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Masters Degrees (Art Crime)

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This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. Read more
This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. By combining cutting edge research from the fields of criminology, archaeology, art history, heritage studies, and law, via discussion of compelling case studies, this programme will allow you to explore the criminal networks that function in the area of art crime and what can be done to protect our past and our culture for the future.

Why this programme

◾This is the only online art crime and illicit antiquities research programme currently available and is the first university-accredited postgraduate degree offered on this topic.
◾You will be taught by leading academics in this field, who are members of the Trafficking Culture Project, the only academic research group devoted to the study of the illicit trafficking of cultural objects.
◾This programme is taught entirely online through pre-recorded lectures and optional real-time seminars. This allows distance learners maximum flexibility while maintaining the high level of instructure and peer interaction needed to explore such challenging topics.
◾Students who successfully complete the PgCert will have the opportunity to come to Glasgow, to complete a full masters degree in the areas of criminology and art history.

Programme structure

You will take three courses across three semesters (includes summer teaching). During each course you will investigate and present an art or antiquities crime case study, produce a portfolio-quality ‘digital artefact’ and write an essay for assessment. Depending on your needs and goals, you can take one of the courses individually or all three to achieve the qualification.

Core courses
◾Antiquities trafficking
◾Art crime
◾Repatriation, recovery return.

Career prospects

This programme complements careers in the museums and heritage sector, in law enforcement and security, in related fields of law, in fine art and provenance research, and should qualify students to proceed to a full masters degree in archaeology, heritage studies, museums studies, art history, criminology or other related discipline.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

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Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression. Read more
Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course will encompass all these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic art supervisors.

Why study Forensic Art at Dundee?

Forensic Art is the presentation of visual information in relation to legal procedures. A forensic artist may aid in the identification or location of victims of crime, missing persons or human remains, and may facilitate the identification, apprehension or conviction of criminals.

Forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge. The course provides training and expertise at the cutting-edge of the forensic art profession

What's so good about studying Forensic Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching methods include traditional and online lectures, practical workshops in the studio and dissecting room and small group discussions. These encourage debate around theoretical research-based solutions to current practical problems.

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

This highly innovative one-year taught MSc will encompass these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic artists.

Semester 1 (60 credits)

In semester 1 the focus is on the study of anatomy through dissection, prosection study, illustration and facial sculpture and applying this to life art practice. Students will also be introduced to research methods and digital media.

Anatomy 1 - Head and Neck (15 credits)

Anatomy 2 - Post Cranial (15 credits)

Life Art (10 credits)

Digital Media Practice (10 credits)

Research Methods (10 credits)

Semester 1 may be also taken as a stand-alone PGCert entitled ‘Anatomy for Artists’.


Semester 2 (60 credits)

Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison (25 credits)

Forensic Art (25 credits)

Medical-Legal Ethics (10 credits)

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Forensic Art and Facial Identification.

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a self-directed project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods are employed, including anatomy spot-tests; oral and visual presentations; portfolio assessment of 2D/3D image acquisition and of artwork; written coursework and examination, such as forensic case reports.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional vocational training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in forensic art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In forensic art, potential careers exist within the police force and overseas law enforcement. Possible careers include:

Police art & design departments producing law enforcement documents, image enhancement, CCTV surveillance, image collection, staff posters and presentations.
SOCO/CSIs in UK or overseas law enforcement agencies
Facial composite practitioner and witness interview expert in police force
Archaeological artist working with museums, institutes and exhibitions
Facial identification services
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. Read more
In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. We draw on state-of-the-art research to address key critical issues surrounding organised criminality and terrorism in contemporary society.

We involve multi-level analyses of organised crime as a concept, alongside the impacts of urbanisation, migration and globalisation upon both the practice of crime and the ways in which we understand them. You address cutting-edge critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues relating to organised crime and terrorism. You explore topics including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of terrorism
-Globalisation and organised crime
-Security and the state
-The hacker ethic
-Human rights

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Employment opportunities for graduates of this course include careers in security, policing, research, intelligence and justice professions.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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This course will appeal to practitioners and students interested in careers in a range of professions such as policing, probation, prison service work, social work and many new areas in third sector and private sector security and outsourced support for offenders, vulnerable adults and young people. Read more
This course will appeal to practitioners and students interested in careers in a range of professions such as policing, probation, prison service work, social work and many new areas in third sector and private sector security and outsourced support for offenders, vulnerable adults and young people. A broad based masters programme in public protection would enable students to pursue their particular interest be it in domestic violence, terrorism, dangerous offenders or child protection.

