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OCA’s MA Fine Art is a unique postgraduate course delivered by distance learning at Level 4 (HE7). Read more
OCA’s MA Fine Art is a unique postgraduate course delivered by distance learning at Level 4 (HE7). It’s ideal for tutors who want to develop their own practice to inform their teaching, artist practitioners seeking to develop their practice further, those with an undergraduate degree who wish to move into creative sectors of employment, and undergraduate students looking to progress to postgraduate study outside the conventional higher education system.

OCA’s MA Fine Art is a three-year, part-time programme offering students academic challenge and innovative delivery. Launched in 2011, it was the first MA Fine Art in Europe to be offered by open learning and is OCA’s first step into postgraduate provision in its 28-year history.

OCA’s MA Fine Art prepares students for professional practice in their chosen discipline, supporting the existing practice and aspirations of students working in a wide range of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, installation, performance, time-based work, digital art and photography. The emphasis of the programme is on studio practice, with theory, context and professional practice integrated throughout.

The flexibility of the MA Fine Art programme, through online delivery and being part-time, makes it accessible to students who, because of work and family commitments, would not otherwise be able to consider studying at higher degree level.

Students travel through the course together in a cohort, sharing experiences and learning through group and individual work. The curriculum builds from a more structured programme towards autonomous study, with an emphasis on enquiry, critical reflection and exploration. Through lectures, seminars, tutorials and critiques as well as one-to-one tutorial support, students benefit from the expertise of core course tutors and guest lecturers and tutors, who have a range of expertise including curation, media and marketing, art theory, professional practice and related disciplines (for example anthropology).

Progression routes are individual as well as collective. For some students, progression comes from receiving commissions for work. For others, it is about exposure of their work to a growing audience through exhibiting in specific galleries. Equally important evidence of progression for students is increasing the range and impact of their peer networks nationally and internationally or moving on to further, related study or work in the arts.

IT / online requirements

Prior to application, an IT survey must be taken to ensure sufficient skills, knowledge and internet / online capabilities. Advice is then given if necessary.

Career choices

This course is extremely flexible and its structure means you can earn while you learn and at the same time advance your career prospects. People studying this MA will be better placed to gain higher level teaching posts in the field of art, or move into creative sectors of employment.

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This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. Read more
This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. By combining cutting edge research from the fields of criminology, archaeology, art history, heritage studies, and law, via discussion of compelling case studies, this course will allow you to explore the criminal networks that function in the area of art crime and what can be done to protect our past and our culture for the future.

Why this programme

-This is the only online art crime and illicit antiquities research programme currently available and is the first University-accredited postgraduate degree offered on this topic.
-You will be taught by leading academics in this field, who are members of the Trafficking Culture Project, the only academic research group devoted to the study of the illicit trafficking of cultural objects .
-This programme is taught entirely online through pre-recorded lectures and optional real-time seminars. This allows distance learners maximum flexibility while maintaining the high level of instructure and peer interaction needed to explore such challenging topics.
-Students who successfully complete the PgCert will have the opportunity to come to Glasgow, to complete a full masters degree in the areas of criminology and art history.

Programme structure

You will take three courses across three semesters (includes summer teaching). During each course you will investigate and present an art or antiquities crime case study, produce a portfolio-quality ‘digital artefact’ and write an essay for assessment. Depending on your needs and goals, you can take one of the courses individually or all three to achieve the qualification.

Core courses
-Antiquities trafficking
-Art crime
-Repatriation, recovery return

Career prospects

This programme complements careers in the museums and heritage sector, in law enforcement and security, in related fields of law, in fine art and provenance research, and should qualify students to proceed to a full masters degree in archaeology, heritage studies, museums studies, art history, criminology or other related discipline.

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In a world dominated by visual imagery, artists need the appropriate skills, reflexive approaches and attitudes of critical enquiry to work as effective professionals within their field. Read more
In a world dominated by visual imagery, artists need the appropriate skills, reflexive approaches and attitudes of critical enquiry to work as effective professionals within their field. In this personalised course of study you can either explore your own specialism of fine art practice, or develop your practice across a broader range of interdisciplinary activity. In a supportive and challenging environment, you will be encouraged to be independent and enterprising in the promotion of yourself and your art.

The course is available to study either full-time over 1 calendar year or part-time over 2 calendar years. As a part time student it is possible to undertake the course from a distance and alongside existing employment.

You will develop new ways of looking at your own practice. You will explore distinct areas of contemporary fine art while reviewing your own and fellow students’ work-in-progress. Through negotiation, you will develop a proposal for new work that will form the framework for further development.

