• Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
University of Manchester Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Manchester Featured Masters Courses
University of Pennsylvania Featured Masters Courses
"art" AND "conservation"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Art Conservation)

We have 128 Masters Degrees (Art Conservation)

  • "art" AND "conservation" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 128
Order by 
The issue of. Contemporary Art Conservation. is at the center of debates and disagreements. Read more

The issue of Contemporary Art Conservation is at the center of debates and disagreements. The diversity and originality of used materials, the ephemerality and perishability of some art works, the use of new media and, last but not least, the immateriality of some performances and happenings make this field a continuously and rapidly evolving ground where well prepared specialists ready to deal with this wide and inestimable patrimony are definitely missing.

Starting from here and from the individual peculiarities of each Campus, Accademia di Belle Arti Aldo Galli signed a partnership which proposes an ambitious Higher Education project.

Career opportunities - The Specialist in Contemporary Art Conservation can work either in conservation or in restoration, boasting a theoretical and practical knowledge specifically connected to the contemporary times. The employment sectors include galleries, public and private museums, public institutions for conservation and land-use planning, exhibition setup and art transportation businesses, studio and analysis labs, university departments of Art History, restoration and conservation companies.



Read less
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

Read less
Training for careers in heritage conservation. If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Read more
Training for careers in heritage conservation

Why choose this course?

If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Established in 1972, the course was the first of its kind in the UK, and has developed an international reputation for producing highly skilled and knowledgeable conservation practitioners.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build relationships with conservation specialists and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

The University also validates the MSc in Building Conservation and Timber Building Conservation at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in Sussex, more details from the Weald & Downland Museum webpage.

What does the course at York cover?

The core of the MA in Conservation Studies covers the history and philosophy of historic environment conservation, and provides a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. Theoretical elements of the course are complemented by a wide choice of short ‘skills modules’, which focus on developing your knowledge of the specialist skills that are an essential part of professional practice.

By choosing a specific set of accredited modules, you can gain the more specialised MA in Conservations Studies (Historic Buildings), which is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). As such, it offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners working towards full professional membership of the IHBC.

Who is it for?

This course attracts a vibrant mix of UK and international students. These include graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history, and related subjects, as well as experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields. We welcome the diversity of our students’ backgrounds.

What can it lead to?

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills required for a wide range of careers in heritage conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust, Historic England, English Heritage and ICCROM to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies has a strong focus on enhancing employability and professional development with a valuable combination of practical skills and theoretical understanding. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage-conservation practitioner.
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct engagement with conservation professionals and specialists.
-Developed the ability to work in a team through group working and placement experiences, and independently through research for your dissertation
-Received guidance on career opportunities in the conservation sector and the key networks for employment
-Worked alongside our Regional Heritage Skills Coordinator with the National Heritage Training Academy

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in heritage conservation roles across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-INTACH (Indian National Trust)
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Chartered surveying
-Planning
-Business and administration
-Education
-International affairs
-Research

Read less
Accredited training for building conservation professionals. The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. Read more
Accredited training for building conservation professionals

Why choose this course?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. The programme conforms with the international ICOMOS Guidelines for Education and Training in Conservation.

Having run successfully for more than 40 years, the programme is now supported by a network of specialist conservation and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally. Contributors to the course include national experts from English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, ICOMOS-UK, Historic Scotland, and the National Trust and from a large number of local conservation and heritage organisations.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage building conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build working relationships with national and international conservation specialists and research organisations.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, practical experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

What does the course cover?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) covers the history, ethics and philosophy of historic environment conservation together with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. It is complemented by training in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings. The practical ‘skills modules’ focus on specific aspects of professional practice, repair and conservation techniques, legislation and planning, policy, finance and managing conservation projects.

Who is it for?

This course attracts graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history and related subjects. It also appeals to experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields, who wish to advance their professional training.

What can it lead to?