More about this course

The course encourages you to look critically at public protection, a key practitioner concept for professionals working in socially responsible professions.

You'll explore applied and theoretical critical understanding of public protection and other aspects of risk, which will transform the professional practice of participants or enhance their future employability.

Modules draw on the research expertise of staff, and aim to create a virtuous circle, where contacts generated through students/staff on the course and via the London Practitioner Forum will enable and assist their further research.

Including critical approaches to the understanding of risk within hard to reach groups and incorporating issues of diversity, the programme draws upon the University's established Criminology MSc degree and utilises the existing module provision.

Two additional modules are offered, Public Protection and Risk Awareness, and Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism.

There is a special emphasis on a sound grasp of the relevant academic literature, including substantial use of key scholarly journals in the field of criminology and criminal justice. There is also a focus on how theory relates to and enhances good practice.

This is assessed through a variety of summative assessments including essays, examinations (seen), practical research methodology assignments, an extended thesis (12-15,000 words), and various formative presentations to class peers.

Modular structure

This course consists of five core modules: Understanding Public Protection and Risk, Crime Control and Community Safety, Criminological Research Methods, Crime and Offender Patterns and the Criminological Dissertation on a topic of students choice.

There are opportunities to specialise in areas of your interest when choosing the two optional designates: topics range from Terrorism/Counter Terrorism, Domestic Violence, Critical Issues in Criminal Justice, Psychology and Crime and other more specialist research modules.

The course also provides a unique opportunity to enhance professional practice and critical understanding.

After the course

The course will help prepare students for employment in the criminal justice sector (including the police, probation, prison, youth offending and community safety departments), as well as academic or government research posts. It is hoped that some students will progress to doctoral studies after successful completion of the MSc.

It is the intention that students already engaged in a related occupation will benefit markedly from the course, in that the latter will provide the academic contextualisation with which to understand and evaluate the complexity of, and reciprocity between, varied agencies, departments and policies related to crime, criminology and criminal justice.

Criminology itself is an increasingly strong and prevalent academic discipline. The analytic and research skills acquired on the MSc are, of course, transferable to other jobs and areas of expertise. Previous students from this course have joined the police service either as police officers or civil investigation officers, some have embarked upon training to equip them to join the probation service or become social workers working with young offenders.

Other students have joined the voluntary sector working in residential or drugs/alcohol units. Still others have entered research jobs within the public or private sector and finally a number have progressed on to PhD studies.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to enable graduate students to develop skills in a variety of areas, which concern the processing, analysis and identification of human remains. Read more
MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to enable graduate students to develop skills in a variety of areas, which concern the processing, analysis and identification of human remains. This postgraduate course provides intensive training in developmental anatomy and osteology, forensic anthropology methods and theory, forensic taphonomy in theory and practice, crime scene investigation and the law, research methods and expert witness and presentation skills. The course has a focus on both domestic forensic anthropology work (e.g. UK and US) and forensic anthropology in the context of international humanitarian work and international criminal investigation.

UCLan’s postgraduate Forensic Anthropology course is the only forensic anthropology/osteology MSc in the UK to be based within a dedicated forensics department with state-of-the-art Crime Scene Investigation practical labs as well as excellent resources in Forensic Biology and Chemistry.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

We have a dedicated MSc Forensic Anthropology laboratory and radiography facilities with the full range of teaching casts as well as an extensive collection of experimentally induced projectile, blunt and sharp force trauma. We have an archaeological skeletal collection consisting of some 120 individuals from two sites, one late Medieval and one Victorian. UCLan’s TRACES facility for decomposition and taphonomic experimentation is located nearby and many students choose to conduct MSc dissertation research projects as part of the long term research agenda into estimating time since death. Staff members teaching the course are also active in research and consultancy. UCLan has an MSc-level Exchange with two US universities with forensic anthropology MA programmes, namely California State University at Chico and Wichita State University, both of which have active forensic anthropology consulting services.