The course is structured to enable you to fully realise your ambitions for your practice. A lecture programme and regular contact with teaching staff, along with seminars from prominent practitioners, will assist you towards the production of a significant body of new work along with a key research folio within which you reflectively evaluate your practice. Students have in the past exhibited their final work at public galleries such as Chapter Arts Centre, Elysium Gallery, West Wharf Gallery and Arcade Cardiff.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/934-ma-arts-practice-fine-art

What you will study

The MA Arts Practice runs over two calendar years part-time or one calendar year full time:

- Part One:
Artist Practitioner 1 Critique 40 credits

Choice of one, 20 credit module from the three MA common modules, which you will study alongside Postgraduate students from other courses across the Faculty of Creative Industries:
- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
- Research Paradigms

- MA Common Modules:
You will receive a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of the core MA Arts Practice course, but because everyone has different requirements of their postgraduate experience, you can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship:
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries:
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms:
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Part Two
- Artist Practitioner 2 Context (40 credits)
- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 Credits)
- Artist Practitioner 3 Major Project (60 Credits) or Research Project –Learning Through Employment (60 Credits)

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Arts Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The programme makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits. The contact time you receive will include weekly workshops or seminars and regular group and individual tutorials. In addition, you will be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Modules are taught via a combination of group seminars and lectures, with individual one-to-one tutorials taking place regularly to support your progress.

We encourage students to discuss and provide feedback on each other’s work, and to approach assignments in groups where appropriate to develop essential skills in teamwork and project management.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

- Work/study placements:
In addition to developing your personal area of art practice, you will benefit from the chance to gain practical exhibiting and curatorial experience and to explore other avenues of professional practice.

- Career options:
Graduates of MA Arts Practice (Fine Art), can progress to careers in academia, a Fine Artist, Teacher, Artist in residence, Public Artist, Community Artist, Ceramicist, Exhibitions Organiser, Socially Engaged Practitioner, Prop maker, Technician, Technical Demonstrator, Craft Designer, Gallery Owner, Art Dealer, Art Conservator, Curator, Art Gallery Technician, Art Transporter, Arts Journalist, Critical Commentator, Web Designer, Arts Administrator, Set Designer, Model Maker, Illustrator, Mural Designer, Creative Director, Art Director, Arts Business Manager or Arts Publicist.

Assessment methods

Modules are largely assessed via practical outcomes, project proposals and research folios. Some modules make use of presentations and discussion of working methods and final outcomes.

We will give you regular verbal feedback to help you develop your understanding during each module.

Facilities

Studying art at the University of South Wales means you can work in dedicated studio spaces and base rooms at our Treforest campus. Within your specialism, you will be able to accomplish a high standard of work in our extensive specialist facilities: 3D workshop, print room, and ceramic studios all equipped with traditional and state of the art facilities, including digital suites and a fully equipped lighting studio for photography. Opportunities are available to extend your technical skills through tailored undergraduate modules.

Facilities at our nearby Cardiff campus range from photographic darkrooms and professional-level printers, to video and audio production studios. While facilities are available in the first instance to students studying related courses, they are available more widely to students wishing to explore cross-disciplinary and multi-media techniques. You will be able to borrow a full range of equipment including cameras, microphones and lighting.

Our specialist library offers a comprehensive range of textbooks, research journals and other physical and online resources, as well as an interlibrary loan service.

Teaching

Our MA Arts Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

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The Comparative Art and Archaeology MA at UCL is a wide-ranging and challenging programme designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the major problems, theories and approaches in the sociological and anthropological interpretation of the art of pre-modern societies. Read more
The Comparative Art and Archaeology MA at UCL is a wide-ranging and challenging programme designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the major problems, theories and approaches in the sociological and anthropological interpretation of the art of pre-modern societies.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to think critically and work independently in a broadly comparative perspective across the boundaries of regional and period specialisation which have traditionally characterised the study of art. They develop subject-specific, research-oriented skills relevant to their development as practising analysts within the history, anthropology or archaeology of art.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's module options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree the most popular choices include:
-Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
-Archaeology of Buddhism
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: a Comparative Approach
-Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
-Cities, States and Religion in Ancient India
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Maya Art, Architecture and Archaeology
-Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire
-Technology in Society: archaeology and ethnography in the Andes
-The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
-The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and presentations. Some optional modules include site visits to museums. Assessment is through essays, coursework, oral examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have progressed to PhD studies while others have developed careers in museums, other professional cultural heritage organisations, as well as art and archaeology-related publishing and television. A high level of success has been achieved by students going on to fully funded PhD research at the University of Oxford, UCL, University of California Berkeley, and Stanford, funded by the AHRC, the Chilean government, Japanese Government, UCL, and the Ministry of Education of Taiwan. Other students have secured positions in the museums and heritage sector, for example at the Petrie Museum at UCL and the Museum for Asian Civilizations in Singapore.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Administrative Assistant, Christie's
-Documentary Maker, Developing a Professional Portfolio (Documentary Film)