The course provides the knowledge and practical skills required for a range of careers in historic building conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust and English Heritage to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) focuses on enhancing students’ employability and professional development with a combination of practical skills training and theoretical teaching. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge so that your chances of employment as a conservation professional are improved.
-Developed both intellectually and personally as a result of having dealt directly with conservation professionals and completed a sustained independent research project.
-Developed the ability to work both within a group through seminar and placement experiences, and independently through research for a dissertation.

The accredited training provided by this course has led postgraduates into varied careers in historic building conservation across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

Read less
On this programme students engage with some of the most dynamic and contemporary aspects of Asian and African art, as well as issues of collection, display, representation, tourist art, and shifts between regional, national and global identities. Read more
On this programme students engage with some of the most dynamic and contemporary aspects of Asian and African art, as well as issues of collection, display, representation, tourist art, and shifts between regional, national and global identities. By focusing on theoretical and methodological questions, they are equipped with the terms and approaches needed for in-depth study of contemporary art. This is combined with the study of contemporary art from a range of Asian and African contexts.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in contemporary Asian and African art, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as contemporary global Media, Film and Music. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in, for example, the film, cinema, languages and modern history of Asia and Africa.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/macaaa/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to Contemporary Art and Art Theory listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Art and Art Theory of Asia and Africa (15PARC995).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching & Learning

- Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

- Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

Read less
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. Read more
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered.

In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe.

Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaime/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Through object-based, interdisciplinary research, this Masters programme focuses on the act of making and everything that entails. Read more
Through object-based, interdisciplinary research, this Masters programme focuses on the act of making and everything that entails. We study studio practices from a variety of disciplines, their materials and techniques, but also intentions and concept. We examine art technological sources to register the artist’s voice, and other testimonies on artistic practice, make reconstructions of historical recipes and modern techniques to understand practices, ageing and its consequences as well as other changes artworks go through. Researching this all-inclusive story of an artefact is known as technical art history. It is an exciting and rapidly growing field involving (technical) art historians, scientists, conservators while also reaching out to other disciplines such as economic and social history, history of science, anthropology and aesthetics.

Why this programme

◾You will work with objects and benefit from staff contacts including those at: the City Collections, Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, Glasgow Museums, National Museums and National Galleries of Scotland, National Trust Scotland and Historic Scotland.
◾You will take a study trip to Amsterdam or Munich, visiting major museums and their conservation studios and research labs as well as research institutions working in the field of technical art history.
◾You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement engaging in interdisciplinary research, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾You will benefit from guest speakers from the technical art history field, broadening your horizon and offering you network occasions and research contacts.
◾You will participate in two reconstruction workshops of historical painting techniques, as well as workshops on the reconstructions of pigment recipes and scientific examination techniques.

Programme structure

Drawing upon the expertise of an interdisciplinary team, the programme will include taught and research components as well as practical workshops and work placements.

This MLitt develops your skills in object-based research, as well as examining the authenticity, attribution and dating of art works – and their change and survival. You do not need any background in science or conservation. We will provide you with the right tools to understand what science can deliver, what conservators can do, and what role you can play in this truly interdisciplinary field.

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses

◾Research methods in practice
◾Art in the making: historical techniques
◾Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
◾The authentic art work
◾Testimonies on painters' practice: documentary and visual sources

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options
◾Work placement
◾Independent study

Career prospects

Career opportunities include curatorial positions in museums and galleries, working with collections within cultural heritage organisations, or in the commercial environment of auction houses performing object-based research including technical investigation. The programme will also prepare you for a further postgraduate education in conservation or academic research.

Read less
The programme will enable you to gain the academic and professional competencies you need to succeed in this field. It offers a blend of academic rigour and applied practical application. Read more

The programme will enable you to gain the academic and professional competencies you need to succeed in this field. It offers a blend of academic rigour and applied practical application. Each module draws upon the specialist knowledge and skills of a number of outstanding experts in conservation and related fields.

The programme will enable you to gain the academic and professional competencies you need to succeed in this field. Your learning is based around interactive workshop sessions, practical demonstrations, site visits and personal study. Each module is introduced by a four-day block of lectures and site visits based at the University's Whiteknights campus, which has 19th and 20th century listed buildings.