Assessment is based on a combination of coursework and examination and includes an MSc dissertation project. Students are encouraged to present their research findings at international meetings.

OPPORTUNITIES

Graduating from this course, you will be well placed to undertake further research at the doctoral level, take up jobs in forensic anthropology laboratories, or to participate in human remains excavations.

A course module that will help you plan your career is available as a free choice module (called an elective), which you can study as part of your degree programme.

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This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. Read more
This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. In particular, it focuses on the trajectory of artefacts through time and space and their historical legacy. Subjects covered include methodological approaches and legal issues relating to provenance and restitution, illegal trafficking of cultural objects, connoisseurship, taste, the patterns of collecting and viewing both private and public and the politics of display. The programme will move the collective debate beyond the usual focus on the Western tradition.

Why this programme

◾This programme is unique to Scotland and the UK as it combines aspects of art history and law and places them in a broad international context.
◾You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area of art history.
◾Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine. The new facilities at Kelvin Hall support object-based study as a number of courses will include handling sessions of the objects in the collections.
◾Work placement opportunities are offered within the programme on a competitive basis. In addition to Scottish institutions, work placements take place in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
◾Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

The programme structure comprises of four core courses and a dissertation (these are compulsory). In addition you can choose two optional courses, either from the ones provided within the programme or from available courses across the College of Arts.

The dissertation (15,000 words in length, including footnotes but excluding bibliography) will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and programme convenors. You will also have an opportunity to take part in a field trip.

The learning and teaching approaches covered in the programme include: lectures (built around case studies), seminars and discussions (supported by relevant published sources), handling sessions and supervision.

Core and optional courses

Core courses
-Cultures of Collecting – Collecting Cultures (semester 1)
-Methodologies 1: Object Biography (semester 1)
-Objects in Motion 1: Provenance (semester 1)
-Objects in Motion 2: Global Illicit Trafficking (semester 2)

Optional courses
◾Objects in Motion 3: Restitution (semester 2)
◾Archaeological Theory and Interpretation (semester 2)
◾Approaching the Ancient World through Material Culture (semester 1)
◾Introduction to Museology (semester 1)
◾Art Crime (Semester 2 online)
◾Repatriation, Recovery, Return (summer online)
◾Independent Study (usually semester 2)
◾Work Placement (semester 2)

Career prospects

This Masters programme is intended to provide you with a strong foundation from which to embark upon a career in the visual arts, the art market, museums and galleries, heritage and historic properties.

Graduates have gone on to hold positions in museums and galleries (both public and private) in Scotland and elsewhere in the UK and have, more broadly, entered the commercial, cultural and heritage sectors in a number of roles. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move into PhD studies and an academic career..

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Enhance your depth and breadth of knowledge, understanding and practical skills with this Analytical Forensic Science Masters from Liverpool John Moores University. Read more
Enhance your depth and breadth of knowledge, understanding and practical skills with this Analytical Forensic Science Masters from Liverpool John Moores University. Prepare for analytical careers in forensics and beyond.

•Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
•Study a curriculum informed by research and industry practice
•Benefit from LJMU’s investment in Analytical Chemistry, accessing cutting edge technology, state-of-the-art laboratories and new crime scene facilities
•Learn from analytical forensic chemists, molecular biologists, crime scene and fire investigation specialists and leading national experts
•Develop transferrable legal and research skills
•Enjoy extensive career opportunities

Analytical Forensic Science is one of four forensic programmes offered by LJMU. All four options share a number of common modules, but each course has its own distinct identity.

Analytical Forensic Science has a heavy practical bias, enabling you to explore current and emerging analytical techniques and practices.
Using state-of-the-art laboratory, crime scene and moot room facilities, you will:
•explore the criminal justice system as a setting in which a forensic scientist might work
•be able to apply appropriate techniques following the analysis and evaluation of complex forensic cases
•learn to critically evaluate current crime scene techniques

You will enjoy a first class learning environment at the city centre Byrom Street site which boasts an ongoing £12 million laboratory investment programme and state-of-the-art research facilities in the newly developed Life Sciences building. Legal aspects of the course are taught in the Moot Room at the multi-million pound Redmonds building on Brownlow Hill.


