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Masters Degrees (Art Curatorship)

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The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. Read more
The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute are linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide an academic programme which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

This twelve-month, full-time programme provides an introduction to:

Museum knowledge, which covers all aspects of curatorship including the technical examination of paintings, connoisseurship, materials and conservation, attribution, provenance and issues relating to display.
Art history and Renaissance culture to increase students’ understanding of methods of analysing the subjects of works of art and their knowledge of Renaissance art works and the conditions in which they were commissioned, produced and enjoyed.
Current scholarship and professional practice in these areas as well as new and emerging areas of research and scholarship.
The programme will be taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Warburg Institute and by National Gallery curatorial and archival experts. The teaching staff of the Warburg Institute are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely and are involved with research related to the topics they teach.

Structure

All students will take three core modules and two optional modules. The core modules include language and paleography classes, which will be selected following an individual language audit for each student, and are spread over two terms. The optional subjects will vary from year to year and students must select at least one in an art historical field.

Core courses:

Art History – Iconology – Dr Paul Taylor
Language, Paleographical and Archive Skills – Various tutors for language and palaeography classes; Dr Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Mr Alan Crookham (National Gallery) for archive skills
Curatorship in the National Gallery – Curatorial, conservation and scientific staff of the National Gallery, including Dr Ashok Roy, Dr Susanne Avery-Quash, Mr Larry Keith and Ms Rachel Billinge
Optional courses (two to be chosen):

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 – Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton

Students will also be encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer will be spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff of the Warburg Institute or a member of staff from the National Gallery.

Assessment

The usual format for classes is a weekly seminar. All students are required to submit three essays of 4,000 words, one at the beginning of the second term and the remaining two at the beginning of the third term. A dissertation of 15,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these four pieces of written work, a catalogue entry (submitted at the end of the first term), and examinations in language, paleographical and archive skills. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the staff at the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. Because of the small numbers involved (places are limited to 12 per year), students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. Read more
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

One of two strands of enquiry in arts practice at masters level (the other beting Arts Practice, Fine Art) the MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course offers students the opportunity to explore their own art practice or to take an outward facing approach, in partnership with others. Students of the course develop the skills to evaluate, critique and implement methodologies, gaining the ability to articulate sound arguments relevant to their practice.

Graduates exploring the role of the Arts in realising health and wellbeing focus on the value of the arts in community engagement and also its impact on the environment. They make a significant contribution to the advancement of Arts in Health within Wales and further afield.

The broad and interdisciplinary nature ensures that our course reflects the diversity of activity and interest in this dynamic field.

The role of the arts in health and well-being is widely recognised and valued. The MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course will be of interest to artists, arts or health managers, community workers and teachers, plus those with an interest in the relationship between arts and health. It aims to support and develop innovative practice and research in this vibrant and expanding sector, so you will be encouraged to engage in creative dialogue,collaboration and interdisciplinary working

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/940-ma-arts-practice-art-health-and-wellbeing

What you will study

The MA Art Practice course runs over two calendar years if you choose part-time study, or one calendar year for full-time study:

Part One
- Critical Studies in the Arts (20 credits)
Learn about systems of enquiry, how to understand and engage with objects and issues that affect your particular domain

- Arts Practice 1 (40 credits)
Develop your skills in your chosen discipline, challenging genre and context to develop an original body of work in either a studio context or placement.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – June during your first year.

Part Two
- Arts Praxis (40 credits)
Refine and build upon your line of enquiry, develop new skills, producing a body of work within a studio context or placement which demonstrates complexity of understanding.

- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 credits)
Explore entrepreneurial, marketing and management aspects of contemporary practice within a framework of social, political, economic and cultural responsibility

- Major Arts Project (60 credits)
Complete a detailed project demonstrating praxis; an area of research and practice relevant to your concerns, utilising research methods appropriate for an arts scholar and an appropriate means of presentation.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – September during your second year.

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Art Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The MA Art Practice course makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits (additional costs will apply for field trips and visits). Contact time will include weekly workshops or seminars, and regular group and individual tutorials. You will also be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practice and gain experience in the field through practical placements, mentoring and live projects matched to your needs whilst benefiting from specialist facilities and expertise to extend your skill sets.