The aim of the flexible MSc Conservation of the Historic Environment programme is to develop your understanding of this important field. It will enable you to approach the issues that you will face in a competent and professional manner.

This course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist programme and is also fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation. 

All modules on this programme can also be taken as stand-alone CPD courses attendees do not submit any coursework and therefore gain no credits towards the qualification.

Why Henley?

The Conservation of the Historic Environment Programme

The Conservation of the Historic Environment programme has a high reputation with former students going on to work in organisations such as Historic England, National Trust, English Heritage, Historic Royal Palaces, Prince's Regeneration Trust, local authorities as well as surveying, planning, architectural and engineering practices.

School of Real Estate and Planning

Our School is the largest in the UK for teaching and research in real estate and planning. Established in 1968 at the University of Reading, we are the only major UK real estate and planning centre to be located within a business school. Being part of the Henley Business School reflects our close and longstanding collaborative relationship with industry.

We enjoy a worldwide reputation for excellence in both teaching and research and we are consistently highly ranked in all major league tables. We undertake internationally recognised, leading edge research into real estate, planning and land and we offer a comprehensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses, all of which are accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Our planning courses are also accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute.

Our programmes are held in high regard by leading employers, many of whom come to us each year to recruit our graduates. We are proud of our outstanding employment record, with more than 95% of our students entering graduate level jobs within 6 months of leaving us.

Henley Business School

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Module descriptions are correct for modules taught in the academic year 2017/18. Optional module listings are indicative, and may be subject to change.

Core Modules

Optional Modules

Careers and accreditations

Graduates from this programme will have the specialist knowledge and competence to find employment with a large number of conservation bodies such as Historic England, National Trust and Historic Royal Palaces, local and central government, planning, surveying and architectural, consultancies and corporate entities where their portfolios include historic buildings.

This course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist programme and is also fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation.



Read less
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors. Read more
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors.

This course is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic town of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning Cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

Open to students and professionals with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents an ideal gateway to a career in demanding professional fields, such as conservation-oriented architectural practice, conservation consultancy and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of the current economic, environmental and social agendas.

This programme is offered jointly within two faculties, Humanities and Sciences.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/362/architectural-conservation

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MSc is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The programme has a varied curriculum which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of conservation. The autumn term cultivates a critical understanding of historic buildings and provides an introduction to conservation philosophy and policy. The acquisition of a strong theoretical background is the basis for the study of practical techniques for the survey and preservation of architectural heritage.

Case studies and workshops carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce you to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. This aspect of the programme benefits from cutting-edge survey equipment and the use of conservation laboratories. A conservation project offers you the opportunity to design an intervention to an existing historic site in the historic centre of Canterbury. The dissertation that concludes the programme invites you to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of your choice, employing a high standard of scholarship.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR841 - Structural Appraisal of Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR842 - The Legislative Framework (30 credits)
AR843 - Intervention at Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR844 - Conservation Principles (30 credits)
AR898 - Dissertation: MSc in Architectural Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly through coursework, with essays, reports, projects and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- ensure you are equipped with academic, professional, and personal skills and qualities that enable you to make a positive contribution related to the preservation of historic buildings.

- cultivate an appreciation of the different values that people can attach to historic buildings and places.

- promote an awareness of traditional building crafts as a valuable cultural resource.

- develop a thorough understanding of the processes that maintain and enhance historic places and the activities that change them.

- develop knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and professional context of architectural conservation.

- promote multidisciplinary collaboration and interaction with a wide range of professional bodies and individuals who have a role to play in the development of the built environment.

- ensure graduates develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to provide informed and specialist advice and to cultivate an awareness of their responsibility as consultants in the field of architectural conservation.

- understand the role that architectural conservation has to play as part of the modern ecological agenda.

- encourage the observation of the historic environment as a whole and its use as an educational resource.

- provide teaching informed by research and scholarship.

- develop an understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning.

- build on close ties within Europe and elsewhere, reflecting Kent’s position as the UK’s European university.

- promote the understanding and preservation of local and national architectural heritage.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation. Read more
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation.