This is a full time, year-long Masters course although you can opt to work at a slower pace and study over three years. There may even be the option to carry out the dissertation project in your existing place of work.
On joining the course you will be appointed a personal tutor who will offer academic and pastoral support. The School also operates an open door policy, providing access to members of staff when you need them.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Advanced Drug Analysis and Toxicology
Combines theory and practical work in analytical chemistry techniques, relating to drug analysis including legal highs.
Law and Court Room Skills
Discusses the criminal justice systems under which a forensic scientist may work and examines expert witness testimony. Aspects of regulation and quality assurance are touched upon.
Research Methods
Covers grant application, critical appraisal of leading research and data interpretation and evaluation. This leads naturally into the dissertation.
Bioanalytical Techniques
Examines state-of-the-art biomolecular techniques, including DNA and protein analysis. Commonly used techniques in the forensic field will be critically analysed and performed along with emerging techniques which can form the basis of the dissertation or further postgraduate study.
Fire Investigation
Offers specialist knowledge of fire and explosive analysis both at the crime scene and in terms of analytical techniques.
Trace Evidence Analysis
Teaches you to identify, differentiate and analyse different types of trace evidence using advanced techniques. Microscopy, including SEM (EDX) and atomic force, form the basis of the practical analysis performed, along with other techniques.
Dissertation
The Dissertation research themes are led by staff and PhD students. Students are encouraged to present their research at conferences.
Further guidance on modules
The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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This programme is based in the UCD Institute of Criminology, the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the Institute contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
This programme is based in the UCD Institute of Criminology, the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the Institute contributes to the achievement of national priorities.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmincriminologycriminaljustice/

Your studies

Students select their own modules from a list that includes: Crime and Society; Advanced Criminological Theory; Victims and International and Transnational Crime. You will also complete a supervised dissertation. The programme provides students with the opportunity to study subjects outside the School of Law, such as History, Sociology and Computer Science.

On completion of your studies, you will have:
- a deep understanding and knowledge of Criminal Justice and Criminology;
- identified legal and policy trends in criminal justice and their impact;
- developed advanced legal research skills;
- increased your ability to communicate the results of research; and,
- an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include

- Coercive Confinement provides an overview the incarceration of individuals during the first fifty years of Irish independence, examining accounts of life within institutions whilst offering an explanation for the system’s longevity and the reasons for its decline.

- Crime and Society maps trends in crime and victimisation and relates strategies of crime control to wider societal factors such as a country’s political priorities, policy-making infrastructure and media culture.

- Punishment, Prison and Public Policy examines the response to crime since the mid-1990s which has been characterised an emphasis on prison expansion and explores some of the dilemmas that confront prison systems everywhere.

- Victims reflects on recent initiatives designed to assist victims and help them to participate more fully in the criminal justice process to discuss the rich body of knowledge about victimisation and its remedies.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme is well- suited to those interested in legal practice, public service, or any other career where success is built upon the ability to understand, analyse and respond to developments in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmincriminologycriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmincriminologycriminaljustice/apply,80087,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This Masters-level Forensic Bioscience course from Liverpool John Moores University is ideal for forensic science practitioners and science graduates. Read more
This Masters-level Forensic Bioscience course from Liverpool John Moores University is ideal for forensic science practitioners and science graduates. You will have access to state-of-the-art learning facilities plus a research-informed curriculum.

•Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
•Suitable for Forensic Science practitioners and science graduates, this course is informed by research and industry links
•Enjoy access to state-of-the-art laboratories, crime scene facilities and a moot room
•Learn from forensic anthropologists, biologists, crime scene and fire investigation specialists and leading in-house academics
•Benefit from a local, national or international work placement
•Develop transferrable skills in legal matters and research methods and specialise in your chosen area


Forensic Bioscience is one of four forensic programmes offered by LJMU. All four options share a number of common modules, but each course has its own distinct identity.

During this course you will:
•explore the criminal justice system as a setting in which a forensic scientist might work (this relates to British and international law)
•discover how to apply appropriate techniques following the analysis and evaluation of complex forensic cases
•learn to critically evaluate current crime scene techniques

Although this year long programme does not have a part time study option, you can work at a slower pace and gain the full Masters over three years by completing the PG Cert in year one, the PG Diploma in year two and the Masters in year three. There is even the option to carry out the dissertation project in your place of work.
On joining the course you will be appointed a personal tutor who will be able to offer academic and pastoral support. The School also operates an open door policy, providing access to members of staff when you need them.

