

- Visualisation Developer

- Visual Computing Software Developer

- Database Developer

- Data Science Researcher

- Computer Vision Developer

- Medical Computing Developer

- Informatics Developer

- Software Engineer



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MRes Art. Theory and Philosophy promotes dialogue amongst practitioners and theorists about art discourse today. Read more

Introduction

MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy promotes dialogue amongst practitioners and theorists about art discourse today. Highly relevant for both artists and writers, the course theorises art from a contemporary perspective embracing ideas in Continental philosophy, The Marxist intellectual tradition, as well as psychoanalytic and feminist theories.

Content

MRes Art allows you to address a specialist area of fine art research and to explore the relationships between your chosen specialism and the broader fine art community in the context of our Fine Art Programme.
Synergies in our Fine Art Programme - incorporating MA Fine Art, MA Art and Science, MA Photography, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, and MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy - create a dynamic context for exploring practices and issues within contemporary culture.

In its extended full-time mode MRes Art gives you the flexibility to access London's richly varied opportunities for work and study while maximising your personal and professional development.

MRes Art prepares you to work particularly in the academic and research contexts of professional environments, to undertake PhD study, or pursue independent research. The course benefits from links with relevant professional and academic organisations in London and internationally and from the varied expertise of its research staff.
The three pathways provide a focus for your study while also enabling you to explore shared ground and questions of disciplinary territories and boundaries.

MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy offers a close reading of relevant texts as well as detailed discussion to promote your understanding and knowledge of major debates and approaches within Continental philosophy and aesthetics, the Marxist intellectual tradition, and psychoanalytic theory concerning art. Key issues include philosophy's relevance for the theorisation of art, politics, philosophy and art, philosophical approaches to contemporary art, and philosophy and art in a globalised context.

Structure

MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode.'

MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises four units:

Unit 1 (40 credits) and Unit 2 (20 credits) run concurrently and last 15 weeks.
Unit 3 (40 credits) follows after the completion of Units 1 and 2 and runs for a further 15 weeks to the end of year one.
Unit 4 (80 credits) runs for 45 weeks, concurrently with Unit 3 to the end of year one, and then continuing to the end of year two.

All four units must be passed in order to achieve the MRes but the classification of the award of MRes is derived from the marks for units 3 and 4 only.

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Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. Read more
Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. It is also used by the pharmaceutical industry to aid in explanation of their products and by television companies in the production of documentaries.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course employs highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced medical art supervisors.

Why study Medical Art at Dundee?

Medical Art is the depiction of anatomy, medical science, pathology and surgery. This may include medical images, models or animations for use in education, advertising, marketing and publishing, conceptual work in relation to research, education and publishing and two or three-dimensional visualisation for the training of specific medical professionals.

Medical and forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge.

What's so good about studying Medical Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

Internships

Short term internships in forensic and medical institutes throughout the world will be offered to selected students following graduation. Internship institutes offer these internships based on the reputation of the course and its tutors and include the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), USA; the Turkish Police Forensic Laboratory, Ankara and Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

Students on both Forensic Art and Medical Art MSc's share joint modules with increasing specialisation. Students may carry out their semester three Dissertation module either at the University or from a working environment or placement.

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

Medical Art students study:

Semester 1 (60 credits)
Anatomy - Head and Neck
Anatomy - Post Cranial
Life Art
Digital Media Practice
Research Methods

Semester 2 (60 credits)
Medical Art 1 - Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2 - Communication and Education
Medical-Legal Ethics

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a research project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Art.

How you will be assessed

Anatomy modules will be assessed by spot-tests and practical examinations and coursework. Medico-legal ethics will be assessed by both a written exam and coursework. All other modules will be assessed by coursework.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in medical art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In medical art potential careers exist in the NHS as well as industry. Medical art and visualisation is a rapidly changing and broad discipline. Possible careers include:

NHS medical illustration departments producing patient information and illustration services for staff
E-learning
3D model making (including clinical/surgical skills trainers) companies
Digital art and animation studios
Publishing houses
Illustration studios
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance illustration and fine art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation. Read more
This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation: a survey of nearly 3,000 years of scientific ideas and communities, and an exploration of the inner workings of science's methods and theories.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in the history of science, the philosophy of science, and an “integrated history and philosophy of science”. The historical coverage is broad, from antiquity to the present, while the philosophical coverage spans causality and the philosophy of medicine as well as the metaphysics of chemistry and computer science.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and three ancillary modules (45 credits), available in full time mode. The Postgraduate Certificate programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), available in full time mode.

Core modules
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students choose four options from the following:
-Science in the 19th Century
-Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century
-Early Modern Science
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science in Antiquity
-Causality, Mechanism, and Classification in Science
-Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science
-Science, Art, and Philosophy
-Special Topics Seminar in History and Philosophy of Science

One optional module from our sister MSc programme, Science, Technology, and Society, may be substituted here provided it contributes to a coherent programme of study.

Ancillary Modules - students choose three ancillary modules which may be options from our degrees, e.g. Science in the 20th Century and Beyond, and Curating the History of Science, or they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in related fields. It also provides appropriate training for those pursuing careers in education, museum and archival curatorship, or governance and policy-making.