Employability
Successful graduates will have been fully prepared to undertake research on the art history and archaeology of early civilizations, from a comparative or region/period/theme-specific perspective, and will also possess the expert background knowledge to move on to related professional work in art history, archaeology and cultural heritage (subject to the particular requirements of a given position).

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe. The teaching staff for this programme bring together a range and depth of expertise that is arguably unparalleled at other institutions.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research

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The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies offers promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain. Read more
The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies offers promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain.

We give all possible support to our researchers, developing the resources available at the University and encouraging an active postgraduate environment for the exchange of information and concepts.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a thesis of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice under the expert guidance of an academic member of staff.

The PhD – the most advanced research degree – comprises of a thesis of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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A career-focused, up-to-date exploration of information technology, this distance learning course trains you on the fundamentals and the development of IT systems. Read more
A career-focused, up-to-date exploration of information technology, this distance learning course trains you on the fundamentals and the development of IT systems. It can also prepare you for industry-recognised Oracle Professional Certification. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The course aims to develop a good understanding and knowledge of current and emerging IT and computer technologies. The course aims to equip students with a combination of relevant technical skills and 'client-facing' awareness in preparation for, or in enhancement of, a career within the IT industry.

The distance learning delivery mode offers significant flexibility whereby all teaching and learning materials are provided in the most advanced Virtual Learning Environment.

Students can obtain an engaging and rewarding study experience with regular guidance, on-going support and timely feedback throughout their course from experienced academic tutors

A variety of online facilities are available for interaction between both students and tutors, as well as among students.

The course is specifically designed for career enhancement. It aims to equip students with a wide range of necessary knowledge and skills highly valued by employers and IT industry. These include mobile computing, IT security management, advanced databases and software project management.

Successful completion of the course entitles students to apply for Membership of the British Computer Society ( MBCS). Becoming a Member of the British Computer Society entitles students to put the letters MBCS after their name.

All assessments are completed via staged coursework with a built-in oral presentation/viva where appropriate using teleconference facility.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS), The Chartered Institute for IT and meets the educational requirement for Chartered IT Professional (CITP) Further Learning registration.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Communication Technologies for IT (Distance Learning) (core, 20 credits)
-Database Systems with Professional Certification (Distance Learning) (core, 20 credits)
-IT Security Management (Distance Learning) (core, 20 credits)
-MSc Project (Distance Learning) (core, 60 credits)
-Mobile Application Design and Development (Distance Learning) (core, 20 credits)
-Research and Development Skills (Distance Learning) (core, 20 credits)
-Software Project Management (Distance Learning) (core, 20 credits)

After the course

Successful completion of this course offers wide-ranging career opportunities in the IT industry in either private or public sectors.

Graduates will be equipped to work in a variety of areas such as database administration, project management, mobile and web development, business or systems analysis, IT consultancy, support services, product management and training.

Meanwhile, the School of Computing has a ‘World of Work’ agency, which enables students to contact potential employers and work on real projects, during their course and afterwards.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The School of Media, Art and Design is delighted to offer a new MA by Research with a range of exciting specialisms. Read more
The School of Media, Art and Design is delighted to offer a new MA by Research with a range of exciting specialisms. As a postgraduate MA student enrolled on this programme you will join a department with over thirty years of experience delivering excellent teaching and learning, research and knowledge exchange, and award-winning professional practice. You will join a vibrant community of researchers and practitioners and play a role in contributing to the culture of research and practice-based research that exists within the department.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/media-art-and-design-by-research.aspx

Course detail

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design provides the opportunity to undertake a supervised programme of independent study and practice in a structured and supportive environment. The programme may be undertaken either full time over one year, or part time over two years.

Suitability

This MA by Research is open to anyone who can satisfy the entry requirements. Individuals who would like to develop their research skills to a higher standard, whether they are using traditional research methods or practice-based research approaches, are particularly encouraged to apply. The MA by Research is offered both full-time and part-time, and given the emphasis placed on independent research, the course is well suited to graduates looking to continue their educational journey in a flexible fashion. The MA by Research is also a proven, and important developmental stepping-stone towards doctoral study.