Our course is taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals and is based on the Department's well established tradition of interdisciplinary education and training.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/conservation/index.html

Key programme features

- Provides technical training within an academic framework
- Taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals
- Based on interdisciplinary co-operation between architects and engineers
- International leader in its field
- Proven track record of employability
- Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
- Fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Buildings Conservation (IHBC)
- Suited to engineers, architects, surveyors, planners, geographers, archaeologists, historians and managers, but we also accept (and encourage) students who have either taken a non-vocational degree (usually history or history of art, but also geographers, archaeologists, etc.) or have a degree in a different field that they want to change from.

The programme draws profoundly on its unique location, the World Heritage City of Bath, an ideal study material and environment.

Structure and Content

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Teaching for taught units takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays, with one day given to each set of two units. The sequence in which units are taught is reversed each year so that part-time students attend on the same day over the period of their study.

- Full-time study: 12 months, with students attending two days a week (Wednesday and Friday)
- Part-time study: 24 months, with students attending one day a week (Wednesday or Friday)
- Extended part-time study: 48 months, with students attending one day/one semester per year.

Where students do not wish to write the dissertation, or are ineligible to progress, a PG Diploma is awarded after successful completion of the taught course only.

Dissertation:
During the final three months of the degree you will produce a dissertation. This is your opportunity to explore a particular topic that has been covered during the programme in far greater depth.

Transfer:
A student may request a transfer from part-time to extended part-time study. If approved, the transfer will take into account units completed already and will be applied on a pro rata basis. For example, if a part-time student completes four units in year one and then transfers to the extended part-time programme, they will be given two more years to complete.

Conservation techniques

- Structural conservation techniques: principles, faults and their causes, diagnoses and remedies, and surveying and analytical techniques
- Materials conservation techniques: technology and conservation of building elements from structure to finishes
- Information and awareness about related fields (including furniture and fabric conservation), and the experts who can be called upon
- The legal framework of conservation.

Philosophy

- A range of philosophies towards the repair and re-use of old buildings
- History of conservation, from John Wood and James Wyatt, the Victorian age, William Morris and the development of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings through to present day policies and the listing of twentieth century buildings
Stimulating debate and the opportunity to develop an individual viewpoint
- A body of knowledge on the history of British architecture from town planning to interiors
- An awareness of adjacent related fields including garden conservation and archaeology.

Teaching of the Theory of Classical Architecture

- Visual training based around the teaching of classical architecture within the context of Bath as a classical city
- Aims to achieve a high level of architectural correctness and competence in detailing architectural elements.

Case studies

- You will attend six case studies (a combination of large and small buildings at sites both local to Bath and further afield)
- The case studies cover the philosophy upon which the conservation work is based, the architectural and engineering principles involved and a study of the techniques and technologies employed.

Career Options

Bath students have an excellent track record for getting jobs.


The MSc provides a short cut to becoming a Chartered Surveyor. Graduates get exemption from the RICS internal examinations and are eligible for entry to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This usually involves two years of structured training with an employer followed by the APC. Visit the RICS website for more information.

Graduate destinations:

- Inspector for the Victorian Society
- English Heritage (historic research department, inspectors, managers)
- Architects’ practices working on conservation and building new country houses in the classical style
- National Trust Manager of Uppark House
- Conservation officer, UNESCO, Paris
- Conservation architects with well-known practices working on every type of historic building from Salisbury cathedral to medieval timber-framed barns
- Development Officer with Turquoise Mountain repairing a mosque in Kabul
- Member of the Information Team, the Science Museum, South Kensington.

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.


Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

Read less
Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. Read more
Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. This MPhil is both an academic programme and professional training; it will give you a framework of theoretical knowledge and a range of practical experience which will enable you to contribute to the understanding and preservation of culturally significant textile artefacts.

Why this programme

◾If you are looking to enter a career in textile conservation practice in a museum or other institution, or to pursue doctoral-level research in this field, this programme is designed for you.
◾You will take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾You will be based in our specialist conservation laboratories. The facilities include workrooms, a wet lab, dye lab, chemistry lab and well-equipped analytical lab.
◾You will benefit from our close links with Glasgow Museums, as well as the University’s own Hunterian Museum. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You will have the opportunity to draw on the museums’ rich and varied textile collections.