Employability
During the course of this programme, students will develop a wide range of transferable skills, including writing, research, critical thinking, and working in collaboration with others. Most graduates of this programme go on to follow careers that engage with the substance of the degree, including in the museums sector, or in academia. For these students, this programme provides an excellent opportunity to develop the specialist skills and personal connections necessary to succeed. These include basic curatorial skills, developing personal contacts in London museums, and developing personal and intellectual connections with key thinkers in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research-active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. The Postgraduate Certificate in Practical Science Communication, linked to the world-class MSc Science Communication course, and also designed by the Science Communication Unit, is aimed at students seeking an additional qualification. It is an opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, the course gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course focuses on practical skills development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs, with visiting specialists helping you to understand what they seek in future employees.

Depending on the options you take, you will develop skills in science writing, cutting-edge science communication techniques, and the abilities you'll need to develop and run science communication projects. This includes devising and managing projects, evaluations and funding.

Modules

You will choose two from these three modules (30 credits each):

• Science on Air and on Screen - Build your radio, TV and digital skills by critically exploring the role of broadcast media in the communication of science. You'll also make an 'as live' radio magazine programme about science, and a short film.

• Science in Public Spaces - Develop your own science communication initiative in this hands-on module from developing a creative concept, to seeking funding, and managing and evaluating a project. You'll explore a range of innovative approaches from sci-art, to museums, festivals to theatre.

• Writing Science - Develop journalistic and other writing styles, including writing for news media, public relations and educational purposes, with a view to developing a portfolio, as well as working on a magazine project.

Format

The course comprises short, intensive teaching blocks of three days (Thursday to Saturday) and you'll most likely need to attend three teaching sessions for each 30-credit module. Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, and tutorials.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways, to reflect the practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations - all of which you can use to attract prospective employers.

Careers / Further study

Practical science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to develop the professional skills that will help you secure employment or research positions in science communication, or to combine it with your existing career.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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MA Fine Art determines and challenges the boundaries of art while locating theory at the centre of practice. In a dynamic learning culture that celebrates diverse backgrounds and ambitions, you’ll develop a critical art practice that will shape your career as an international artist. Read more

Introduction

MA Fine Art determines and challenges the boundaries of art while locating theory at the centre of practice. In a dynamic learning culture that celebrates diverse backgrounds and ambitions, you’ll develop a critical art practice that will shape your career as an international artist. The MA Fine Art studios are located in an independent building in Archway, so the course offer allows students a self contained studio building facilitating their independent working practices and self-organisation alongside all the benefits of the King's Cross campus.

Content

Synergies in our Fine Art Programme - incorporating BA Fine Art, MA Fine Art, MA Photography, MA Art and Science, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, and MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy - create a dynamic context for exploring practices and issues within contemporary culture.

In its extended full-time mode MA Fine Art gives you the flexibility to access London's richly varied opportunities for work and study while maximising your personal and professional development.

MA Fine Art provides an extensive final unit of 120 credits (45 weeks) enabling continuous development and realisation of a significant programme of work.

MA Fine Art supports and is shaped by:

Diversity of professional directions, aspirations and cultural perspectives

Reflective research-based practice including writing as practice in fine art

An interrogation of what informs making and how making generates knowledge

Independent study and practice and critical reflection on definitions of art and its potential within social space

Exploration of the parameters of contemporary art, building on knowledge of the contexts and frameworks of practice

Dialogue to determine the conditions of possibility for contemporary art.

Structure

MA Fine Art lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode.'

MA Fine Art is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 3 units. Unit 1 (40 credits) and Unit 2 (20 credits) run concurrently and last 15 weeks. Unit 3 (120 credits) follows after the completion of Units 1 and 2 and runs for 45 weeks.

Students successfully achieving Units 1 and 2 may exit at this point with the award of Postgraduate Certificate.

All three units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from the mark for Unit 3 only.

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Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights. Read more
Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students who have a numerate first degree or can demonstrate numerate skills. Students are often at the early stages of their careers in diverse professions including economics, statistics and computer science.

Students will have a curiosity about data, and will want to learn new techniques to boost their career and be part of exciting current industry developments. The MSc in Data Science includes some complex programming tasks because of the applied nature of the course, so many students have a mathematics or statistics background and enjoy working with algorithms.

Objectives

The demand for data scientists in the UK has grown more than ten-fold in the past five years *. The amount of data in the world is growing exponentially. From analysing tyre performance to detecting problem gamblers, wherever data exists, there are opportunities to apply it.

City’s MSc Data Science programme covers the intersection of computer science and statistics, machine learning and practical applications. We explore areas such as visualisation because we believe that data science is about generating insight into data as well as its communication in practice.

The programme focuses on machine learning as the most exciting technology for data and we have learned from our own graduates that this is of high value when it comes to employment within the field. At City, we have excellent expertise in machine learning and the facilities students need to learn the technical aspects of data analysis. We also have a world-leading centre for data visualisation, where students get exposed to the latest developments on presenting and communicating their results – a highly sought after skill.