Content

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design is not a taught MA, and therefore there are no modules offered. Instead, the individual defines their own set of research questions in conversation with their supervisory team. The range of subjects available for students to research is necessarily constrained by the range of specialisms offered by the supervisors within the School. Areas of specialism include:

• Animation
• Applied Art
• Cultural Studies
• Digital Media
• Film
• Fine Art
• Graphic Design
• Journalism
• Media and Communications
• Media Studies
• Photography
• Radio
• Television
• Web Design

Format

Students are supported principally through regular tutorials from a specialist supervisor. All supervisors are members of staff within the School of Media, Art and Design who have significant research experience and have been granted supervisor status by the Graduate School. A supervisor will help the student adopting the traditional research mode to frame the research topic and provide ongoing guidance about carrying out secondary and primary research and writing up the findings.

A supervisor will help the student adopting the practice ­based mode to devise and produce their project and to set it within a critical framework. Face­to­face supervisions will take place on a regular basis during term time, and supplemented by telephone, email and Skype guidance as needed. The schedule of supervisions will be agreed by negotiation between the supervisor and the student. Tutorials can be scheduled around a student’s other commitments and meaningful distance learning can be facilitated. Work­in­progress is reviewed by a panel of supervisors half way through the registration period. Following advice from this review students complete their theses or projects.

One of the few fixed commitments is the integral research seminar programme, which MA by Research students are required to attend, typically one afternoon each fortnight through October - June. The seminar programme is built around the department’s own research seminar series and is designed to integrate the student body by addressing issues of common interest, such as aesthetics, genre, form etc. Some seminar presentations will be tutor-led, others student-led. Every Masters student will be expected to deliver a research paper during the seminar programme. Students choosing the practice ­based mode will be expected to present work-in-progress for group critique.

Students choosing the practice­based mode will have access to the department’s extensive range of specialist equipment, which they will be able to book, and to its specialist facilities at times that they are not in use for taught classes.

Assessment

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design is offered via two modes:

A traditional research mode that consists of supervised academic study culminating in the submission of a thesis of 25,000­-30,000 words.

A practice­based mode that consists of supervised work on a body of creative practice that culminates in the submission of a project or portfolio equivalent to 20,000-25,000 words, together with a reflective analysis of no less than 5,000 words and no more than 10,000. The combined word count equivalent for a practice-based submission should not exceed 25,000-30,000 words.

The MA by Research is assessed using the Graduate School’s validated doctoral framework, which means that MA by Research students produce a single thesis (whether written or comprising both practice-based and written elements) that will be submitted at the end of their study. The thesis will then be examined both internally and externally and four possible outcomes will be achieved: Pass, Pass with Minor Corrections, Pass with Major Corrections, and Fail.

What can I do next?

The programme leads to a significant qualification in its own right but could also fast­track successful applicants to MPhil and ultimately to PhD qualifications.

The skills and specialist period knowledge developed during the programme provide additional grounding for careers in media, art and design.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MA Museum Cultures offers you the opportunity to study this expanding and dynamic field at close proximity to the most world-distinguished museums and galleries. Read more
The MA Museum Cultures offers you the opportunity to study this expanding and dynamic field at close proximity to the most world-distinguished museums and galleries. If you are contemplating a career in the museum and gallery sector and if you are interested in developing an in-depth understanding of contemporary debates about museums and their cultural significance, then this is the course for you. Our MA gives you the chance to develop a range of key skills, from critical thinking and writing to practical experience through a work placement in a museum, gallery or archive. Museums have been of enormous importance in shaping empires, nations and cities, and their collections are connected to wider histories of conflict and social change. To study museums is to study the development and fierce contestation of our collective cultural imagination and memory.

You begin with a core course that introduces interdisciplinary perspectives on the study of museums and a research skills module where you work collaboratively with your classmates. You then take 2 options in areas of specialist interest and either an independent research project or a work placement in a museum, gallery or archive. Finally, you will be individually counselled in your choice of dissertation topic.