You will study at the Byrom Street site in the University’s City Campus. With an ongoing £12 million investment in laboratory facilities here and state-of-the-art research facilities in the newly developed Life Sciences building, you’ll enjoy a first class study environment.
The Avril Robarts Library, open 24/7 during semesters, is located just minutes away on Tithebarn Street.
Legal aspects of the course are taught in the Moot Room in the multi-million pound Redmonds building on Brownlow Hill.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Forensic Bioscience
Combines theory and practical work in post mortem interval determination, entomology, microbiology and pathology.
Law and Court Room Skills
Discusses the criminal justice systems under which a forensic scientist may work and examines expert witness testimony. Aspects of regulation and quality assurance are touched upon.
Research Methods
Covers grant application, critical appraisal of leading research and data interpretation and evaluation. This leads naturally into the dissertation.
Bioanalytical Techniques
Examines state-of-the-art biomolecular techniques, including DNA and protein analysis. Commonly used techniques in the forensic field will be critically analysed and performed along with emerging techniques which can form the basis of the dissertation or further postgraduate study.
Taphonomy and Trauma Analysis
Examines decomposition processes and trauma analysis.


Dissertation
The Dissertation research themes are led by staff and PhD students. Students are encouraged to present their research at conferences.
The following options are typically offered:

Fire Investigation
Offers specialist knowledge of fire and explosive analysis both at the crime scene and in terms of analytical techniques.
Trace Evidence Analysis
Teaches you to identify, differentiate and analyse different types of trace evidence using advanced techniques. Microscopy, including SEM (EDX) and atomic force, form the basis of the practical analysis performed, along with other techniques.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. The Institute brings together leading academics from across UCD and is the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Its members have conducted major research projects on a wide range of topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice, including work on coercive confinement, prison violence and desistance from crime. The work of the Institute has been the focus of debates in parliament, legislative and policy initiatives and numerous reports in the media.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- To understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and social policy that come to the fore in the study of Criminology and Criminal Justice;
- To apply their knowledge and understanding of Criminology and Criminal Justice to real and hypothetical factual situations;
- To conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice
agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Criminal Justice History considers the history of specific offences in a broad socio-political context. Offences examined will include the history of unlawful killing and the evolution of sexual offences alongside aspects of the criminal justice process.

- Advanced Criminological Theory explores key theories of crime both classic and recent, including biological, psychological and sociological explanations of criminal behaviour and their potential application in the Irish context.

- Crime and Punishment explores a number of central issues in criminal jurisprudence such as responsibility, culpability, harm and moral wrongdoing to deepen an understanding of the basis on which conduct is criminalised and criminal liability imposed.

- International and Transnational Crime focuses on the emergence of international criminal law has emerged as a distinct body of law responding to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, before considering the impact of globalisation on crime.

Careers

This programme provides opportunities for those who wish to work or are already working in relevant areas, such as policing, youth justice, prisons, probation and voluntary organisations to enhance their knowledge of the field. It also provides a good platform for doctoral studies and a possible academic career in what has become an area of substantial growth in universities around the world.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/apply,80113,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the
world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part- time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This course is designed for those with a first degree in either forensic science or another science subject (ideally chemistry or biology but other degrees are also acceptable) who want to further their knowledge and experience of forensic science. Read more
This course is designed for those with a first degree in either forensic science or another science subject (ideally chemistry or biology but other degrees are also acceptable) who want to further their knowledge and experience of forensic science.

The full-time distance learning MSc should be completed in 18 months including your dissertation. There is a two-week long residential practical programme, held at our Stoke-on-Trent campus at the end of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma stages of study. These workshops enable you to put your learning into practice and gain valuable experience in our state-of-the-art laboratories, crime scene house and mock courtroom facilities.

The MSc dissertation completes your study. This is a independent research project which will usually be undertaken, at least in part, in our state of the art specialist facilities.