Graduates can progress to careers in academia, arts administration, artists in residence, arts education, arts and disability, community arts, commissioned works, gallery administration and curatorship, health sector management, public art, studio practice, social services, and youth work.

Assessment methods

You will usually have to complete coursework as you progress, and normally sit exams at the end of each academic year.

Facilities

Practical facilities available to students include an MA base room, computer lab with software for digital imaging and film editing, printmaking studio, ceramics, casting, wood and metal workshops, photographic darkroom and studio.

Learning resources include the campus library, access to online journals and research.

Teaching

Our MA Art Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

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This is an exciting, challenging, and rigorous course that addresses the multifaceted needs of today’s visual artist. Read more
This is an exciting, challenging, and rigorous course that addresses the multifaceted needs of today’s visual artist. We teach using a mixture of seminars, tutorials, peer reviews, and guest lectures in a well-equipped studio environment that facilitates and encourages creative enquiry, supported by a strong theoretical awareness of contemporary practice. Contemporary fine art practice embraces a wide and diverse spectrum of activity and our team has expertise in the areas of painting, sculpture, photography, film and video, installation work, environmental art, public art, performance, textual work, artists’ books, curatorship, and exhibition organisation.

We’ll encourage you to demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems and to act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level. In addition, you’ll also continue to advance your knowledge and understanding and develop new skills to a high level.

We have expertise in critical theory, art history, philosophy of art, art criticism, and journalism. All members of the teaching staff are practising artists, writers, or theorists and members of research groups within the school. Several members have experience of supervising PhD students, while others are external examiners for other UK art and design institutions. Many have successfully bid for research funding, enabling the continuation of personal research, as well as projects that feed back into the curriculum to enhance the student experience. The research group for Digital and Material Arts, together with the Design and Visual Communication group, will provide you with opportunities to hear about the latest research. You’ll also have the opportunity to participate in study visits to regional and national museums and galleries, exhibitions, symposia and conferences.

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The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Read more
The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Its purpose is to extend and develop graduates’ art historical interests, expertise and scholarship into the area of curatorship and active engagement with collections and exhibitions in the museum and gallery realm.

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This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. Read more

Overview

This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management.

You’ll develop your understanding of the ways in which historians and cultural theorists have interpreted and represented architecture, material culture and museums over the past 2,000 years. You’ll look at different methods of display and interpretation and the methodologies behind museum practice and country house collections. Then you’ll choose from optional modules on topics such as cultural theory, sculpture, Hollywood icons or cinema.

At the same time, you’ll develop practical skills. You’ll work on an interpretation project in our Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery and you’ll even undertake a negotiated work placement in your second semester. Supported by the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills for a successful career in the museum and art gallery sector.

All students on the degree become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy opportunities from networking events and links to alumni to conferences, seminars and reading groups.

You’ll study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a national museum, nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many private and charitable museums and galleries.

We’re also a short bus or train journey away from everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Bronte Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. Students who study part-time will attend on one day per week each year. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

A set of core modules form the bedrock of the programme, introducing you to the concept of the ‘museum’ and the ways in which Western museums have represented and interpreted history and historical material.

You’ll also use contemporary theory to consider 20th-century museum practice and key questions around curatorship, museology and museum management. The role of the curator, funding and sponsorship and the display and interpretation of objects are among the topics you’ll cover.

Your core modules will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge and gain practical skills. You’ll take part in an interpretation project in the University’s Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery, as well as completing a work placement in an external arts or heritage organisation.

All MA students in the School take two core modules which develop the research skills to complete research projects such as your essays and dissertation. This will build to our unique MA Symposium in Semester 2, where you present some of your own research across interdisciplinary panels, and a dissertation which enables you to undertake research in a topic of interest to you.

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Learn to speak and write confidently about museums and curatorship, together with hands-on experience in a museum setting, with a focus on photography. Read more
Learn to speak and write confidently about museums and curatorship, together with hands-on experience in a museum setting, with a focus on photography. Think about the future of museums and how you can contribute to it.

This MA introduces you to:
-Curatorial scholarship and its methodologies (including conservation-led research and technical art history)
-The histories of museums and their collections
-The ethical and legal frameworks within which curators and museums work
-The nature and politics of museum displays

You visit museums in Sussex and in London, allowing you to learn first-hand about institutional histories, collections, permanent galleries and temporary exhibitions.