The Department of History of Art at Birkbeck has an international reputation for its innovative approaches to the history of art, visual culture and museum studies. Our expertise extends into areas such as postcolonial museums, museums in Latin America, Africa and the Middle East, the senses and museums, architecture and museums, museums and art, museums and memory, museums and conflict, museums and gender, small museums, and museums, politics and heritage. As well as regular gallery and museum visits, we offer an exciting study trip abroad every spring. Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the department’s postgraduate events; the annual Murray lecture where speakers have included Penelope Curtis, director of Tate Britain and Neil McGregor, director of the British Museum; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

Our flexible approach to full-time and part-time evening study is ideal if you are thinking about undertaking paid or voluntary work experience in London’s museums and galleries during the daytime, while studying for a postgraduate degree that can give you a head start in a competitive jobs market.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our MA Museum Cultures programme throughout the year.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Taught by scholars across Birkbeck, including our Department of History of Art, Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies and Department of History, Classics and Archaeology. This programme offers an interdisciplinary perspective on contemporary debates within museum studies and encompasses museums in Africa, Asia and the Americas as well as in Europe.
We provide students with supervised work placements in museums, galleries and archives including Tate, the British Museum, the Whitechapel Gallery and the Horniman Museum. Past students have helped design and run schools programmes, documented collections that were previously uncatalogued, conducted visitor research and assisted curators in producing exhibitions.
This course of study offers you access to cutting-edge research by some of Britain’s foremost scholars and all the flexibility of evening study at Birkbeck. Whether you have a busy job, have other commitments or want to maximise library time during the day, evening study makes MA study work better.
You can choose option modules from postgraduate courses including History of Art and Arts Policy and Management.
Students studying Museum Cultures are invited to attend postgraduate events in the Department of History of Art and across the School of Arts. Guest speakers include international curators, museum directors, art historians and artists.
The department attracts a rich programme of visiting scholars and practitioners. Our History and Theory of Photography Research Centre and the newly established Architecture, Space and Society Centre offer students the opportunity to develop their knowledge of those areas, as does the Centre for Film and Visual Media which is based in the Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies.
The Department of History of Art has an outstanding reputation for offering critical and creative programmes designed and taught by leading academics and practitioners in the field, within a learning environment that is supportive of the needs of students from a wide range of educational backgrounds.
With our location in Bloomsbury in central London, you can explore some of the world's best architecture, galleries and museums, collections and arts spaces - many of which are on our doorstep or a short distance away. The British Library is within close proximity as is the British Museum, Sir John Soane's Museum, Foundling Museum, Wellcome Gallery, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and V&A.
We have a state-of-the art cinema and exhibition spaces, all housed in a historic building that was a former home to key members of the Bloomsbury Group, including the author Virginia Woolf and the artist Vanessa Bell.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive collection of books and journals in art history and museum studies. You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, the British Library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A).

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Since its inception in 2003, our distance learning MA Antiques course has been inspiring researchers and practitioners; individuals who want to develop a specialised interest in antiques without the necessity of on-campus attendance, and who wish to do so on a part-time basis. Read more
Since its inception in 2003, our distance learning MA Antiques course has been inspiring researchers and practitioners; individuals who want to develop a specialised interest in antiques without the necessity of on-campus attendance, and who wish to do so on a part-time basis.

Whether it’s a leisure activity, you wish to be an antique dealer or you want recognition of your professional status in antiques, our MA Antiques course appeals to a wide range of students. This postgraduate course has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The MA Antiques has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments. We accommodate such needs by offering a clear structure of progression, balanced by flexible personal tutorials: for which you can expect to have weekly one-to-one contact with academic staff via web based visual conferencing. It is this bespoke interaction with academic staff that our students tell us they find both supportive and inspirational. Our post graduate distance learning students come from a wide diversity of nationalities and locations: America, Canada, England, Germany, Greece, Scotland, and South Africa, to name a few.

Assessment is by 100 per cent coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. For each of the 40 credit modules you undertake, you will have both a mid-module assignment and an end of module assignment to complete. Through weekly tutorials you will receive on-going formative feedback and guidance, but the final module mark and summative feedback is based on the end of module assignment only.

COURSE OUTLINE

MA Antiques offers:
-A postgraduate qualification in antiques with a proven success rate
-Marketing advantages for your business, and/or your own career development
-The opportunity, after the first year, to specialise in a field of your choice
-Support for students who, after a long period away from formal education, may find postgraduate study daunting at first
-Encouragement for individuals who may not have formal entry qualifications - experience counts
-Assessment by 100% coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. So, no examinations, summer school or on campus requirements

OPPORTUNITIES

The course structure offers specific career progression through enabling individuals to apply themselves to one of three routes: academic publication, research funding, or exhibition/research project management. Previous topics from our graduates have included:
-The Hallmark System for English Silver: An Instrument of Enforcement or a Method to Identify Period Silver?
-A Web site Exhibition of Chinese Jade from the GvS Collection
-Regency Metamorphic Library Chairs (1790 -1840)
-Imitation or Innovation in Bretby Art Pottery
-Modern Art for the Table -The 1934 Harrods Exhibition
-Panelled Furniture: A Survey of 17th and 18th Century
-The contribution of Edmund Evans, Walter Crane, Randolph Caldecott and Kate Greenaway to the design of Victorian books for children

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Campus-Based. October each year. Distance Learning. February each year. This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. Read more

Start Dates

Campus-Based: October each year.
Distance Learning: February each year.