Course content

This course builds upon your previous experience in the biological, chemical or forensic or other appropriate sciences to develop your ability to analyse evidence in a myriad of forms. The emphasis is on accuracy, accountability and thoroughness, with the ultimate aim of providing results and interpretation for use by a court of law. The theory is delivered using Blackboard, an online virtual learning environment. This provides the flexibility of studying at your own pace and from any location in the world. Whilst using Blackboard, you will interact with other students on the course through online discussion groups and receive excellent support from tutors via e-mail or phone.

The Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma courses are, respectively, the first third and first two thirds of the MSc course. At Postgraduate Certificate level, the emphasis is on the crime scene, specifically the collection, packaging and analysis of evidence such as fingermarks, footwear marks, documents, hairs, fibres and glass. Those continuing on to the Postgraduate Diploma will then change the emphasis of their studies to the chemical and biological analysis of evidence in forensic laboratories. During the Diploma, you will learn about a host of techniques, from the interpretation of blood spatter evidence to the analysis of illicit drugs, and from DNA profiling to the analysis of fire accelerants and drugs. The Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma stages of study each end in a two-week long residential practical programme, held at our Stoke-on-Trent campus. These summer workshops enable you to put your learning into practice and gain valuable experience in our state-of-the-art laboratories, crime scene house and mock courtroom facilities.

MSc students continue their studies beyond the Postgraduate Diploma stage, allowing specialisation in an aspect of forensic science. To complete the MSc, you will undertake a independent research project in an area either suggested by yourself or by choosing a title from a list of topics. In this work, the emphasis is on initiative and originality in the analysis and interpretation of results. The experimental part will usually be undertaken at our Stoke-on-Trent campus but, by agreement, could be based at the learner’s place of work or at a local institute.

Accreditation

This award is accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

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This course allows you to develop an advanced knowledge of crime and offenders, as well as to assess contemporary trends and concepts in criminal justice policy and community safety. Read more
This course allows you to develop an advanced knowledge of crime and offenders, as well as to assess contemporary trends and concepts in criminal justice policy and community safety. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

It will incorporate approaches to crime control within the community and penal institutions. You will also gain the methodological and analytic skills required to conduct research within the field of crime and criminal justice; this level of knowledge and skill can prepare you for doctoral study or research posts within the criminal justice arena, or can consolidate your professional experience.

You are assessed via essays, projects, examinations and a dissertation between 12,000 and 15,000 words in length. The dissertation forms a key element of the MSc. It allows you to pursue in depth a topic of your choosing and is to be completed over the summer study period.

Modular structure

The course consists of four core modules, and a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Core modules:
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
-Crime Control and Community Safety
-Criminological Research Methods
-Crime and Offender Patterns

Students also select one 'designate' module per semester, and these include (subject to availability):
-Community Development
-Sexual Violence: causes, consequences, and interventions
-Psychology and Criminal Behaviour
-Intelligence Analysis
-Urban Patterns and Spatial Analysis

After the course

The aim of the course is to prepare you for employment or further study in the criminal justice sector.

The curriculum will equip you for a range of careers in the criminal justice system and related professions, all with excellent recruitment prospects. Key career paths include the Metropolitan Police Service, Probation Service, Foreign Office, Prison Service, youth offending and community safety departments, as well as academic or government research posts.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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MSc Forensic Science is designed for both graduate students and forensic practitioners. It will develop theoretical knowledge and practical application of the key aspects of forensic science. Read more
MSc Forensic Science is designed for both graduate students and forensic practitioners. It will develop theoretical knowledge and practical application of the key aspects of forensic science. On this course you will initially cover the fundamentals of forensic biology and forensic chemistry that underpin much of the laboratory analysis associated with forensic investigations. Following on from this, the recovery and processing of a variety of evidence types found at crime scenes will be studied in detail as will the evaluation and presentation of that evidence in a legal context. You will have access to extensive modern facilities with state-of-art facilities, including our crime scene houses, forensic, chemistry and biology laboratories. After completing six taught modules students will undertake a three module research project which will develop research skills – a diverse range of projects are available, both within the University and through external placements.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

UCLan’s School of Forensic and Applied Sciences is the first specialist School of its kind in Europe, benefiting from purpose-built facilities and £29 million of investment. Our facilities have recently been enhanced by the opening of our new £12.5-million J B Firth building to support our capability in chemistry and fire safety and engineering. In addition, our state-of-the-art resources include three crime scene houses, a vehicle examination area, a blood spatter pattern analysis suite, dedicated laboratories for the search and recovery of evidential materials, forensic anthropology, forensic biology and genetics and forensic entomology, together with a moot court room.