You’re taught by Sussex tutors and external specialists. In the past, these have included senior staff from the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, the V&A, and the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

How will I study?

In the autumn and spring terms, you take museum skills modules with seminars at Sussex and visit local and national collections alongside taking core modules and an option based on photography.

The summer term is taken up with a work placement at a local or national museum or gallery, working with photographic collections.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to participate actively in the taught sessions and museum visits. With your tutors and classmates, you debate a range of ethical concerns facing museum curators.

You also develop your own research interests through the dissertation. Assessed work includes:
-Term papers
-Practical assignments
-A learning journal (written during the placement as a reflection on that experience)
-A 12,000-word dissertation

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You gain knowledge about objects and collections, specifically in the context of photography, and develop a critical awareness of museum practices.

You develop communication and project management skills. These skills provide the practical and theoretical foundation for careers in:
-Museums
-Galleries
-Heritage at curatorial level
-The cultural sector more broadly

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The Sydney Master of Art Curatorship provides candidates with a sophisticated awareness of the full range of cultural, theoretical, social, political and economic issues underlying the art gallery and museum system. Read more
The Sydney Master of Art Curatorship provides candidates with a sophisticated awareness of the full range of cultural, theoretical, social, political and economic issues underlying the art gallery and museum system.

A highly valued aspect of the course is the project-based internships supervised by industry professionals in local, national and international visual arts organisations which provide invaluable workplace experience, training and networking opportunities.

The Master of Art Curating is designed and taught collaboratively by the Department of Art History and Film Studies and Sydney College of the Arts. The course emphasises the skills required for curating in a variety of contemporary contexts.

The program will provide students with a rich combination of academic core skills, art-historical and art-critical knowledge and community-engaged experience, creating pathways to careers and professional development in art institutions of all types. Graduates will possess a strong foundation in the history of art museums and their cultural impact, and an awareness of the changing nature and role of curators in society and the current challenges they face.

The program provides critical insight into and practical knowledge of both traditional institutions, such as museums and galleries, and the expanding field of contemporary curating and its wide range of non‑traditional exhibition spaces. These include artist-run and community art spaces, public art projects, festivals and commercial spaces.

Graduates will develop specialist knowledge and understanding of major developments and issues in the field of the history of art, and to be able to apply these to the care, display, and interpretation of objects, performances and art practices in curatorial contexts.

The course brings students into major Sydney art institutions for seminars. It includes an internship placement and students may choose to complete a second internship as part of their studies.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Read more

What is this programme about?

MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Through the application of design theory and practice, incorporating new technologies into the discourse, students will be able to create or initiate solutions and experiences in the context of the cultural industries.

This MA programme provides its graduates with the advanced skills necessary to confront their professional challenges and move forward in this highly competitive industry. Integrating materiality and object interpretation through applied imagination, developing innovative creative-thinking, enterprise skills and research-led projects, the programme's multidisciplinary and critical approach gives students a distinctive insight into the collaborative nature of these industries.

The programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. With an international outlook, our graduates will be sought after across an array of arts, design, events, culture, entertainment, media and creative technology departments globally.

The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, policy making, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms. Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind OR http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries/

Who is this programme for?

This MA programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

How is the programme organised and what will I learn?

The programme is run in two modes: full-time over one year and part-time over two years, with the taught content made up of core and option courses totalling 180 credits.

Core courses
* Experience Design (XD) - 30 Credits
* Materiality & Interpretation - 30 Credits
* Design Management and Cultural Enterprise - 30 Credits
* MA Final Project - 60 Credits

Option courses (two to choose from):
* Curatorial practice - 15 Credits
* Coding in Creative Contexts- 15 Credits
* Sound Design- 15 Credits
* Social Media and SEO - 15 Credits

What do students do after this programme?

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing, policy making, and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms.

Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

How are we taught?

Typically, in full-time mode, you can expect 10 hours attendance per week over two days in a class of around 15-20 students. Teaching is a mixture of studio work, seminars, lectures and workshops. The full-time mode should only be considered by students who are able to dedicate at least 25 hours per week to the programme. The part-time mode is recommended for students in full-time employment.