Course Description

This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. The course is taught by distance learning, so you can learn around your existing commitments in a way that suits you.

This fascinating course investigates the architectural development of the English country house and its artistic contents, as well as its place within history and literature. The course also examines the economic and political importance of the house and its impact on the landscape, plus the technologies employed to design, build and run it.

[[Course aims ]]

To gain a detailed knowledge of the major issues related to the study of the country house and of the literature on the subject, and to develop an understanding of the complex and changing position of the country house in its local, regional and national environment.

Distance Learning

This course is also available for study by distance learning with a start date in February each year. Modules for the distance learning course may vary.

(Please note: The information included on this webpage is indicative of the course provision provided by the University of Leicester. Due to regular enhancement of the University's courses, please refer to Leicester's own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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We offer promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in Eastern Mediterranean and Balkan history and culture from the Byzantine to the modern period, whether your interests are historical, art historical, archaeological or literature-based. Read more
We offer promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in Eastern Mediterranean and Balkan history and culture from the Byzantine to the modern period, whether your interests are historical, art historical, archaeological or literature-based.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision.

The PhD – the most advanced research degree – leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

For more information on distance learning including answers to frequently asked questions, student experiences and funding opportunities, please see our distance learning website.

These degrees have no taught components, but relevant taught modules may be attended by arrangement to develop appropriate research skills, including the study of ancient and modern languages.

We encourage you to attend conferences on subjects related to your research interests and to participate in our lively interdisciplinary seminar series (some of which are run by our postgraduates).

You are able to broaden your skills through appropriate training in teaching skills and, where possible, have the chance to gain experience in teaching. In addition, our annual postgraduate colloquia provide training in oral presentation skills and the professional dissemination of research within an interdisciplinary environment.

At Birmingham you also have the option of studying languages, free of charge. Almost no other UK University offers you the opportunity to learn the intense graduate academic language skills which you may need to pursue your research.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Shakespeare Institute offers promising candidates the opportunity to carry out their research in Stratford-Upon-Avon, as members of a closely-knit research community. Read more
The Shakespeare Institute offers promising candidates the opportunity to carry out their research in Stratford-Upon-Avon, as members of a closely-knit research community.

Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company, with access to extraordinarily rich libraries and archives, the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

At the Institute, you are able to study for full-time and part-time research degrees at all postgraduate levels (MA by Research, MLitt, and PhD).

You will work towards writing a thesis on a topic of your own choice, agreed with the Institute at the time of admission, and are supervised by a member of the Institute's teaching staff. There is also the opportunity for split location registration.

The PhD - the most advanced research degree – leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words. If you have not already completed a research Masters, you will normally register for an MA by Research in the first instance, and apply to upgrade your registration to a PhD on the basis of progress made.

The MLitt involves undertaking research on a chosen topic leading to the preparation of a thesis of 60,000 words.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words.

All research students take a course on the Methods and Materials of Research. The aim is to provide an initial training in the methodologies of research in the various fields associated with Shakespeare Studies. There are no other compulsory courses, but research students are expected to attend Thursday Seminars and the Research Seminars; they are also given the opportunity of undertaking specialist training in palaeography.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This part-time modular programme is mainly for industry-based students from the UK and overseas whose focus is on process technology, management, business and IT. Read more

Why this course?

This part-time modular programme is mainly for industry-based students from the UK and overseas whose focus is on process technology, management, business and IT.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE), an international body of Chemical Engineers operating in countries such as the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and more. Graduates can fulfil the Master’s degree requirement for gaining chartership and becoming a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

This course uses a project and work-based approach. It operates mainly by distance learning to allow you to spend the minimum time off-the-job. The programme meets the development needs of graduates from a range of engineering, technology and science disciplines, for example:
- Chemical Engineers
- Mechanical Engineers
- Control Engineers
- Chemists

It’s relevant to a broad range of type and size of company throughout the chemical and process sectors.

For graduates in disciplines other than chemical engineering, a wide range of chemical engineering bridging modules are available and can be studied as part of an agreed programme prior to starting the MSc.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/processtechnologymanagement/

You'll study

The MSc Chemical Technology & Management and the MSc Process Technology & Management are delivered in parallel. Both courses have some of the same core classes. Some of the classes relate to business/management and IT and some are technical classes of mutual interest.