Placements

There is the opportunity to do an internship as part of the programme. The final project, which is normally three months for a full-time student, can be extended to six months if you want to study within a specific organisation. When it comes to the big data and data science area, we have established relationships with organisations including the BBC, Microsoft and The British Library so you can be confident that with City, your access to professional experience is unparalleled. One recent student undertook an internship with Google and has since secured a job within the company.

Academic facilities

The School's computer science laboratories are equipped with the latest up-to-date hardware and software. From Oracle’s leading commercial object-relational database server to PCs with state-of-the-art NVidia GPUs for computer graphics, you will have access to an array of tools to support your learning.

The MSc Data Science programme offers two (three by mid 2016) dedicated computer servers for the Big Data module, which you can also use for your final project to analyse large data sets. We give you the opportunity to undertake training in MATLAB, the most popular numerical and technical programming environment, while you study.

Scholarships

A scholarship for the full fees of the MSc will be offered to an outstanding applicant. The scholarship is available to UK/EU and overseas students, studying full-time. To be considered for the scholarship, please include with your full application a one-page essay with your answer to the question:

'What are the challenges that Data Science faces and how would you address those challenges?'

The submission deadline for anyone wishing to be considered for the scholarship is: 1 MAY 2017

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that students’ specialist knowledge and autonomy increase as they progress through each module. Active researchers guide your progress in the areas of machine learning, data visualization, and high-performance computing, which culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently and, where appropriate, in collaboration with industrial partners.

Taught modules are delivered through a series of 20 hours of lectures and 10 hours of tutorials/laboratory sessions. Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

Tutorials help you develop the skills to apply the concepts we have covered in the lectures. We normally achieve this through practical problem solving contexts.

Laboratory sessions give you the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques using state-of-the-art software, environments and development tools.

In addition to lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules from lecture notes and lab materials, to coursework feedback, model answers, and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through a combination of written examination and coursework, where you will need to answer theoretical and practical questions to demonstrate that you can analyse and apply data science methods and techniques.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem using large datasets from industry, academia or government and use your knowledge of collecting and processing real data, designing and implementing big data methods and applying and evaluating data analysis, visualisation and prediction techniques. At the end of the project you submit a substantial MSc project report, which becomes the mode of assessment for this part of the programme.

Course content

Data science is the area of study concerned with the extraction of insight from large collections of data.

The course covers the study, integration and application of advanced methods and techniques from:
-Data analysis and machine learning
-Data visualisation and visual analytics
-High-performance, parallel and distributed computing
-Knowledge representation and reasoning
-Neural computation
-Signal processing
-Data management and information retrieval.

It gives you the opportunity to specialise so, once you graduate, you can apply data science to any sector from health to retail. By engaging with researchers and industrial partners during the programme, you can develop your knowledge and skills within a real-world context in each of the above areas.

Core modules
-Principles of data science (15 credits)
-Machine learning (15 credits)
-Big Data (15 credits)
-Neural computing (15 credits)
-Visual analytics (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Advanced programming: concurrency (15 credits)
-Readings in computer science (15 credits)
-Advanced databases (15 credits)
-Information retrieval (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Digital signal processing and audio programming (15 credits)
-Cloud computing (15 credits)
-Computer vision (15 credits)
-Software agents (15 credits)

Individual project - (60 credits)

Career prospects

From health to retail, and from the IT industry to government, the Data Science MSc will prepare you for a successful career as a data scientist. You will graduate with specialist skills in data acquisition, information extraction, aggregation and representation, data analysis, knowledge extraction and explanation, which are in high demand.

City's unique internships, our emphasis on machine learning and visual analytics, together with our links with the industry and Tech City, should help you gain employment as a specialist in data analysis and visualization. Graduates starting a new business can benefit from City's London City Incubator and City's links with Tech City, providing support for start-up businesses.

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Environmental earth science (or geoscience) covers a range of topics including hydrology, sedimentology and geomorphology. This course provides specialist skills and knowledge for science graduates wanting to pursue careers in environmental earth science. Read more

What is environmental earth science?

Environmental earth science (or geoscience) covers a range of topics including hydrology, sedimentology and geomorphology.

Who is this course for?

This course provides specialist skills and knowledge for science graduates wanting to pursue careers in environmental earth science. Environmental scientists undertake work such as developing ways to minimise the impacts of humans on the natural environment.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University brings together a team of academic and associate staff across multiple disciplines.
*Nationally-recognised leader in geoscience
*state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities
*internationally-acclaimed academic teaching staff
*strong collaboration with industry and research organisations, both locally and internationally.

Career Opportunities

A postgraduate qualification from JCU can enhance your career prospects, enable you to reskill and change careers completely, or develop a specialist area of expertise and personal interest.
Earth science and environmental science graduates enjoy well-paid careers in Australia and overseas. A range of opportunities await graduates in the academia as well as in private and public sectors.
As an Environ mental Scientist, for instance, you will measure and record features of the environment and study, assess and develop methods of controlling or minimizing the harmful effects of hum an activity on the environment.
Graduates can also get jobs as research assistants or support staff for teaching. With a PhD, you can gain research positions (Postdoctoral, Fellowships) that are often funded for a few years or apply for permanent positions as a lecturer and researcher.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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