This course is assessed through preparation of case notes, essays, reports, practical reports, group and individual presentations and written and practical exams.

OPPORTUNITIES

Placements are possible with forensic providers, both in the UK and overseas on an ad-hoc basis. Placements are also possible in other relevant institutions, such and biology or chemistry laboratories.

Our courses are taught by internationally-acclaimed academics and former senior practitioners.

Will Goodwin, Sibte Hadi, Matt Baker, Judith Smith, Isobel Colclough, Allan Scott, Charlie Ellis, Geoff Keeling, Kev Pritchard

[[LEARNING OUTCOMES[[
-To provide an in-depth study of Forensic Science
-To develop the critical and analytical skills involving the principles, practices and techniques of Forensic Science
-To develop competence in research methods and presentation of information
-To develop skills in solving problems both independently and as a team member to a level commensurate to the master’s level

FURTHER INFORMATION

On this course you will initially cover the fundamentals of Forensic Biology and Forensic Chemistry that underpin much of the laboratory analysis associated with forensic investigations. Following on from this, the recovery and processing of a variety of evidence types found at crime scenes will be studied in detail as will the evaluation and presentation of that evidence in a legal context. The final 16 weeks of the course will involve undertaking a research project.

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The Master of Science in criminal justice offers a multidisciplinary curriculum to give students the sophisticated working knowledge of the major systems within the field. Read more
The Master of Science in criminal justice offers a multidisciplinary curriculum to give students the sophisticated working knowledge of the major systems within the field.  Students will take challenging and rigorous courses rooted in history, law, philosophy, research, psychology, management, and political science that involve critical analysis of complex issues.

Faculty provide a quality education to students who have demonstrated competence and commitment to learning and growth, who desire to make a meaningful contribution to the field of criminal justice and who share the values of idealism, honesty, integrity, justice, and fairness.

Internet scheduling and evening courses make full- or part-time graduate study at WCU convenient for anyone interested in pursuing this degree.  The program is well-suited for current or future criminal justice professionals, as well as those who plan to pursue further graduate study.

Course Content

The Department of Criminal Justice offers a strong core of required courses, enhanced by an eclectic selection of electives designed to meet the interests and needs of our students. Each course is taught by a qualified faculty member who has direct experience in the particular subject matter.

Criminal Justice is very interdisciplinary in nature. Students interested in Criminal Justice may be interested in careers such as law enforcement and investigation, criminal prosecution or defense, probation and parole, juvenile treatment, corrections victims' advocacy, crime mapping, research, and more.  The program is designed to offer flexibility so that the student can tailor course selection to professional career goals. In this regard, students work closely with advisors to select courses each semester.

Course material is constantly updated to incorporate the ever-changing base of knowledge in this quickly evolving field. We offer such diverse electives as:  Victimology, crime Mapping, White Collar Crime, Terrorism, Environmental Crime, Organized Crime, Criminal Investigations, Interviewing and Assessing the Offender, Animal Cruelty,Evidence and Advocacy, Contemporary Legal Issues, and Justice Studies. 

Curriculum

• Required modules (15 semester hours)
CRJ 505, 507, 508, 509, and 600

• Optional Thesis* (3 semester hours)

• Electives (12-15 semester hours)
Chosen from among the following: CRJ 500, 503, 504, 506, 522, 524, 526, 530, 535, 555, 560, 566, 570, 582, 590, 599, *610 with departmental approval, and 999 (All courses listed are three semester hours unless otherwise noted.)

Please see the website for more information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/business-public-management/criminal-justice/#coursestext

Philadelphia Campus

The M.S. in Criminal Justice is also offered at the Philadelphia campus.

Curriculums for programs offered at the alternative PASSHE Center City satellite campus in Philadelphia are equivalent to those found on WCU’s main campus. With state-of-the-art classrooms, the Center City location serves the needs of degree completers and/or adult learners who are balancing work and family obligations.

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