The course format is a three year, modular course with a major final year project completed in your place of work. A two year postgraduate diploma option and one year postgraduate certificate are also available.

You can tailor the degree to your own requirements by selecting classes from the areas of:
- Process Technology
- Chemical Technology
- Business/IT

The Process Technology modules address two major priority areas for the process industries:
- The design, optimisation, control and operation of safe, clean, economically viable processes
- A deeper understanding of principles in complex areas, such as reactors, multi-phase mixtures and advanced separation processes

- How many classes do you need to complete?
The MSc requires 12 taught classes and a work-based project (equivalent to six modules). The diploma requires 12 classes and the certificate six classes.
For graduates in disciplines other than chemical engineering, foundation or bridging modules in chemical engineering are available.

- Final project
You’ll normally take on this project in your own workplace allowing you to make practical use of the concepts learned throughout the course. The project is the main focus of year 3 of the course. An academic supervisor with experience in your chosen project field will help you with the academic requirements of the project. The management and eventual conclusion of the project will be driven by you.

Facilities

In the department of Chemical & Process Engineering we've state-of-the-art research laboratories that opened in 2008. They include a comprehensive suite of experimental facilities including:
- light scattering
- spectroscopy
- adsorption measurements
- high pressure viscometry

Distance learning students are able to access to the University library online services, borrow online books and download academic papers and journals. You'll be able to access the University of Strathclyde library which holds 1,200,700 electronic books, 239 databases and over 105,000 e-journals that can be used 24 hours a day from any suitably enabled computer. The library also offers a postal service for distance learning students.

Course awards

Teaching staff in the department regularly receive nominations in the annual University-wide Teaching Excellence Awards, voted for by Strathclyde’s students. Staff have also been in receipt of external awards from organisations such as the IChemE and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Additional information

This programme is only available on a part-time basis. If you want to cover the same scope of subjects on a full-time basis you should apply for the MSc Advanced Chemical & Process Engineering or MSc Sustainable Engineering: Chemical Processing.

Learning & teaching

The course is based on printed lecture notes and material delivered from the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), ‘myplace’. GoToWebinar is used for live tutorial sessions.

Lecturers provide support through:
- online tutorials
- forums
- email
- telephone
- face to face on campus tutorials

Engineering modules are run by staff in the Chemical and Process Engineering department and specialists from industry.

Distance learning students are also welcome to attend full time lectures and tutorials and access on campus facilities if they are in the Glasgow area either temporarily or as a local resident.

- Guest lectures
There are a number guest lectures from experts across several industries.

Careers

Whether you're planning to progress your career into management, redevelop yourself as an engineer or move into a new industry – a Masters degree will expand your career opportunities. As you choose your own modules, the MSc Process Technology and Management allows flexible and adaptable learning, so that you can plan your degree to you own career aspirations. Relevant industries that graduates work in include oil and gas, food and drink, pharmaceutical, water treatment and many more.

In addition, this MSc will provide you with a means to validate your skills and competency to employers – but also to the engineering council (specifically IChemE) opening up new prospects with charterships and further development.

- Where are they now?
100% of our graduates are in work or further study.*

Job titles include:
Manufacturing Co-ordinator
Operations Director
Process Chemist
Process Engineer
Production Chemist
Senior Research Engineer

Employers include:
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
DSM Nutritional Products Ltd
H2Oil & Gas Ltd
Infineum UK Ltd
Simon Carves Engineering

*Based on the results of the national Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12).

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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MA Games Design provides unique study opportunity rooted in creative development linked across a range of digital and traditional approaches. Read more
MA Games Design provides unique study opportunity rooted in creative development linked across a range of digital and traditional approaches. The course also provides a distinct opportunity to study these disciplines at postgraduate level from a perspective that is not always readily available within the UK.

MA Games Design enables the postgraduate student to focus on the creative aspects of the discipline. It provides a structure and vehicle for the development of personal approaches to creative ideas, appropriate to the level of study and based in research activity.

The course is for those individuals who wish to creatively question ‘industry norms’ and develop a personal area of investigation. To this end the course has a strong emphasis on personal exploration which it is hoped will bring together new ideas and theories within accepted common practice.

The course provides an opportunity for individuals to further their aspirations through research and reflection in a selected area of their discipline. This is enabled by access to a broad range of staff and material that can encourage and support this exploration and enhance the individual’s creativity. This will enable them to make insightful and unique contributions to their field of study.