How do I apply for this programme?

Apply directly on our website (link below). Selected applicants will be invited to attend a personal or skype interview. We recommend early applications, as the places are limited. Overseas applications for this course should be received no later than the end of July for entry in September to allow the sufficient time for visa applications.

Where can I find more information?

For more information, please see the course page at our online prospectus and take a look at the CPDA website.

MA Design for Cultural Industries Blog: http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries

MA Design for Cultural Industries Prospectus Page http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind

Department Website and Student Work http://cpda.gre.ac.uk

How to Apply: http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply/pg

For more information, you can also contact Programme Leader Dr. Isil Onol by email:

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This innovative course benefits from collaborative relationships with museums and galleries of national and international significance, notably the Holburne Museum, Bath; Spike Island, Bristol; Arnolfini, Bristol; and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery. Read more
This innovative course benefits from collaborative relationships with museums and galleries of national and international significance, notably the Holburne Museum, Bath; Spike Island, Bristol; Arnolfini, Bristol; and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery.

It covers a wide range of curatorial approaches, from management of the historical collection to creative curating of contemporary art, craft and design. The course takes a broad view of curatorial practice and the programme includes consideration of activities in the private domain of the domestic interior, and in virtual reality, as well as commercial treatments, such as shop window display.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is offered in both full and part-time modes. It is normally one year, (3 trimesters) in duration in full time mode or 6 trimesters in part-time mode. The first two trimesters comprise taught sessions and assessed projects, while the Master’s Project in the final part of the course is by negotiated project. Completion of the first 2 modules on the course leads to the award of the Postgraduate Certificate, and completion of the first 4 modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Subsequent completion of the MA double module leads to the award of MA Curatorial Practice.

MODULES

Research Methodologies - Part one introduces generic research methodologies with part two considering subject specific material, analysis and evaluation techniques.

The Role of the Curator - The Role of the Curator considers the changing role of the curator and the ‘politics’ of curating. It addresses developments in critical theory and their impact on curatorial practices and includes topics such as representing communities, ethnicities, gender issues, ‘interventions’, gallery learning, the ‘post-museum’ and creative curating.

Collections and Collecting - This element of the course considers private activities in the domestic interior, as well as public collections and their management. It covers material culture, the urge to collect, the collection as shrine, oral history and its methods, object studies, research in the archiving and management of historical collections, with the collection at the Holburne Museum in Bath providing an important case study.

Cultures of Display - The module looks at public and private modes of display. As well as considering a range of museum and gallery practices, it includes studies in domestic display, commercial display and digital display.

Master’s Project - The Master’s Project is capable of accommodating a variety of approaches for assessment. Examples might include (but are not restricted to) the traditional written dissertation, perhaps drawing on historical or archival case studies, research into and/or curating of an exhibition in a particular venue, and forms of digital production, such as the construction of a museum or gallery specific web site.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The MA adopts a ‘practice-led’ approach; while some sessions are delivered by university academics at the Corsham Court Centre, others are delivered by our collaborators and relate to particular case studies or collections. There are field trips to museums and galleries in the Bath/Bristol area and opportunities to work alongside museum and gallery professionals on selected in-house activities. ‘Real life’ projects can be pursued in response to assessment assignments, especially in relation to the final ‘Master’s Project’ double module.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

• The ability to deal with complex issues in the area of curatorial practice history, theory and context, effectively employing skill in analysis and synthesis as necessary.
• The ability to independently plan and implement research activities in the subject fields of curatorial practice, demonstrating professionalism, self-direction and originality.
• The ability to effectively propose and curate exhibitions, drawing on research and understanding.
• The ability to initiate and contribute to debate and discussion in relation to curatorial practice.
• The capacity to advance knowledge, learning and skills in the subject fields of curatorial practice.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Typical career destinations include:
• Curatorial work in museums and galleries
• Freelance curatorship
• Galleries/Arts administration
• Public Art
• Critical writing, such as exhibition reviews and catalogue essays

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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Situated practice is a key development in arts and humanities, where expertise comes not from a focus on a pre-defined discipline or subject (for example art, architecture or design) but from a creative and critical position that operates beyond these categories. Read more
Situated practice is a key development in arts and humanities, where expertise comes not from a focus on a pre-defined discipline or subject (for example art, architecture or design) but from a creative and critical position that operates beyond these categories. This pioneering programme will lead students into making work that is situated physically and engages with contemporary social, cultural and political conditions.