◾This is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and one of only a few specialist textile conservation programmes in the world.

Programme structure

You will take core courses over two semesters in each year, with a work placement in the summer between the first and second years. You will write up your dissertation over the second summer and submit it at the end of August.

The core courses will develop an understanding of
◾the practical skills used in textile conservation
◾related practical skills including dyeing and photography
◾the science underpinning textile deterioration and conservation treatments
◾preventive conservation techniques
◾the technological, cultural, historic and aesthetic contexts of textile artefacts
◾the place of conservation in the wider cultural sector.

Core courses

Year 1
◾Research methods in practice
◾Principles and practice: core skills and ethics
◾Understanding textiles: technology
◾Principles and practice: developing skills
◾Preventive conservation
◾Material cultures
◾Placement

Year 2
◾Principles and practice: advanced skills
◾Conservation in practice
◾Deconstructing the artefact
◾Principles and practice: conservation projects
◾Professional development
◾Research management
◾Dissertation

Career prospects

The programme is at career-entry level and graduates are qualified to go on to a post-training internship or directly into the workplace as a textile conservator in a museum or other institution around the world, as well as to undertake further study at PhD level.

The great majority of graduates of this programme and if its predecessor, the Textile Conservation Centre’s MA Textile Conservation programme, now work in museums and other institutions. Graduates of the two programmes have an outstanding record of employment on graduation and of remaining in the sector. They now work in nearly 30 countries and are in senior positions worldwide.

MPhil graduates have been awarded Mellon Fellowships at Denver Art Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, in the USA, while others now work for National Museums Scotland, Historic Royal Palaces and the National Maritime Museum in the UK and Heritage Conservation Center, Singapore, among others.

However, it is worth noting that many graduates go on to short-term contract posts initially. It is easier to find a textile conservation post if you are able to be flexible in terms of location.

Further information:
◾Institute of Conservation (ICON)
◾American Institute for Conservation

Read less
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Read more
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean (http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaea/

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Designed for students wishing to pursue a career in the practice of heritage conservation, this programme consists of one year's training at the institute, with an emphasis on developing practical experience under specialist guidance in the conservation laboratories, followed by a ten-month assessed conservation work placement in a museum or similar institution. Read more
Designed for students wishing to pursue a career in the practice of heritage conservation, this programme consists of one year's training at the institute, with an emphasis on developing practical experience under specialist guidance in the conservation laboratories, followed by a ten-month assessed conservation work placement in a museum or similar institution.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of, and foundation training in, the practice of conservation of heritage objects and develop critically aware approaches to diagnosis, problem solving, decision making and application of conservation treatments. They gain practical training and experience of the professional context in which conservation takes place.

Students undertake modules to the value of 360 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (120 credits), in year one, a dissertation (90 credits), and an internship (150 credits) in year two. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Year One
-Conservation Processess
-Conservation Studies
-Conservation: Materials Science

Year Two
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words. During their second year, all students undertake superised work experience in a professional environment.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, practical sessions and one-to-one tutorials. The programme is assessed in year one through essays, projects and conservation practical work on museum-quality objects; and in year two, through practical projects, progress reports and oral presentation.

Careers

A very high proportion of our graduates go on to pursue careers in conservation in local and national museums, and heritage organisations (in the UK, Europe, USA and Asia). In addition graduates also progress to doctoral studies at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator, Antiques Vault
-Conservator, British Museum
-Conservation Laboratory Supervisor, UCL Qatar
-Assistant Objects Conservator, Cincinnati Art Museum
-Objects Conservator, Bevaringstenestene - Museumssenteret i Hordaland (The servic

Employability
The programme prepares students for entry into the conservation profession on graduation and ensures that graduates are able to meet the challenges of a long-term career as a practising conservator.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology has an established and widely recognised strength in providing academic and professional training in the practice of conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to the UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X