It is a core feature that within the courses academic structure there is opportunity to accommodate the broad range of proposals expected from potential students. This type of course is particularly suited to professional practitioners wishing to pursue a sustained period of time developing new ideas, and recent graduates wishing to focus their studies at an advanced level.

Throughout the course students are encouraged to pursue a unique personal line of inquiry within the broad subject area of Games Design culminating in the Postgraduate Project / Dissertation response at the end of the course.

At the end of the course the students will have had the opportunity to build up a personal body of work that represents their personal developmental journey, and reflect a personal response to their discipline.

Fundamental to the philosophy of the course is the provision of an opportunity for students to explore and realise their individual aspirations and potential, creating a framework for developing more fully as skilled and informed professional practitioners. This is enabled through discussion and feedback with the course team and relevant peer groups.

Reflecting the diversity of activity that falls within the boundaries of games design the course encompasses three distinct strands of activity, design, art and modelling. In the commercial world of game development these strands are often interwoven and the emphasis can change from company to company. Likewise these strands can vary from individual project to project within a company. To accommodate this varied field of skills the common lecture theme of the course encompasses all of these activities and an individual engaged in the course may respond in one, two or all three of the strands of activity.

Throughout the duration of the course students are required to keep an ongoing ‘Reflective Diary’ that is clearly used to record all lines of enquiry, development of ideas, critical reflection and analysis. This will be in the form of a public blog.

The MA Games Design has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via Distance Learning. Building on our practical experience of delivering Distance Learning courses within the School, we will continue to offer an educational climate that enables individuals to "develop as confident, valued graduates, skilled in the application of knowledge."

Modules:

Games Design and e-Learning
Issues and Methodologies for Games Design
Dissertation Project Research 1 and Research 2
Dissertation Project Research 3 and Dissertation Project Evaluation
Dissertation Project

The course is delivered on line via the Internet as a Distance Learning course in a virtual learning environment using Blackboard. For the taught modules there are weekly lectures and mini assignments with a mid module and end of module assignment.

Coursework is the most important element in both the learning and assessment processes. All module assessments are based on 100% coursework, there are no formal examinations.

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This course is designed for those with a first degree in either forensic science or another science subject (ideally chemistry or biology but other degrees are also acceptable) who want to further their knowledge and experience of forensic science. Read more
This course is designed for those with a first degree in either forensic science or another science subject (ideally chemistry or biology but other degrees are also acceptable) who want to further their knowledge and experience of forensic science.

The full-time distance learning MSc should be completed in 18 months including your dissertation. There is a two-week long residential practical programme, held at our Stoke-on-Trent campus at the end of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma stages of study. These workshops enable you to put your learning into practice and gain valuable experience in our state-of-the-art laboratories, crime scene house and mock courtroom facilities.

The MSc dissertation completes your study. This is a independent research project which will usually be undertaken, at least in part, in our state of the art specialist facilities.

Course content

This course builds upon your previous experience in the biological, chemical or forensic or other appropriate sciences to develop your ability to analyse evidence in a myriad of forms. The emphasis is on accuracy, accountability and thoroughness, with the ultimate aim of providing results and interpretation for use by a court of law. The theory is delivered using Blackboard, an online virtual learning environment. This provides the flexibility of studying at your own pace and from any location in the world. Whilst using Blackboard, you will interact with other students on the course through online discussion groups and receive excellent support from tutors via e-mail or phone.

The Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma courses are, respectively, the first third and first two thirds of the MSc course. At Postgraduate Certificate level, the emphasis is on the crime scene, specifically the collection, packaging and analysis of evidence such as fingermarks, footwear marks, documents, hairs, fibres and glass. Those continuing on to the Postgraduate Diploma will then change the emphasis of their studies to the chemical and biological analysis of evidence in forensic laboratories. During the Diploma, you will learn about a host of techniques, from the interpretation of blood spatter evidence to the analysis of illicit drugs, and from DNA profiling to the analysis of fire accelerants and drugs. The Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma stages of study each end in a two-week long residential practical programme, held at our Stoke-on-Trent campus. These summer workshops enable you to put your learning into practice and gain valuable experience in our state-of-the-art laboratories, crime scene house and mock courtroom facilities.

MSc students continue their studies beyond the Postgraduate Diploma stage, allowing specialisation in an aspect of forensic science. To complete the MSc, you will undertake a independent research project in an area either suggested by yourself or by choosing a title from a list of topics. In this work, the emphasis is on initiative and originality in the analysis and interpretation of results. The experimental part will usually be undertaken at our Stoke-on-Trent campus but, by agreement, could be based at the learner’s place of work or at a local institute.

Accreditation

This award is accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

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