Degree information

This MA programme has broadly two goals:
-To provide a high-quality stand-alone qualification which trains critical, innovative and transdisciplinary practitioners in the making of projects which address the specific concerns of particular sites, and develop modes of research response and propositional transformation appropriate for those sites.
-To provide high-quality practice-led research training to enable students to carry out future doctoral and action research in the field.
Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and the 'Major Project' exhibition module (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Certificate is available as an alternative qualification for students who pass modules amounting to 60 credits or more.

Core modules
-Situated Practice: Research Methods (15 credits)
-Mediated Environments (30 credits)
-Critical Spatial Practice: Site Writing (30 credits)

Optional modules
-Open Work module (15 Credits)
-Alternatively students may choose one optional module from across UCL, with agreement of the Programme Director and relevant department.

Exhibition
This module is based around the preparation of an original piece of situated practice, first in the form of a live intervention on site, then documented through an artist’s book, and finally remade in an exhibition format.

Teaching and learning
Tutorials and seminars are the leading teaching methods, together with lectures, group-working, writing workshops, research seminars, film screenings, and reviews of student work by Bartlett School of Architecture staff and visiting researchers. There are building and gallery visits in London and further afield, and an annual fieldtrip (optional). Modules use these advanced-level teaching approaches to encourage innovative student-led work.

Fieldwork
There will be one field trip (optional) annually as part of the programme. Students will also conduct their own original spatial research into a specific site of their own choosing for their Major Project.
Maximum cost to student is £500.

Careers

Situated practice is internationally understood as encompassing activity and research in curatorship, public engagement, event design, creative regeneration, participation design and activism, site-writing, situated film and video-making, information design and new media work, communication design and publishing, online environment design and civic media, and management of associated institutes.

Employability
The combination of networks, knowledge and technical expertise makes graduates of The Bartlett some of the most sought-after in the world. Graduates of this programme will leave with the skills and expertise that relate to a rapidly expanding and evolving sector in industry, including a strong understanding of appropriate methodologies in art and design practice-led research. In addition, students will develop site-related ‘situated practice’ projects. These may vary from physical installations, to digital interventions and to site writings and will establish the foundation for their final thesis in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Situated practice is a rapidly growing and highly active post-disciplinary domain; a popular example would be the 2016 winner of the Turner Prize, a street regeneration project in Liverpool by the artist and architect collective Assemble in collaboration with local residents.

Situated Practice MA graduates will be uniquely educated and highly equipped to pioneer new forms of hybrid practice between art and architecture in domains of urban design, spatial design, event design, critical and theoretical writing, performance, and craft.

Located within The Bartlett School of Architecture, the programme will examine the fertile territories where the discipline of architecture cross-pollinates with the other creative arts. The neighbourhood of Hackney Wick, where the programme will be located, is home to the greatest concentration of artists in the UK.

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Through the MA in Creative Arts Practice you will develop your creative identity and engage with digital culture. You will also join a vibrant community of professional artists, designers, musicians and performers. Read more

Course Overview

Through the MA in Creative Arts Practice you will develop your creative identity and engage with digital culture. You will also join a vibrant community of professional artists, designers, musicians and performers. We all work together to develop and diversify our work.

This course is based in Culture Lab, our home for creative digital practice. We are a research community at the forefront of thinking about how creative practice can generate new kinds of knowledge.

You will learn to work flexibly with open source and emerging technologies and create innovative work. In addition, research methods from experimental design will strengthen your practice. You will also engage with theories of digital art, culture and technology.

You will choose your course of study, including: live electronic performance; digital art practice; film making; creative writing; experimental music; creative enterprise.

We're in the heart of the city centre campus. Newcastle has a vibrant art scene, so is a great place to study digital creative arts.

The Newcastle University Institute for Creative Arts Practice aggregates the creative critical mass within a world-class research-intensive University. We'll encourage you to collaborate and create work that has a global significance. We offer a supportive environment where collaborative and interdisciplinary creative projects can thrive.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-arts-practice-ma/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-arts-practice-ma/#howtoapply

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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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